Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

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Kati
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Kati » 10 Jul 2019 19:50

Someone is keeping tab on the Chinese spying cases .....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_C ... ted_States

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 10 Jul 2019 21:47

China ups aggression in South China Sea through military exercises - Dipanjan Roy Chaudhury, Economic Times
China is holding military exercises in the South China Sea (SCS) ahead of third anniversary of the PCA ruling in favour of Philippines reinforcing its claims in the world’s most critical trade route via sea.

The location of the drills as between the contested Paracel and Spratly island groups. China’s navy, coast guard and maritime militia are a constant presence in the region and it staged a massive fleet review in the area last year featuring its sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Lisa » 10 Jul 2019 22:42

chetak wrote:the hans get hammered once again.

this is becoming boringly repetitive


Tanzania Suspends China-Funded $10 Billion Bagamoyo Port Project; Calls The Financing Terms ‘Exploitative’



Chetakji, For you to read, compare and contrast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TAZARA_Railway

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chetak » 10 Jul 2019 23:03

Lisa wrote:
chetak wrote:the hans get hammered once again.

this is becoming boringly repetitive


Tanzania Suspends China-Funded $10 Billion Bagamoyo Port Project; Calls The Financing Terms ‘Exploitative’



Chetakji, For you to read, compare and contrast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TAZARA_Railway



much obliged, thanks Lisa ji.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat

Postby Peregrine » 12 Jul 2019 18:52

X Posted on the Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis Thread

https://youtu.be/GRBcP5BrffI



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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Jul 2019 19:13

Anti-China protests in the Philippines mark third anniversary of Manila’s South China Sea legal victory - South China Morning Post
Dozens of protesters on Friday staged a rally in front of the Chinese consulate in Manila as the Philippines marked the third anniversary of its arbitral victory over China at The Hague, which rejected Beijing’s historical claims to resources in the South China Sea.

They condemned President Rodrigo Duterte’s actions since the legal win as “unconstitutional” and called for his impeachment, while urging China to “get out” of the disputed waterway,

While presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo on Friday defended Duterte’s response to the ruling, most Filipinos agree with the protesters’ stance, according to a survey by private pollster Social Weather Stations.

The June 22 poll, also released Friday, found that 93 per cent of respondents thought it was important that the Philippines regain control of the islands occupied by China in South China Sea, while 89 per cent said “it is not right for the government to leave China alone with its infrastructure and military presence in the claimed territories”. . .

While it was thought The Hague ruling would have a bearing on these disputes, Duterte’s lack of action to enforce it, and his subsequent soft stance on dealing with Beijing, has enraged some quarters in the Philippines.

A June 26 statement from the palace, explaining that China would “allow” Filipino fishing near Scarborough Shoal, and a 2017 deal to allow Chinese fishing vessels into the Philippines’ EEZ, were two such deals.

The revelation about the EEZ only came to light last month when a Chinese fishing vessel rammed a smaller Philippine ship near the Reed Bank, abandoning 22 Filipino fishermen, who were later rescued by a Vietnamese shipping vessel.


The EEZ deal was “lopsided” as the steel-hulled Chinese fishing ships were bigger and better equipped than their Philippine counterparts, which had wooden hulls, according to Jay Batongbacal, director of the University of the Philippines’ Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea. The maritime expert was speaking at a forum held by the NGO Stratbase to mark the ruling’s third anniversary.

Speaking to local media on Friday, presidential spokesman Panelo said Chinese President Xi Jinping had threatened war if Manila enforced The Hague ruling.

“Now if you’re the president, having heard that from the president of China, what do you do?” Panelo said. “So you turn to negotiate. You don’t go to war with them because you cannot win. You will be losing lives and property. So he is not violating the constitution, he is in fact enforcing [it and] protecting the Filipino people.”

So far, Duterte’s submissive stance on the South China Sea has not dented his popularity rating. His net satisfaction rating rose to 68 per cent in the second quarter of this year from 66 per cent in the first quarter.

Former Philippine foreign affairs secretary Albert del Rosario, who was blocked from entering Hong Kong last month, said in the Stratbase forum that Manila was being fooled into “succumbing to threats of force, including a threat of war”.

Del Rosario also noted that “with the recent clearer security guarantee definition provided by the US, it may not be necessary therefore to shrink to China’s threat of war”.


On the possibility of the Philippines going to war with China, former Philippine solicitor general Florin Hilbay said the country was negotiating from a position of weakness.

“I’ve never heard of any other country saying, ‘We’re gonna lose in a war and we cant do anything’. You don’t say that, at least not publicly,” he said during a televised forum with presidential spokesman Panelo on Friday.

“You are practically giving a blank check to China and they will do anything to take advantage of that very weak position because you have already given [them] everything.”

Meanwhile, an Asean forum of defence ministers on Thursday urged China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to agree on an “effective” code of conduct for the South China Sea. The ministers signed a declaration commending a recent maritime exercise between China and Asean, and announced that the regional bloc would hold a drill with the US next year.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 12 Jul 2019 19:19

X Posted on the Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis Thread
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oc5vVat5iuc

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Jul 2019 19:35

China and Vietnam in stand-off over Chinese survey ship mission to disputed reef in South China Sea - SCMP
Chinese and Vietnamese coastguard vessels have been involved in a week-long confrontation over a reef in the South China Sea, risking the biggest clash between the two nations in five years.

The stand-off may trigger a wave of anti-China sentiment in Vietnam not seen since 2014
, when a Chinese oil rig arrived off the disputed Paracel Islands.

Six heavily armed coastguards vessels – two Chinese and four Vietnamese – have been eyeing each other in patrols around Vanguard Bank in the Spratly group of islands since last week. About a dozen vessels were reported in the vicinity by marine tracking websites on Thursday.

The stand-off emerged despite a pledge in May by Chinese and Vietnamese defence ministers to settle maritime disputes by negotiation.

On Wednesday last week, Chinese survey ship Haiyang Dizhi 8 (Marine Geology-8) entered waters near the Vietnamese-controlled reef to conduct a seismic survey, Ryan Martinson, an assistant professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, said in a tweet on Friday, citing ship tracking data.

Its escorts included the 12,000-tonne armed coastguard vessel 3901, complete with helicopter, and the 2,200-tonne coastguard ship 37111.

On Friday, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang did not confirm a stand-off at Vanguard Bank, but he said China was determined to protect its interests in the South China Sea.

“We are also committed to managing our differences through negotiations with relevant countries,” Geng said.


President Xi Jinping meanwhile told visiting Vietnamese National Assembly chairwoman Nguyen Thi Kim Ngan that the two countries should “safeguard maritime peace and stability with concrete actions”.

Earlier on Friday, National People’s Congress chief Li Zhanshu told Nguyen that both sides should work together on a code of conduct for the South China Sea.

Relations between China and Vietnam were at their lowest ebb in a decade in May 2014, when the China National Offshore Oil Corporation moved oil platform Hai Yang Shi You 981 into waters near the Paracels. Vietnam sent vessels to stop the rig fixing to the seabed and were met by Chinese escort ships.

Beijing and Hanoi accused each other of allowing ships to ram opposing vessels. Anti-China protests swept Vietnam, and in southeastern Binh Duong province 14 factories owned by Chinese businesses were attacked.

Tensions eased in July that year, when China said the rig had finished its work and was withdrawn from the disputed waters.

Since then, the two countries have made efforts to improve relations. In May, Chinese Minister of National Defence General Wei Fenghe visited Hanoi, pledging with his Vietnamese counterpart that both nations would maintain stability in the South China Sea.

Vanguard Bank is the westernmost reef of the Spratlys and sits within what Hanoi claims is 200 nautical miles of its exclusive economic zone. That claim is contested by Beijing and Taiwan.

The Vanguard Bank basin is known to have rich oil and gas reserves, and Vietnam has dozens of oil rigs operating in the area. In 1994, armed Vietnamese vessels forced Chinese survey ship Shiyan 2 (Experiment 2) from the area after a three-day stand-off.

China claims most of the South China Sea, but that is contested in places by Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei.

In the past few years, Beijing has built and reclaimed seven islands on reefs under its control in the Spratlys and deployed troops and weapons to strengthen its claim over natural resources and trade routes in the area.

The latest stand-off came as China bolstered the role of its coastguard, which has been under military control since July last year and has been preparing for confrontations in disputed waters.

Collin Koh, a research fellow at the S Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, said China and Vietnam were likely to refrain from “untoward actions that may escalate the situation into a clash”.

“Especially for China, an escalated situation may carry consequences such as a fallout in ties with Vietnam and potential difficulties that can be anticipated, especially when Hanoi takes on the chairmanship of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) later this year,” he said.

“That would go against the narrative that China’s been trying to shape, which is that the South China Sea is peaceful and stable and can be managed properly without needing extra-regional intervention.

“So we might imagine an escalation at Vanguard will shatter that myth. Of course, this applies to Asean as well, although Beijing is more concerned about it because of its abhorrence towards external intervention in the South China Sea,”
Koh said.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chetak » 13 Jul 2019 17:21

in the maldives, the cheeni dragon doing business the OBOR way.

twitter


“For the bridge, GMR gave us a quotation for $77 million and the Chinese gave us a bill for $300 million....we are seeing in other countries, they are asking for equity and with that we relinquish land and sovereignty”

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby darshan » 17 Jul 2019 23:51

Govt of India approves construction of India’s largest hydroelectric project in Arunachal Pradesh
https://www.opindia.com/2019/07/govt-of ... l-pradesh/
Dibang Multipurpose Project is a hydropower cum flood moderation scheme proposed on Dibang River in Lower Dibang Valley District of Arunachal Pradesh. Apart from producing electricity, the project will moderate flood in areas downstream of the Dibang Dam during the monsoon session. The plant will produce 2880 MW of electricity, making it the largest hydel power in the once completed. It is estimated that the project will produce 11223MU of energy in a 90% dependable year. The Dam constructed for the project will be 278-meter-high, making it tallest in the country.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 19 Jul 2019 08:54

China promises greater market access to India if it improves RCEP offer - Amiti Sen, Business Line
China has dangled a carrot before India to make it improve its market liberalisation offer under the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) pact by offering to open its own market even more, but New Delhi is cautious. {India has to be more than just being 'cautious'. We have to outright reject this proposal. Two reasons for that. One, China cannot link a bilateral issue with a multilateral agenda. Period. Two, past history proves that Chinese promises are humbug. We have seen the colour of Chinese money before and that never looked good or appetizing.}

In the one-on-one talks between the two countries, that are part of the 16-member proposed regional bloc, China has said that if India went beyond its current offer of eliminating tariffs on about 74 per cent items for the country, it would not only match it but commit to a higher number, an official told BusinessLine.

India, however, is apprehensive that its industry will not be able to make as much gains from the tariff elimination under RCEP as the Chinese already have a head-start which is reflected in the $54-billion trade surplus China has over India.

Most of the countries that are part of the RCEP, including the 10-member ASEAN, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand, are pushing India to decide on its market opening offer for China as early as possible {Everyone wants to make money out of India and at India's cost. It's as simple as that. China might come in handy even when Japan & Oz might want India to checkmate China otherwise. This is brutal realpolitik} as that was holding the rest of the negotiations back.

Members keen on pact

Members are keen to have the RCEP agreement in place by the end of this year and a three-member team comprising Trade Ministers from Indonesia and Thailand and the ASEAN Secretary General was in New Delhi last week to meet Commerce & Industry Minister Piyush Goyal in order to fast-track decision making.

Although India is also not eager to open its markets for Australia and New Zealand, to the same extent as for the ASEAN, Japan and South Korea with which it has bilateral free trade agreements, it is most cautious about China as the Indian industry feels most threatened by it.

“Last fiscal, China exported goods worth $70 billion to India while India’s exports to the country was $16 billion. Following tariff liberalisation, exports of both countries would go up but the apprehension is that China’s increase would be proportionately much higher than that of India’s and the trade deficit would balloon,” he said.

As per China’s latest offer, if India increased its offer to eliminate tariffs for substantially more items (Beijing is pushing for over 90 per cent) than its existing offer, it could eliminate tariffs on 5-7 per cent more goods for India.

“The problem is that the Indian industry is more focussed on protecting its domestic market from Chinese goods rather than increase its presence in the Chinese market,” the official said.

The Indian industry, especially the steel, textile, automobile and engineering goods sectors, has already requested the government to keep ambitions very low as far as China is concerned. In a recent meeting with the Commerce & Industry Ministry, industry representatives asked the government to stick to the initial offer of eliminating duties on 42 per cent of items imported from China.

Once implemented, the RCEP could be the largest free trade zone in the world as member countries account for 25 per cent of global GDP, 30 per cent of global trade, 26 per cent of global foreign direct investment (FDI) flows and 45 per cent of the total population.

Trade Ministers from all ASEAN countries will meet in China early next month to take stock of the current negotiations and put an informal time-line for its conclusion.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 19 Jul 2019 13:38

China’s debt at 303% of GDP, 15% of global total: Report – Reuters

NEW DELHI: A key gauge of China's debt has topped 300% of gross domestic product, according to the Institute of International Finance (IIF), as Beijing steps up support for the cooling economy while trying to contain financial risks.

China's total corporate, household and government debt rose to 303% of GDP in the first quarter of 2019, from 297% in the same period a year earlier, the IIF said in a report this week which highlighted rising debt levels worldwide.

The IIF is a private global financial industry association, based in Washington.

"While authorities' efforts to curb shadow bank lending (particularly to smaller companies) have prompted a cutback in non-financial corporate debt, net borrowing in other sectors has brought China's total debt to over $40 trillion - some 15% of all global debt," the report said.

"Of note, onshore bond issuance suggests a big pickup in borrowing by local governments and banks this year."

China's economic growth slowed to 6.2% in the second quarter, its weakest pace in at least 27 years, as demand at home and abroad faltered in the face of mounting US trade pressure.

To revive investment and protect jobs, Beijing has been encouraging banks to lend more, particularly to struggling smaller firms. It has also unveiled billions of dollars in tax cuts and infrastructure spending.

In the first half of this year, local governments' total net bond issuance reached 2.1765 trillion yuan ($316.5 billion), the finance ministry said on Tuesday.

Chinese officials have said repeatedly said debt risks are manageable overall.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby g.sarkar » 19 Jul 2019 15:01

https://www.spiegel.de/international/bu ... 75643.html
The World's Bank
Vast Chinese Loans Pose Risks to Developing World

China is the largest creditor in the world, funding infrastructure projects in the developing world in exchange for access to raw materials. A new study shows that the risk of a new debt crisis is significant.
By Bartholomäus Grill, Michael Sauga and Bernhard Zand
The future rail link cuts its way through the jungles of Laos for over 400 kilometers. Soon, trains will be rolling through -- over bridges, through tunnels and across dams built just for the line, which runs from the Chinese border in the north to the Laotian capital of Vientiane on the Mekong River. After five years of construction, the line is set to go into service in 2021. And the Chinese head of one of the sections has no doubt that it will be finished on time. "Our office alone employs 4,000 workers," he says. There is also no lack of money: The Chinese government in Beijing has earmarked around 6 billion dollars for the project and has recently become both Laos's largest creditor and most significant provider of development aid. After five years of construction, the line is set to go into service in 2021. And the Chinese head of one of the sections has no doubt that it will be finished on time. "Our office alone employs 4,000 workers," he says. There is also no lack of money: The Chinese government in Beijing has earmarked around 6 billion dollars for the project and has recently become both Laos's largest creditor and most significant provider of development aid. China, after all, isn't just directly financing 70 percent of the new train lain, it is also building dams, schools, military hospitals and has even launched a communications satellite into space for the country. In April, Beijing loaned Laos another 40 million dollars for road construction -- a credit that was provided through the multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank based in Beijing, a financial institution that China established as an alternative to Western development banks.
If Hong Kong is included, China isn't just the largest creditor in Laos, but in the entire world. Beijing's foreign loans dominate global markets almost to the same degree as its toys, smartphones and electric scooters do. From Kenya to Montenegro, from Ecuador to Djibouti, roads, dams and power plants are being built with billions in loans from Beijing. And all of those countries will have to pay back those loans in the years to come. With interest.
The flood of capital from China helped prevent the global economy from plunging into depression following the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers and the ensuing financial crisis. But it isn't without controversy. For some, the billions of dollars from China are a welcome contribution to helping many underdeveloped regions in Asia and Africa expand infrastructure. For others, the loans from Beijing have forced half the world into economic and political dependency on Beijing. Some have described the situation as "debt bondage," while a group of U.S. senators wrote a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last summer warning of China's "attempt to weaponize capital."
A Lack of Transparency
Furthermore, little is actually known about the loans. China's foreign assets are now worth $6 trillion, but outside of the government in Beijing, nobody knows much about where that money has been invested and what conditions and risks are attached. Because China doesn't completely open its books to international organizations like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), there is a lack of needed transparency, says IMF head Christine Lagarde. Now, though, with the release of a new study by a German-American team of academics under the leadership of Harvard professor Carmen Reinhart, Largarde will have a clearer picture. For months, the economists dug through both known and unknown source material, compiling the most comprehensive analysis yet of Chinese foreign loans. And the image that has resulted does nothing to assuage concerns about the financial power being exerted by Beijing. On the contrary: The data shows that many countries in the poorer regions of the world have accepted far more credit from China than previously known. And the loans frequently come with onerous conditions that are strongly oriented toward Beijing's strategic interests and increase the risk that many countries in the developing world could plunge into financial crisis. "The West still hasn't understood how profoundly China's rise has changed the international financial system," says Christoph Trebesch, a co-author of the study from the Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
.....
Gautam

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby tandav » 19 Jul 2019 15:29

This is historically how imperial China has expanded, Northern Chinese Mandarin speaking empires made roads to Southern Manchuria and within a century southern state speaking cantonese became part of China. Today modern china is applying an ancient formula to gain territory.

g.sarkar wrote:https://www.spiegel.de/international/business/chinese-loans-pose-risks-to-developing-world-a-1275643.html
The World's Bank
Vast Chinese Loans Pose Risks to Developing World

China is the largest creditor in the world, funding infrastructure projects in the developing world in exchange for access to raw materials. A new study shows that the risk of a new debt crisis is significant.
By Bartholomäus Grill, Michael Sauga and Bernhard Zand
The future rail link cuts its way through the jungles of Laos for over 400 kilometers. Soon, trains will be rolling through -- over bridges, through tunnels and across dams built just for the line, which runs from the Chinese border in the north to the Laotian capital of Vientiane on the Mekong River. After five years of construction, the line is set to go into service in 2021. And the Chinese head of one of the sections has no doubt that it will be finished on time. "Our office alone employs 4,000 workers," he says. There is also no lack of money: The Chinese government in Beijing has earmarked around 6 billion dollars for the project and has recently become both Laos's largest creditor and most significant provider of development aid. After five years of construction, the line is set to go into service in 2021. And the Chinese head of one of the sections has no doubt that it will be finished on time. "Our office alone employs 4,000 workers," he says. There is also no lack of money: The Chinese government in Beijing has earmarked around 6 billion dollars for the project and has recently become both Laos's largest creditor and most significant provider of development aid. China, after all, isn't just directly financing 70 percent of the new train lain, it is also building dams, schools, military hospitals and has even launched a communications satellite into space for the country. In April, Beijing loaned Laos another 40 million dollars for road construction -- a credit that was provided through the multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank based in Beijing, a financial institution that China established as an alternative to Western development banks.
If Hong Kong is included, China isn't just the largest creditor in Laos, but in the entire world. Beijing's foreign loans dominate global markets almost to the same degree as its toys, smartphones and electric scooters do. From Kenya to Montenegro, from Ecuador to Djibouti, roads, dams and power plants are being built with billions in loans from Beijing. And all of those countries will have to pay back those loans in the years to come. With interest.
The flood of capital from China helped prevent the global economy from plunging into depression following the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers and the ensuing financial crisis. But it isn't without controversy. For some, the billions of dollars from China are a welcome contribution to helping many underdeveloped regions in Asia and Africa expand infrastructure. For others, the loans from Beijing have forced half the world into economic and political dependency on Beijing. Some have described the situation as "debt bondage," while a group of U.S. senators wrote a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last summer warning of China's "attempt to weaponize capital."
A Lack of Transparency
Furthermore, little is actually known about the loans. China's foreign assets are now worth $6 trillion, but outside of the government in Beijing, nobody knows much about where that money has been invested and what conditions and risks are attached. Because China doesn't completely open its books to international organizations like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), there is a lack of needed transparency, says IMF head Christine Lagarde. Now, though, with the release of a new study by a German-American team of academics under the leadership of Harvard professor Carmen Reinhart, Largarde will have a clearer picture. For months, the economists dug through both known and unknown source material, compiling the most comprehensive analysis yet of Chinese foreign loans. And the image that has resulted does nothing to assuage concerns about the financial power being exerted by Beijing. On the contrary: The data shows that many countries in the poorer regions of the world have accepted far more credit from China than previously known. And the loans frequently come with onerous conditions that are strongly oriented toward Beijing's strategic interests and increase the risk that many countries in the developing world could plunge into financial crisis. "The West still hasn't understood how profoundly China's rise has changed the international financial system," says Christoph Trebesch, a co-author of the study from the Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
.....
Gautam

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 19 Jul 2019 21:07

Vietnam says Chinese oil survey vessels violated its sovereignty - Reuters
Vietnam said on Friday a Chinese oil survey vessel and its escorts had conducted activities in Vietnam's exclusive economic zone and continental shelf that violated its sovereignty.

Vietnam has demanded China stop the “unlawful activities” and that its ships leave Vietnamese waters
, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokeswoman Le Thi Thu Hang said in a statement.

Ms. Hang's statement comes days after two Washington-based think-tanks said Vietnamese and Chinese ships had been engaged in a weeks-long standoff near an offshore oil block in disputed waters of the South China Sea, which fall within Vietnam's exclusive economic zone.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Jul 2019 14:54

China proposes united front with India and emerging economies to counter trade headwinds - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
Ahead of the next informal summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping, China has flagged its interest in partnering India for building a united front of emerging economies and developing countries to counter trade headwinds.

Amid a spiralling trade war with the U.S., Chinese ambassador-designate to India, Sun Weidong, told resident Indian journalists on Friday that “the ugly path of unilateralism and protectionism has now affected the growth and stability of the world economy.”

“This will surely have an impact on the emerging markets and the developing countries because it also based on the international order that they rely on,” he observed. Seeking a bigger partnership with India on a global scale, Mr. Sun said on the eve of his departure to New Delhi that China and India had a “historical” duty to become frontrunners in protecting multilateralism and globalisation.

He pointed out that the scale and impact of this initiative should echo the success of Panchsheel
— the five principles of peaceful coexistence nailed by the two countries in the 1950s — which became the template for guiding state-to-state relations.

“China and India are the only two emerging markets and developing countries in the world that have a population of over 1 billion. So while upholding our legitimate rights and interests, we have to shoulder our historical responsibility in terms of safeguarding peace, stability and prosperity for the world…,” Mr. Sun observed.

The Chinese envoy specially flagged the reform of the World Trade Organisation, the defence of the U.N. system, cyber-security, and climate change as the arena for China-India collaboration in the future.

India and China reset their ties last year at the Wuhan informal summit, after the two countries nearly came to war in 2017, during the Doklam military stand-off. But with the next edition of the informal summit slated later this year, Mr. Sun was emphatic that the time had arrived when the two neighbours should move away from merely “managing” their differences to a stage of active partnership, capable of yielding an “Asian Century”.

“The Chinese people are now in an endeavour for (realising) the first millennium goal, and at the same time Prime Minister (Narendra) Modi has come out with the vision of the new India. That means our two countries are in a similar development stage; we share similar goals for our development and that enables us to share very extensive and in-depth common interests.” {The two countries are not in a similar development stage and the goals are not the same}

Mr. Sun stressed that the Chinese side was “willing to work with India to enhance our strategic mutual trust, step up our all-dimensional cooperation, to lend support to each other’s development so as to realise the mutual dancing of the Chinese dragon and the Indian elephant and to make our joint efforts for the emergence of the Asian century.”

The Chinese envoy spotlighted that the two countries must grasp “the overriding trend of the changes in the current world landscape and to properly understand the stage of our own developmental process and bear in mind the long-term picture so as to take initiative in shaping our bilateral relationship.” {He is suggesting that India should be mindful of China as the latter is the future}

Asked to comment on bridging the trade gap between the two countries — a concern shared by Prime Minister Modi and President Xi during their meeting last month in Bishkek on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation summit — Mr. Sun said China “ highly values” India’s concerns on the trade imbalance. But he also made it plain that Beijing has “never deliberately created a trade surplus against India.”

He pointed out that from last year, China had increased imports of Indian rice and sugar, along with stepping up the review and approval process of the Indian pharmaceuticals. “I am convinced that with our concerted efforts, the issue of trade imbalance between China and India will be gradually addressed.”


On the resolution of the border issue, Mr. Sun reiterated that the dialogue among the Special Representatives of the two countries, which began in 2003, had yielded the political principles guiding the resolution of the boundary row. Besides, “the basic principle of a package planned though mutual adjustment to resolve the boundary issue” had been identified.

Commenting on managing India and China’s overlapping interests in the Indian Ocean and South Asia, the Chinese envoy pointed to the “China-India plus” mechanism “to better build regional infrastructure connectivity and to ensure better synergy of policies and strategies between countries.”

After the Wuhan summit, China had proposed a joint approach with India to address some of the major issues in the region, including the Rohingya refugee crisis along with possible initiatives in Nepal, Afghanistan and Iran. On a personal note, Mr. Sun said he looked forward to working with External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar, with whom he had interacted when he had been posted in Beijing as India’s Ambassador to China. “We worked closely together. So I really hope that in the new tenure of your government, this relationship will be further promoted through our common and mutual efforts.”

SSridhar
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Jul 2019 20:30

How to Confront an Advancing Threat From China - Nikki Haley, Foreign Affairs
Excerpt
A NEW STRATEGY FOR A NEW STRUGGLE

Since the United States emerged as the world’s leading power, we have never had to contend with a potential military challenger that was also our most important trading partner. In the Cold War, we confronted a Soviet Union whose economy was a fraction of the size of China’s today. History offers no close analogies, but that doesn’t mean it offers no lessons.

During the Cold War, our government crafted new policies and programs to check Soviet military technological progress and weaken the Soviet economy. These included export control and trade promotion programs that served national security purposes. We created the U.S. Information Agency, which countered Soviet propaganda, and the Strategic Defense Initiative, which aimed to neutralize the Soviet Union’s long-range nuclear-armed missiles. We also established programs to encourage higher education in relevant areas—for example, the Russian language and nuclear weapons technology.

To counter Chinese threats to U.S. vital interests, it is necessary for us to think creatively and courageously—and without any illusions about our adversary’s intentions. To begin with, we should revise our regulations on trade and investment, especially in the high-tech sector, so that China can no longer exploit our openness. In general, I dislike government interference in private business. But our national security takes precedence over free-market policies. Adam Smith made this point in The Wealth of Nations, arguing that Great Britain’s interest in preserving naval supremacy was more important than free trade in the maritime sector: “Defense,” he wrote, “is of much more importance than opulence.” With China committed to taking military advantage of all private commercial activity, we must alter the lens through which we examine U.S. regulation of foreign trade, international supply chains, inward investments, intellectual property protection, and incentives for critical defense technologies. The necessary regulation will be expensive and onerous, but it is the price we must pay to secure our country.

Even as we adjust our economic policies, we will also need to improve our diplomacy. The radical nature of China’s national security strategy has become clear only in the last few years. As we rethink our own national security strategy in response, we have an interest in encouraging our allies to rethink theirs. Congress should ensure that U.S. officials have the authority and resources they need to promote understanding of China’s strategy and to rally multilateral efforts to compete with it—to counter Chinese influence, to defend against military threats, and to preserve the principles on which the prosperity-promoting post–World War II international system was constructed.

To handle threats posed by China—as well as by Russia, North Korea, Iran, and jihadist terrorist networks, among others—we must strengthen our military. We need greater naval capability, more long-range air strike forces, and improved information technology and cyber-capabilities. We must also modernize our long-neglected nuclear infrastructure.{The withdrawal from INF treaty is the first step} The U.S. defense budget is huge, but not enough is allocated for capital investment. With limited resources, there will always be tradeoffs. But we must always be able to respond, in strong and measured fashion, to our most militarily sophisticated adversary.

China poses intellectual, technological, political, diplomatic, and military challenges to the United States. The necessary response is similarly multifaceted, requiring action in fields as disparate as intelligence, law enforcement, private business, and higher education. In recent years, many problems have been described as requiring “whole of government” responses. China requires a response that is not just “whole of government” but “whole of nation.” Fortunately, there is support across the political spectrum for countering China’s new aggressive policies. We must act now, before it’s too late. The stakes are high. They could be life or death.


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