Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

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chola
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chola » 24 Dec 2017 00:47

The hans were/are keen to grab the doklam area and maybe break through the chicken neck stretch to isolate/separate India's NE including arunachal so as to link up with a yet to be constructed deep sea port in beedi land by building a new deep-sea port at Sonadia thus cleaving a pathway to the IOR from the under developed China’s Yunnan province.


Underdeveloped is the key word!

Watch this wild ELEPHANT taking it out on a chini bus and truck in Yunnan.



This isn’t like an elephant in Assam with his mahout. Chinese do not know how to deal with a big mammal besides eating it. In any halfway developed Cheen province, any mammal larger than a cat would run screaming in fear away from chinimen.

Must be a way to draw attention to the last wild places in Cheen — Tibet, Yunnan, Xinjiang, etc. all on the borders — and get world pressure to stop their infrastructure build up there.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 24 Dec 2017 13:25

deejay wrote:Pankajs ji, the way I see it is that now the Doklam plateau has become a Strategic Pain rather than a Strategic Gain for Chinese. They are now forced to maintain a high level of troop deployment at these remote places through winter. Obviously, they thing we are going to do what Pakis did in Kargil.

On the other hand we cannot do a strategic permanent build up the conflict area itself since it is a Bhutanese territory and not ours. What this means is that once the summer sets in 2018 (May-June) on wards this place can be an interesting place to keep a watch just like other areas where Chinese keep trying to build roads etc.

Presently, for winters, the Chinese are putting more troops through the weather grind. Over the cold months they will take weather related casualties and costs like we do. Once again, their build up is defensive and not offensive in nature. Building bunkers is clear sign of hardening defences.

Agree. Only when summer is upon us and the climate suitable for construction can we come to any conclusion wrt the Chinese intentions for Doklam plateau. For now it is mostly wait and watch on both sides.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby DavidD » 25 Dec 2017 03:38

IMO if China is to make a move it'll be in the winter. From China's perspective, infrastructure is their biggest advantage, and that advantage is the greatest during the winter. The current build-up is occurring during the winter because they believe that India cannot conduct similar build-up during the winter, and it'll be the same if they want to move on Doklam.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby UlanBatori » 25 Dec 2017 07:39

From related news: No chance of this finding pp innocent after 7 years bijnej.
The Communist Party-controlled Courts in China convict more than 99.9 percent of those who appear before them.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby anupmisra » 25 Dec 2017 18:00

Chinese users claim iPhone X face recognition can’t tell them apart
Defang this!

Apple has been accused of being “racist” after a Chinese boy was able to unlock his mom’s iPhone X with his own face.
The father, identified only by his surname, Liu, said he phoned Apple’s customer service hotline to report the problem. He was told it was a rare, isolated case caused by his wife and son looking very similar.
The news comes just a week after a Chinese woman realized she could unlock her colleague’s iPhone X using the facial recognition software.
It’s now been suggested that the iPhone X is unable to tell Chinese people apart.
“Racist iPhone X thinks all Asian people look the same.”


Image

https://nypost.com/2017/12/21/chinese-u ... hem-apart/

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 26 Dec 2017 18:24

China needs Detroit-style bankruptcy as debt problems remain: central bank official

BEIJING: China needs to let local governments take responsibility for their finances, including allowing bankruptcies, as part of an effort to defuse their debt risks, a central bank official wrote on Monday.

Central government control of the scale of local government bonds should be eliminated, while responsibility to issue and repay bonds should be held by the city or county that will actually use the funds, Xu Zhong, head of the People’s Bank of China’s research bureau, wrote in a an editorial on the financial news website Yicai.

“Eliminate central government control on the scale of local government bond issues, expand the scale of local government debt issues,” Xu wrote.

“Whether (bonds) can be issued, and at what price, must be examined and screened by the financial markets. There does not need to be worry about local governments chaotically issuing debt.”

China’s top leadership decided at a meeting this week to take concrete measures to strengthen the regulation of local government debt next year as policymakers look to rein in a massive debt pile and reduce financial risks facing the economy.

The government needs to clarify responsibility as it explores a bankruptcy system for local governments, Xu wrote, as there is still an expectation that the central government will bail out those that run into fiscal problems.

“China must have an example like the bankruptcy in Detroit. Only if we allow local state-owned firms and governments to go bankrupt will investors believe the central government will break the implicit guarantee,” Xu wrote, adding that social services should be maintained.

The United States city of Detroit filed the largest-ever municipal bankruptcy in July 2013, with $18 billion of debt.

Xu also said that China should dismantle the hukou system of internal migration control, as free movement of people promoted equal access to public services and helped resolve imbalances in finances. In a report published on Saturday, China’s National Audit Office said China should dispel the “illusion” that the central government will pick up the bill for local government debt.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Hari Seldon » 26 Dec 2017 21:12

PRC's soft-power investment in hollywood paying off even as PRC turns off the 'free money' spigots...

Basically, after the cheeni films market surpassed the US box office n USD terms, no studio worth its salt will take any risk of offending PRC. So self-censorhip is the norm.

https://www.ft.com/content/d5d3d06e-de8 ... 1e63a52f9c

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 27 Dec 2017 02:34

X Posted on the I W T Thread

China promises to keep India informed about artificial lakes along Brahmaputra

BEIJING: China on Tuesday promised to keep India informed about the condition of the artificial lakes that have come up along the Brahmaputra in Tibet near the Indian border with China. At least three major lakes have come up, worrying sections of people in the Indian north east who fear that the lakes might burst and flooding waters flow downstream into India.

"It is caused by natural factors. It is not a man-made accident," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said, citing satellite imagery. "We hope the Indian media will not make a groundless speculation on this," she said.

There are fears in India that the three artificial lakes might endanger lives of people living along the Siang in Arunachal Pradesh and downstream of Brahmaputra in Assam. The size of the lakes and the quantum of water in them is not yet estimated. China is saying they have been created due to landslides along the upstream areas of Brahmaputra, which is called Yarlung Tsangpo in Tibet, after a 6.4 magnitude earthquake last month.

"The Chinese side, through the existing channels, will maintain communication with the Indian side on the cross-border rivers," Hua said. The lakes are on the eastern section of the India-China boundary, she said.

There were earlier reports about heavy pollution in the Siang river suspected to have been caused by heavy construction and tunnel building on the Chinese side of the border. China had denied these reports. Indian officials are believed to have taken up this issue during the recent 20th border talks between NSA Ajit Doval and Chinese state councillor, Yang Jiechi on December 22 in Delhi.

India and China share a long boundary which includes a 3,488 km long Line of Actual Control (LAC). China claims Arunachal Pradesh as Southern Tibet, India asserts that the dispute covered Aksai Chin area which was occupied by China during the 1962 war.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Prem » 27 Dec 2017 04:38

https://www.stripes.com/japan-eyes-conv ... e-1.504067
Japan eyes converting destroyer to aircraft carrier, the 1st for Self-Defense Force

TOKYO — Japan is considering remodeling the Maritime Self-Defense Force's largest-class destroyer, the Izumo, into an aircraft carrier on which fighter jets can take off and land, The Yomiuri Shimbun has learned. If the plan materializes, it will be the first aircraft carrier to be possessed by the Self-Defense Forces.According to multiple government sources, the government aims to begin operation of the aircraft carrier in the early 2020s, and it intends to maintain its interpretation that Japan cannot possess an aircraft carrier with attack capabilities, by using the envisaged aircraft carrier for defense purposes, such as using it as a refueling base in defending remote islands.The government assumes that the new aircraft carrier will carry U.S. forces' F-35B fighter jets , the sources said. By strengthening Japan-U.S. cooperation, the government aims to prepare for threats posed by North Korea and China.The Izumo is a destroyer with a large deck, and its shape is similar to that of an aircraft carrier. It has an overall length of 248 meters and a full load displacement of about 26,000 tons. It is said that the vessel is capable of carrying 14 helicopters. If it is remodeled into an aircraft carrier, it likely will be able to carry about 10 F-35B fighter jets, according to the sources.In the remodeling, the deck's heat resistance will be enhanced so that it can withstand the heat produced by the jet engine of an F-35B fighter jet, the sources said. A specific remodeling method will be examined going forward, including a plan to build a slope into the deck to assist aircraft in taking off, much like a ski jump.If U.S. military bases in Japan are destroyed in case of a contingency, the aircraft carrier will serve as a substitute runway.
In fact, North Korea has mentioned the possibility of attacking U.S. military bases in Japan with ballistic missiles. In case of an emergency on the Korean Peninsula, runways at the bases could become unusable. At the same time, China is expanding its maritime advances. Given these situations, building up the ability to defend remote islands is an urgent issue facing Japan.The government has cited an aircraft carrier with attack capabilities as an example of armed forces with war potential, the possession of which is prohibited under Paragraph 2 of Article 9 of the Constitution.However, a senior Defense Ministry official said, "If it is used for defense purposes, it will not fall under the category of an aircraft carrier with attack capabilities."

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 27 Dec 2017 08:56

‘There isn’t going to be a war between India and China today’, says Bertil Lintner - Interview by Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
Q: Your latest book on the 1962 war challenges the idea that India triggered it, and its title “China’s India War” counters Neville Maxwell’s account called “India’s China War”.

A: You can say that all the books on the 1962 war fall into [different] categories. The first by Indian military officers who served during the war, and they are essentially military histories about how the battles were fought and so on. But they don’t give the geopolitical context. The second is the category of scholarly books on the border dispute. Now here it is important to remember the difference in political culture between India and China. India has a strong legalistic approach, with courts and laws being very important. China, on the other hand, dismisses all treaties that it doesn’t like by calling them ‘unequal treaties’ which were imposed on China when China was weak. But even in more modern days, when China is strong, these treaties mean nothing.

Recently, the Chinese foreign ministry said that the treaty with Britain over Hong Kong was now history, or that the international court ruling on the South China Sea favouring the Philippines was just an unfair judgment. And as I point out in the book, while India was preparing White Papers and documentation and maps and copies of treaties on the boundary, China was preparing for war.

Q: As early as 1959, you say in the book…

A: Yes, and the reason that people like Maxwell and others thought it was India’s forward policy that provoked the war was because China was a very closed society in those days. People were not even aware at the time that tens of millions of people had died in a famine in China as a result of the Great Leap Forward, and there was a crisis within the Communist Party. Mao Zedong was at his least popular moment in {sic?, probably meant since}1949 and Mao needed to unite the party and the country behind himself. India was a convenient enemy because the Dalai Lama had been given refuge here in 1959. The other reason was that in the 1950s, India under Jawaharlal Nehru had become the main voice for newly independent countries in Asia and Africa. India initiated the Non-Aligned Movement, gave the language of Panchsheel. Now at the time, the West’s three-world theory saw the Western Bloc, the Eastern Bloc, and the global South (underdeveloped world). The Chinese view of the world was the superpowers, the lesser powers, and the poor countries (Third World). China wanted to become the leader of the revolutionary forces in the Third World and had to dethrone India from that position. After the war, Mao became strong enough to begin the cultural war, and Nehru, who died a broken man two years later, was no longer able to lead India as a spokesman of the Third World and Asia.

Q: You’ve written about the roles of the Soviet Union and the U.S. as key to the outcome in 1962. In a war-like situation between India and China today, what position would the U.S. and Russia take?

A: Well, first of all, I don’t think there is going to be a war between India and China today. Trade is too important. I think what we’re seeing today is a new Cold War in Asia, an informal alliance between India and Japan [versus China]. The United States is a bit unpredictable under Donald Trump, but it had under Barack Obama embarked on a pivot to Asia, with the rise of China as the main concern. For the first time, since the 15th century and Admiral Zheng He, the Chinese are now in the Indian Ocean. China didn’t even have a proper navy until recently. So now when it talks of One Belt One Road, and the ancient maritime trade routes, it must be remembered it’s not so ancient. In the Indian Ocean, you have India, which considers it its own lake, as it were. But also in the Indian Ocean is the U.S.’s most important base, Diego Garcia. And the French control 2.5 million acres of land in the Indian Ocean. This is why these alliances are growing.

Q: To come back to the land boundary, you have said that the Doklam stand-off this year was not about China’s designs on India, but aimed to drive a wedge between India and Bhutan. Why do you say that?

A: Bhutan is China’s only neighbour that doesn’t have diplomatic ties with it. Relations are maintained through these boundary talks, which have been going on for more than two decades. Bhutan has been under Indian influence, but it is now asserting itself as a sovereign power. Why did China even need the road in Doklam? Maybe the plan was to get Indian troops out of Haa (Bhutan’s Haa Valley) and get them more directly involved in this conflict, which would embarrass many Bhutanese. You can see the statements from Bhutan at the time, which were very cautious, and many Bhutanese think that India overreacted and wanted to show its control over Bhutan. China is on a charm offensive there (in Bhutan). They’re sending acrobats there, circus performers, football teams, tourists, scholarships for students. Clearly China wants to extend its influence to all its neighbours, and that includes Bhutan.

Q: What does this mean for India-China relations in the future, especially the resolution of the boundary question?

A: I think the Indian Ocean is going to become the biggest challenge in the near future. I find it hard to believe they will fight another war in the Himalayas. China has in the past suggested a swap between Arunachal/South Tibet and Aksai Chin. On paper that sounds reasonable, but we don’t know how serious the Chinese are. Also, if China were to accept the Line of Actual Control (LAC) as the border, it could control any dissidence within. In India, which is a democracy, the government couldn’t just go ahead with that solution… it would be political suicide. So this package is a non-starter. But in the larger picture, China doesn’t care if the boundary remains unresolved. They are not looking for a solution, they are looking for a strategic advantage. Where there is a conflict of interest building up is in the Indian Ocean. And the joint naval exercises with Australia and other countries is important. While visiting the Andaman Islands recently, I was told that the U.S. navy was visiting Port Blair. Now we know that they are not there to learn to rescue shipwrecks and play cricket.

Q: Do you see the newly convened “Quad”, of India, Australia, Japan and the U.S., building up as a military alliance?

A: Yes, I think so. It is almost inevitable. Nobody really wants to talk about it, but it will come. It has to do with the rise of China, and with economic power will come political power and then military power, which you need to protect your interests.

Q: In your previous book, ‘Great Game East’, you dealt with China’s inroads in the Indian subcontinent, from Myanmar to the Maldives. The Maldives has recently concluded a free trade agreement with China, and is growing much closer to Beijing in all respects. The question is, how can India counter China’s obvious advantage in terms of money power?

A: Well so far, India has been an observer, and not done that much really. The same thing is happening in the Seychelles. China is paying enormous attention to the country, of less than 100,000 people. India’s eastern border with Myanmar is so much more important, for example. But India spends an inordinate time on its western border (with Pakistan). Myanmar is China’s corridor to the Indian Ocean. What India can do to counter it is to pay more attention.

Q: Do you think India’s position on the Belt and Road Initiative, which every neighbour except Bhutan has joined, will be effective or counter-productive?

A: I think on the Belt and Road Initiative, India should have made its opposition to it much earlier, and articulated its concerns better, because they were lost on most outside observers.

Q: Will the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) change the politics of the region?

A: So far, I don’t think the CPEC has been much of a success. Pakistan is not a stable country, and China will have to deal more and more with its internal dynamics. Plus, the CPEC connects to Xinjiang, away from China’s economic centres, unlike, say, Myanmar that connects to China’s eastern economic zones and ports. Over the past year, given the problems in Rakhine state, China is even looking for a third route into the Indian Ocean to bypass the choke-point at the Strait of Malacca. Here China is pushing the idea of the Kra Canal (from Gulf of Thailand to the Andaman Sea). So for China what is important is the goal, not so much the routes to it.

Q: Moving to the east, is China’s control in Myanmar inevitable, or is there something India can do?

A: India has three main problems on its boundary with Myanmar compared to China. The first is infrastructure. On Myanmar’s northern border, China has super-highways, an airport not far from the border. Kunming has been upgraded to a huge international airport. On the Indian side, infrastructure is still a major problem. It’s better than 10 years ago perhaps, but not comparable to what already exists on the Chinese side.

The other problem is red-tape and bureaucracy, and it seems that the Chinese Communist Party are better capitalists than India, a democracy, is. There are still many trade restrictions on the Indian side and several checkpoints. An integrated checkpoint, which is being planned by India, will help. The third problem is from underground rebel groups operating on the Indian side, which can carry out attacks and extort money all along the border. Anyone with a gun can demand anything. But I can say with certainty that people of Myanmar would like to do much more trade with India, because the dependence on China is so massive, it is worrying for everyone, including their military.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 27 Dec 2017 19:53

Nepal rejects India’s offer to jointly re-measure Mt Everest - PTI
Nepal has rejected India’s offer to jointly re-measure the height of the world’s highest peak Mount Everest following the massive earthquake in 2015 and will carry out the exercise on its own, the top official of the Himalayan nation’s survey department has said. Nepal will, however, seek help from India and China for getting crucial data for the exercise, Nepal’s Survey Department’s Director General Ganesh Bhatta told PTI.

Sources in New Delhi indicated that China could be behind Nepal refusing India’s proposal to jointly re-measure Mount Everest as the peak is on the Sino-Nepal border.
According to a statement by the Department of Science and Technology which comes under India’s Ministry of Science and Technology, after the 2015 “Gorkha earthquake” that jolted Nepal, various doubts were raised by the scientific community over the height of the peak.

The 7.8 magnitude quake in April 2015 had devastated the Himalayan nation, killing more than 8,000 people and displacing lakhs of others. The Survey of India, a 250-year-old institute under the DST, proposed re-measuring Mt Everest as an ‘Indo-Nepal Joint Scientific Exercise’ with Nepal’s survey department. “They have not responded to our proposal. Now they are saying that they are not involving either India or China. They will be re-measuring Mt Everest on their own,” Major Gen Girish Kumar, the Surveyor General of India, told PTI.

Kumar said that a representative from India attended a meeting convened in Kathmandu, where surveyors and scientists from different countries including China were also present. “There was a proposal from India to help us measure Mt Everest, but we are doing it on our own,” Bhatta, who is in Nepal, told PTI over phone.

When asked whether China had also given a proposal to re-measure Nepal, he replied in the negative. He noted that China had measured Mt Everest in 1975 and 2005 while Indian surveyors had carried out a similar mission in 1956. The SGI had also measured the Everest during the British era. “India was the first country under Sir George Everest’s leadership as the Surveyor General of India to have declared the height of Mount Everest and establish it as the highest peak in the world in the year 1855,” the Department of Science and Technology’s website states. Bhatta said preparatory work has already begun on the project and they are gathering preliminary data crucial for this survey.

The massive earthquake has “shook” even the basic parameters of Nepal, so data from other countries will be crucial, he said. India is being requested to provide the levelling data while China has been asked to provide the gravity data. The data will be very important to determine the height of Mt Everest, Bhatta said. “We won’t be crossing over into the Chinese territory for measurements. The work of summiting Everest will take place in 2019,” he said.

Kusalaraj, a scientist at the Centre for Earth Science at the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, said minor change in the height of Mt Everest may not have a direct impact on the lives of people immediately.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 27 Dec 2017 21:55

it seems the founder of LeEco is absconding from the mainland, whereabouts unknown and has ignored some court summons to return and pay back creditors.
https://www.engadget.com/2017/12/27/lee ... -to-china/

a big cheese in huawei arrested on corruption charges
https://technode.com/2017/12/26/another ... d-bribery/

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 27 Dec 2017 22:40

Sunlight v subversion
What to do about China’s “sharp power”

China is manipulating decision-makers in Western democracies. The best defence is transparency

Image

WHEN a rising power challenges an incumbent one, war often follows. That prospect, known as the Thucydides trap after the Greek historian who first described it, looms over relations between China and the West, particularly America. So, increasingly, does a more insidious confrontation. Even if China does not seek to conquer foreign lands, many people fear that it seeks to conquer foreign minds.

Australia was the first to raise a red flag about China’s tactics. On December 5th allegations that China has been interfering in Australian politics, universities and publishing led the government to propose new laws to tackle “unprecedented and increasingly sophisticated” foreign efforts to influence lawmakers (see article). This week an Australian senator resigned over accusations that, as an opposition spokesman, he took money from China and argued its corner. Britain, Canada and New Zealand are also beginning to raise the alarm. On December 10th Germany accused China of trying to groom politicians and bureaucrats. And on December 13th Congress held hearings on China’s growing influence.

This behaviour has a name—“sharp power”, coined by the National Endowment for Democracy, a Washington-based foundation and think-tank. “Soft power” harnesses the allure of culture and values to add to a country’s strength; sharp power helps authoritarian regimes coerce and manipulate opinion abroad.

The West needs to respond to China’s behaviour, but it cannot simply throw up the barricades. Unlike the old Soviet Union, China is part of the world economy. Instead, in an era when statesmanship is in short supply, the West needs to find a statesmanlike middle ground. That starts with an understanding of sharp power and how it works.

Influencing the influencers

Like many countries, China has long tried to use visas, grants, investments and culture to pursue its interests. But its actions have recently grown more intimidating and encompassing. Its sharp power has a series of interlocking components: subversion, bullying and pressure, which combine to promote self-censorship. For China, the ultimate prize is pre-emptive kowtowing by those whom it has not approached, but who nonetheless fear losing funding, access or influence.

China has a history of spying on its diaspora, but the subversion has spread. In Australia and New Zealand Chinese money is alleged to have bought influence in politics, with party donations or payments to individual politicians. This week’s complaint from German intelligence said that China was using the LinkedIn business network to ensnare politicians and government officials, by having people posing as recruiters and think-tankers and offering free trips.

Bullying has also taken on a new menace. Sometimes the message is blatant, as when China punished Norway economically for awarding a Nobel peace prize to a Chinese pro-democracy activist. More often, as when critics of China are not included in speaker line-ups at conferences, or academics avoid study of topics that China deems sensitive, individual cases seem small and the role of officials is hard to prove. But the effect can be grave. Western professors have been pressed to recant. Foreign researchers may lose access to Chinese archives. Policymakers may find that China experts in their own countries are too ill-informed to help them.

Because China is so integrated into economic, political and cultural life, the West is vulnerable to such pressure. Western governments may value trade over scoring diplomatic points, as when Greece vetoed a European Union statement criticising China’s record on human rights, shortly after a Chinese firm had invested in the port of Piraeus. The economy is so big that businesses often dance to China’s tune without being told to. An Australian publisher suddenly pulled a book, citing fears of “Beijing’s agents of influence”.

What to do?

Facing complaints from Australia and Germany, China has called its critics irresponsible and paranoid—and there is indeed a danger of anti-Chinese hysteria. However, if China were being more truthful, it would point out that its desire for influence is what happens when countries become powerful.

China has a lot more at stake outside its borders today than it did. Some 10m Chinese have moved abroad since 1978. It worries that they will pick up democratic habits from foreigners and infect China itself. Separately, Chinese companies are investing in rich countries, including in resources, strategic infrastructure and farmland. China’s navy can project power far from home. Its government frets that its poor image abroad will do it harm. And as the rising superpower, China has an appetite to shape the rules of global engagement—rules created largely by America and western Europe and routinely invoked by them to justify their own actions.

To ensure China’s rise is peaceful, the West needs to make room for China’s ambition. But that does not mean anything goes. Open societies ignore China’s sharp power at their peril.

Part of their defence should be practical. Counter-intelligence, the law and an independent media are the best protection against subversion. All three need Chinese speakers who grasp the connection between politics and commerce in China. The Chinese Communist Party suppresses free expression, open debate and independent thought to cement its control. Merely shedding light on its sharp tactics—and shaming kowtowers—would go a long way towards blunting them.

Part should be principled. Unleashing a witch-hunt against Chinese people would be wrong; it would also make Western claims to stand for the rule of law sound hollow. Calls from American politicians for tit-for-tat “reciprocity”, over visas for academics and NGO workers, say, would be equally self-defeating. Yet ignoring manipulation in the hope that China will be more friendly in the future would only invite the next jab. Instead the West needs to stand by its own principles, with countries acting together if possible, and separately if they must. The first step in avoiding the Thucydides trap is for the West to use its own values to blunt China’s sharp power.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 27 Dec 2017 23:01

Can't change India's mentality on OBOR, but doors of cooperation open: Chinese media

NEW DELHI: 2017 was the worst year in India-China relations, but bilateral ties between the two countries could be on the up-and-up in the coming year if both make concerted efforts at dialogue and exercise restraint, Chinese state media said.

An op-ed in China's Global Times puts forth that there are three main contentions marring bilateral relations between New Delhi and Beijing - the border dispute, the Tibet issue and India's wariness of China-Pakistan amity. While it is unlikely that these trio of issues will be amicably resolved in the near future, "control and management" are the only way to navigate the gamut of India-China ties, it said.

Bilateral relations were further strained by China's firm opposition to India's entry into the elite Nuclear Suppliers Group, as well as it's blocking of New Delhi's petition to place Jaish-e-Muhammed chief Masood Azhar on the UN's list of global terrorist.

"On these issues, the two nations should further exchange views and remain patient, which helps reach consensus more easily than public pressure and censure," the opinion piece advised.

2017 was also the year of the long drawn-out Doklam standoff, which "pushed the two Asian powers to the brink of war, becoming the biggest crisis between them in the past 55 years", the editorial claimed. In the end, the tense face-off was resolved through diplomatic channels, which "realigned the development Beijing-New Delhi relations in the right direction", said Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi. But the incident also signaled a historic turning point and will set the tone for bilateral military relationship between India and China in 2018 and beyond.

"From an optimistic perspective, the standoff will prompt the two countries to deepen strategic communication and control disputes to usher them in a new era of development. But looking through blue glasses, the confrontation has fully exposed all contradictions between the two neighbors and only urged them to maintain sharper vigilance against each other," said the Global Times op-ed.

On the subject of regional cooperation, Beijing's stratagem to lure India into the One Belt One Road Initiative (OBOR) figures prominently. Despite New Delhi's objections, China remains optimistic that the economic benefits will outweigh sovereignty concerns and India will participate in the multi-billion dollar project.

"Beijing knows it will not be able to change India's mentality and judgment in 2018, but will not close the door of cooperation," it observed.

The op-ed also chastised India for allegedly trying to bar its south Asian neighbours from forging closer cooperation with China. On the other hand, it touted China's involvement in Sri Lanka's Hambantota port and the K P Oli-led communist government in Nepal as signs of burgeoning friendship with the two nations.

Since Beijing and New Delhi have wide-ranging common interests on regional and global affairs, the two should further strategic cooperation instead of adopting tactics that may worsen relations, the editorial said.

"2017 is the worst year for China-India relations. But if India would like to meet China halfway and make concerted effort, 2018 will probably become the best year for their bilateral ties," it concluded.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Dec 2017 11:28

We are aware of China’s maritime ambitions: India - The Hindu
The Centre on Wednesday informed the Lok Sabha that it was aware of China’s ambition to emerge as a “maritime power”, and indicated that India maintained a “close watch” on all developments that threatened its security.

“India and China have, on several occasions, reiterated that, as large neighbours following independent foreign policies, the relationships pursued by India and China with other countries must not become a source of concern for each other. Both countries have agreed to display mutual respect and sensitivity to each other’s concerns and aspirations,” said Minister of State for External Affairs Gen. (Ret.) V.K. Singh
, in response to a question. The statement is significant in view of China’s recently concluded Free Trade Agreement with the Maldives which has drawn India’s attention.

“The government is aware of China’s stated objective of becoming a ‘maritime power’. As part of this strategy, China is developing ports and other infrastructure facilities in the littoral countries in the Indian Ocean region, including in the vicinity of India’s maritime boundary.”

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Dec 2017 11:53

The Chinese road to dusty debt - G.Parthasarathy, Business Line
China’s much touted ‘silk roads’ and ‘maritime silk routes’ trace their origin to its trade across Central Asia and the Indian Ocean. Interestingly, silk constituted a relatively small portion of Chinese trade, though it gave an exotic content to what was primarily commercial activity in which China was the principal beneficiary.

The maritime silk route across the Indian Ocean was first set during the course of seven expeditions between 1404 and 1433 by a Chinese naval fleet headed by Admiral Zheng He, a Mongolian Muslim eunuch appointed by Ming emperor Yongle. During the course of expeditions to Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Calicut, Zheng brought back kings and princes to ‘Kowtow’ (genuflect) before the Ming emperor.

Exploitative actions

Indonesia has ensured that it responds cautiously to Chinese inducements and avoids getting closely drawn into a Chinese embrace. Beijing, however, seems to have drawn Sri Lanka into its web, taking advantage of the island’s economic vulnerabilities. After visiting Calicut in 1406, Zheng returned to Sri Lanka in 1411 with a large army to take revenge for an earlier perceived insult. Parts of the island were plundered and the Sri Lankan king, Vira Alakeswara, was taken back to Nanjing, together with the holy ‘tooth relic’ of the Buddha; the king was replaced by a ‘malleable’ ruler. While the humiliated king was returned to his people a few years later, the tooth relic was returned six centuries later, in 1960, by Prime Minister Chou en Lai, as a gesture of “goodwill”, Chinese style. Chinese trade was historically as exploitative as trade by the British East India Company.

Today, Colombo is full of hoardings of China’s “magnanimity”, manifested in its “assistance” in infrastructure, industrial and construction projects. Beyond the Galle Main Road in Colombo is the $1.4-billion Port City Project to be filled with Chinese built, owned, or managed luxury apartments, golf course, theme park, hotels and office buildings. All these will soon become part of Sri Lanka’s mounting official debt burden. This will accentuate the already unbearable debt burden Colombo has accumulated from earlier Chinese “aid”. The main instruments of this “aid” and plunder of natural resources are the China Communications Construction Company and its subsidiary, the China Harbour Engineering Company. The World Bank has blacklisted both these companies across the world because of their corrupt practices, including bribery. The only well-executed and profitable Chinese-built project in Sri Lanka is the container terminal in Colombo.

Apart from this, Chinese projects located in President Mahinda Rajapakse’s constituency, Hambantota, have imposed an unsustainable debt burden on Sri Lanka. Given the western aversion for his regime and Indian doubts about the project’s viability, Rajapakse welcomed Chinese “assistance” to develop his constituency. He sought and obtained Chinese “support” to heavily finance projects ranging from the Hambantota port, to a power plant, an airport, an industrial park, a cricket stadium and a sports complex. All these investments have proved uneconomical. Hardly any ships visit Hambantota , barely one aircraft lands in the airport daily, and the sports facilities remained unutilised, even as locals were outraged by the proposed construction of an industrial park. Sri Lanka has been spending 90 per cent of government revenues to service debts.

Pressure tactics

Unable to repay its debts, Sri Lanka has been forced to convert Chinese investments into equity in Hambantota, giving the Chinese partial ownership of the port. Following discreet Indian expressions of concern, Sri Lanka has retained operational control of Hambantota port, ensuring that Chinese submarines and warships do not freely berth there.

Some pre-emptive action has also been taken to ensure that the eastern port of Trincomalee does not become the next port of interest for Chinese strategic ambitions, thanks to the timely initiative of Petroleum Minister Dharmendra Pradhan. The Indian Oil Corporation has established a business presence in Sri Lanka for progressive involvement in the use of Trincomalee for import and processing of petroleum products. It is imperative to build on this, by constructing a modern petroleum tefinery, on equitable terms, in Trincomalee.

China’s belt and road initiative in Myanmar is primarily concentrated on developing the Bay of Bengal port of Kyaukpyu ,and connecting the port to neighbouring Yunnan province by oil and gas pipelines, and road and rail networks. But Myanmar is wary of over-dependence on China because of, amongst other reasons, environmentally damaging energy projects and its yearning for access to precious metals and stones. Myanmar may, however, find it difficult to resist the pressure unless India, Japan, South Korea, the US, the EU and neighbouring Asean countries make a coordinated effort to strengthen economic relations with it. A similar approach would be needed regarding China’s approach to construction projects in Nepal and Bangladesh.

China’s ‘all- weather friend’ Pakistan is also facing problems in implementing the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). Despite high-level meetings, important projects like the Diamer-Bhasha Dam located in Gilgit-Baltistan, in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir, are stalled, because of disagreement on the financial terms set by the Chinese.

There are also differences on implementing railway projects based out of Peshawar and Karachi, apart from a series of road projects. Moreover, there is very little transfer of technology and know-how, and minimal local participation in Chinese construction projects. Beijing has, after all, to utilise its vast surplus labour force and construction machinery and materials abroad, as its unprecedented domestic construction projects at home are completed.

Pakistan’s dilemma

More and more questions are being raised in Pakistan about where the resources will come from to repay the over $50-billion debt the that will accrue from CPEC projects, where local participation is minimal. Moreover, Pakistan will soon be unable to credibly claim that it exercises its sovereignty in places like the Gwadar port, which is all set to become a Chinese-run military base, close to the strategic Straits of Hormuz.

Writing in Dawn newspaper, columnist Khurram Hussein perceptively observes: “In reality, the China Pakistan Economic Corridor is about allowing Chinese enterprises to assume dominant positions in all dynamic sectors of Pakistan’s economy, as well as a ‘strategic’ direction that is often hinted at, but never fleshed out.”

The writer is a former High Commissioner to Pakistan

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Dec 2017 18:36

India should control its border troops: Chinese military - PTI
Highlighting the Doklam standoff as its major achievement of international cooperation this year, the Chinese military on Thursday said India should "strictly control" its troops and implement border agreements to maintain peace and stability along the border.

Chinese Defence Spokesman Col Ren Guoqiang said the highlights of his country's international military cooperation in 2017 included handling 'hotspot issues' like Doklam.


This year, under the unified deployment, the military has "resolutely" safeguarded China's sovereignty and security interests, Col Ren told media here.

The Chinese military has "played its due role in the handling of the hotspot issues such as the Sino-Indian confrontation in the Donglang (Doklam) area and safeguarded the China's rights and interests in the South China Sea," he said in response to a question.

The Doklam standoff began on June 16 after the People's Liberation Army (PLA) began building a road in area claimed by Bhutan. The Indian troops intervened to stop the road as it posed a security risk to Chicken Neck, the narrow corridor connecting India with its north-eastern states.

The standoff ended on August 28 following a mutual agreement under which China stopped the construction of the road and India withdrew its troops.

The 3,488-km-long Line of Actual Control between India and China covers from Jammu and Kashmir to Arunachal Pradesh.

When asked how Chinese military view its relations with its Indian counterpart in 2018 in the backdrop of the Doklam standoff, Col Ren said India should implement the border agreements and control its troops.

"We hope the Indian side can earnestly implement the relevant agreements reached between the two sides on the border issue and strictly control its border defence troops and do more for the positive development of China-India military-to-military relationship," he said.

During the border talks, the first since the 73-day-long military standoff in Doklam, in Delhi on December 22 between National Security Advisor Ajit Doval and Chinese State Councillor Yang Jiechi, both sides stressed the importance of maintaining peace and stability along the border, Ren said.

"As far as we know both sides have agreed that it is important to maintain peace stability along India-China border and create favourable conditions for further development of bilateral relationship, which has provided a good environment and good momentum for the continued enhancement of China and India relationship," he said.

In terms of China and India military-to-military relationship, it is important to have strategic communication and push forward healthy development of ties between the two militaries, Col Ren said.

"We hope Indian side walk towards the same direction as the Chinese side and both sides can push forward the development of the relationship and jointly maintain the peace and stability along the China-India border which is in the interest of both sides," he said.


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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2017 20:35


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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 29 Dec 2017 02:26

Taiwan president says China military causing regional instability

TAIPEI: China’s frequent military activity is causing regional instability, Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen said on Thursday, adding that the island’s forces have been keeping a close eye on what they are up to.

China considers self-ruled and democratic Taiwan to be its sacred territory and has never renounced the use of force to bring what it views as a wayward province under Chinese control.

China has taken an increasingly hostile stance towards Taiwan since Tsai, from the island’s pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party, won presidential elections last year.

Beijing suspects her of pushing for the island’s formal independence, a red line for China. Tsai says she wants peace with the mainland, but that she will defend Taiwan’s security and way of life.

China’s air force has carried out 16 rounds of exercises close to Taiwan in the past year or so, Taiwan’s defense ministry said in a white paper this week. China’s military threat was growing by the day, it warned.

Beijing has repeatedly said its drills, which have also taken place in the disputed South China Sea and the Sea of Japan, are routine and not aimed at any third party.

Tsai, speaking to senior military officers in Taipei, said the island wanted peace but could “not have a single day without combat preparedness”.

“In this period of time, the frequent military activities of mainland China in East Asia have already affected safety and stability in the region to a certain extent,” Tsai said.

“Our country has always been a contributor to safety and stability in the region, this is why the national army has to keep an eye on movements of the Chinese military and take appropriate actions when needed to guarantee the safety of the country and region.”

China has warned Taiwan against “using weapons to refuse reunification” and its state media has given high profile to images of Chinese jets flying close to the island.

Tension rose this month when a senior Chinese diplomat threatened that China would invade Taiwan if any US warships made port visits there.

Taiwan is well equipped with mostly US-made weapons, but has been pressing Washington to sell more advanced equipment.

The United States is bound by law to provide Taiwan with the means to defend itself, to China’s distaste.

Proudly democratic Taiwan has shown no interest in being run by autocratic China, and Taiwan’s government has accused Beijing of not understanding what democracy is about when it criticizes Taipei.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Dec 2017 07:45

Trump 'disappointed' over China allowing oil into North Korea - Reuters
US President Donald Trump on Thursday said he was "very disappointed that China is allowing oil to go into North Korea" and that such moves would prevent "a friendly solution" to the crisis over Pyongyang's nuclear program.

"Caught RED HANDED - very disappointed that China is allowing oil to go into North Korea. There will never be a friendly solution to the North Korea problem if this continues to happen!" Trump wrote in a post on Twitter.

China earlier on Thursday said there had been no UN sanction-breaking oil sales by Chinese ships to North Korea after a South Korea newspaper said Chinese and North Korean vessels had been illicitly linking up at sea to get oil to North Korea.

The Trump administration has led a drive to step up global sanctions on North Korea in response to Pyongyang's efforts to develop nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting the United States.

Washington says the full cooperation of China, North Korea's neighbor and main trading partner, is vital to the success of this effort, while warning that all options are on the table, including military ones, in dealing with North Korea.

The UN Security Council last week unanimously imposed new sanctions on North Korea for a recent intercontinental ballistic missile test, seeking to further limit its access to refined petroleum products and crude oil.

The UN resolution seeks to ban nearly 90 percent of refined petroleum exports to North Korea by capping them at 500,000 barrels a year.

The US-drafted resolution also caps crude oil supplies to North Korea at 4 million barrels a year and commits the Council to further reductions if North Korea were to conduct another nuclear test or launch another ICBM.

Documents seen by Reuters this month showed Washington called on the Security Council to blacklist 10 ships for circumventing sanctions by conducting ship-to-ship transfers of refined petroleum products to North Korean vessels or transporting North Korean coal.

China and Russia subsequently asked for more time to consider the proposal.

In September, the Security Council put a cap of 2 million barrels a year on refined petroleum products exports to North Korea.

China has repeatedly said it is fully enforcing all resolutions against North Korea, despite suspicion in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo that loopholes still exist.

Asked at a regular briefing whether Chinese ships were illegally providing oil to North Korean ships, Chinese Defence Ministry spokesman Ren Guoqiang reiterated that China, including the military, strictly enforced UN resolutions.

"The situation you have mentioned absolutely does not exist," he said. {liar}


South Korea's Chosun Ilbo newspaper this week quoted South Korean government sources as saying that spy satellites had detected 30 instances of ship-to-ship transfers to North Korean vessels since October.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 30 Dec 2017 19:15

Taiwan warns against Chinese drills - AFP
Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen warned on Friday against what she called China's “military expansion” as it ups drills around the island, but said she did not believe the two rivals would go to war.

Beijing has stepped up pressure on Taiwan and relations have become increasingly frosty since Ms. Tsai took office in May last year, as she refuses to acknowledge Taiwan is part of “one China”. China views self-ruling Taiwan as part of its territory, to be reunified at some point.

Ms. Tsai warned that China’s frequent air and naval drills showed that “its intentions for military expansion in the region are getting more and more obvious”.

According to Taiwan’s Defence Ministry, Chinese warplanes conducted 25 drills around Taiwan between August 2016 and mid-December this year.


“Cross-strait issues definitely cannot be resolved by military force. [They] should rely on peaceful means to deal with different opinions and positions,” Ms. Tsai said.

Ms. Tsai pledged Friday to strengthen Taiwan's homegrown defence. “Taiwan cannot rely on others to defend its sovereignty... Taiwan is not big, but our determination to defend our country and home is resolute.”

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 31 Dec 2017 08:55

The fortune hunters of Qinghai - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
China’s lofty Qinghai Province — taking up a large slice of the Tibetan plateau — has been known for its stunning scenery. Sandwiched between Tibet and Xinjiang, it is also a host for China’s diverse ethnic minorities. The Muslim Hui and the Salar people, Tibetans, Tus and Mongols all rub shoulders in this sparsely populated mountainous province.

The remote Province, China’s fourth largest, now attracts streams of visitors — not tourists, but new-age fortune hunters. The underlying cause for their visits is China’s rapidly advancing electric car revolution. Electric car batteries need lithium, which is plentiful in Qinghai. In fact, China holds the second-largest reserves of the mineral, with Chile standing on the top of the tree.

The lithium rush usually begins with Golmud. This is the third largest city in the Tibetan plateau after Xining and Lhasa. The city is within a striking distance of 20 salt lakes, all rich in minerals. For lithium seekers, the newly opened Golmud airport is the natural gateway to the salt lakes. But rail transit is also an option. The well-known Qinghai-Tibet railway — a 1,956-km steel corridor from Xining to Lhasa — passes through Golmud, perched at a dizzy height of nearly 3,000 m. The Qinghai-Tibet railway has many firsts to its credit. The line passes through the Tanggula Pass, which stands at a height of 5,072 m — the highest point of any railway in the world. The train also passes through the Fenghuoshan tunnel, perched at a jaw-dropping altitude of 4,905 m.

Among the water bodies in the area, the Chaerhan Salt Lake is a star attraction. The vast lake, 160 km long from east to west, with a 20-40 km north-south stretch has copious mineral reserves. The water body and its surrounding areas are said to contain nearly 83% of China’s lithium reserves. Sensing the demand for electric cars, Build Your Dream (BYD), China’s premier electric vehicle company, based in Shenzhen, was quick to lock in some of the lake’s extensive lithium reserves. Last year, it secured a concession to recover lithium and paired with a state-owned enterprise to set up a factory. Others who are riding on the electric car bandwagon are also focussing on lithium as the core item in their supply chain. Unsurprisingly, shares of lithium carbonate have doubled on Shanghai’s metal market, within a short span of two years.

Scouring the globe

As of now, the hunger for lithium in China remains insatiable, and Chinese companies are scouring the globe for accessing the mineral. The scramble for lithium was evident when a Chinese buyer — Shandong Mingrui Group — paid $78 million in cash to purchase lithium assets from an Australia-listed company in southern Mali. The Financial Times reported earlier this year that the Chinese buyer paid 2,000 times the price for the deal.

Last year, Tianqi Lithium paid $209.6 million for a 2.1% stake in Chile’s SQM, one of the world’s largest lithium producers. Tianqi Lithium’s website says it has a shareholding interest in Zhabuye Salt Lake Lithium Project, which is located in Shigatse, Tibet — a railhead of an extended Qinghai-Tibet line.

Separately, a Beijing-based company has locked in a lithium supply of 5,000 tonnes a year from Mexico, starting from 2019. The frenzied global hunt for lithium is in anticipation of a boom in the sale of environmentally friendly electric cars.
As of now, electric vehicles account for only 2% of total new car sales. But demand is expected to surge to nearly five million vehicles over the next eight years.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 01 Jan 2018 00:38

China will have a 'say' on all major international issues, says Xi Jinping in New Year message

BEIJING: China will have a "say" on all major international issues and actively push its Belt and Road initiative, Chinese President Xi Jinping said in his New Year message on Sunday.

Xi said China will resolutely uphold the authority and status of the UN, actively fulfil China's international obligations and duties.

He also said that China will remain firmly committed to the pledges to tackle climate change, actively push for the BRI and always be a builder of world peace, contributor of global development and keeper of international order.

"As a responsible major country, China has something to say," Xi said in his first New Year address of his second-five year term, telecast live all over the country.

The BRI through which China seeks to build its influence in the world through a host of road, rail and port connectivity projects also incorporates China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

India has objected to the CPEC as it traverses through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. China defends it saying that it is a connectivity project and it will not impact its stand on the Kashmir issue.

Xi said the Chinese people are ready to chart out a more prosperous, peaceful future for humanity, with people from other countries.

On domestic front, Xi, in a surprise admission, said there were areas where the government's work fell short of expectations.

Though progress has been made, he said, issues of public concern remain, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

"That is why we should strengthen our sense of responsibility and do a good job of ensuring the people's well-being," Xi said.

"The well-being of our people is the party and the government's greatest political achievement. Our cadres should put the people's state of living at the heart, and help them live a better life," he said.

He vowed to eradicate poverty. China claims it has eradicated poverty among over 650 million people in the last three decades.

By 2020, all rural residents living below the current poverty line would be lifted out of poverty, Xi said, adding that it will be the first time in China's history that extreme poverty will be completely eliminated.

"It is our solemn promise. Only three years are left to 2020. Every one of us must be called to action, do our best, take targeted measures to secure victories one after another," he said.

"This is a great cause, important to both the Chinese nation and humanity. Let's do it together and make it happen," he said.

He also said China would resolutely carry out reform in 2018.

"We will take the opportunity of celebrating the 40th anniversary of the reform and opening-up in 2018 to further carry out reform, as reform and opening-up is the path we must take to make progress in contemporary China and to realise the Chinese dream," Xi said.

China's great achievement of development was made by the people and for the people, and that among the people's most pressing concerns were education, employment, income, social security, health care, elderly care, housing and environmental protection, he said.

He extended New Year greetings to all Chinese and best wishes to friends all over the world.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 08:45

China-hand Gokhale to be Foreign Secretary - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
The government has announced the name of Vijay Gokhale, an officer with formidable experience on China and the East Asian neighbourhood, as its next Foreign Secretary.

Mr. Gokhale, a 1981-batch officer, currently Secretary (Economic Relations) in the Ministry of External Affairs, will take over from S. Jaishankar when he demits office on January 28, a notification issued by the Ministry of Personnel said on Monday.

Mr. Gokhale was Ambassador to China before moving back to the Ministry, and is widely credited with conducting delicate but tough diplomatic negotiations in Beijing during the Doklam crisis.

The talks led to a peaceful resolution of the 70-day military standoff that ended just days before Prime Minister Narendra Modi travelled to China for the BRICS summit in August 2017.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2018 10:23

India and China after the Doklam Standoff [Dr. Manoj Joshi @ Hudson Institute; I don't agree with him on every point but still worth a watch]



Our self proclaimed *China hand* should definitely watch this. He makes 2 points wrt Doklam that I had written about during the crisis which was fairly obvious to a laymen like myself.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2018 10:41

Explained | India & China: Life After Doklam With Shyam Saran [Still in the middle of the talk]


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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 14:18

China develops underwater surveillance networks in Indian Ocean, South China Sea - PTI
China has developed a new underwater surveillance network to help its submarines get a stronger lock on targets while protecting the nation’s interests along the maritime Silk Road, which includes the Indian Ocean, a media report said today.

The system, which has already been launched, works by gathering information about the underwater environment, particularly water temperature and salinity, which the navy can then use to more accurately track target vessels as well as improve navigation and positioning, the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post reported.

The project, led by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), is part of an unprecedented military expansion fuelled by Beijing’s desire to challenge the United States in the world’s oceans, the Post said.

After years of construction and testing, the new surveillance system was now in the hands of the navy, which reported “good results”, the oceanology institute said in latest briefing in November, according to the report.

But China still has some way to go before it can compete with the world’s only true superpower, it said.

The Chinese system is based on a network of platforms — buoys, surface vessels, satellites and underwater gliders — that gather data from the South China Sea, and the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, the paper quoted the report by Oceanology Institute.

That information is then streamed to three intelligence centres — in the Paracel Islands in the South China Sea, the southern province of Guangdong, and a joint facility in South Asia {Pakistan, most likely} — where it is processed and analysed, it said.

Yu Yongqiang, a researcher with the Institute of Atmospheric Physics — also under CAS — and a member of the expert panel overseeing China’s global underwater surveillance network, said that while it undoubtedly represented progress in China’s submarine warfare capabilities, it was dwarfed by the systems operated by the U.S. around the world.

“We have made just a small step in a long march,” he said.

For submarines patrolling the sea route, or “road”, element of China’s global trade and infrastructure development plan known as the ‘Belt and Road Initiative’, which included the 21st century Maritime Silk Road, the system’s ability to not only measure, but also predict temperature and salinity at any location, any depth and at any time will be invaluable.

Submarines use sonar (sound navigation and ranging) to locate, identify and attack other vessels.

Mr. Yu said that as well as improving their targeting ability, the new surveillance system should enable submarines to steer a much safer course through difficult waters.

For the naval forces charged with guarding the maritime Silk Road, there are many adversaries lurking in often hostile waters, according to a researcher involved in the development of the new surveillance system.

Since the Cold War, the U.S. had closely guarded the Western Pacific via “island chains”, the researcher said.

Similarly, the South China Sea was circled by many small, “unfriendly” countries involved in territorial disputes with China; while India was wary of Beijing’s growing influence in the region and was consequently trying to tighten its grip on the Indian Ocean, he said.

“Our system can help tip the balance of power in these regions in China’s favour,” the researcher said.


According to a study by the Centre for a New American Security and the International Institute for Strategic Studies, by 2030 China will have 260 warships and submarines compared to the US’s 199.

As the battle for the oceans hots up, tools such as the underwater surveillance network could be the difference between winning and losing, the report said.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2018 16:40

The Himalayan Stand-Off


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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 17:32

China's advanced hypersonic missile threat to India, US, Japan: Report - PTI
China's new "hypersonic" ballistic missiles will not only challenge the defences of the US but also be able to more accurately hit military targets in Japan and India, a media report said today.

The report in the South China Morning Post comes after Tokyo-based The Diplomat magazine reported that China's rocket forces conducted two tests late last year of a new "hypersonic glide vehicle" or HGV, known as the DF-17.

Citing US intelligence sources, The Diplomat last month reported that the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Rocket Force carried out the first test on November 1 and the second one two weeks later.

Both tests were successful and the DF-17 could be operational by around 2020
, the US intelligence sources were quoted as saying.

Asked about the two tests, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang today declined to react saying the Defence Ministry should be approached for information on this. Both tests were successful and the DF-17 could be operational by around 2020, the US intelligence sources were quoted as saying.

HGVs are unmanned, rocket-launched, manoeuvrable aircraft that glide and "skip" through the earth's atmosphere at incredibly fast speeds.

Compared to conventional ballistic systems, HGV warheads can travel at much higher speeds, lower altitudes and less- trackable trajectories. The approach leaves defence systems less time to intercept the warhead before it drops its payload.

The DF-17 test missiles were launched from the Jiuquan launch centre in Inner Mongolia and flew about 1,400 km during the trial, The Diplomat reported.

Chinese state media first reported on the country's HGV technology in October, with footage of the system in a hypersonic wind tunnel in various arrays.


Beijing-based military analyst Zhou Chenming said HGV technology has become part of the nuclear strategy between the world's three big nuclear powers: China, the US and Russia.

"Compared to conventional ballistic missiles, HGVs are more complex and difficult to intercept," Zhou told the South China Morning Post.

"The US, Japan and India should be worried about China's developments in HGV technology because it can reach targets quicker and more accurately, with military bases in Japan and even nuclear reactors in India being targeted," he was quoted as saying by the daily.

China eyes artificial intelligence for 'fire-and-forget' cruise missiles.

Chinese military specialists said the DF-17 was one of several iterations of glider systems developed by the PLA, including the DF-ZF which has been through at least seven tests.

Song Zhongping, a former member of the PLA's Second Artillery Corps, the rocket wing's predecessor, said the DF-17 was the weaponised model of the DF-ZF prototype.

Song, a military commentator for Hong Kong's Phoenix Television told the Post that the HGV system could be used with various kinds of ballistic missiles, including intercontinental ballistic missiles with a range of at least 5,500 km.

He also said multiple HGV warheads could be used with the DF-41, which has a range of at least 12,000 km and can hit anywhere in the US in less than an hour.

Macau-based military observer Antony Wong Dong said HGVs could also be used to target and destroy a US anti-missile system known as THAAD, or Terminal High Altitude Area Defence, which are currently deployed in South Korea to war doff---- attacks from North Korea.

"China's HGVs ... could destroy the THAAD radar system if there is war between the two countries," Wong said.

"Once the THAAD radars fail to function in the first stage, it could reduce the window to raise the alarm about the PLA's [ICBMs] ... leaving the US without enough time to intercept," he said.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 17:41

China has claimed to have achieved several things last year.

On February 1, 2017, it tested the new DongFeng-5C missile with a MIRV capability of 10 warheads. On April 26, 2017, PLAN launched its first aircraft carrier in Dalian, the Type 001A. On May 22, 2017, China flight tested successfully its Z-19E ‘BlackWhirlwind’ gunship at Harbin. On June 28, 2017, PLAN launched the Type-055 Guided Missile Destroyer, billed as Asia’s largest and most advanced warship (next only to the US Zumwalt-class destroyer). On August 1, 2017, China opened its first overseas military base at Djibouti. On October 29, 2017, China announced the successful trial at the Hainan naval base of a new quieter electric propulsion system for its submarines. There is also a report of China building a 40,000 tonne landing helicopter dock.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2018 17:43

Explained | India & China: Life After Doklam With Mr. Ashok Kantha


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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 02 Jan 2018 18:27

X Posted on the Analyzing CPEC and Terroristan Threads

China media advises India to shun hostility, join CPEC

BEJING: Chinese state media has once again extended invitation to India to join the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) and advised New Dehli to shun policy of antagonism towards its neighbours.

State-owned Global Times in an opinion piece on Tuesday stated that major world powers have abandoned the traditional mind-set of geopolitical competition after the Cold War and embraced peace and development in keeping with the spirit of the times. However, some countries, such as India, still swear by the outdated geopolitical strategy and base their sense of security on narrow national interests and political confrontation.

India’s strategic considerations are underpinned by its traditional geopolitical strategy. India reckons regional cooperation promoted by China will bring about a zero-sum game and even jeopardize its national security and interests. New Delhi’s clout will weaken because of its dwindling ties with adjacent states. SOLLY! CHIN-CHIN CHOP CHOP CHOP. INDIA NOT LIKEEE TLAVELSING THLOUGH TELLOLISTAN

When some powers outside the region enter and affect India’s sphere of influence, more countries in the region are eager to break away with India. As a result, the geopolitical game in the region surrounding India is likely to grow stronger.

India’s opposition to the Belt and Road initiative not only deprives it of an opportunity for development and shows its jealousy toward its neighbors gaining from the initiative, but also reflects New Delhi’s dread and delusion with China attempting to grab its sphere of influence.

In addition, the world may suspect that Beijing is trying to isolate New Delhi through the initiative. Hence, India’s allegation that its national interests will likely be affected by China’s efforts to extend the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) to Afghanistan may sound reasonable. Undeniably, India brings trouble to itself making it lose development opportunities.

In fact, the Belt and Road initiative is designed to boost international cooperation following the principle of shared growth through discussion and win-win cooperation.

Instead of pursuing a country’s growth at the cost of others or damaging interests of a nation, the initiative is a new geopolitical collaborative model characterized by joint participation and shared development.

China and other countries welcome India to join the initiative. Extending the CPEC to Afghanistan is not intended to undermine India, but to enhance the economic corridor. HA! HA!! HA!!!

As emerging powers responsible for propelling the new international order, China and India should abandon an outdated antagonistic mind-set, uphold the values of friendship, justice and shared interests, participate in regional governance and develop new state-to-state relations.

That’s how we can foster a peaceful global environment and stable international order, strive for development featuring openness, innovation, inclusiveness and mutual benefits, boost national, regional and global development and build a community with a shared future for mankind.

Comments : When will the Chinese Lealn that India DOES NOT WANT TO DO ANYTHING WITH TELLOLISTAN! :twisted:

Cheers Image

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 20:07

Post Doklam, India needs to watch China’s bullish economics led cultural embrace of South Asia - Shruti Pandalai, IDSA
The India China relationship in 2017 became defined by Doklam, now synonymous with the 73 day military standoff (between June and August 2017) in the tri-junction with Bhutan and defused through proactive diplomacy. It brought into perspective the fractured relationship between the two Asian giants on the global stage and increased fears of China’s growing unilateralism as it inexorably broadens its interests and sphere of influence, especially in South Asia.

Much water has flowed under the bridge since then. In the talks held between Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj and her Chinese counterpart Wang Yi, they agreed that Doklam proved that rebuilding of “mutual trust” and improved “strategic communication” were imperative. The two countries decided to work afresh on confidence building measures to manage border flare ups in the 20th round of talks between special representatives on the border issue. In fact, soon after Doklam, when President Xi and Prime Minister Modi met at the BRICS summit in Xiamen, China’s Ambassador to India, Luo Zhaohui, wrote in The Hindu, pressing for a “Treaty of Good-Neighbourliness and Friendly Cooperation”, to ensure that “China-India relations do not derail, confront, or go out of control, and make the Himalayan region a new highland for Asia’s development.” It is a line few in New Delhi will find problematic, but many will suspect. For most Indian observers, rarely have China’s assuring pronounce-ments matched its actions.

The trajectory of India-China relations in 2018 is still weighed down by news of 1,800 Chi-nese troops camping at Doklam, sporadic reports about the diversion of the Yarlung Tsang-po, the upper stream of the Brahmaputra river and the polluting of its waters as it enters Arunachal Pradesh, and the ‘wars’ being fought in newsrooms of both countries, with the latest salvo coming from the Chinese defence spokesperson stating “India should control its border troops” to avoid a repeat of Doklam. This warning ties in with the assessment in New Delhi of the threat of a future military confrontation with China, especially since President Xi’s message to the People’s Liberation Army at the all-important, 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China was “to become a modern fighting force by 2035, the world’s best military force by 2050; and, intensify its combat readiness by focusing on how to win wars.” New Delhi has indeed read between the lines.

Even as New Delhi grapples with the uneasy predictability of dealing “with another Doklam like incident” it has to accept that the confrontation, most importantly, tested (in extremes) the idea of ‘regionalism’ in South Asia, traditionally seen as India’s sphere of influence. The impact of shrewd Chinese investments in the neighbourhood, re-energised by the grand “One Belt One Road” (OBOR) project, is steadily changing the geopolitics of the region. “Creditor imperialism” and “sharp power” are some of the many terms being used to de-scribe how China is spreading its influence. On the ground it is increasingly evident that China, through its economic bullishness, is trying to impose itself culturally in South Asia, and this should worry India more than the military brinksmanship. Because shared culture and history have always been the links that legitimized India’s status as a natural leader of South Asia.

At the peak of the Doklam crisis, I found myself in Sri Lanka for an academic exchange. Interestingly, my impressions of how Sri Lanka dealt with the “Chinese debt trap” came more from anecdotes and frank opinions exchanged with locals: taxi drivers, tuk tuk operators and shop owners; than from academic discussions. The extent of Chinese inroads into Colombo is obvious in the streets, where you spot spas that have hoardings only spelled out in Mandarin, in souvenir shops where Chinese tourists outnumber other nationalities and in the advertisements for scholarship for Sri Lankan students to study in China, to help “develop their country when they return” by joining “infrastructure projects funded by China”.

I was intrigued when the tuk tuk driver, doubling up as a tour guide, told me that if I wanted to see the “real Colombo”, we had to “leave China town”, where, according to him, my ho-tel was located. There was no sarcasm in his tone, he was just stating facts. In fact, he gen-erously pointed out to the many 5-star and 7 star projects including the Shangri-La Hotel, coming up as part of the Colombo Port city project, which is funded at US $ 1.4 billion by the Chinese. While he complained about how Chinese workers were all over the area, he also sympathised at the hectic pace of construction they had to keep up with after delays halted the project due to local protests. His commentary was insightful about how locals perceived “the Chinese imposition” and their assessment of the payoffs.

Our first stop was the famed Buddhist Temple, Gangaramaya, which is known for its confluence of Sri Lankan, Thai, Indian, and Chinese architecture and is one of the most important and oldest temples of Sri Lanka. It extends its complex to host a library and a museum and then further down the road to the serene Seema Malaka Temple, which sits in the middle of the Beira Lake and serves as a meditation centre. “It is where PM Modi offered his respects in May’, added my local guide helpfully. (Modi was the chief guest at the UN-recognised 14th International Vesak Day in May 2017 meant to mark the birth, enlightenment and passing away of Lord Buddha).

Yet, what caught my attention was the entrance to the Gangaramaya temple complex that also houses the museum and library. It is guarded by large statues of Chinese warriors, identified as General Guan Yu by my guide, and said to be an object of worship for the Chinese Confucius, Buddhist and Tao traditions. According to China Daily, Guan Yu was a prom-inent historical figure in Chinese history, and was a famous general during the Three King-doms period. The general was later deified in Chinese culture and is reverently referred to as Guan Gong or Guan Di and has come to symbolize brotherhood, integrity, loyalty and righteousness. There are many statues of the general within the temple complex, along with idols of Hindu deities like Lord Ganesha, Goddess Lakshmi and Lord Nataraja. There is an entire museum cluttered with artefacts predominantly from China alongside collectibles from South and South East Asia.

There is also a “fully equipped Buddha Chamber constructed by a devotee from Quanzhou in China”, advertised prominently for tourists. Since there are no explanatory plaques on how these collections came about, except that they belong to the collection of the Temple priest, one had to rely upon the guide’s limited inputs.

My tuk tuk driver pointed out that the statues had been around for a while and added with a shrug “Madam, China has so much money they can do what they want.” There is no escaping this truth for India. Senior colleagues in Colombo’s strategic community, however, nuanced this argument in informal chats. They reminded me that Sri Lanka is a proud, independent nation, which has acted in its best interests and balanced its relationship with New Delhi and assuaged its concerns while trying to secure the best deal from Beijing for its economic turnaround. However, one expert pointed out that “one can’t hold on to nostalgia in relationships, the ground is shifting with the next generation, because of the systematic cultivation by Beijing of the political ,military and business elite.” China’s push to insert it-self culturally into South Asia and give roots to its influence beyond the economic arena can be understood through its efforts to make inroads into the" Buddhist project in South Asia”. The Belt and Road, it has been argued, needs to be seen in this context.

“OBOR - China’s spiritual project in Asia”

This experience made me recall a conversation with a former Ambassador and senior col-league at IDSA, P. Stobdan. He has often articulated the idea that China is “rapidly developing a plan for a ‘Buddhist globalisation’ with its financial, political and marketing clout”. He has argued that President Xi has been instrumental in putting Chinese Buddhism on the global stage since 2005 even before ascending to the apex of the Chinese leadership. Stating that China controls the World Buddhist Sangha Council founded in Sri Lanka in 1966, Stobdan explains that the Chinese are helping to repair, renovate and resurrect Buddhist institutions across Asia. “Buddhist globalisation helps Beijing push its economic projects – religious diplomacy makes it easier for China to win economic and infrastructural projects in Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Nepal and elsewhere.” He has provoked a debate in New Delhi by describing the OBOR as nothing but the ‘political geography of Buddhism’ and spoken open-ly of how “China’s ability to edge in on India’s cultural influence has geopolitical benefits for Beijing.”

This is reinforced by the fact that China’s $3 billion investment in Nepal is aimed at linking OBOR with Buddha’s birthplace in Lumbini. Further, the Chinese hand in Pakistan’s attempts to revive the ‘Gandhara trail’ by linking Lahore, Taxila and Peshawar as Buddhist pilgrimage routes cannot be missed. In fact, it has been speculated that it is on Beijing’s insistence that, Islamabad sent sacred Taxila relics to Sri Lanka for a public exposition during Vesak day (day of enlightenment of Buddha) and even received a delegation of 40 high ranking Sri Lankan Buddhist monks scholars, led by Parliament Speaker Karu Jayasuriya, earlier this year.

India being the land of the Buddha, has never had to lay claims to its spiritual heritage, yet it certainly has felt the need to do more to reclaim its legacy.
In 2011, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s government hosted the first Global Buddhist Congregation and then joined hands with Myanmar in 2012 to convene a conference of Buddhist scholars in Yangon. From the beginning of his term in 2014, Prime Minister Modi has often evoked Buddhism in his diplomacy and outreach to leaders in the neighbourhood in Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka and in building bridges with countries like Myanmar, Japan and Korea. However, as 2017 has proved, Modi’s hopeful idea that “shared heritage” could smoothen tensions between Delhi and Beijing has not fructified.

The “CPEC Biryani”: A case for building cultural consensus in Pakistan

If India needed more examples of China’s attempts at cultural appropriation in South Asia, it need look no further than across the border. The Pakistani media was abuzz with comments and even criticism of what they labelled as the “CPEC Biryani ad” showcasing the all-weather Pakistan China Friendship. The roll out of the $ 42-62 billion China Pakistan Economic Corridor has seen a an influx of Chinese companies and expats into the country, making sceptics fear that apart from issues of economic viability, Pakistan will soon become a Chinese colony.

The advertisement for a biryani masala, so carefully choreographed, seems to have all the answers for the critics of the CPEC. It opens in a wealthy neighbourhood in Lahore, with women going about their routine, as a Chinese expatriate observes them from her home. When her husband expresses concern and asks the wife if she has tried to make new friends in the city, she reminds him of the striking cultural differences as they dig their chopsticks into bowls of noodle soup. They continue to eat in silence when the wife has an idea. The following 45 seconds show the Chinese woman first shopping at the supermarket and then bustling in the kitchen as she follows a Biryani recipe translated to Mandarin. The advertisement cuts to the now headscarf-wearing Chinese protagonist carrying biryani in a bam-boo steamer basket and crossing over to her neighbours. At the doorstep, she mumbles a soft “assalamu alaikum” leaving her Pakistani neighbour pleasantly surprised. The ladies of the house welcome her with quintessential warmth and cheek-pulling hospitality while praising the biryani made by their “Chini padosan” (Chinese neighbour). Wiping her tears away, the family matriarch soothes the overwhelmed protagonist by telling her that she is always welcome in their home.” The timing of this advertisement was crucial, as Pakistani economists point out that both Islamabad and Beijing are trying to ensure that ‘burgeoning resistance’, especially from the poor , who fear that CPEC is another attempt at land grabbing, does not flare up.

Sustaining Indian activism in South Asia

While it would be premature to look at the competition for influence in South Asia as a zero sum game, Beijing’s intervention in India’s neighbourhood in 2017 has set off alarm bells. Nepal elected a “China-friendly government”, which has promised to use Chinese investments to build up infrastructure including links across the Tibet-Nepal border. The signing over of Sri Lanka’s Hambantota port to China and Maldives finalising a free trade agreement with Beijing are all parts of China’s bullish embrace of the region. Ex Maldivian President Nasheed, visiting India in August, had warned of the presence of Chinese warships in Male, while saying that Doklam had put smaller countries in the region in an uncomfortable spot, with most not wanting to pick sides.

Talking about China’s support to Myanmar on the Rohingya issue, the head of a visiting delegation from Bangladesh told scholars in IDSA:

“The common man in Bangladesh has no expectations from China on the Rohingya issue but much disappointment from the Indian side. In fact Bangladesh is enthusiastic about the BRI and is looking at an increased Chinese footprint in the country. Beijing’s social investments, with the jump in the number of language centres, large exchange of students and rapid expansion of soft power are being welcomed by Dhaka. China is looking at an entry into the Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean Region through deep sea port facilities and hence has made commercial, strategic and social inroads into Bangladesh.”

This is the harsh reality in South Asia today that India has to contend with. India’s recent activism with partner countries in South Asia bilaterally and through regional groupings like BIMSTEC is a step in the right direction and needs to be sustained. In a majority of conferences in New Delhi, the most common refrain heard from South Asian experts (except Pakistan), is that “India needs to do more”. This is positive news for India. Despite China’s strategic push, economic dole outs and attempts at cultural appropriation, it is India which South Asian countries have expectations of and feel comfortable enough to complain to. The relationship goes beyond the transactional. Yet, India would do itself no good if it took these expectations for granted.

As we head into 2018, a former Foreign Secretary’s words after the de-escalation in Doklam carry an important lesson. She said: “if there’s a clear winner, it must be Bhutan, for it won peace.” The Doklam template was one of mutual respect between Bhutan and India and that needs emulation in all aspects of India’s dealings with the countries in the region. It is clear that the Chinese military is not the only threat India needs to watch out for in South Asia. China’s meticulous and bullish economic and cultural embrace will have long term implications for the region.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby NRao » 02 Jan 2018 20:43

Too late to defang China.

Specifically between India and China, military is no longer an issue. It is politics and economics.

India will need help from other nations to counter China. Even then India will always be on her back foot. Chinese economic might will deal with any help India will get from any other nation.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby RKumar » 02 Jan 2018 20:46

It should be added to the first post of every China thread


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grg8XqMHdCQ

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Bart S » 03 Jan 2018 02:21

More than anything military that China can muster, it is stuff like this that is the biggest threat to us:




This is in a market where the likes of Ericsson and Alcatel+Lucent+Nokia (combined entity) are tethering on the brink of bankruptcy and can barely muster a third of the revenue! I was surprised to find that NTT of Japan is also a major customer of Huawei, which means that the likes of Fujitsu etc are no longer able to compete in their home market all of the time.

We run the risk of being seriously outclassed and left in the dust if our politicians and bureaucrats don't get their act together. If things go to plan, they will end up as a China-sized Singapore

/end of rant/dhoti-shiver :( :evil:

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby ArjunPandit » 03 Jan 2018 05:10

China Hypersonic
We must and must use this threat to accelerate our hypersonic missile testing programs. It will be a once in generation opportunity to sit on the high table for actually setting up rules/regimes

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Prem » 03 Jan 2018 05:16

“A Rebalancing China and Resurging India: How Will The Pendulum Swing For Russia?”

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jan 2018 06:48

Amid friction, India to host CPC team - Sachin Parashar, ToI
Differences over key issues between India and China will not come in the way of the two countries ramping up political contact. India will host a six-member delegation of the powerful central committee of Communist Party of China (CPC) for five days starting Wednesday, official sources told TOI.

The delegation will be headed by Meng Xiangfeng, a close confidant of President Xi Jinping and deputy director of the general office of the CPC central committee. The visit, taking place under the aegis of the ministry of external affairs' (MEA's) exchange programme with the international liaison department of CPC (IDCPC), will see the delegation interacting with a host of BJP members and ministers, including commerce minister Suresh Prabhu, junior external affairs minister V K Singh and Maharashtra CM Devendra Fadnavis This will be the third high-profile visit in quick succession from China after those by foreign minister Wang Yi and state councillor Yang Jiechi.

Xi and PM Narendra Modi, during the latter's visit to China in 2015, had agreed to provide a fillip to the MEA-IDCPC exchange programme as a means to enhance contact between Indian states and Chinese provinces. Referred to as CPC's highest organ of authority when the Chinese parliament, the National People's Congress, is not in session, the central committee is responsible for electing members of the party's politburo and politburo standing committee.

Ironically, the delegation will land in India on a day foreign minister Sushma Swaraj will start her three-nation tour of Southeast Asia — Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia — looking to further boost India's "intensive bilateral interactions'' with the region within the framework of the Act East policy.

On the first leg of her visit, Swaraj will be in Thailand, where she will meet her counterpart Don Pramudwinai to discuss all bilateral issues, with the focus on political, defence and economic ties and further enhancing India's engagement with Asean member states. Thailand, as the MEA said in a statement, will assume the role of coordinator country for India-Asean relations in the middle of 2018.

Beijing will closely follow a series of substantive engagements that the government has lined up with Asean member states this month to mark 25 years of India-Asean dialogue partnership, including the invite to the heads of government/state of all 10 Asean member states for the Republic Day parade.

Several countries in the region, who believe India has the potential to act as a counter-weight to China, have repeatedly urged India to enhance its presence in Southeast Asia.
In Indonesia, Swaraj will call on President Joko Widodo and also meet the new Asean secretary general, Lim Jock Hoi. "As the biggest country in the Asean region with the largest economy, Indonesia is an important partner for India, including in trade and strategic matters," said the government.

Finally, Swaraj will visit Singapore, where she will inaugurate the regional Pravasi Bharatiya Divas of Asean countries on January 7. The theme of the event is "Ancient Route, New Journey: Diaspora in the Dynamic Asean-India Partnership". She will also have bilateral meetings with Singapore leaders.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jan 2018 07:01

Eye on Indian Ocean: China to invest $1 billion in mega Sri Lanka project - ToI
China will invest $1 billion in the construction of three 60-storey buildings at a mega-project near Sri Lanka's main port, Colombo said on Tuesday, as Beijing aims to boost its influence in the Indian Ocean.

The deal follows an earlier Chinese investment of $1.4 billion to carry out reclamation work for the wider Colombo International Financial City development, strategically located next to Sri Lanka's harbour, the only deep sea container port in the region.

The countries hope the project, initiated by former Sri Lankan president Mahinda Rajapakse, will create a financial centre in the Indian Ocean comparable with those in Singapore and Europe, drawing billions in foreign investment and thousands of jobs.

Sri Lankan officials said 60 per cent of the 269 hectare (672 acre) reclamation, due to finish next year complete with yacht marina, had already been completed.

No completion date was given for the buildings, the first for the development.

"China Harbour (company) will put in $1 billion to build three buildings," Sri Lanka's urban development minister Champika Ranawaka told reporters in the capital.

"These three 60-storey buildings will be able to attract more foreign companies into Sri Lanka."

The controversial project was formally launched after a visit to Colombo by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2014 but work was suspended by the new administration, which came to power in January the following year.

It resumed after the state-owned China Communications Construction Company (CCCC) entered into a fresh agreement with the new government in August 2016, despite geopolitical concerns from regional super power India.

Colombo is a key hub for Indian import-export cargo. {That's the problem. We have been unable to attract mother ships to our ports for various reasons including infrastructure deficiencies}
Beijing has been accused of seeking to develop facilities around the Indian Ocean in a "string of pearls" strategy to counter the rise of its rival and secure its own economic interests.

After protests by New Delhi, Colombo removed freehold rights granted to the Chinese company and offered the land on a 99-year lease instead.

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe visited the site Tuesday to inspect the progress of reclamation.

"We will shortly have legislation to turn this area into a financial centre like in Europe or Singapore," he said.

The CCCC has said it expects the project to create 83,000 new jobs and help Sri Lanka attract another $13 billion in direct foreign investment to develop infrastructure.

China, the largest single lender to Sri Lanka, secured contracts to build roads, railways and ports under Rajapakse, who is facing investigations over allegations of corruption during his decade in power.


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