Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

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ArjunPandit
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby ArjunPandit » 18 Dec 2018 17:32

There needs to be sustained campaign, I see airtel wifi routers at home made in china and huawei. for few bucks our entire data even if routed for few minutes to china (if it hasnt been already) can do wonders to their algos for fine tuning anything they want to do whenever they want to. People say data is the oil of this century, if you ask me data + ML algos will be what nukes had been. I guess that is known to most here, but still reiterating that fact.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 18 Dec 2018 17:36

Japan to buy more stealth fighters, radar to counter China, Russia - Reuters
Japan will accelerate spending on advanced stealth fighters, long-range missiles and other equipment over the next five years to support US forces facing China's military in the Western Pacific, two new government defence papers said.

The plans are the clearest indication yet of Japan's ambition to become a regional power as a military build-up by China and a resurgent Russia puts pressure on its US ally. {Both individually and in collusion. Japan is not facing the same level & kind of collusion that India is facing between China & Pakistan, apart of course from the Chinese lap dog NoKo. But, the fear will always be lurking in Japanese minds}


"The United States remains the world's most powerful nation, but national rivalries are surfacing and we recognise the importance of the strategic competition with both China and Russia as they challenge the regional order," said a 10-year defence programme outline approved by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government on Tuesday.

The United States, followed by China, North Korea and Russia, are the countries that most influenced Japan's latest military thinking, the paper said.

China, the world's second biggest economy, is deploying more ships and aircraft to patrol waters near Japan, while North Korea has yet to fulfil a pledge to dismantle its nuclear and missile programmes.

Russia, which continues to probe Japanese air defences, said on Monday it had built new barracks for troops on a northern island it captured from Japan at the end of World War Two.

More stealth fighters

Japan plans to buy 45 Lockheed Martin Corp F-35 stealth fighters, worth about $4 billion, in addition to the 42 jets already on order, according to a separate five-year procurement plan approved on Tuesday.

The new planes will include 18 short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) B variants of the F-35 that planners want to deploy on Japanese islands along the edge of the East China Sea.

The islands are part of a chain stretching past Taiwan and down to the Philippines that has marked the limit of Chinese military dominance east of the disputed South China Sea.

The navy's two large helicopter carriers, the Izumo and Kaga, will be modified to accommodate F-35B operations, the paper said.

The 248-metre (814 ft) long Izumo-class ships are as big as any of Japan's aircraft carriers in World War Two.

The ships will need reinforced decks to withstand the heat blast from F-35 engines and could be fitted with ramps to aid short take-offs, two defence ministry officials told Reuters.

Trade war threat


The new F-35 order may also help Japan avert a trade war with the United States.

US President Donald Trump, who has threatened to impose tariffs on Japanese car imports, thanked Abe for buying the F-35s when the two met at a summit in Argentina this month.

Other US-made equipment on Japan's shopping list includes two land-based Aegis Ashore air defence radars to defend against North Korean missiles, four Boeing Co KC-46 Pegasus refuelling planes to extend the range of Japanese aircraft, and nine Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye early-warning planes.

Japan plans to spend 25.5 trillion yen ($224.7 billion) on military equipment over the next five years, 6.4 percent higher than the previous five-year plan. Cost-cutting will free up another 2 trillion yen for purchases, the procurement paper said.

Japan only spends about 1 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) on defence, but the size of its economy means it already has one of the world's largest militaries.

"The budget is increasing and there has been an acceleration to deploy capability as soon as possible," Robert Morrissey, head of Raytheon Co's unit in Japan, said this month.

Wary of North Korean promises to abandon ballistic missile development, Japan's military is buying longer-range Raytheon SM-3 interceptor missiles to strike enemy warheads in space.

The defence papers assessed non-traditional military threats as well. A new joint-forces cyber unit will bolster Japan's defences against cyber attacks. More electronic warfare capabilities are planned.

Japan's air force will also get its first space unit to help keep tabs on potential adversaries high above the Earth's atmosphere.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 18 Dec 2018 17:40

ArjunPandit wrote: . . I see airtel wifi routers at home made in china and huawei . . .

Hathway FTTH and now Jio use Chinese ONTs. There is nothing else in the market.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby ramana » 18 Dec 2018 23:07

SS, I came to some conclusions on the events in 1970 to 80s. And where it leads to 2000 decade.

IG never wanted Siachen glacier. Occupying that feature is a protect Ladakh measure for IA.

Congress from her time wanted to give that area to Pakistan as a CBM to China to assure them of Tibet.
That is why it was uncharted or un-demarcated in 1972.

Don't ask proof, data but it boiled up in my mind thinking over the past 40 years history where Congress mostly has talks with Pakistan and first topic is Siachen.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Prasad » 18 Dec 2018 23:18

Crossposting the crossposting -
hnair wrote:Crossposting:

This is something that needs to be followed closely. Xi's neat little solutions to the Uighur problem is playing right into the hands of western Great Gamers. India's messy, long drawn out but more sustainable methods is not even a remote option for Xi's strongman approach surrounded by military and engineering kind of advisers. Same limitations that Kaiser and Hitler had.


nairgolis,
Xi Jinping is Hu Jintao's protege. Guess what Hu did in Tibet. Apple doesn't really fall far from the tree imo. They're just doing in X what they did in Tibet. More tech. Greater visibility cos tibetan budhists aren't as heart-tugging for the secularattis and liberal idiots as poor widdle uighurs who also happen to be muslim.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 20 Dec 2018 22:13

60 Chinese experts visiting desi mobile company told to leave India

MUMBAI: A mobile phone manufacturer implementing the government’s ‘Make in India’ initiative recently learned that around 60 Chinese experts visiting its Daman and Silvassa plants were asked by the Foreigners Regional Registration Office (FRRO) to “leave India” immediately for ostensible violations of business visas. The company approached the Bombay high court on Wednesday to question the validity of the “drastic notices”.

Nausher Kohli, the company’s counsel, appeared before a bench of Justices B P Dharmadhikari and Sarang Kotwal to seek an urgent hearing before the Christmas vacation as the Chinese nationals have been directed to leave India immediately— some have already left even though their visas are still valid. The bench took the urgency into account and posted the matter for hearing on Friday. Kohli said they were visiting plants of Pacific Cyber Technology on business visas. “The notices have been issued to 60 Chinese nationals without providing them and petitioners an opportunity to be heard.”

The Chinese nationals were sent by the company’s joint venture partner, its customers and suppliers from abroad. The plants are recipients of the ministry of electronics and information technology’s modified special incentive package scheme, the petition stated. These plants design, develop and assemble mobile phones and are “committed to the government’s Make in India movement,” it further stated.

Some of the Chinese nationals have valid visas till December 20, some till December 27 while the longest validity is May 2019. Almost all were on a 180-day business visa. One leave India notice that the FRRO issued on December 15 to one of the 60 Chinese nationals read: “Consequent upon the field inspection on December 4 at M/s Pacific Cyber technology Pvt Ltd, Athal, you…were found working on machine, therefore you have violated the condition laid down for B-1 visa granted to you.”

The FRRO officer, Dadra and Nagar Haveli, added, “Now, you are hereby directed to leave India immediately for misuse of B-visa, otherwise action will be initiated against you under Foreigners Act and Rules.” The company has its registered office in Mumbai and its mobile manufacturing units are in Daman and Silvassa. Its majority shareholders are based in Hong Kong. It has manufactured “5.5 million phones” in the past seven months. “Experts visit the plants to impart training on running highly sophisticated machines effectively and to detect defective machines on the machine line itself,” stated the petition. Customer and supplier representatives also visit to ensure that the quality requirements are met.

The petition said their “entire industry is dependent on such visits by technical experts and representatives”. Seeking expert advice or training is considered “an essential norm” in the mobile phone industry since the past two years.

Cheers Image

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Neshant » 21 Dec 2018 03:40

Singha wrote:generally i think the east asian top down work culture and tough bosses do not sit well in rest of world be it NA/EU/IND/AUS.

with much fanfare samsung had setup a silicon valley office a while ago, I heard its in doldrums now.

even in india the samsung and LG policies are quite tough, though pay is good. samsung has a no-wfh policy. they recruit students from very good institutes...though i am not sure how many stick around long term.


Tough bosses result in a total lack of innovation culture within the company.

To a large extent, hire and fire culture destroys all morale and insentive to produce great things for the company.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Skanda » 21 Dec 2018 04:10

Twitter
China’s one-child policy and rising expectations have produced a shortage of low-skill, low-wage labor. Now, China’s detention camps for Muslims turn to forced labor. By ⁦@ChuBailiang⁩ and ⁦@austinramzy⁩


China’s Detention Camps for Muslims Turn to Forced Labor

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 21 Dec 2018 07:57

First time i see india in the list of nations acting in sync with the gorilla vs chinese hacking
So its obvious they stole a lot from us too but we aint saying to save face

https://www.cnn.com/2018/12/20/tech/chi ... index.html

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Dec 2018 08:14

Govt. mulls scrutiny of Huawei, ZTE - PTI
The government will be mindful of concerns around national security threat from Chinese telecom gear firms like Huawei and ZTE at the time of the commercial roll-out of 5G networks but has no issues as far as their participation in the trial of the next generation technology is concerned, an official said.

“Government is keeping a watch on the global situation around security concerns. There are no issues around participation of Chinese telecom firms in 5G trials. The concerns will be examined at the time of commercial roll-out by an inter-Ministerial panel,” a DoT official told PTI.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby hnair » 21 Dec 2018 11:29

I think that inflection point in the early 90s which was announced by hysterical headlines saying "Japan acquiring hollywood studios and landmarks" have well and truly arrived for the chinese. This trade and tech war is what happens when you want to impress the world, by doing shock and awe tactics against entrenched powers at whose mercy you are at in the matter of economy :lol:

Huwaei's current troubles was visible from a long way off. India, after being neutral, too will do an Iran and side against china at some point, thanks to the Great Hall moron's games in pakistan, sri lanka etc. "Chinese are patient, in it for long term" and Sun Tsoo-tsoo my ass! No one who thinks long term, rushes headfirst into a mijjile-measurement contest with the big beasts out there

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chetak » 21 Dec 2018 11:35

SSridhar wrote:Govt. mulls scrutiny of Huawei, ZTE - PTI
The government will be mindful of concerns around national security threat from Chinese telecom gear firms like Huawei and ZTE at the time of the commercial roll-out of 5G networks but has no issues as far as their participation in the trial of the next generation technology is concerned, an official said.

“Government is keeping a watch on the global situation around security concerns. There are no issues around participation of Chinese telecom firms in 5G trials. The concerns will be examined at the time of commercial roll-out by an inter-Ministerial panel,” a DoT official told PTI.


What happens if the wrong guys are in power at that time??

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 21 Dec 2018 11:47

hnair wrote:I think that inflection point in the early 90s which was announced by hysterical headlines saying "Japan acquiring hollywood studios and landmarks" have well and truly arrived for the chinese. This trade and tech war is what happens when you want to impress the world, by doing shock and awe tactics against entrenched powers at whose mercy you are at in the matter of economy :lol:

Huwaei's current troubles was visible from a long way off. India, after being neutral, too will do an Iran and side against china at some point, thanks to the Great Hall moron's games in pakistan, sri lanka etc. "Chinese are patient, in it for long term" and Sun Tsoo-tsoo my ass! No one who thinks long term, rushes headfirst into a mijjile-measurement contest with the big beasts out there

hnair sir, I appreciate your enthusiasm, but China is not Japan, US woke up alright, but it's too late. A decade too late.
Last edited by TKiran on 21 Dec 2018 11:49, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Aditya_V » 21 Dec 2018 11:48

chetak wrote:


What happens if the wrong guys are in power at that time??


People make a choice when they vote and should live with thier choice.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby hnair » 21 Dec 2018 12:41

TKiran wrote:hnair sir, I appreciate your enthusiasm, but China is not Japan, US woke up alright, but it's too late. A decade too late.


Stop answering questions I did not ask - I did not say china is japan. Also next time, be less patronizing.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chetak » 21 Dec 2018 12:50

Aditya_V wrote:
chetak wrote:
What happens if the wrong guys are in power at that time??


People make a choice when they vote and should live with thier choice.


Should we trust caste based vote accumulation mechanisms to discern the security threats from entities like huawei??

or would it be better to evolve a national policy to handle such eventualities??

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chetak » 21 Dec 2018 12:53

Singha wrote:First time i see india in the list of nations acting in sync with the gorilla vs chinese hacking
So its obvious they stole a lot from us too but we aint saying to save face

https://www.cnn.com/2018/12/20/tech/chi ... index.html


Its what we deserve when guys in high security positions routinely use gmail and the like for official communication despite strict regulations not allowing them to do so.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 21 Dec 2018 13:15

even some govt depts and schemes have gmail/yahoo addresses as POC.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby hnair » 21 Dec 2018 14:17

Senior secretary level people in Kerala gubmint does this and then when one of the gents went to center, carried his same gmail id in his card.... :shock:

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 21 Dec 2018 14:41

cloud based "deploy once and use anywhere" devops saar - no need to migrate servers, storage running out, IT dept, security or POP server upkeep.

just go in without undies under the lungi and freely use worldwide.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 21 Dec 2018 17:12

US ramps up pressure on Berlin over Huawei
German politicians weighed allegations targeting Huawei against past evidence of hacking by the United States.

By Janosch Delcker

12/20/18, 7:00 AM CET

Updated 12/20/18, 8:49 PM CET

BERLIN — Donald Trump's administration is turning up the heat on Berlin over Chinese technology.

In a closed-door meeting last week, U.S. technology experts presented German policymakers with information they described as "reason" to exclude Chinese telecom giant Huawei from the rollout of 5G technology in Germany, according to a high-ranking U.S. official who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the discussion.

The experts argued that using the company's hardware in a wireless network makes it vulnerable to penetration and espionage from the outside, the official stated.

The move underscored American efforts to sway Germany's attitude toward Chinese tech giants as part of a broader battle for technological supremacy, just as a U.S. cybersecurity firm accused the Chinese government of carrying out a large-scale hacking operation against the European Union.

U.S. officials know Berlin's attitude is crucial when it comes to setting the tone toward Huawei across Europe.

As the bloc's largest economy, Germany's decision on whether to restrict the Chinese company is likely to serve as a model for other European countries, many of which depend on Berlin's cybersecurity expertise. It will also determine whether the U.S. campaign is as successful in Europe as it was in Australia, Japan or New Zealand, where it convinced counterparts to restrict Huawei.

Against this backdrop, a lobbying battle is raging in the backrooms of Berlin over whether the company should be allowed to supply equipment for the country's rollout of fifth generation, or 5G, telecom networks, according to almost a dozen interviews with lawmakers, diplomats, security officials and lobbyists.

So far, German authorities have stopped short of voicing public concerns about Huawei. Officials say they have no evidence of security risks linked to the Chinese technology.

“I have not received any reliable information until now, neither from experts nor from other sources, which would justify an exclusion of Huawei because of security concerns,” Joachim Pfeiffer, a senior member of the German parliament and the spokesperson on economic and energy policy for Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats, told POLITICO.

The Trump factor

The fact that Trump remains deeply unpopular in Berlin plays into the debate over Huawei, causing concerns about the credibility of U.S. warnings.

Pfeiffer pointed to concerns about U.S. impartiality with regard to Chinese companies.

American warnings had "to be considered within the big picture of the new global conflict between China and the U.S.,” added Pfeiffer. Germany's challenge would be to “deal with this topic without letting either side exploit us.”

Jens Zimmermann, a member of parliament and the digital policy spokesperson for the Social Democrats, Merkel’s junior coalition partner, echoed that skepticism.

“During the Obama administration, and probably also during all previous administrations, one would have taken those warnings very, very seriously and would have no reason to doubt their credibility,” he told POLITICO.

“But the way Mr. Trump does politics poses the question to us Europeans if this isn’t just another element of the economic policy Mr, Trump is pursuing?” he added.

Another complicating factor is how deeply Huawei is entrenched in Germany.

Founded in 1987, Huawei pushed into Western markets in the late 1990s by undercutting the prices of its competitors.

Nowhere was it as successful as in Western Europe and particularly in Germany, where it set up operations in 2001.

Today, all three major telecoms companies in the country cooperate with Huawei. Tens of thousands of antenna masts scattered across Germany were manufactured by the company. Responding to questions by POLITICO, Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone and Telefónica Deutschland all defended their ties to the Chinese company.

Suggesting that restricting the use of Huawei equipment would slow down the rollout of 5G and make it more expensive, Deutsche Telekom warned that “considering the near-term needs for extension and investment, Germany will hardly be able to afford to exclude high-performance suppliers."

The company said it stood by that statement, even after announcing last week that it would “reassess” its procurement strategy in light of "the global discussion about the security of network elements from Chinese manufacturers."

Huawei itself rejected allegations of a security risk.

The company “has never been asked by any government to build any backdoors or interrupt any networks," a spokesperson wrote in an email. "Our customers, who have been using and testing our technology for years ... don't see any security problems in our technology."

Snowden's shadow

German officials privately pointed to the irony of American counterparts warning about foreign espionage in Berlin following revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden of wholesale U.S. spying, including on Merkel.

"Experience has shown me that when it comes to foreign products — including those that don't come from China — there's always a risk that the technology has some security gaps in the background that allow foreign secret services to access them," said Zimmermann, who was a member of the Bundestag's inquiry committee that investigated the NSA spying scandal.

Germany's security agencies should look into allegations about Huawei but should demand "hard evidence on the table" before denying access to foreign suppliers, added Zimmermann.

The recent discussions, he said, showed that Germany and Europe as a whole had to regain their "digital sovereignty."

Similarly, the CDU's Pfeiffer stressed that Germany should aim "to preserve its independence" when it comes to expanding its mobile networks.

"Huawei is a Chinese company," he added, "but the alternative would be American technology, and this would equally raise the question of backdoors."

"Experts tell me that, in the case of doubt, they see an even greater danger there," Pfeiffer said.

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-ramp ... p-hackers/

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby abhik » 21 Dec 2018 17:35

chetak wrote:


What happens if the wrong guys are in power at that time??

When there is such a mealy mouthed response from the "right" guys why worry about the "wrong" guys?

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 21 Dec 2018 17:45

I can point you to the german response as a example that is similar to India's "wait and watch attitude". not all jump to attention as fast the "five eyes" gang.


US ramps up pressure on Berlin over Huawei
German politicians weighed allegations targeting Huawei against past evidence of hacking by the United States.

By Janosch Delcker

12/20/18, 7:00 AM CET

Updated 12/20/18, 8:49 PM CET

BERLIN — Donald Trump's administration is turning up the heat on Berlin over Chinese technology.

In a closed-door meeting last week, U.S. technology experts presented German policymakers with information they described as "reason" to exclude Chinese telecom giant Huawei from the rollout of 5G technology in Germany, according to a high-ranking U.S. official who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the discussion.

The experts argued that using the company's hardware in a wireless network makes it vulnerable to penetration and espionage from the outside, the official stated.

The move underscored American efforts to sway Germany's attitude toward Chinese tech giants as part of a broader battle for technological supremacy, just as a U.S. cybersecurity firm accused the Chinese government of carrying out a large-scale hacking operation against the European Union.

U.S. officials know Berlin's attitude is crucial when it comes to setting the tone toward Huawei across Europe.

As the bloc's largest economy, Germany's decision on whether to restrict the Chinese company is likely to serve as a model for other European countries, many of which depend on Berlin's cybersecurity expertise. It will also determine whether the U.S. campaign is as successful in Europe as it was in Australia, Japan or New Zealand, where it convinced counterparts to restrict Huawei.

Against this backdrop, a lobbying battle is raging in the backrooms of Berlin over whether the company should be allowed to supply equipment for the country's rollout of fifth generation, or 5G, telecom networks, according to almost a dozen interviews with lawmakers, diplomats, security officials and lobbyists.

So far, German authorities have stopped short of voicing public concerns about Huawei. Officials say they have no evidence of security risks linked to the Chinese technology.

“I have not received any reliable information until now, neither from experts nor from other sources, which would justify an exclusion of Huawei because of security concerns,” Joachim Pfeiffer, a senior member of the German parliament and the spokesperson on economic and energy policy for Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats, told POLITICO.

The Trump factor

The fact that Trump remains deeply unpopular in Berlin plays into the debate over Huawei, causing concerns about the credibility of U.S. warnings.

Pfeiffer pointed to concerns about U.S. impartiality with regard to Chinese companies.

American warnings had "to be considered within the big picture of the new global conflict between China and the U.S.,” added Pfeiffer. Germany's challenge would be to “deal with this topic without letting either side exploit us.”

Jens Zimmermann, a member of parliament and the digital policy spokesperson for the Social Democrats, Merkel’s junior coalition partner, echoed that skepticism.

“During the Obama administration, and probably also during all previous administrations, one would have taken those warnings very, very seriously and would have no reason to doubt their credibility,” he told POLITICO.

“But the way Mr. Trump does politics poses the question to us Europeans if this isn’t just another element of the economic policy Mr, Trump is pursuing?” he added.

Another complicating factor is how deeply Huawei is entrenched in Germany.

Founded in 1987, Huawei pushed into Western markets in the late 1990s by undercutting the prices of its competitors.

Nowhere was it as successful as in Western Europe and particularly in Germany, where it set up operations in 2001.

Today, all three major telecoms companies in the country cooperate with Huawei. Tens of thousands of antenna masts scattered across Germany were manufactured by the company. Responding to questions by POLITICO, Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone and Telefónica Deutschland all defended their ties to the Chinese company.

Suggesting that restricting the use of Huawei equipment would slow down the rollout of 5G and make it more expensive, Deutsche Telekom warned that “considering the near-term needs for extension and investment, Germany will hardly be able to afford to exclude high-performance suppliers."

The company said it stood by that statement, even after announcing last week that it would “reassess” its procurement strategy in light of "the global discussion about the security of network elements from Chinese manufacturers."

Huawei itself rejected allegations of a security risk.

The company “has never been asked by any government to build any backdoors or interrupt any networks," a spokesperson wrote in an email. "Our customers, who have been using and testing our technology for years ... don't see any security problems in our technology."

Snowden's shadow

German officials privately pointed to the irony of American counterparts warning about foreign espionage in Berlin following revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden of wholesale U.S. spying, including on Merkel.

"Experience has shown me that when it comes to foreign products — including those that don't come from China — there's always a risk that the technology has some security gaps in the background that allow foreign secret services to access them," said Zimmermann, who was a member of the Bundestag's inquiry committee that investigated the NSA spying scandal.

Germany's security agencies should look into allegations about Huawei but should demand "hard evidence on the table" before denying access to foreign suppliers, added Zimmermann.

The recent discussions, he said, showed that Germany and Europe as a whole had to regain their "digital sovereignty."

Similarly, the CDU's Pfeiffer stressed that Germany should aim "to preserve its independence" when it comes to expanding its mobile networks.

"Huawei is a Chinese company," he added, "but the alternative would be American technology, and this would equally raise the question of backdoors."

"Experts tell me that, in the case of doubt, they see an even greater danger there," Pfeiffer said.

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-ramp ... p-hackers/

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Dec 2018 18:33

Swaraj, Chinese FM hold talks under new framework - PTI
In yet another step towards improving ties, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and her Chinese counterpart Wang Yi on Friday held extensive talks under a newly established framework and agreed on "ten pillars" of cooperation to enhance cultural and people-to-people exchanges. {Obviously, the idea of 'ten pillars' has come from China because they are specialists in coining such catchy phrases with numbers: Panch Sheel, The Four Comprehensives (of Xi Jinping), the 'Three Represents' (of Jiang Zemin) etc}

Wang, who arrived here early on Friday morning, said he had a "very successful" meeting with Swaraj under the 'High Level Mechanism on Cultural and People-to-People Exchanges' that was decided upon during the Wuhan summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi Jinping.

"India-China relations have reached a new historical stage," he said at the inaugural session of 3rd India-China High Level Media Forum.

Swaraj, in her remarks, said she was satisfied with the outcome of her two-hour dialogue with Wang during which they discussed ways to expand cultural and people-to-people ties.

She said India and China have agreed on '10 pillars' of cooperation to enhance cultural and people-to-people exchanges.

The 10 pillars are cultural exchange, cooperation in films and television, cooperation in museum administration, cooperation sports, exchanges between youths, cooperation on tourism, exchanges between states and cities, cooperation in traditional medicine, cooperation in yoga and cooperation in education.

Bilateral cooperation has improved significantly after the Wuhan Summit, Swaraj said, noting that the militaries of two countries were also enhancing cooperation.

Wang described the new mechanism for cultural and people-to-people exchanges as a "major initiative" in the history of India-China ties.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Dec 2018 19:59

Chinese & US collusion in equipping Pakistan with Nukes is accepted by the US State Department and revealed now.

That apostle of non-proliferation, Jimmy Carter, stands exposed. We knew that all along but it is confirmed now.

US turned blind eye to Pakistan's nuclear programme in 70s after China's intervention: Documents - PTI
WASHINGTON: The US acceded to Pakistan's demand to overlook its secretive nuclear weapons programme following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in the late 70s after Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping convinced Washington to support Islamabad for the "stability" in South Asia, according to latest declassified State Department documents.

The documents reveal that the then Pakistani dictator General Zia-ul Haq and Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping were successful in extracting this price from the US in lieu of Islamabad's support to America against the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

In addition to the US turning a blind eye to Pakistan's nuclear weapons programme, Deng also convinced the US to start giving more military and financial aid to Pakistan, according to the US Foreign Relations 1977-1980 volume on Afghanistan.

The voluminous document indicates that both Zia and Deng successfully convinced the then Jimmy Carter administration that India under Prime Minister Indira Gandhi would be pro-Soviet.

"There are limits on our ability to aid Pakistan because of their nuclear explosive programme. [b]Although we still object to their doing so, we will now set that aside for the time being, to facilitate strengthening Pakistan against potential Soviet action
," the then US Defence Secretary Harold Brown said in a January 8, 1980 meeting with Deng.

The Chinese leader applauded the US decision[/b] as he was successfully able to convince the Carter administration on this issue.

"That is a very good approach. Pakistan has its own reasons for developing a nuclear programme. We ourselves oppose the Pakistan effort on nuclear weapons because we believe it is meaningless to spend money on such a programme," he said.

"Pakistan has its own arguments, ie, India has exploded a nuclear device but the world has not seemed to complain about this. So now you have decided to put this aside and solve the question of military and economic aid to Pakistan. We applaud this decision," said Deng, who later emerged as China's top leader.

He also convinced the US to not equate India and Pakistan when it comes to giving aid.

"You may recall that I raised the question of aid to Pakistan with President Carter. He said the US will give aid in proportion to the population of the two countries. I said this was not feasible," Deng told Brown referring to his conversation with Carter.

"The Pakistanis and Indians are afraid of each other. If the population ratio formula should be used, Pakistan will be in an increasingly inferior position. We hope that since the United States decided to give aid to Pakistan, it will really satisfy Pakistan's requirements. We hope your aid to Pakistan will not be affected too much by India's reaction," Deng said.

"With regard to question of South Asia, there is no other way except giving aid to Pakistan. It has always been our view that the US policy giving more attention to India than Pakistan is not an appropriate policy.

"Regarding India, we have always felt that the United States should try to cultivate good relations, and this has had a good effect. But India is not a stabilising factor. Perhaps you already know the general election results," he said.

He was referring to the then just-concluded parliamentary elections in which Indira Gandhi came back to power with a majority.

Observing that Gandhi had got 70 per cent of the vote, Deng said it was very difficult to judge that time how India will go.

"Even if Indira Gandhi should follow India's previous policy; still India is not the most reliable and stabilising factor in southern Asia," he argued.

"Let's not talk about Indira Gandhi. The present government is thinking of recognising the Heng Samrin Regime {of Cambodia}. Perhaps after Pakistan has been strengthened, India will become a more stabilising factor. What one should try to achieve is to make Pakistan a genuine stabilising factor in South Asia," he said.

"We hope the US will give earnest and sincere thought to this question. If one does not keep this clear in one's mind, then one's attitude toward India will make one vacillate in one's position toward Pakistan.

"In the past the US has refrained from aiding Pakistan. I think in part this is the work of India, probably because of a fear of offending India. Since you now have decided to aid Pakistan, I am sure India will send you one note after another, strongly objecting," Deng said.

Around 10 days before Gandhi was sworn in as the new Prime Minister of India on January 14, 1980, Zia had a meeting with the then US Ambassador to Pakistan in which he successfully bargained for the US to keep an eye off its nuclear weapons programme in lieu of its support for America against the Russian invasion in Afghanistan.

President Carter's statement of January 4 "gives impression that nuclear issue need not be an obstacle and Pakistan needs to know precisely what America proposes to do to help Pakistan," Zia was quoted as saying in a readout of the meeting.

In October, when Zia visited the US, President Carter offered F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan. Zia asked for six more planes in addition to increase in the military aid.

"On another issue, I just want to say that Mrs Gandhi is no friend of Pakistan or the US," he told Carter.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Neshant » 22 Dec 2018 05:53

US Arrests Chinese National Charged With Theft Of Trade Secrets At Phillips 66

Image


https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12- ... hillips-66

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 24 Dec 2018 06:29

CPR India
@CPR_India
'A key question is whether the US policy shift is occurring too late to stop #China’s global rise or even compel it to respect international norms and rules.' writes
@Chellaney
on 'The US’s new free and open Indo-Pacific strategy'
@htTweets
(link: http://bit.ly/2CmCuYx) bit.ly/2CmCuYx

The end of the 45-year-old US conciliatory approach to China does not necessarily signify the advent of an overtly confrontational policy or even a new cold war. China, for example, still gets a free pass on human-rights abuses. The US has slapped no sanctions on China for detaining more than a million of its Muslims in internment camps. Imagine the US response had Russia set up such camps.

The policy shift appears more about finding economic levers to blunt China’s strategy of global expansion and ascendancy. In Asia, for example, China is seeking to displace the US as the leading power and contain its peer rivals, Japan and India, by seeking to enforce a 21st-century version of the Monroe Doctrine, including through geo-economic tools and territorial and maritime revisionism. It has gained de facto control of much of the South China Sea.

A key question is whether the US policy shift is occurring too late to stop China’s global rise or even compel it to respect international norms and rules. Having become strong through assorted trade barriers, quotas, currency manipulation, forced technology transfer, intellectual property theft, and industrial and export subsidies, China is unlikely to fundamentally change its behaviour in response to the new American pressure. Xi, China’s new self-crowned emperor, would undermine his position — and his strategy to build a Sino-centric Asia — by yielding to American demands.

Xi’s regime will seek to bear the US pressure — at some cost to China’s economic growth — but without materially altering its policies or global ambitions. The 90-day “truce” in the trade war that Xi negotiated with Trump in Buenos Aires meshes with Beijing’s “two steps forward, one step back” strategy to progressively advance its ambitions.

Nevertheless, the US, by embracing a more realistic and clear-eyed approach, is signalling that China’s economic and strategic aggression will no longer go unchallenged. Even if the US fails to compel Beijing to respect international rules, its policy change signifies that the free ride that China has long enjoyed is ending — a free ride that has brought the security of its neighbours, including India, under pressure.

Indeed, Trump has shown how active pressure on China, as opposed to Indian-style imploration, can yield concessions. Whereas deference to China usually invites bullying, standing up to it generates respect and compromise.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 24 Dec 2018 08:07

https://mobile.twitter.com/Chellaney/st ... 1670150144

Brahma Chellaney
@Chellaney
What's been the guiding principle of Indian foreign policy from 1947 to 2018? Hope. The result? India is the only known state that has repeatedly cried betrayal, not by friends, but by foes in whom it reposed hope.

Fact: China has doubled its trade surplus with India under Modi

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 24 Dec 2018 08:46

Our strategic programs have also got a big push under modi on flip side after languishing during upa regime

Some of that trade surplus increment is due to exoloding demand for items like smartphones in last 5 years. Govt has identified certain items like phones and goaded people to atleast assemble in india via lower taxes and as you know many like wistron and xiaomi started ops

Would be interesting to know how south korea did because lg and samsung dominate some areas like tv , washing machine and microwave. Both have factories in india but key parts may be imported. We should push them to localize

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 24 Dec 2018 20:45


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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby ArjunPandit » 24 Dec 2018 22:22

TKiran wrote:https://mobile.twitter.com/Chellaney/status/1076410941670150144

Brahma Chellaney
@Chellaney
What's been the guiding principle of Indian foreign policy from 1947 to 2018? Hope. The result? India is the only known state that has repeatedly cried betrayal, not by friends, but by foes in whom it reposed hope.

Fact: China has doubled its trade surplus with India under Modi

HOw about India applies tarrif on Chinese goods citing national security? My fear is more things will start slipping under the net through the nepal or BD route. That said, we need to start strangulating the chinese on this revenue. This has destroyed our local industries

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 25 Dec 2018 09:31

View: Don’t be so deferential to China; leverage conciliatory mood to correct imbalances - Dilip Sinha, Economic Times

The writer is a former diplomat.

Parliament’s standing committee on external affairs has expressed concern that the Indian gover nment’s “conventionally deferential foreign policy” towards China is not being reciprocated. This is a rather late realisation.

In the 1950s, China took full advantage of India’s refusal to oppose its territorial expansion and annexed Tibet without any opposition. Its current aggrandisement continues to be matched by India’s reticence.

But China has been careful not to antagonise India too much. It has selectively followed its calculated policy of ‘hide your strength and bide your time’ so as not to open too many fronts at the same time.

China, in fact, has been assiduously cultivating India ever since US President Donald Trump rattled it with his unpredictability and a trade war. Faced with this threat, China swiftly abandoned its Doklam-style confrontation with India and replaced it with wooing Prime Minister Narendra Modi, leading to the two-day summit with President Xi Jinping at Wuhan.

In an article in an Indian daily last Thursday Chinese foreign minister, Wang Yi, laid down a five-point vision for 2019 that would do the framers of Panchsheel proud. He has talked of strengthening political trust with neighbours, safeguarding regional peace, and promoting domestic reform.

All this is unexceptionable, though a trifle overworked. More worrisome is his insistence on ensuring the success of yidai yilu, China’s cherished – but now increasingly controversial – Belt and Road strategy for expanding its global reach.

China’s economic slowdown is quite evident even from its own statistics. There are also reports of questions being raised among the ruling elite about Xi’s leadership style. In such an environment, it appears to have decided that it would be best to make concessions to the US on trade and prevent a full-blown trade war with its largest market.

Trump’s arm-twisting on trade has ensured a number of concessions from China, such as lower duties on American cars and buying more agricultural produce. But Trump has not stopped at trade.

Last week, he signed into law a bill pressing China to open Tibet to American visitors in return for allowing Chinese nationals to visit the US. China’s reaction to this is likely to be less accommodating.

India would do well to not lose such an opportunity for rebalancing its relations with its northern neighbour. The parliamentary committee has recommended adopting a “flexible approach” using all options, including its relations with Taiwan, but avoiding “adversarial posturing”. This is sound advice.

India should, indeed, loosen its self-imposed shackles in relations with China, especially on the three troublesome subjects – trade, Taiwan and Tibet.

China has used its clout as a permanent member of the Security Council to get several UN websites to depict Arunachal Pradesh as disputed territory. This is despite India adhering faithfully to the one-China diktat from Beijing. China’s staunch opposition has ensured that Taiwan remains the only major country in the world to remain outside the UN.

India has greater reason to worry about its trade deficit with China than the US. India’s trade balance with China is more skewed than US’s.

Both countries are able to export only about a quarter of what they import from China. But India does not have such compensating features as a surplus in trade in services and local sales by American companies manufacturing in China. China’s exports to India jumped 30 times since it joined the WTO in 2001, even though its global exports grew eight times during the same period.

India’s SME sector is in severe distress due to cheap imports from China. Our markets are flooded with Chinese goods, making a mockery of the government’s Make in India programme.

On the other hand India’s exports to China, especially manufactured goods, continue to face tariff and non-tariff barriers. In the classic mould of colonial trade, China buys raw materials from India and sells it manufactured products.

The trade imbalance will never get corrected in such a pattern. The only jobs created in India will be of delivery boys carrying Chinese products to Indian homes for mega e-retailers. This is an unsustainable trade model fraught with serious social consequences for India.

Government’s current policy of addressing this trade imbalance is to encourage Chinese companies to manufacture in India. This is likely to bring some screwdriver assembly plants but it will not help revive Indian companies. Besides it will throw up long term security concerns.

China’s current conciliatory mood is a good time to press for immediate steps to correct the imbalance in bilateral trade and make relations with Taiwan more formal. It is also time to push the envelope on Tibet.

Tibetans in India have become the world’s most forgotten refugees. While India has been pressing Myanmar to take back its Rohingya refugees, it has been reluctant to discuss the issue of Tibetan refugees with China, let alone raise the issue of the autonomy of Tibet, the assurance on the basis of which India had recognised its annexation by China.

Government would do well to pay heed to the parliamentary panel report, drawing from its recommendations to reset relations with China.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 25 Dec 2018 13:13

The decades that transformed China - Pallavi Aiyyar, The Hindu

An excellent article.

The December 1978 Third Plenary Session of the Eleventh Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) might sound obscure, but its global repercussions were of seismic proportions. Deng Xiaoping’s series of economic policies, termed “reform and opening up”, went on to catapult China from an agricultural backwater into a manufacturing powerhouse that shapes the world’s economic architecture.

As China celebrates the 40th anniversary of “reform and opening up”, it holds the world’s largest foreign reserves ($3.05 trillion in October), and boasts the second-largest economy (with a GDP of $12.2 trillion in 2017). Its share of the world’s economy has ballooned from 1.8% in 1978 to 18.2% in 2017. In doing so, it has defied decades of predictions that its uncomfortable blend of authoritarian politics and economic liberalisation was unsustainable.

A country of contradictions

Contemporary China is rife with contradictions. Its ruling party espouses a communist, egalitarian ideology while presiding over the emergence of a hugely unequal, capitalism-driven society. The divergent interests of the urban middle class clash with those of peasants and migrant workers. It has the world’s largest number of Internet users (more than 772 million) and accounts for more than 40% of global e-commerce transactions despite being one of the world’s most censored digital environments.

And yet, the CPC has proved adept at squaring seeming circles and proved doomsday scenarios of its imminent collapse wrong, time and again. A crucial tool in achieving this feat has been the pilot project, poetically rendered as the Deng Xiaoping maxim, “crossing the river by feeling the stones.” This approach was characterised by experimentation and local policy tinkering, in order to establish what worked best in practice, before adoption at the national level.

The special economic zones (SEZs) promoted along China’s coast in the 1980s, for example, were not brought into existence based on a priori assumptions about their theoretical utility. The idea was for them to be laboratories that provided a controlled environment within which experiments could be conducted boldly. Eventually SEZs became the locomotive for economic growth, attracting unprecedented flows of foreign investment and transforming fishing villages like Shenzhen into global manufacturing hubs. This approach was used repeatedly over the years to test new policies, from cooperative medical care schemes to abolishing controls on the movement of workers from the countryside to the cities. Consequently, the CPC swapped the kind of abrupt, ideologically based upheavals that characterised Mao Zedong’s mass movements from the 1950s to the 1970s, for pragmatic solutions that worked.

What ‘worked’ was defined by certain parameters, most fundamentally the preservation of the CPC’s power. To this end, Beijing deployed a range of strategies including censorship and purges, but also the co-option of key constituencies like the urban middle class. By tying the prosperity of this group to the continuance of the party at the helm of policy-making, the CPC effectively neutralised what could have been its most formidable foe.


Critically, what was found to work best for preserving power was delivering on promises of economic growth. This self-interested focus on performance continued as over time, the middle classes began to demand improvements in their quality of life beyond opportunities for material prosperity. The party responded by stepping up environmental protection. Beijing’s air pollution is a case in point. From being a poster boy for foul air, the Chinese capital has transformed into a model to be emulated by cities like Delhi.

Far from sclerotic, post-reform-and-opening-up China has developed a problem-solving approach that makes its leaders more responsive to socio-economic challenges than is generally believed of autocratic governments. Reforms have extended beyond the economic realm into governance and administration. An example is the introduction of term limits and mandatory retirement ages for officials. Internal report cards issued to evaluate the performance of local bureaucrats are used to promote good governance, by linking promotions and bonuses to the meeting of economic and, increasingly, environmental targets.

This emphasis on outcome rather than ideology has its corollary in performance over process, which helps explain why a country like India continues to lag behind China on most parameters of development. The legitimacy of democracy absolves Indian governments from the necessity of performing. The CPC can afford no such luxury. Hence the counter-intuitive state of affairs where, despite political representation for the poor in India and the lack of political participation in China, Beijing trumps New Delhi on the delivery of basic public goods like roads, drains and schools.

The Xi Jinping era

The legacy of “reform and opening up” is crucial in explaining how China got to where it is today. However, its continued relevance in the new era under President Xi Jinping’s leadership has become the million yuan question. Despite Beijing’s formal commitment to further economic liberalisation, the ongoing trade war with the U.S. marks a path divergent to the one trod over the last four decades. Moreover, the CPC has still not resolved the contradiction between state control of the economy and the embrace of free markets, what in China is called “socialism with Chinese characteristics”.

There are other signs of a break from Deng-inspired policies — most notably, the recent scrapping of the presidential term limit that enables Mr. Xi to potentially continue in office indefinitely. Besides, while Deng preached economic openness and encouraged China to recruit overseas expertise, Mr. Xi emphasises self-reliance and warns of the threats posed by “hostile foreign forces”. The focus on peaceful economic integration is being supplanted by a trade war that some fear could degenerate into a new cold war. Nationalism has trumped the Dengist strategy of “hiding strength and biding time”. Even the pilot project approach of experimentation appears to be out of favour. An article in The Economist points out that while in 2010 some 500 policy-related pilot projects were in place at the provincial level, this number had plummeted to about 70 by 2016.

Is “reform and opening up” past its sell-by date? If so, what will replace it? And how will Beijing meet future challenges with the U.S. as an adversary, rather than the trade and investment partner it has been so far? The answers, while critical, are unclear. What is clear is that the CPC will need to walk several tightropes going forward, a balancing act that could prove tough for acrobats even as skilled as the Chinese.

Pallavi Aiyar has reported from China, Europe, Indonesia and Japan. She is a Young Global Leader with the World Economic Forum

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby abhik » 25 Dec 2018 23:46

Singha wrote:Our strategic programs have also got a big push under modi on flip side after languishing during upa regime
...

Is there any hard data to back up this type of claim? (rhetorical question only... I doubt it can be proved). In contrast if one looks at tangible/quantifiable metrics like trade imbalance, defense expenditure etc. the picture does not look so different to the previous dispensation... feels like decision making is mostly in autopilot/go-with-the-flow mode.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 26 Dec 2018 02:40

From Doklam to Wuhan, 2018 will go down as watershed year in India - China ties – PTI

BEIJING: The year 2018 will go down as a watershed in India-China relations for its remarkable turnaround - from the brink of a major military standoff to bonhomie - with the first informal summit of the top leaders of the two countries leading to cooling down of tensions between the two Asian giants.

In 2017, the bilateral ties were marred by rancour and bitterness over the $60 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), which is part of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) - a pet project of President Xi Jinping to consolidate China's influence abroad - followed by the 73-day standoff at Dolkam

The deadlock over the CPEC and the Doklam standoff prompted Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi to explore peaceful development of ties with an informal summit at Wuhan.

Under the strategic guidance of the two leaders, the two countries resumed joint military drill in 2018 - the first exercise of its kind since they were locked in the standoff at Doklam 18 months ago.

"In the current profound dynamic international situation, the sound development of China-India relations conforms to the fundamental interests of both countries," the Chinese foreign ministry said, summing up the Sino-India ties this year.

"Looking forward to the year 2019, China is ready to work with India to enhance political mutual trust, deepen exchanges and cooperation across the various fields, properly manage differences and promote faster, better and more stable development of China-India relations, guided by the important consensus reached by leaders of the two countries," it said in a written reply to PTI.

While the BRI itself posed a major threat to dent India's influence in the South Asian neighbourhood with China dolling out billions of dollars in loans for infra projects to smaller countries amid allegations of debt diplomacy, the CPEC has emerged as the biggest irritant in Sino-India ties. China went ahead with the CPEC disregarding India's protest that it passes through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir.

India hit back by boycotting the BRI Forum hosted by President Xi last year.

Also, China's open opposition to India's efforts to become member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group and stonewalling of New Delhi's bid to declare Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Muhammad chief Masood Azhar as a global terrorist by the UN has widened the rift between the two countries.

"The 2018 was the year when India-China relations moved from Doklam to Wuhan and beyond," said Gautam Bambawale, who was India's envoy to Beijing for the best part of the year and played a key role in closely interacting with the Chinese officials to workout the first-ever informal summit.

"In order to do so, both countries and their leaderships had to introspect and independently came to the conclusion that an Informal Summit would provide both leaders the opportunity for strategic communication. Their conversations at Wuhan set the tone for a quick repair of the relationship," Bambawale, who retired on November 30, said in e-mail response to PTI.

"The outgoing year has seen political communication at its best. Prime Minister Modi and President Xi met four times this year. What has not been noticed is that defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman and her counterpart Wei Fenghe have also met thrice this year. Our foreign ministers too have met on multiple occasions. The visit to India this year of public security minister of China was a significant event," he said.

More importantly, for the first time both sides held numerous delegation-level talks to push India's exports to China to address the over $51 billion trade deficit.

China has agreed to step up imports of India's rice, sugar, rapeseed oil, besides the long overdue imports of pharmaceuticals, which could partly balance the trade. China is also responding to New Delhi's persistent campaigns to step up its big-ticket investments in India.

The development of bilateral military ties is the "most critical India-China interactions this year," Bambawale said, referring to the resumption of the 'Handin-Hand' military drills in Chengdu and the defence dialogue - both of which were held after a gap of one year due to Doklam standoff.

The two nations also held the 21st round of border talks in November during which they called for advancing the dialogue process to find a solution to the border question.

"Great interaction, more conversations across the board are important for the maintenance of peace and tranquillity in the India-China border areas," Bambawale said.

While 2018 is the year of most extensive political conversations between the two sides, observers say 2019 could be the year of deliverables with onus on China to reset its strategic ties with India without its close ally Pakistan hampering the development of meaningful Sino-India relations.

The year 2019 will be watched with great interest in China as India goes for the general elections and how the results could shape the nature of the political dialogue as Xi is set to travel to India next year for the informal summit.

Towards the end of the year, foreign minister and state councillor Wang Yi travelled to New Delhi, where he attended the first meeting of the People-to-People mechanism with external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj.

"Both countries, their Governments and their people will have to continue expanding and enhancing their conversations, their interactions in 2019 so as to enhance mutual understanding which in turn will hold the relationship on an upward trajectory,"

Cheers Image


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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chola » 31 Dec 2018 10:46

^^^ Happening onlee because Trump has their little reptilian balls in his fist with the trade war.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2019 13:05

China building 'most advanced' naval warships for Pakistan: report - PTI
China is building the first of four "most advanced" naval warships for its "all-weather ally" Pakistan as part of a major bilateral arms deal to ensure among other things "balance of power" in the strategic Indian Ocean, state media reported.

Equipped with modern detection and weapon systems, it will be capable of anti-ship, anti-submarine and air-defence operations, China Daily quoted state-owned defence contractor China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC) as saying.

The under-construction ship is a version of the Chinese Navy's most advanced guided missile frigate, it said.

The CSSC did not specify the ship's type but said it is being constructed at its Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai.

China, an "all-weather ally" of Islamabad, is the largest supplier of weapon system to Pakistan. Both the countries also jointly manufacture JF-Thunder a single engine multi-role combat aircraft.

nce constructed, the warship "will be one of the largest and technologically advanced platforms of the Pakistani Navy and strengthen the country's capability to respond to future challenges, maintain peace and stability and the balance of power in the Indian Ocean region," the report said.

It will also support the Pakistani Navy's initiative of securing sea lanes for international shipping by patrolling distant waters, the daily quoted the CSSC as saying.

The mention of the Indian Ocean is regarded as significant as China, which has already taken over Pakistan's strategic Gwadar port under the multi-billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), looks to assist the Pakistani navy to restore the balance of power in India's backyard.

China has acquired the logistical military base in Djibouti and taken over the Hambantota port of Sri Lanka under a 99-year debt swap deal.

China recently denied a New York Times report that it finalised a plan to build advanced fighter aircraft under the CPEC in Pakistan, adding a military dimension to it.

India protested to China over the CPEC as it is being laid through the Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK).

Pakistan became the first country to hook on to China's BeiDou Satellite Navigation System, a rival to the US Global Positioning System (GPS) which went global recently. The system was expected to be used for military applications.

The report said Type 054A is the best frigate in service with the PLA Navy. Military sources said the ship has a fully loaded displacement of about 4,000 metric tonnes and is equipped with advanced radars and missiles. About 30 Type 054As are in service with the PLA Navy.

An insider in China's shipbuilding sector with knowledge of the Type 054AP programme told the Daily that the ship is the largest and most powerful combat vessel China has ever exported.

"Based on pictures circulating on the internet, the ship will have vertical launch cells that can fire Chinese HQ-16 air-defence missiles and other kinds of missiles. Vertical launch cells will bring flexibility to the user in terms of weapons portfolio, thus giving it a stronger fighting capability," he said, adding that the Type 054AP is the best frigate Pakistan can access in the international market.

"The service of Type 054APs will double the combat power of the Pakistani Navy's surface fleet," he said.

Commenting on the ship's construction, Cao Weidong, a senior researcher at the PLA's Naval Military Studies Research Institute, said in the past, the Pakistani Navy would ask its Chinese contractors to use Western radars or weapons on ships constructed by the Chinese shipbuilders because it believed the Western naval technologies were better than Chinese ones.

"But it seems that all weapons and radars on the new ship will be Chinese products, which reflects our progress in the industry and the Pakistani Navy's confidence in our technology and capability," he said.

Cao said there are many nations selling frigates in the market, so Pakistan must have made thorough comparisons in terms of combat capability and costs.

"I believe the reason they chose our type is that ours is one of the few that can carry out all of the air-defence, anti-ship and anti-submarine tasks {ha..ha. Pakistan doesn't have the cash to buy from anyone else and India wouldn't also take kindly to any country selling such an offensive weapon}," he said, expecting the service of the Chinese frigate to substantially boost Pakistan's defence capability.

darshhan
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby darshhan » 02 Jan 2019 13:12

abhik wrote:
Singha wrote:Our strategic programs have also got a big push under modi on flip side after languishing during upa regime
...

Is there any hard data to back up this type of claim? (rhetorical question only... I doubt it can be proved). In contrast if one looks at tangible/quantifiable metrics like trade imbalance, defense expenditure etc. the picture does not look so different to the previous dispensation... feels like decision making is mostly in autopilot/go-with-the-flow mode.


To you that is.

We can feel the difference

abhik
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby abhik » 02 Jan 2019 23:06

^^^
Exactly what I was saying, people are "feeling" as per their political biases which hard data (like in this case trade deficit) does not necessarily reflect.


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