US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

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abhik
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby abhik » 09 Jul 2019 08:53

ldev wrote:
"The Trump administration's recent decision on Huawei tells us about the softer stand the administration is taking," said a source at the Department of Telecommunications. "This also indicates that India would not be facing much U.S. pressure regarding its decision on 5G."


So per this baboon, we have not yet decided on letting Huawei participate in 5G because of US pressure? :shock:

darshan
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby darshan » 11 Jul 2019 02:58

Intel is holding talks with a potential buyer over its wireless patents. Lot of Indians may have worked this.
https://www.macrumors.com/2019/07/10/in ... g-patents/

ramana
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby ramana » 12 Jul 2019 00:29

darshan wrote:Intel is holding talks with a potential buyer over its wireless patents. Lot of Indians may have worked this.
https://www.macrumors.com/2019/07/10/in ... g-patents/


Sounds monopolistic. But lets see.

Manu
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby Manu » 13 Jul 2019 02:00

https://www.forbes.com/sites/stuartanderson/2019/02/25/it-services-companies-and-clients-bear-brunt-of-h-1b-crackdown/?utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=social&utm_term=Dottie%2F#6fec088f5415
A proper crackdown, this is. I hope retaliatory action is taken in terms of American goods/services (Capital vs Labor). They are hurting Indian Companies, not US companies. Pretty direct tactics.

In FY 2018, USCIS denied 80% of the H-1B petitions for new (initial) employment for Capgemini, a French multinational, 61% for U.S. company Cognizant, and between 34% and 54% for IT services companies Syntel, Infosys, Mindtree and HCL America. To put these figures in perspective, major U.S. tech companies, including Amazon, Facebook and Apple, had 1% or 2% of their new H-1B petitions denied in FY 2018.

Vic Goel, managing partner of Goel & Anderson, said in more than 20 years of representing companies he has never seen the tactics currently used to change how U.S. immigration law is applied. Immigration law does not indicate a different standard for adjudication based on the type of firm or the location work will be performed, attorneys point out.

In FY 2018, the USCIS data show major U.S. companies were 6 of the 7 top employers with approved H-1B petitions for initial employment, led by Amazon (2,552 petitions), Microsoft (1,252), Intel (873), Google (724), Ernst & Young (716), Apple (698) and Facebook (651).

Rony
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby Rony » 07 Oct 2019 11:25

The World’s Next Factory Won’t Be in South Asia

Vietnam seems to be the consensus pick for winner of the U.S.-China trade war, as Chinese and other manufacturers shift production to the cheaper Southeast Asian nation. If there’s a loser, at least in terms of missed opportunities, it may be the countries of South Asia.

There may not be another such chance this generation. The only proven pathway to long-lasting, broad-based prosperity has been to build a manufacturing sector linked to global value chains, which raises productivity levels and creates knock-on jobs across the whole economy. This was how most rich nations, not to mention China itself, lifted themselves out of poverty.

Yet the evidence suggests that South Asian countries are lagging behind in attracting manufacturing investment. It’s not just Vietnam that’s racing ahead. African countries, too, are making manufacturing a top priority.

The fantasy, most common in India, that a country might somehow “leapfrog” from a rural, agriculture-heavy economy straight to a services-based economy is just that: a fantasy. South Asia can’t afford to lose this chance to grow its manufacturing sector.

Attracting manufacturing investments will require, first and foremost, that governments in the region acknowledge the competition is passing them by. India, for example, must abandon its overconfidence that investors will come simply for its large population.

Secondly, South Asian countries need to undertake a concerted, whole-of-government push to boost investment levels. Specifically, they need to create the conditions manufacturers need to thrive, from steady power supplies to efficient port operations and customs clearance.

Moreover, they need to understand the specifics of these businesses. Factories have unique requirements depending on what they make. For example, cloth and clothing factories, despite their seeming similarities, have extremely different requirements: The former is capital-intensive, with huge amounts of power-hungry machinery churning out bolts of cloth, whereas the latter is labor-intensive and features rows of workers cutting and sewing.

Countries need to analyze which manufacturing sub-sectors they are best positioned for, meet the requirements those manufacturers have in order to set up shop, and target the regions of China (and elsewhere in the world) where those types of manufacturers are to be found.

The good news is that all of these measures are eminently feasible. And in many cases, the first steps are already being taken, such as with the construction of Bangladesh’s first deep sea port at Matarbari. The bad news is that unless South Asia moves faster, others may have already seized the opportunity to industrialize.

ramana
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby ramana » 08 Oct 2019 22:38

Rony, Many of the factories in Vietnam are Chinese owned and its just a shift from China to Vietnam.
Same thing happened when Taiwanese shifted to mainland China in the 90s..
So all these whines about not shifting to India are based on fantasy.

hanumadu
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby hanumadu » 10 Oct 2019 08:54

Sunil MIttal claims Huawei technology is ahead of Nokia or Ericsson and China will be independent of all US components in the next 24-36 months.


chola
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Re: US - China Trade War : Where is India ?

Postby chola » 10 Oct 2019 09:53

ramana wrote:Rony, Many of the factories in Vietnam are Chinese owned and its just a shift from China to Vietnam.
Same thing happened when Taiwanese shifted to mainland China in the 90s..
So all these whines about not shifting to India are based on fantasy.


Actually owned by Taiwanese, SoKoreans, Hong Kongers, etc. They are mainly transplants from the Four Asian Tigers. While cultural proximity made China and then Vietnam a better fit for them, I don't think it is a fantasy. We have a chance but it would mean getting rid of the License Raj and providing reliable power and transportation.


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