China Meets World

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sudarshan
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China Meets World

Postby sudarshan » 16 Sep 2020 09:09

The long awaited "benis" thread on China is here. Oldies would know what that term means. But this thread will be different.

This thread will track the progress of the immature brat China as it meets the real world. There will be no racist memes here. There will be no making fun of the way they look or speak. Yeah yeah, we find it amusing that they mix up their "r"s and "l"s. So what? Lots of Indians have trouble with English letters as well.

So what is the thread about then? It is about mocking their attitudes. Attack the post, not the poster. Attack the attitude, not the person. Global Times reports are perfect. They contain the right mix of delusion, grandeur, pontification, vainglory, and mandate of heaven. Lately they have also taken (almost) to pleading and groveling. "In the name of heaven, baba, let us get away with one more salami slice!"

A sensible approach would be to post one of their vainglorious diatribes, and then take it apart, piece by piece. Lay on the humor here, be creative, knock yourselves out - but logically, don't descend to mocking looks or speech. Below, I will present a perfect example of this approach (not by me, wish it were!). Dissect, analyze, lay bare the delusions of super-powerdom. Notice - "super powerdom" not "supel poweldom." We don't want the latter.

Their taller than tallest, deeper than deepest, sweeter than honey friend is fair game as well. The borders there are blurring anyway, only a matter of time before the assimilation is complete. But keep it China-centric, emphasize the building merger with China, don't get diverted by the munna.

China likes to bully and push around. This is what we will work with. They are in no position to bully, it is part of their vainglorious delusion, supported by the fact that their neighbors are intimidated. Including many Indians. Not any more. The first step to breaking out of that box, is to start recognizing how silly it is, how flimsy the box is - and no better way than to start laughing at it.

So here, below, is an example of the kind of dissection we are looking for here. Enjoy.

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Re: China meets world

Postby sudarshan » 16 Sep 2020 09:10


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Re: China meets world

Postby Suraj » 16 Sep 2020 11:25

A very nicely laid out set of guidelines, sudarshan, and exactly how we'd like it. This thread is long overdue!

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Re: China meets world

Postby jamwal » 16 Sep 2020 16:52

https://www.irrawaddy.com/opinion/analy ... anmar.html

Badly Behaved Chinese Tourists Draw Local Ire in Myanmar

For visiting tourists, the monastery’s main attraction is the sight of hundreds of barefoot, downcast monks silently lining up to accept late morning meals offered by donors. Witnessing the ritual imparts a sense of tranquility and is a deeply moving experience for many onlookers. Mahagandhayon is also famous for its strict religious discipline.

But the monastery’s tranquility was shattered one morning in early January this year when a group of visiting Chinese tourists quarreled loudly as they competed for the best place to take pictures of the monks. The argument sparked an uproar at the monastery, and tourist guides had to lead the tourists out of the compound.

The Chinese tourists’ behavior forced the monastery to post instructions in Chinese on its walls, telling visitors not to enter prohibited places like dining halls, not to drink alcohol and not to engage in arguments inside the monastery compound.

“Most [foreign] tourists follow the rules on how they should behave while they are observing the peaceful monastery life here. But the Chinese do not,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win, a member of the Mandalay Tourist Guide Association’s executive committee, told The Irrawaddy.

The tour guide, who caters to Chinese travelers, complained that most of his clients rarely follow the rules, such as taking off their shoes at pagodas. “We warn women not to wear shorts when visiting religious sites, but they ignore us,” he said.

Myanmar society still mostly adheres to well-established dress codes, particularly regarding skirt length for women. In religious buildings, the knees and shoulders should be covered, and it is customary to remove one’s shoes.

“It’s so annoying,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win added, referring to the offensive behavior he’s observed by many Chinese travelers.


From scalding a flight attendant with hot water to drying underwear in an airport lounge, tourists from mainland China have frequently made international headlines in recent years due to inappropriate behavior, as the country’s increasingly affluent middle class gets the travel bug.


When Chinese tourists started flooding into local tourist sites last year, many Myanmar people embraced them as the saviors of the country’s dying tourism sector, with Western travelers staying away from the country.

But that hope didn’t last long.

As the number of mainland Chinese tourists rapidly increased, they gained a reputation for behaving poorly at tourism sites. Mandalay and Bagan, the most popular sites among Chinese, suffered the most.


Local residents reported being upset by the frequency with which Chinese visitors broke the rules, especially in religious places. The most common violations were taking photos in restricted areas, trespassing in places where visitors are not allowed to enter, and refusing to remove their shoes inside monasteries.

Industry workers also complain of such behaviors as littering, wearing inappropriate clothes, customers washing their feet in restaurants’ bathroom sinks, speaking loudly and spitting.

In the ancient city of Bagan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, local people have complained that Chinese tourists litter monument sites with discarded water bottles. Local restaurant staff say they frequently argue with Chinese visitors for taking large amounts of food from buffet counters and leaving it uneaten on their tables, and breaking products in souvenir shops.

“It’s annoying to have to deal with these problems every day. They are so boorish,” said Daw Kyi Thar Khin, the owner of the Yamin Shwe Sin antique shop in Bagan.

“They discard water bottles near the pagodas. When I tell them not to do it, they laugh at me and say it’s not my business,” she said.


Another sore spot among local people is Chinese visitors’ tendency to point at items displayed on the ground with their feet. In Myanmar culture, touching or pointing with the feet is considered rude, as the feet, the lowermost parts of the body, are considered unclean.

“They ask the price using their feet,” said Daw Win Win, who sells T-shirts and local products near the U Being Bridge, a century-old wooden bridge and a popular tourist site in Mandalay.

“Why can’t they just behave properly?” she said.

To prevent such problems, some guides working with Chinese tourists equip themselves with megaphones and use them to play recorded warnings not to break traditional rules at pagodas and historic sites. However, more often than not the warnings fall on deaf ears, they say.

“Sometimes it’s hopeless, because the recorded message can’t be heard over their shouting,” said U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win, the Mandalay tour guide.

Prior to become a tour guide for Chinese tourists, U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win worked as an English-speaking guide for Western visitors from 2015 to 2018. He recalled that most of his previous clients were polite, willing to adapt to Myanmar culture and respectful of the traditions here.

“They also know how to behave at religious sites. I didn’t even have to remind them,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win said.

The president of the Mandalay Tourist Guide Association, U Win Zaw Oo, told The Irrawaddy that guides are dealing with culture shock every day.

“They wash their feet in the sinks at restaurants. That is totally unacceptable in our culture,” he said.

In response to the Chinese tourists’ behavior, some restaurants have put up signs in Chinese prohibiting customers from washing their feet.



15.1k
By NAN LWIN 25 September 2019

YANGON—Mahagandhayon monastery in Mandalay Region is one of Myanmar’s most prominent monastic colleges. Well known for its adherence to the Buddhist monastic codes, every year it attracts thousands of tourists eager to glimpse the peaceful monastic life of the more than 1,500 monks who reside and study Buddhist teachings there.

For visiting tourists, the monastery’s main attraction is the sight of hundreds of barefoot, downcast monks silently lining up to accept late morning meals offered by donors. Witnessing the ritual imparts a sense of tranquility and is a deeply moving experience for many onlookers. Mahagandhayon is also famous for its strict religious discipline.

But the monastery’s tranquility was shattered one morning in early January this year when a group of visiting Chinese tourists quarreled loudly as they competed for the best place to take pictures of the monks. The argument sparked an uproar at the monastery, and tourist guides had to lead the tourists out of the compound.

The Chinese tourists’ behavior forced the monastery to post instructions in Chinese on its walls, telling visitors not to enter prohibited places like dining halls, not to drink alcohol and not to engage in arguments inside the monastery compound.

“Most [foreign] tourists follow the rules on how they should behave while they are observing the peaceful monastery life here. But the Chinese do not,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win, a member of the Mandalay Tourist Guide Association’s executive committee, told The Irrawaddy.

The tour guide, who caters to Chinese travelers, complained that most of his clients rarely follow the rules, such as taking off their shoes at pagodas. “We warn women not to wear shorts when visiting religious sites, but they ignore us,” he said.

Myanmar society still mostly adheres to well-established dress codes, particularly regarding skirt length for women. In religious buildings, the knees and shoulders should be covered, and it is customary to remove one’s shoes.

“It’s so annoying,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win added, referring to the offensive behavior he’s observed by many Chinese travelers.


Chinese tourists fight for the best picture-taking spot as monks from Mandalay’s Mahagandhayon monastery line up to receive donations of food in January. / Sithu
Looking East

From scalding a flight attendant with hot water to drying underwear in an airport lounge, tourists from mainland China have frequently made international headlines in recent years due to inappropriate behavior, as the country’s increasingly affluent middle class gets the travel bug.

With snow-capped mountains in the north, the World Heritage-listed ancient city of Bagan in the central plain, and white-sand beaches in its deep south, Myanmar has been on international tourists’ maps since it started opening to the world in 2012.

However, the Southeast Asian country didn’t have much firsthand experience with rowdy Chinese tourists until last year, when the government adopted a “Look East” policy in an effort to revive a moribund economy—including the tourism sector—that was hit hard after the country’s image was globally tarnished by the Rohingya crisis in 2017. The international community accused the country’s military of human rights violations against the Rohingya and criticized the government over its silence on the issue. As a result, many Western tourists have boycotted Myanmar since then; as of August this year, the number of visitors from the West had declined by 40 percent since the Rohingya crisis erupted.


Flourish logoA Flourish data visualization
In a bid to increase the number of tourists from Asia, Myanmar announced that effective last October through September 2020, visitors from Hong Kong and Macau would qualify for visa exemptions, while those from mainland China would qualify for visas on arrival. Since then, the number of mainland Chinese visitors to Myanmar has increased significantly. From January to August this year, the number was 457,069—more than double the figure for the same period last year—according to the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism (MOHT), making Chinese tourists the top foreign travelers to Myanmar this year, followed by Thais with 176,150 visitors.


Flourish logoA Flourish bar chart race
Lack of respect

When Chinese tourists started flooding into local tourist sites last year, many Myanmar people embraced them as the saviors of the country’s dying tourism sector, with Western travelers staying away from the country.

But that hope didn’t last long.

As the number of mainland Chinese tourists rapidly increased, they gained a reputation for behaving poorly at tourism sites. Mandalay and Bagan, the most popular sites among Chinese, suffered the most.



Local residents reported being upset by the frequency with which Chinese visitors broke the rules, especially in religious places. The most common violations were taking photos in restricted areas, trespassing in places where visitors are not allowed to enter, and refusing to remove their shoes inside monasteries.

Industry workers also complain of such behaviors as littering, wearing inappropriate clothes, customers washing their feet in restaurants’ bathroom sinks, speaking loudly and spitting.

In the ancient city of Bagan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, local people have complained that Chinese tourists litter monument sites with discarded water bottles. Local restaurant staff say they frequently argue with Chinese visitors for taking large amounts of food from buffet counters and leaving it uneaten on their tables, and breaking products in souvenir shops.

“It’s annoying to have to deal with these problems every day. They are so boorish,” said Daw Kyi Thar Khin, the owner of the Yamin Shwe Sin antique shop in Bagan.

“They discard water bottles near the pagodas. When I tell them not to do it, they laugh at me and say it’s not my business,” she said.


Chinese Tourists in Bagan in July. /Zaw Zaw/The Irrawaddy
Another sore spot among local people is Chinese visitors’ tendency to point at items displayed on the ground with their feet. In Myanmar culture, touching or pointing with the feet is considered rude, as the feet, the lowermost parts of the body, are considered unclean.

“They ask the price using their feet,” said Daw Win Win, who sells T-shirts and local products near the U Being Bridge, a century-old wooden bridge and a popular tourist site in Mandalay.

“Why can’t they just behave properly?” she said.

To prevent such problems, some guides working with Chinese tourists equip themselves with megaphones and use them to play recorded warnings not to break traditional rules at pagodas and historic sites. However, more often than not the warnings fall on deaf ears, they say.

“Sometimes it’s hopeless, because the recorded message can’t be heard over their shouting,” said U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win, the Mandalay tour guide.

Prior to become a tour guide for Chinese tourists, U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win worked as an English-speaking guide for Western visitors from 2015 to 2018. He recalled that most of his previous clients were polite, willing to adapt to Myanmar culture and respectful of the traditions here.

“They also know how to behave at religious sites. I didn’t even have to remind them,” U Nyein Kyaw Kyaw Win said.

The president of the Mandalay Tourist Guide Association, U Win Zaw Oo, told The Irrawaddy that guides are dealing with culture shock every day.

“They wash their feet in the sinks at restaurants. That is totally unacceptable in our culture,” he said.

In response to the Chinese tourists’ behavior, some restaurants have put up signs in Chinese prohibiting customers from washing their feet.


A Chinese-language sign requests that diners refrain from washing their feet in the sinks at a restaurant in Mandalay. / Supplied
To try and keep Chinese tourists from causing offense overseas, the China National Tourism Administration (CNTA) in 2013 published a 64-page illustrated guidebook on “Civilized Tourism” to educate the traveling public about the need to respect social norms when abroad. The book offers advice on topics from queue jumping to toilet use.

In response to the international criticism, Chinese authorities have also published a set of guidelines for citizens to follow when traveling overseas, which state: “Tourists shall observe public order and respect social morality in tourism activities, respect local customs, cultural traditions and religious beliefs, care for tourism resources, protect the ecological environment, and abide by the norms of civilized tourist behavior.” Even President Xi Jinping weighed in, urging his citizens to behave overseas.

Judging from the views of many working in Myanmar’s tourism sector, however, the effort seems to have been largely fruitless.

Frustrations among local people boiled over in the second week of September when some mainland Chinese tourists stole jade stones from the Kyauksein (Jade) Pagoda on the outskirts of Amarapura in Mandalay Region. Covered in over 10,000 tonnes of jade, rising to a height of 75 feet, 6 inches and considered the world’s first jade pagoda, Kyauksein Pagoda is a favorite destination among Chinese tourists in Myanmar. Around 3,000 to 4,000 Chinese visit every day, according to the MOHT.

The news went viral on social media in Myanmar, with most commenters demanding the government take serious action to prevent such behavior.

The pagoda’s trust told the media that it was not the first time Chinese visitors had been caught trying to steal stones from the site. Chinese tourists had been caught twice by the pagoda trust trying to ply decorated jade stones from the walls. The trust warned the tour company and tour guides that brought the Chinese visitors that they would face legal action if it happened again.



In Myawaddy, a town on the Thai border in Karen State, a brawl erupted last week between a group of local residents and seven Chinese people who urinated in front of a phone shop owned by a local person. The locals filed a complaint against five of the Chinese; two others fled the scene.


Apart from the reports of rowdiness, many locals complain that Chinese tourists also bring a “zero-dollar” tourism culture. The practice has been banned in many countries in the region on the grounds that neither the government nor local communities benefit from it.

Under these plans, Chinese tourists buy cheap tour packages from companies that are registered in Myanmar but owned by Chinese nationals with little or no involvement from local tour operators and businesses. The packages involve tightly planned itineraries based around hotels, restaurants and retail shops connected to the Chinese tour operators.

The agencies do not hire local Chinese-speaking tour guides. Instead, the tourists are guided by Chinese nationals. Moreover, when making purchases, they use Chinese-based payment services like Alipay or WeChat Pay instead of local payment methods, further depriving Myanmar of revenue. Often, the travelers are forced to buy from shops that are linked to the tour agencies, which are paid commissions by the shops, industry sources say.

Recently, the government formed a special committee comprising officials from regional and state governments to take action against zero-dollar tours. Many companies involved in the trade received warnings from the committee.


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Re: China meets world

Postby sudarshan » 17 Sep 2020 07:40

Years ago I remember reading something about WWII, during the battle of Stalingrad. The Germans were surrounded, on the verge of defeat, waiting for the Soviet axe to fall. One night, the Germans were despondently shooting as usual, keeping the good fight going, while the Soviet side was having a gala feast. They were playing music on loudspeakers.

Then all of a sudden the Germans stopped shooting. The surprised Russians noticed during a break in their revels. When a loudspeaker came on from the German side, and a voice spoke in halting Russian - "play more Bach, we won't shoot." The homesick Germans wanted to join in the revels to the extent they could, before moving on to meet their makers.

Now ffwd (fast forward) to the present age, these dumbass Chinese soldiers playing Punjabi music on the LAC :-? . They seriously bought into their propaganda or what - that the half-starved Indians are being forced by the inhuman Modi govt. to stand in the Septembr-rr-rr cold, yearning for home, and all they need is a little feel-good music, and they will grovel in gratitude? What's the thinking?

Y'know, maybe all it takes is a few p*** leaflets scattered on the other side to other-foot that shoe, if you know what I mean.

EDIT: Thanks Suraj san.

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Re: China meets world

Postby Rupesh » 17 Sep 2020 07:57

Chinese are so rude

.
Besides having to look out for oneself to ensure one’s survival, the lack of rule-of-law and corruption also means people have little or no respect for laws. This is bound to happen when ordinary people in China are forced to watch their rights and laws being violated every day by their leaders, Chen said, citing the Chinese idiom, 上行下效, meaning that “people in lower class follow what their leaders in the upper class do”.

When I was younger, I visited my uncle and his family in Beijing. We went to a restaurant to dine. Then the waitress forgot to bring us water even though we requested for it a few times. My uncle kicked a huge fuss over it to the extent to berating a few waitresses and the manager.

I felt it was rather strange and unbecoming given that it wasn’t a very bad mistake and that my uncle was a good tempered man. Later on, my father explained to me that it was China’s style of doing things and if you show weaknesses and all, you would get taken advantage of.

...........
Family members share toilets, bedrooms… everything. They get used to the noise, the total lack of privacy, even seeing each other naked, in the toilet, in a way that would just go against all manners of social norms in the West.

She goes on to give this example:

What stops people from just pissing or shitting in the public in the West and other countries is modesty – they don’t want complete strangers to get to see them in the act of pissing or shitting. Modesty simply isn’t there, people just don’t care who gets to see them naked as they are so used to it growing up in such cramped and crowded conditions.


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Re: China meets world

Postby SSridhar » 17 Sep 2020 10:51

Like AoA, we need something for the Hans. CoG - Confucius-o-Great or something else...suggestions welcome.

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Re: China meets world

Postby Rupesh » 17 Sep 2020 11:00

FCA - Fake, Cheap & Copied.

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Re: China meets world

Postby V_Raman » 17 Sep 2020 11:04

First rule of this thread is that you don’t waste admin time posting ‘but but what about India’ nonsense
Last edited by Suraj on 17 Sep 2020 20:37, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Removed content

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Re: China meets world

Postby RCase » 17 Sep 2020 11:05

SSridhar wrote:Like AoA, we need something for the Hans. CoG - Confucius-o-Great or something else...suggestions welcome.

How about MFH - Mandate From Heaven, Mo Fo Han.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby RCase » 17 Sep 2020 11:09

CoPa (copy, paste)

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Re: China meets world

Postby Rsatchi » 17 Sep 2020 11:43

V_Raman wrote:
Rupesh wrote:Chinese are so rude



pissing in public - lets not give that as example in Indian context - that is a very very very bad comparison. sorry - not to slap ones own face - but public hygiene and toilet hygiene - in general - is a sore topic for indians.

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At least the Indians if I remember correctly went to the fields Unlike emptying 'Chamber Pots' into the street and carrying 'Vinaigrette box' :lol:
so lets not beat ourselves with a stick

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Re: China meets world

Postby RaviB » 17 Sep 2020 16:27

SSridhar wrote:Like AoA, we need something for the Hans. CoG - Confucius-o-Great or something else...suggestions welcome.


STS = Sun Tzu Says
CMT = Chairman Mao Teaches ( This is actually a sarcastic thing young Chinese say)
HCBB = Hindi-Chini Bye-Bye

China Numbah Wan (Wan in Chinese means 10,000, so I'm always unsure what they mean when they say that)

Right now the most common slogan is "China Dream" which is plastered everywhere.


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Re: China meets world

Postby M_Joshi » 17 Sep 2020 17:39

Rupesh wrote:Chinese are so rude

What stops people from just pissing or shitting in the public in the West and other countries is modesty – they don’t want complete strangers to get to see them in the act of pissing or shitting. Modesty simply isn’t there, people just don’t care who gets to see them naked as they are so used to it growing up in such cramped and crowded conditions.



It's a cultural thing. Chinese tourists shopping in Burberry in UK sure would not have come straight from a crowded home in a Chinese village. A restroom is just next door. These people are different. Normal human morals of decency, shame, honesty etc are just not in them.

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Re: China meets world

Postby rajpa » 17 Sep 2020 20:15

SSridhar wrote:Like AoA, we need something for the Hans. CoG - Confucius-o-Great or something else...suggestions welcome.



HoX
Holy Xit
Holy Xitler

HoaX Holy Almighty Xitler

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Yayavar » 18 Sep 2020 00:02

RCase wrote:CoPa (copy, paste)


Good one. Insightful and apt.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Suraj » 18 Sep 2020 00:50

Stop the presses! Stop the presses! GloTa Stop! Comrade you-know-Hu has spoken!

China suffered 'far fewer' casualties than India in June clash: Global Times editor
China suffered "far fewer" than the 20 deaths incurred by India's military in a clash on their border in the Himalayas in June, the Global Times editor-in-chief said in a tweet, contradicting a claim made by India's defence minister.

"No Chinese soldiers was captured by Indian troops, but PLA captured many Indian soldiers that day," Hu Xijin said in the tweet https://twitter.com/HuXijin_GT/status/1 ... 5050478592, referring to China's People's Liberation Army (PLA).

The Global Times is published by the People's Daily, the official newspaper of China's ruling Communist Party.

The tweet was accompanied by a screenshot, stamped 'fake news', of an Indian media report about defence minister Rajnath Singh saying India inflicted heavy casualties on Chinese forces during the fighting.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Jarita » 18 Sep 2020 08:23

This is a rich vein

http://factsanddetails.com/china/cat4/s ... em113.html

Image

Looks like communism is responsible for this descent.
During the Cultural Revolution good manners were condemned as bourgeois and a means of inhibiting people and keeping them down. At that time it was considered a compliment to be call a dalacocu—“a big, rude guy."


A Hong-Kong-born, London-based Chinese wrote a guidebook in which advised Chinese “Don't ask foreign women how old they are” and “Don't clean your ears in public."


He also said Chinese tourists were notorious for consciously breaking rules. “You'll see people flouting “no smoking” signs in luxury outlets, knowing few will complain when they're spending $10,000. There's also a feeling that “foreigners have been trampling on us for 200 years, and now it's our turn.'”


He then described how Mao liked to scratch himself and conduct meeting naked when it was hot. He also said Mao occasionally “absent-mindedly turned down the belt in his trousers and searched for some guest”---namely fleas and lice.

Deng Xiaoping, a notorious spitter, didn't set a very good example either. He was not shy about hacking and spitting in public, and he often had a spittoon situated next to his chair when he met with world leaders.


Theroux once recorded the following items on the floor of train: duck bones, fish bones, peanut shells, cookie wrappers, sunflower seed husks, teacups, tumblers, thermoses, wine bottles, foot tins, spit, orange rinds, raw shells and used diapers.


Doctors and staff routinely spit on the hallway floors in hospitals. Be careful when walking past a bus full of Chinese. Passengers often spit out the window. Women also spit but not as much as the men.


I saw wads of phlegm glistening like freshly shucked oysters on staircases and escalators. I saw them frozen into slicks on the sidewalk and oozing down the sides of walls. It often seemed that if people weren't spitting, they were coughing without covering their mouths, or shooting wads of snot out of their noses. This was done by plugging one nostril and using the other as a blowhole. "We Chinese think it's best just to get it out," a woman told me over dinner one night. She said that, in her opinion, it's disgusting that a westerner would use a handkerchief and then put it back into his pocket.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Jarita » 18 Sep 2020 18:19

^^^ this is so bad and this is across East Asia. Unfortunately, it is post colonialism where the white man boyfriend has been embedded in the mindset.
Mind you, they are trying to that in India too with the movies, social engineering and ask for US base (that will be a start). Even in Japan, they have a white boyfriend fetish forget about the Philippines etc.
Glad that it has not reached the Indian subcontinent or the Middle East.

The scarcity of females + communism and it’s cultural nonsense have also driven this deterioration.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Rsatchi » 18 Sep 2020 21:37

First I heard the term 'Shengnan' meaning leftover: to describe 30+ unmarried person in China
Wondering whether the PLA boys should hailed as 'Shengnan' on the public address system by our troops at the border(like they use to call German soldiers as Jerry) :lol: :lol:
30 million gender deficit No wonder their kidnapping girls from Laos/Cambodia etc and and Napaks are willing supplying!!!
With all the bravado of deveoped country: looks like the young cant get married because of the inability to buy an apartment!!
https://youtu.be/Au8y19tVAJQ
And more of the eating habits:
https://youtu.be/TCKnjq5ZVY8
Throwing shells on the floor!! :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: China Meets World

Postby jamwal » 18 Sep 2020 22:55

Image

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Re: China Meets World

Postby darshan » 19 Sep 2020 00:32

Not sure why chinese have to kidnap foreign females when in china's little Africa there's no shortage of native chinese marrying Africans.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Jarita » 19 Sep 2020 20:36

Their treatment of animals is the stuff nightmares and biblical hells are made of.


See this chart https://api.worldanimalprotection.org/

I am unable to post this chart but China shares something in common with their taller than mountain friends, an abysmal rating on animal welfare.

https://api.worldanimalprotection.org/s ... hina_2.pdf

You don't even need to read the report given the Yulin images and other grotesque stuff that comes out. That dog eating peppers is actually kindness by their standard.

Their royal palates extended even further. I believe that the Qing dynasty book of recipes prescribed human organ parts for specific meal types.
This part of the culture is way before the CCP although CCP excesses and hunger did take a toll on the types of recipes and food. Basically, anything is game. Worse, there is a complete insensitivity to killing the animal. Burning and boiling alive are one part of the methodology.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby SriKumar » 19 Sep 2020 21:02

I did not want to contribute to this thread but this is one thing that I do want to bring up- their treatment of animals.
In zoos, they feed live animals to predators.

I dont know how widspread this is, but this is sold as entertainment to the average Chinese visitor to a zoo, which presumably includes children. They grow up thinking these things are fine (some would argue this is fine because it is reality where some animals eat other animals but clearly this normalizes cruetly at a young age. The act of killing is what is being sold as entertainment.).

5 suros will buy you an animal to feed the lions in zoo.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LeuQcsj-2w

This video shows them dumping a live cow in a tiger enclosure. For people who believe animals have emotions like fear or affection (any dog owner will certify to this) the video can be disturbing. You just have to see any mother animal or bird with its babies/chicks to know animals have many things in common with humans.

At 1:02, you can see zoo visitors in a bus in the background watching the 'show'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLuoVRYzaUM

The way the tigers gather around the blue truck ...they know food is coming. They've done this before.

Added later: The first video note says that about 80 zoos in China offer this 'facility' of feeding live animals to apex predators.
ANd I've seen pictures of bears in tight cages, just a little larger than the bear itself. They keep the bear alive and have a tube into it, to get some 'juice' out, i believe it is bile from the liver they are after. Saw this on TV about 10 years ago.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby rsingh » 19 Sep 2020 21:42

Loss of face and inferiority complex is deep rooted in Chinese culture.They can not wear their traditional cloths, keep long hairs like their ancestors. Best Chinese classical music is enjoyed outside China. They have western style concert halls with western classical music. Piano learning is prefered. That picture of Mr Eleven in suit and tie with Modi ji says a lot about two cultures. IN Chinese mind, if you are not dressed like westerns than you are dehati. Japanese are bit better.
We were under UK occupation but our culture flourished. They were under western powers. They tease India about being slaves of west. Who is slave?

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Rsatchi » 19 Sep 2020 21:46

SriKumar wrote:I did not want to contribute to this thread but this is one thing that I do want to bring up- their treatment of animals.
In zoos, they feed live animals to predators.

I dont know how widspread this is, but this is sold as entertainment to the average Chinese visitor to a zoo, which presumably includes children. They grow up thinking these things are fine (some would argue this is fine because it is reality where some animals eat other animals but clearly this normalizes cruetly at a young age. The act of killing is what is being sold as entertainment.).

5 suros will buy you an animal to feed the lions in zoo.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LeuQcsj-2w

This video shows them dumping a live cow in a tiger enclosure. For people who believe animals have emotions like fear or affection (any dog owner will certify to this) the video can be disturbing. You just have to see any mother animal or bird with its babies/chicks to know animals have many things in common with humans.

At 1:02, you can see zoo visitors in a bus in the background watching the 'show'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLuoVRYzaUM

The way the tigers gather around the blue truck ...they know food is coming. They've done this before.

Added later: The first video note says that about 80 zoos in China offer this 'facility' of feeding live animals to apex predators.
ANd I've seen pictures of bears in tight cages, just a little larger than the bear itself. They keep the bear alive and have a tube into it, to get some 'juice' out, i believe it is bile from the liver they are after. Saw this on TV about 10 years ago.

No wonder they are closer to Napaks and Islamic countries!!!
Public blood letting is the national sport

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Rsatchi » 19 Sep 2020 21:57

And more of the live shows in China:
Cooking live animals :roll:
https://youtu.be/prwUIBqOvSs
And the judge proudly proclaims that the fish's mouth has to be moving or else the chef fails to qualify :shock:

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Re: China Meets World

Postby SriKumar » 19 Sep 2020 22:31

Rsatchi wrote:And more of the live shows in China:
Cooking live animals :roll:
https://youtu.be/prwUIBqOvSs
And the judge proudly proclaims that the fish's mouth has to be moving or else the chef fails to qualify :shock:
Many moons ago I was watching a show on local Chinese cuisine- I think it was a western crew filming it. The patrons in the restaurant seected a live fish in the aqaurium to eat. The chef picked it out, and from there on, it was sliced, stuffed and lightly sauted in a fying pan. In Less than 90 seconds, it was on a plate in front of the customer and.....still moving. I was not grossed out or anything but it was odd to watch.

MEanwhile, here is something for dog-lovers,......I mean, people who like dog meat. The videos shows puppies, cats in cages ...
China's dog festival (it is not a Stylistic show of dogs, it is about eating various flavors in dog meats- also cats).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0fbhBAXir4

Apparently dogs are a traition in Southern China. Youtube has tons of videos. This is my LAST on this (this one actually grossed me out to barfing....dogs being butchered). One comment section talks about boiling them live, but I did not watch the video. Only stills at a couple of time-points. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfaZeIxHFUM

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Re: China Meets World

Postby sudarshan » 21 Sep 2020 23:02

X-post from military forum:

Rakesh wrote:What passes for news in China! My goodness! :rotfl:

Just click on that link. Just do it.

https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/1303 ... 06913?s=20 --->Impressive training video of Chinese Aeronautical Establishment shows jet speeds along the runway before turning 90 degrees as it takes off with its nose pointing towards the sky.

Livefist replied to that tweet....

https://twitter.com/livefist/status/130 ... 47232?s=20 ---> Hi @PDChina, this is embarrassing.

That’s a remote controlled aeromodel, not a real jet.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby vera_k » 23 Sep 2020 08:51


chola
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Re: China Meets World

Postby chola » 24 Sep 2020 12:28

LOL "Sponsored by Wuhan Wet Market"

....

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Re: China Meets World

Postby sanjaykumar » 24 Sep 2020 20:10

That’s just plain racist with no possible redeeming instructional value. But perhaps necessary for the Chinese to realise how the world is beginning to view them.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Pathik » 24 Sep 2020 20:17

This video would qualify as racist anywhere in the world except in China :)

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Re: China Meets World

Postby Rakesh » 24 Sep 2020 21:43

chola wrote:LOL "Sponsored by Wuhan Wet Market"....

Chola, why are you posting this on BRF? You should know better.

One month ban. Racism not permitted.

If you do this again, you will be permanently banned.

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Re: China Meets World

Postby sanjaykumar » 25 Sep 2020 02:06

I don’t like to sort cultures hierarchically, but what I have seen in Africa compared to China makes me value Africans as more cultured than Chinese.

I do not see spitting, blowing the nose with fingers onto the street, wanton animal cruelty or selective foeticide in Black Africa. I do not see the odious bazaar conduct of China. I do not see the supercilious contempt of others in Africa.

I post this here to underline that there is sufficient deeply diseased in Chinese culture that one need not stoop to racist caricature. The Chinese are doing a great job by themselves.


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