China Meets World

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DavidD
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Re: China meets world

Postby DavidD » 03 Oct 2020 06:00

sudarshan wrote:
DavidD wrote:As for changing names, it's just a name. I don't know if it's just Chinese culture or if it's a sequela of the Cultural Revolution, but in general Chinese don't hold anything as sacred. Using a Western name in a Western country is simply logical. Everyone can spell it, you don't have to answer "how do you pronounce that" every time someone sees your name, it's just more convenient than using a Chinese name. You see it in restaurants too. Japanese restaurants would have "Gyoza" or "Ramen", while Chinese restaurants instead of having "Jiaozi" or "Lamien" they just call them by their English names "dumplings" or "pulled noodles".


If using a western name in a western country is logical, then it would also be logical to:

a. use an Indian name when in India (or on an Indian forum, such as this one?)

b. use an Islamic name (which is actually again a western name, technically they're both derived from the Hebrew anyway - Yusuf/Joseph, Daoud/David, Salman/Suleiman/Solomon, Yahya/Yahanan/Johann/John, Ibrahim/Abraham, Musa/Moses...) in an Islamic country

c. use a native African name in Africa (although those guys are now mostly Xtian or Muslim anyway)

d. use local variants of western names in Latin countries ("Diego," "Pedro," "Juan," etc.) or Russian variants in Russia ("Ivan," "Mikhail," "Nikolai," "Semyon") or hard Russian names ("Boris," "Vladimir," etc.)

e. use Japanese or Korean names in those countries

Do Chinese do all that?


I haven't lived in those places, but I know of many Chinese table tennis players who moved to Japan and picked up Japanese names. In fact, I'm pretty sure every single one that I've seen play has, because every time it was the commentator who made me aware that they're actually Chinese. I used to live in Florida and have met a few ethnic Chinese who came from Latin America and they all have Spanish names.

sudarshan
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Re: China meets world

Postby sudarshan » 03 Oct 2020 06:51

DavidD wrote:I haven't lived in those places, but I know of many Chinese table tennis players who moved to Japan and picked up Japanese names. In fact, I'm pretty sure every single one that I've seen play has, because every time it was the commentator who made me aware that they're actually Chinese. I used to live in Florida and have met a few ethnic Chinese who came from Latin America and they all have Spanish names.


Thanks for answering. I'll take your word for that for now. If it's a policy that Chinese follow consistently everywhere, then that's to their credit. OTOH, when I ask Chinese kids their name, and they tell me the adopted name, I try probing - "no, what's your Chinese name?" and they almost seem ashamed of it. I try to make it a point to use their original name, just like I always go by my name, surprisingly, the goras are fine with trying out my original name (though they massacre it of course). But the Chinese sometimes try to get me to adopt a more "convenient" name (western, in this case). Maybe it's just cultural.

sudarshan
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Re: China meets world

Postby sudarshan » 08 Oct 2020 23:31

This thread got really serious for a while. Would like to remind folks that this is a trolling thread, meant to have a party and pass the tab on to the friendly neighbor. Just no racism, mocking looks, mocking speech. Most of the rest goes here (mod discretion will be involved of course).

Been waiting for a good chance to demonstrate this principle to forumites, and lo and behold, China obliges.

Thank you Beijing, for Being so oBleijing :).
Last edited by sudarshan on 08 Oct 2020 23:51, edited 2 times in total.

sudarshan
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Re: China Meets World

Postby sudarshan » 08 Oct 2020 23:38

Chinese letter to Indian media, advising on how to report on Taiwan. What aukat, huh?

https://www.opindia.com/2020/10/taiwan- ... ensorship/

LETTER FROM PEKING

For those not in the know:

a. That is a 1957 novel by Pearl S. Buck
b. Peking was how the western world used to refer to the Chinese capital, before the adoption of pinyin transliteration changed it to Beijing

Next I think they will try the following:

* Send gdp growth targets to Indian states and districts (growth for this fiscal strictly *NOT* to exceed 2.3%)
* Send memos to the Indian Army on how to behave on the LAC
* Send memos to state police on how to deal with the rioters whom they unleash in Indian cities
...

I think they confused India with Pakistan? Note to Beijing: your latest province is Pakistan, not India.

China gets to meet the real world again.

sudarshan
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Re: China Meets World

Postby sudarshan » 14 Oct 2020 23:00

Beijing Being oBleijing again.... GloTimes zindabad.

tsarkar (in mil thread) wrote:https://twitter.com/nitingokhale/status/1315928112907968512
If I do, it is my right; if you do it is provocation. Old Chinese playbook.

Sums up Chinese expectation from tributary state that we refuse to be.


As one responder pointed out, that Chinese dude has such a nice Backpfeifengesicht (don't be intimidated by that long German term, go look it up - you won't regret it, I assure you).

Responses invited to the above :). Here's a couple:

* But ji, who told you that is infrastructure? That is ultrastructure onlee....

* What if we assure you that our soldiers won't use those bridges for military monitoring and control? It is for tourists. Our soldiers also will wear t-shirts/ slacks when they tour that area on those bridges (as civvies). Of course, if they foolishly choose to tour in stifling tanks instead of comfy ac cars, that is their business.

* Sure, we will amicably discuss the issue with the other side (the Tibetans, we mean).


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