India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

A Sharma
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Postby A Sharma » 31 Mar 2007 08:21

FROM NAL website

SARAS Low Speed Taxi runs have begun in the right and are going on as per the schedule. Three low speed runs have been completed as on 24/03/07.

Immediately after the second run on 24/3/07, I catch up with Wg. Cdr. Makker and Wg. Cdr. Malik, chief test pilots to get their first hand impression on PT-II’s performance. Makker and Malik graciously opine that, “Pre-flight formalities, engine start and after-start checks went off smoothly – no surprises. PT-II appears to be a good platform to maneuver. Nose-wheel steering is very well tuned. Responses to steering inputs are consistent. There’s no doubt that PT-II appears to be a powerful machine.â€

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Postby Vick » 02 Apr 2007 08:30

From DN
[quote]Posted 04/02/07 14:07
India’s Defense Lab Seen as National Industry Failure
Lawmakers’ Report Says DRDO Falls Far Short of Goals
By VIVEK RAGHUVANSHI, NEW DELHI

India is at most halfway to its goal of producing 70 percent of the military’s weapons, and lawmakers blame the state-owned Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

Five years after launching an indigenization plan, domestic plants supply only 30 percent to 35 percent of the military’s needs, forcing the military to import far more arms than planned, according to a March 16 report by members of the parliament’s Defence Committee.

“The Committee are not happy to be informedâ€

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Postby Vipul » 02 Apr 2007 20:28

Private help for Rs 500-cr national security grid.

NEW DELHI, APR 1: India may soon establish a nation-wide surveillance grid that will use IT, telecom and technological capabilities to process intelligence inputs so that the country’s internal and external security is strengthened.
An inter-ministerial committee headed by the department of telecom secretary has suggested setting up of an autonomous centralised communication centre to monitor all traffic—satellite, wireline, wireless, Internet, e-mails, the voice-over-Internet-protocol —to research crime and terrorism.

Such centres exist in the US, the UK, Japan and France, helping their governments to minimise security hazards.

The Indian initiative, however, is expected to be made with a public-private partnership for an estimated initial project cost of Rs 500 crore over the next five years.

The committee has suggested that the government fund the centre to the tune of Rs 400 crore. The private sector can chip in with the balance Rs 100 crore. The centre can be operated and maintained by a professional agency that will sustain itself by charging users on a pay-per-use basis.

The committee feels there is duplication among different law enforcement agencies, each having its own process that further constrains them to share information. Further, the present surveillance system is technologically outdated.

The proposed centre will have centralised connectivity with every service provider and law enforcement agency, and will ensure secure and transparent mediation of intercepted information.

According to the committee, the centre must have representatives from the home and defence ministries, the Centre of Development of Telematics, the Telecom Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Science, IITs and leading telecom operators.

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Postby A Sharma » 05 Apr 2007 03:38

BEL achieves record turnover of Rs.3960.38 cr

Some of the significant orders executed during the year include supply of Flycatcher Radar, Reporter Radar, Surveillance Radar Element, Ellora – an Electronic Warfare System, Hand Held Thermal Imager, an Integrated Shipboard Data Network for P-17 class of ships and implementation of convergent billing for MTNL. New products introduced during the yearinclude Safari - a jammer system used for VVIP security and for protection of Army convoys, Advanced Land Navigation System, VPS Mk III - a hand-held, lightweight UHF radio for use by the defence forces, Battery Level Radar, Electronic Voting Machine Mk II and Intelligent Message Terminal.

The order book as on April 1, 2007, is estimated to be around Rs.9,100 crores. The significant orders received during the year include the Artillery Combat Command & Control System, Electronic Warfare systems, STARS V Mk II – a secure tactical radio in VHF band, and Naval Systems for P28 and P15A class of ships.

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Postby Tilak » 05 Apr 2007 08:00

Defence staff on war path
Statesman News Service

BALASORE, April 2: The AIDEF (All India Defence Employees Federation) would undertake a series of programmes in order to press for their 15-point charter of demands. This was disclosed by the members of the national executive committee following its two-day annual meet here.

In support and realisation of the 15-point charter of demands, the affiliated unions of AIDEF across the country besides observing the mass campaigning day on 27 April and embarking on a day-long dharna in front of respective head offices of establishments, would observe 9 May as Rakshya Utapadan Ratna Day with rallies, meetings and demonstrations.

And, following which, in case of non-fulfillment of demands, the federation will observe a week-long protest from 4 to 8 June, said Mr SN Pathak, the president of the federation, in a recent Press brief after culmination of the meet, adding that these decisions have been taken unanimously in the national executive meet here in protest against the indifferent attitude of the Centre in settling their demands. He claimed that the affiliated unions (376) have over 2 lakh members . The general secretary, Mr Salil Bhattachraya, Mr C Srikumar, vice-president Mr CH Satyanarayana, Mr Rajendra Jha, Mr Guna Takurtha, Mr Ravibran Pillai, Mr JD Suryawansi were the other executive members of the federation present in the meet.

The members strongly opposed the move of the government to implement the Prof. P Rama Rao Committee report to privatise the activities of DRDO and the decision of the government to confer status of RUR to private industries and MNCs. They also objected the proposal to corporate the Army workshops. They raised objections to the contractual engagement and outsourcing in permanent and perennial nature of jobs in all establishments including MES , besides opposing exploitation of contract and causal workers.

The demands of the charter are ~ to ensure sufficient work order for all ordinance factories, withdrawal of implementation of JAFA Committee recommendation on DGQA (Director-General of Quality Assurance) and arbitrary abolition of 649 posts. Filling up all existing posts, exempt defence establishments from the purview of ADRP, compassionate appointment to the dependents of the deceased and medically boarded out employees were their prime demands. They also demanded immediate compensatory appointment in case of group D staff dependents.

Restoration of overtime wages, implementation of pending arbitration awards , revocation of new defined contributory pension scheme were among their other demands. They too demanded for approval of all pending cadre review proposals in the directorates under the ministry of defence without referring to pay commission and grant of interim relief to Central govt employees as well as pensioners at the rate of 15 per cent of basic pay with DP subjected to minimum Rs 1,000 with effect from 1 January 2006.

Withdrawal of recruitment rules for technical supervisory staff, ammunition mechanics of Navy and industrial employees of EME, were their other demands.

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Re: Elecon

Postby JaiS » 06 Apr 2007 08:44

Elecon hunts for a buyout in US, Europe

[quote]

MUMBAI: Gujarat-based Elecon Engineering is on the lookout for an acquisition in the material handling equipment (MHE) and gearbox segments in the European and US markets. It is also in talks for setting up a joint venture in the Far East for making gearboxes and expects a deal this fiscal.

The company recently bagged a contract for supplying 2 propulsion gearboxes worth Rs 50 crore for India’s first indigenous aircraft carrier. For this project, it has entered into a technical collaboration with France-based Renk AG, which would supply the engineering components.

“These gearboxes would have a localisation content of more than 50%,â€

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Postby Raj Malhotra » 08 Apr 2007 10:05

I feel that in order to encourage more deliverable projects even OFB-PSU should have R&D budgets to develop evolutionary lines from their present projects and to increase indigenous content of their production

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Postby Paul » 12 Apr 2007 11:32

[quote]Armoured for big business
- Defence equipment firm chooses Nagaland over Malaysia
NISHIT DHOLABHAI
New Delhi, April 11: By the end of this year, Nagaland might well be exporting ballistic body armour and load-bearing equipment to Baghdad and Washington.

Indian Armour, a Faridabad-based defence equipment firm, has chosen to set up base on the troubled turf of Nagaland rather than Malaysia.

The announcement is a shot in the arm for the Neiphiu Rio government before a scheduled visit by defence minister A.K. Antony next month.

Rio met company CEO Anil Kant and finalised the venture, sources said. The state government has reportedly assured the company of adequate power supply and security.

Indian Armour is already exporting its products to US-based Armour Holdings and could send products manufactured in Nagaland for use by the allied forces in Afghanistan and Iraq. Protecting the “future Indian soldierâ€

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Postby Singha » 12 Apr 2007 12:54

well Nagaland is within India for one reason! :D
mizoram and nagaland has some of the highest strength bamboo you can
imagine...I mean thick as neha dhupia torso and skin around 3 inches thick.
"Medang"

there was report of a indian unit experimenting with bamboo fibers for
BPJ.

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Postby A Sharma » 12 Apr 2007 19:43

HAL turnover soars to Rs 7,505 crores

HAL’s enhanced financial achievement is mainly attributed to the successful execution of programmes including the SU-30 MKI, DO-228, ALH and Jaguar. This apart, a series of aircraft upgrade programmes contributed to HAL’s growth. During this year, the project for the design and development of light combat helicopter (LCH) was finalized, apart from additional orders for aircraft and helicopters resulting in an all-time high order book position of over Rs 40,000 crores.

The Advanced Jet Trainer (Hawk) is progressing as per the schedule and the first Hawk will roll out of HAL hangars during 2007-‘08. The year also saw the completion of the first aircraft of the limited series production of LCA, besides two more aircraft joining the fleet of prototypes. Under the ALH weapon system integration programme, the glass cockpit utility version was certified and the first batch produced for Army. During the year, HAL also set the ball rolling for co-development of a medium-lift helicopter (10-Ton class) and a multi-role transport aircraft.

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Postby ShauryaT » 14 Apr 2007 04:04

For the first time, Chander said, DRDO had acted only as an integrating agency with the Agni-III, with most of the missile's components being made by private industry. A total of 258 private firms and 20 DRDO laboratories were involved in this venture.

"This is why there were no production delays and the next missile is being readied in parallel," he said.

[url=http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=8532]ICBM with 5,500-km range can be developed in three years: DRDO
[/url]

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Postby mandrake » 15 Apr 2007 16:05

Not sure if this is the rigfht thread or not,
Denying India veto at UNSC is an insult: Belarus

Sunday, April 15, 2007
11:50 IST

Blog this story



Minsk (Belarus): The erstwhile Soviet state of Belarus has offered to share with India laser-optical technology that is crucial for civil and defence applications, including in the guidance systems of smart weapons and missiles.

Belarus will be setting up a laser-optical research centre in India under an agreement to be signed during the visit of its President Alexander Lukashenka to India beginning Sunday.

India will be training Belarus personnel in Information Technology with the prospect of setting up a technology park in Minsk, 52-year-old Lukashenka said in an exclusive interview in the ornate Blakitny (blue) hall of the massive Stalin era Presidential Palace.


"We have a huge technological potential, much more than our own requirements and we are ready to share it with India," he said.


Lukashenka said strategic relations with nuclear powers -- India, China and Russia-- are the cornerstone of his country's foreign policy.


"Relations with India are the pride of our foreign policy. I underscore that we are proud of our close and friendly ties with India, dating back to decades and centuries," said the Belarus strongman, dubbed as the last dictator in Europe.


Lukashenka said Belarus backs India's candidature for the permanent membership of the UN Security Council with full veto rights.


"In 1998, speaking from the rostrum of the UN General Assembly, we had declared that in the changed world without India the mandate of Security Council is fractured to some extent," said Lukashenka responding to a question on New Delhi's bid for the permanent seat in the UN Security Council.


"Almost ten years back we had declared that it was highly unjustified that a country with the population of over a billion, possessing high technologies and like China, a nuclear power, is not represented in the Security Council," Lukashenka said.


He said that his nation of 10 million people, sandwiched between NATO and powerful Russia, will vote for India, whenever its candidature for the UNSC is put on vote.


"Depriving a nuclear power like India of the right of veto or other attributes of a permanent member as enjoyed by other permanent five will be an insult to the nation," Lukashenka said.


Lukashenka also sounded very optimistic about trilateral defence cooperation among India, Russia and Belarus. "Here we are not competitors with Russia. Moscow has involved us in several defence projects with India and more are in the pipeline," said Lukashenka, who has managed to preserve the potent military-technical complex inherited from the ex-USSR and banned the defence enterprises from churning out casseroles and spades under the so-called policy of conversion adopted by many former Soviet republics, including Russia.


Replying to questions, Lukashenka said India must take a lead in rejuvenating the Non-Aligned Movement. "I have requests from many NAM Heads of State that I talk to India to play a more active role," he said.
http://content.msn.co.in/News/Internati ... 7_1150.htm


I've heard only three country (not even china) makes their own Laser-optical goodies, So India the 4th huh? :twisted:
:twisted:

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Postby Gaurav_S » 16 Apr 2007 17:02

BHEL posts Rs 2,510 cr turnover from its in-house products

R&D at BHEL

New Delhi : Engineering company Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd has posted a record turnover of Rs 2,510 crore of products and systems developed through its in-house research efforts.
The turnover through commercialisation of its indigenous products is almost 14 per cent of the company's total turnover of Rs 18,702 crore in the last fiscal, BHEL said in a statement today.
"This is the result of a constant thrust on developing new technologies and products, beside improving existing products and systems in terms of reliability, cost, quality through in-house R&D initiatives," the statement said.
During 2006-07, BHEL had spent 58 per cent more than the previous fiscal in research and development at Rs 238 crore, it said.
BHEL has also set up a Centre of Excellence for Surface Engineering to consolidate its position in crucial technology areas and improve manufacturing processes, the statement said.
In 2006-07, the company had developed technologies like maintenance free Brushless Exciter for hydro generators, 1100 kW flame proof squirrel cage induction motors and advanced digital flame scanner for reliable flame monitoring in boilers, it said.
BHEL was :?: also developing a more energy efficient single cylinder non-reheat steam turbine for 100-140 MW application suitable for plants with large amount of waste heat and no reheat option.
The company has already received an order for 120 MW turbine from Tata Steel, the company said.

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Postby JaiS » 17 Apr 2007 11:00

X-post from the space thread.

Rs 1 lakh cr windfall awaits defence, aerospace players

[quote]

MUMBAI: Here’s a multi-billion-dollar prediction from none other than former ISRO chief Dr K Kasturirangan. And it sure is music to the ears of private players interested in Indian space research, defence and nuclear energy. Put together, these segments will be worth Rs 1 lakh crore in the next 10 years, he says.

He has a few words of advice, too.

[b]“Industries should adopt and produce the new technology so as to meet the future domestic demand in aerospace and nuclear field and also from US and European countries,â€

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Postby bala » 18 Apr 2007 03:56

Weight problems still persists; engine is being upgraded. 2009 is when DGCA clearance is possible.

Saras prototype to make maiden flight

The second prototype (PT2) of India's first indigenously designed and developed civilian aircraft Saras is on the verge of making its maiden flight this week. Designed and built by the Bangalore headquartered National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL), a constituent of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, the eight to 14-seater Light Transport Aircraft Saras will follow in the footsteps of prototype one (PT1) which flew in May 2004.

PT1 had suffered from serious weight problems. Against an empty aircraft design value of 4,125 kg, it weighed 5,118 kg, a near 25 per cent increase, affecting its range, fuel carrying capacity, fuel economy, and its design payload capacity of 1,232 kg. Though PT2 has not particularly addressed the knotty weight issue, it will nevertheless have a higher powered (1,200 pounds) Pratt and Whitney pusher, turboprop (rear facing propellers) configured engines (PT6-67A), new propellers and a brand new subwing that supports the engine to the fuselage. K. Yegnanarayan, said that it was not possible to reduce the weight of PT2 since the various parts for the two prototypes had been made together. However, Dr. Yegnanarayan said that a `weight optimisation' exercise had already been put in place and that the weight would be brought down by around 500 kg in the production standard, or limited series production aircraft. "With parts of the production aircraft especially the wing and tail plane to be made using carbon fibre composites a reduction will not be too difficult."

With this in mind NAL have embarked on a programme to make three composite airframes, which will form the backbone of a lighter Saras. According to Dr. Yegnanarayan, while one of the airframes will be used for flying, the other two will be used for structural and fatigue testing. NAL are hoping for formal DGCA clearance for the Saras by 2009.

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Postby Vick » 18 Apr 2007 04:39

From DN
Posted 04/16/07 13:47
Government Panel Ponders Incentives for Indian Defense Scientists
By VIVEK RAGHUVANSHI, NEW DELHI

Faced with acute problems retaining its scientists, India’s Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) has decided to provide them a share of the royalties their inventions would generate when they become available on the commercial market.

A senior official at the state-owned defense research agency said the incentive plan is in line with the U.S. Federal Technology Transfer Act passed in 1986 and related rulings, and similar initiatives in many other developed countries.

The incentives are part of a recommendation given to an Indian government select committee that is looking into pay and allowances of government officials, including DRDO scientists. The committee must approve the incentive plan.

DRDO has more than 50 laboratories involved in research, design and development work for India’s defense forces, including development of the Agni missile and the Advanced Technology Vehicle nuclear submarine.

DRDO said more than 2,000 scientists have left the organization in the last five years; some of them worked on the agency’s prime projects. If the government does not come out with adequate incentives for scientists to remain, the sources said, the loss of senior talent could threaten several DRDO projects.

Since defense production here was opened to private Indian companies three years ago, many of those defense scientists have moved to the private sector. A number of overseas defense companies are collaborating with private Indian defense companies to co-produce weapons and equipment to tap into the emerging defense offset market here, estimated at about $10 billion in the next seven years.

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Postby bala » 19 Apr 2007 03:10

Saras flight

Saras PT2 makes maiden flight

The second prototype of Saras, India's first commercial civilian aircraft, had a successful 40-minute maiden flight here on Wednesday, climbing to an altitude of 9,000 feet. the eight to 14-seater light transport aircraft, Saras Prototype two (PT2), follows Prototype one (PT1), which flew in May 2004. PT2 had an almost flawless flight, attaining a maximum speed of just under 150 knots. Executing several mild manoeuvres to get a feel of the aircraft's handling qualities, the pilots reported "no surprises."

The chief difference between PT2 and PT1 is the incorporation of two turboprop (rear facing propellers) Pratt and Whitney PT 6A-67A engines of 1200 hp each and propellers of a larger diameter. PT1 had two PT 6A-66 engines of 850 hp each. While PT2 is much closer to the final production standard, NAL has begun a weight optimisation programme "through optimisation of metallic structures, stringent fabrication control and increased use of composites." NAL scientists agreed that much work still remained before it could become a marketing or even an aviation success. Indian Air Force (IAF) is expected to be the launch customer. NAL is expected to demonstrate the performance of PT2 to the IAF by simulating the all up weight of 7,100 kg.

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Postby Ajay M » 19 Apr 2007 18:31


Vipul
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Postby Vipul » 19 Apr 2007 19:31

bala wrote:Saras flight

Saras PT2 makes maiden flight

The second prototype of Saras, India's first commercial civilian aircraft, had a successful 40-minute maiden flight here on Wednesday, climbing to an altitude of 9,000 feet. the eight to 14-seater light transport aircraft, Saras Prototype two (PT2), follows Prototype one (PT1), which flew in May 2004. PT2 had an almost flawless flight, attaining a maximum speed of just under 150 knots. Executing several mild manoeuvres to get a feel of the aircraft's handling qualities, the pilots reported "no surprises."

The chief difference between PT2 and PT1 is the incorporation of two turboprop (rear facing propellers) Pratt and Whitney PT 6A-67A engines of 1200 hp each and propellers of a larger diameter. PT1 had two PT 6A-66 engines of 850 hp each. While PT2 is much closer to the final production standard, NAL has begun a weight optimisation programme "through optimisation of metallic structures, stringent fabrication control and increased use of composites." NAL scientists agreed that much work still remained before it could become a marketing or even an aviation success. Indian Air Force (IAF) is expected to be the launch customer. NAL is expected to demonstrate the performance of PT2 to the IAF by simulating the all up weight of 7,100 kg.


Any Pics?

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Postby A Sharma » 19 Apr 2007 19:45

There are pics on NAL website
SARAS PT2 makes maiden flight

Video

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Postby Vipul » 20 Apr 2007 22:38

Thx AS :)

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Postby Gaurav_S » 24 Apr 2007 06:37

Open your labs to us: India to global tech firms

Link

[quote]The World's most cutting-edge research and development (R&D) centres innovating out of India — think Intel, IBM, Google, GE — urgently need to come under security regulations in "the national interest", a government report has said.

A few strong lines of caution tucked inside a report to the Planning Commission by a think tank chaired by the government’s principal scientific advisor, in a committee set up to recommend a vision for science and technology for 2007-12, have dwelt on “security aspects related to R&D being pursued by foreign firms in Indiaâ€

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Postby ramana » 24 Apr 2007 18:48

X-Posted from Indian interests thread:

Raghz wrote:Found this whilst looking for PMS Blackett, who was the scientific advisor to Nehru. Incidentally PMS Blackett was one of the people who advised Nehru not to use the IAF during 1962 war.

Posting in full...


Suri Bhagavantam(1909-1989): Architect of defence research

PROFESSOR SURI Bhagavantam took over as Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister and Director General, Defence Research and Development Organisation in July, 1961.

He was instrumental in making the DRDO an effective instrument to provide the country's fighting forces on land, sea and air with the latest technologies.

In the nine years he headed the DRDO, he set up labs for development of missiles, air craft, aero engines, combat vehicles like tanks, electronic warfare systems, high explosives and underwater weapons.

Encryption and decryption, war gaming and training of service officers in modern warfare technologies were other disciplines in which hecreated necessary facilities.

A chain of labs was established in different parts of the country from Visakhapatnam to Leh and Tezpur. The best tribute to his contribution to the building up of DRDO came from one of his distant successors Dr. V. S. Arunachalam. He said "His tenure saw an explosive growth of the organisation with many, many laboratories and disciplines nucleating at various parts of the country and a large number of scientists getting inducted to defence research. But for these laboratories and competent scientists, DRDO's contribution in these areas of national defence would have been grossly inadequate."

In doing all this, Bhagavantam had to brush aside summarily the advice given by the Nobel laureate and "friend" of India Prof. PMS Blackett to Pandit Nehru that DRDO should confine itself to development of subsystems and import substitution and not attempt to develop major systems like radars, missiles, tanks etc for which India should depend on imports. The country has to be grateful to Bhagavantam for ignoring this friendly advice.

Bhagavantam's formal college education ended with a first class first B.Sc., degree in Physics of the Madras University from the Nizam College, Hyderabad. As a prize-winning essayist Bhagavantam joined Sir C. V. Raman's Laboratory in Calcutta as a research scholar.

He impressed Raman with his scientific abilities, thinking and experimental skills. He obtained his M.Sc., degree from Madras University.

He joined the Andhra University at Waltair as a lecturer in Physics in 1932, rose to become Professor and Head of the department in 1938 at the very young age of 28 years. The university conferred on him the D.Sc. degree (Honoris causa) a little earlier.

In 1948-49 he spent one year in London at the High Commission as the first scientific liaison officer. This was his first trip abroad.

While in London, he was invited by a number of universities in U.K. and Europe including Soviet Union to deliver lectures.

During this period he developed a friendly relationship with M. V. K. Krishna Menon, the then High Commissioner. Returning to India in 1949 he moved to Osmania University as Professor of Physics.

Within a short span of a few years he became the Vice Chancellor of the University when he was in his early forties. In 1957, he was appointed Director of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore from where V. K. Krishna Menon persuaded him to take up the post of Scientific Advisor to Minister of Defence. He retired in October, 1969.

He authored about 300 research papers. He wrote three books on Group Theory, Raman Effect, and Crystal Symmetry and Physical Properties which are considered classics and have been translated into various languages. He was elected fellow of a number of scientific and professional bodies in India and abroad and awarded honorary doctorates by many universities.

He was an erudite scholar in Sanskrit and Telugu. He had a tremendous sense of humour. Bhagavantam had a great faith in the future of this country. A teacher by choice, he continued to be one throughout his life.

M. Krishnamurthi


Retd Chief Controller
R & D, DRDO

Link

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Postby A Sharma » 24 Apr 2007 21:46

link
You are a metallurgist. BARC is working on advanced materials. Can you comment on this? What is a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)?

We have to develop many advanced high temperature materials for the CHTR. We are developing several carbon-based materials. It will be carbon-carbon composites. Fuel will be carbide fuel with different coatings. Then we will develop refractory metals such as molybdenum alloy and niobium alloy. We are working on newer zirconium alloys for the fuel tubes and the pressure tubes for the water-cooled reactors. The SMA is used in our Light Combat Aircraft. We have plans to extend its use in several applications, including biomedical applications.

link
The DRHR has also developed a mobile robot called Smartcar, for remote survey and inspection. The car navigates smartly on three wheels and is equipped with ultrasonic sensors and wireless communication sets.

Another remote-controlled vehicle performs the amazing job of disposing of 300-odd boxes containing 13,000 fuses of anti-tank mines, for the Ordnance Factory at Khamaria in Jabalpur, Manjit Singh said. The DRHR developed a six-wheeled vehicle that housed remote-controlled arms (manipulator), closed circuit television cameras and communication devices. The control station was situated at a safe distance from the vehicle's path. The operator controlled the vehicle and the manipulator and received the feedback through CCTV cameras. The manipulator lifted each box weighing 30 kg, one at a time, from the storage room to the disposal site, opened the box by removing its spring clip and disposed of the fuses by burning them.

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Postby A Sharma » 25 Apr 2007 08:10

Link

Data Patterns has been acclaimed with an ‘Industry Appreciation Award’ for its efforts in effectively designing and developing the Decoy Launcher (DLCP) and FOG-based Sensor Package for NSTL (Naval Science & Technological Laboratory), Vishakapatnam.

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Postby Sumeet » 25 Apr 2007 21:22

Spectacular growth forecast for civil and military aviation sectors


Ravi Sharma

The industry will need investments totalling $120 billion by 2020

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Scope for public-private partnerships
Partnerships will include R&D and production
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Bangalore: With estimates indicating that the Indian aviation industry will need investments totalling $120 billion by 2020, the Bangalore-based Society of Indian Aerospace Technologies and Industries (SIATI) has come out with a blueprint that forecasts spectacular growth for the industry through public-private partnerships and international collaborations. Partnerships that include both research and development and production.

The blueprint by SIATI, which represents over 300 small, medium and large scale private industries, in addition to major aerospace players engaged in the development and manufacture of aircraft, structures, systems/equipment, components and materials, encompasses a period till 2020. Penned by SIATI's president C.G. Krishnadas Nair and aeronautical scientist K.N. Krishnamoorthy, Vision 2020 forecasts all round growth of both the civil and military aviation sectors.


Challenges

Speaking to The Hindu , Dr. Nair, who is a former chairman and managing director of the public sector Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), said the demand for transport/cargo aircraft, the need for more military aircraft, the recently introduced off set clause in aircraft and defence procurements (that are valued at over Rs. 300 crores), the investment for airport infrastructure, and training and educating the manpower that is needed to manage the industry will provide challenging opportunities for growth, that will necessarily be achieved through public-private partnerships.

"For long HAL was the only organisation capable of designing aircraft and helicopters. Its capabilities were enhanced by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) and the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA). But today there are a number of private companies such as Taneja Aerospace, Dynamatic Technologies and Tata Advanced Materials, which have emerged as potentially major players in the aviation sector. Other private industries such as Godrej and Sobha Nadathoor have also entered aerospace manufacture. These organisations will develop their own in-house capability for design and development activities and partner with HAL and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in future programmes."


Long term partnerships

According to Dr. Nair, HAL, NAL, ISRO and DRDO will in the days to come "synergise with the private sector and focus on long term partnerships, to reduce lead-time and costs in the realisation of their projects, to enhance global market share and exports."

Dr. Nair citied the example of HAL whose corporate plan envisions outsourcing around 30 per cent of production and 20 to 30 per cent of design activities over the next 5 to 10 years. "The focus is not just on components but on complete structural assemblies, equipment and systems ready for the final assemble and integration of aircraft. HAL will also look for risk sharing partners right from design through manufacturing and marketing of its new projects such as the Light Attack Helicopter, Light Observation Helicopter, Indian Multirole Helicopter, Multirole Transport Aircraft, future fighters and advanced jet trainers."

Among the successful examples of public-private partnership that SIATI's blueprint highlights are the BrahMos missile which is being produced by the DRDO in collaboration with Russian and Indian private industries; the Light Combat Aircraft programme which has a number of private players involved in the development of components, systems and equipment; and ISRO's association with the private sector for both satellites and launch vehicles.


More ventures

Highlighting the setting up of design and manufacturing activities in India by a number of overseas aerospace companies, the blueprint forecasts the establishing of many more such ventures during the next 5 to 15 years. It also forecasts the incorporation of joint ventures in the manufacture of aero structure, aircraft equipment and systems, airport security and, aircraft and passenger handling equipment.

On the setting up of maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities, the blueprint forecasts that overseas aircraft, engine and systems manufacturers will set up joint ventures in India.

The forecast says India's airlines industry is expected to spend more than Rs. 1,32,000 crores to buy 343 aircraft by 2015.

And, while aircraft movement will increase from 1,000,000 in 2006-07 to 1,513,000 in 2020, passenger traffic will go up during the same period from around 90 million to 219 million.

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Postby srai » 25 Apr 2007 23:21

Paul wrote:
Armoured for big business
- Defence equipment firm chooses Nagaland over Malaysia
NISHIT DHOLABHAI
...


Defence equipment firm chooses Nagaland over Malaysia

While this is good news indeed! I wonder why chose Nagaland over Malasiya.


It's a good move to encourage public/private companies to invest in the North-East and the J&K regions to improve economic opportunities for local people. It's one way to defeat insurgency in the long run.

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Postby shyamd » 26 Apr 2007 17:18

Warning Ajai Shukla. Caution!
MoD to fund R&D by private industry
As dawn broke on the Pokhran field firing ranges late last year, three of India's latest T-90 tanks readied themselves on the firing line.

These were the first firing trials to determine whether Indian-manufactured T-90 ammunition could replace the Israeli armoured piercing ammunition that is imported at nearly Rs 10,000 per round.

As the zeroing targets 1800 metre away became visible through the Russian gun sights, the T-90s opened fire. It soon became apparent that the rounds were falling short of the targets, but there was no way to modify the tank's fire control system to correct that. Asked to modify the FCS for Indian ammunition, the Russians pointed out that the T-90 contract had no such provision.

An irate Ministry of Defence has told Russia that the proposed contract for an additional 347 T-90s depends on Russia modifying their FCS to fire Indian ammunition.

And to modify the T-90s that have already been delivered, the MoD is making a potentially revolutionary departure from its traditional policy. It is looking towards India's private sector, and offering to pay most of the development costs for a software solution to the FCS problem.

Relying exclusively on the Defence R&D Organisation for its equipment needs is now in the past for the MoD. Instead, private companies who fulfil certain norms to be eligible for the honourific of Raksha Utpadan Ratna, will be given specific defence R&D projects and the MoD will pay 80 per cent of the development costs.

Speaking exclusively to the Business Standard, secretary for Defence Production, KP Singh pointed out that the private sector, which stayed out of defence field due to high costs and uncertainty of military R&D, needed to be harnessed.

"There is a need for risk sharing between the government and the private sector. The DRDO works with 100 per cent government money. The private sector, in contrast, is not being given development costs. The DDO will now fund private sector R&D as well."

This significant new announcement is backed with money. A corpus of Rs 100 crore is being introduced, which will be funded from the MoD's capital acquisition budget. In terms of the overall military R&D spend, this is small change; the DRDO budget for this year is Rs 3186 crore (Rs 31.86 billion).

But it is a clear acceptance of the need to reduce the government's exclusive dependency on the DRDO and, like the US, fund research by private corporations that have established themselves in the defence field.

The MoD has asked the Chief of Integrated Defence Staff, Lt Gen HS Lidder to identify ten important military R&D projects for the private sector, which can be subsidised by the MoD.

KP Singh stated, "I've asked the CIDS to keep the projects and the wherewithal ready for when the private sector companies come. I've suggested that he earmark ten projects, which we are ready to fund, the first of them being the T-90 FCS adjustment to fire Indian ammunition.

Blocking the immediate start of private sector is the MoD's failure to identify any private companies as RuRs. A committee headed by Probir Sengupta was set up in May 2006 to identify companies who fulfil RuR requirements, which are currently pegged at Rs 1000 crore (Rs 10 billion) in annual sales, Rs 100 crore (Rs 1 billion) in capital, and a proven track record in military R&D.

Names should have come last September, but delays continue. Private sector welcome the MoD's proposal, but say that the requirements for RuR status have been pegged too high.

Dr AJ Prasad from HBL, a Hyderabad based defence manufacturer, while agreeing on the need for strict requirements, says, "private sector companies who fulfil the MoD financial conditions do not have much of an R&D record. The companies that do serious R&D don't fulfil the Rs 1000 crore (Rs 10 billion) requirement. So there's a need to re-evaluate the issue of size and bring it down to perhaps half."

The MoD, nevertheless, is enthused by being able to tap into an increasingly capable private sector. KP Singh declares, "I'm very optimistic. In 15-20 years, there will be an explosion of the private sector in the field of defence. We'll make the best use of them in defence production."

But while this signals a dramatic shift in MoD views, resistance is building up from the DRDO, which sees its turf being encroached upon and from the defence PSUs who fear aggressive competition from private players.

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Postby shyamd » 26 Apr 2007 21:53

Two-day Army technology board meet inaugurated

Staff Reporter

Hyderabad: The two-day Army Technology Board eighth meeting was inaugurated by Lieutenant General M.L. Naidu here on Wednesday at Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Secunderabad. ATB aims at undertaking low-cost fast track projects to meet the requirements of the Army. The project proposals include those for the development of new equipment and for upgrading the existing equipment. Mr. Naidu said that the charter of the ATB is to act as a medium of exchange of knowledge and collaboration in the fields of technology with the academia to identify, approve and fund technological research, studies and development projects.


MNC products "must be redesigned"
P.V.V. Murthi

"DRDO willing to offload research work relating to basic sciences"

VELLORE: Indian manufacturers have to concentrate on redesigning products made by the multi-national companies to meet the Indian requirements, M. Natarajan, Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister said here on Wednesday.

Inaugurating the Centre for Advanced Manufacturing Technologies at the VIT University, Mr. Natarajan said while foreign companies sell their products in India with ease, the buyers did not realise that whether these products suited their requirements. Citing an example of an importer of shampoo bottles from the U.K., he said that the importer consulted a chemist, who on examining the product, found that the shampoo contained Vitamin E, which was required for European women who stayed indoors.

He suggested that the cost could be cut by removing the Vitamin E content since Indian women, who went out for work in the hot sun, did not require it.

Referring to the criticism of time over-runs in the manufacture of new products by the Defence Research and Development Organisation, Mr. Natarajan, who is also Director-General of the DRDO, said that translating a design into a free flow production was a major challenge.

Engineering production needed redesigning of the parameters without changing the basic functioning.

Mr. Natarajan said that the DRDO laid emphasis on basic sciences and engineering.

The DRDO was willing to offload its research work relating to basic sciences and engineering to technical institutions such as the VITU provided they come up with meaningful proposals.

Funds would not be a constraint, he said. G. Viswanathan, VITU Chancellor, said that it was predicted that India would be one of the economic giants between 2040 and 2050. But this would be possible only when it concentrated on the manufacturing sector.

Lazar Mathew, Dean-School of Biotechnology, Chemical Engineering and Bio-Engineering, requested Mr. Natarajan to help the VITU to establish a Centre for Biomedical Technology.

S. Narayanan, Dean, School of Mechanical and Building Sciences, VITU, also spoke.

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Postby vina » 26 Apr 2007 23:10

Asked to modify the FCS for Indian ammunition, the Russians pointed out that the T-90 contract had no such provision.

An irate Ministry of Defence has told Russia that the proposed contract for an additional 347 T-90s depends on Russia modifying their FCS to fire Indian ammunition.


Hmm.. Notice to Shukla types. See. Arjun has its uses .. and this imported T-90 tin can that is so beloved to you is not all ding-dong ship-shape..
The babu's really crack me up.. The Russians have these guys by the b*lls and have already shown them the "birdie" (better known as middle finger in India) and said , if you want FCS changes, pay for it , or keep buying our Ammo.
The threat on additional 347 T-90s is laughable.. It is similar to someone saying. do as I say , or I will hold my breath until I go blue and die.. Gosh.. they have you by the scruff and what if they call your bluff and say.. Ok.. No remaining stuff. What are you gonna do ? They are already neck deep in this T-90/T-72 stuff..no way you can pull out.. They will put tail between legs and crawl back.

And to modify the T-90s that have already been delivered, the MoD is making a potentially revolutionary departure from its traditional policy. It is looking towards India's private sector, and offering to pay most of the development costs for a software solution to the FCS problem.

Pray, how will they do that ?Are the Russians going to give them the source code.. What if is propreietary Russian system (hardware and software) that no one outside Russian milatry has knowledge of ?

So will they rip and replace with a brand new locally developed FCS? .. If so what about the OEM warranties on the damn dabba.. Wont it become null and void ?

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Postby Vipul » 27 Apr 2007 01:26

Raksha Utpadan Ratnas to the rescue.

(Hara-hua Shukla is getting Lifafas from the Indian Pvt Sector also).

DEFENCE DEALS AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR-II

Indian Army soldiers, who use outdated night-vision devices to maintain a year-round vigil on the Line of Control (LoC), should be pleased with the defence ministry’s recent decision (reported in Business Standard yesterday) to subsidise research and development by select private manufacturers.

The defence public sector utility Bharat Electronics Ltd has proved its inability to mobilise R&D to upgrade the night vision devices it supplies to the Army.

But now, private sector companies nominated as Raksha Utpadan Ratnas (RuRs) can draw upon a corpus of Rs 100 crore from the defence ministry’s capital budget to fund specific R&D projects, like upgrading night vision devices.

But the ministry’s unwillingness to empower private companies to supply high-grade night vision devices indicates that the new R&D policy still runs up against old practices and habits.

The night vision devices story is complex, but illustrates the contradictions in the defence ministry’s procurement, manufacture and R&D policies.

It began with the Jammu & Kashmir insurgency in the early 1990s, with the Army urgently demanding lightweight night vision binoculars and night vision goggles to staunch the flood of militants across the LoC (Night vision binoculars are heavier and more expensive than night vision goggles because the former magnifies images).

The Army also demanded passive night sights (PNS) that would be fitted onto its INSAS and AK-47 rifles, allowing them to shoot accurately in darkness.

With the private sector excluded from defence until 2001, BEL and the ordnance factories formed a joint venture called BELOP, purchased night vision devices technology from Delft, a Dutch defence major, and churned out thousands of second generation (Gen-2) NVDs that quickly became outdated.

The defence R&D and production establishment (the DRDO, 40 ordinance factories and 8 Defence PSUs) have always touted transfer of technology (ToT) as the first step to indigenous development. But without any R&D by BELOP to improve their NVDs beyond Delft's Gen-2 technology, the militants soon had a qualitative edge in NVDs.

But the MoD asked BEL no hard questions about R&D. Instead, encouraged by BEL, the MoD launched a new initiative in 2005 to procure state-of-the-art NVDs, which had by then improved from Gen-2 to SuperGen and HyperGen.

But then, private companies were competing with BEL in defence manufacture, offering not just production but R&D and product improvement as well.

Intent on shutting out competition, BEL marched into the MoD with a 1996 letter (issued before the private sector was allowed into defence production) that stipulated BEL would produce all NVDs for the military.

The Secretary (Defence Production), KP Singh, told Business Standard that he turned down BEL's demand. "I told BEL that we have opened defence manufacture to the private sector, so we can no longer pass such an order. If technology has to be passed on to the private sector, then it will be."

But while turning down BEL's demand for monopoly over NVD production, the MoD effectively gifted BEL with the NVD contract. Violating its own Defence Procurement Policy of 2006 (DPP-2006), the MoD allowed BEL to preside over the selection procedure.

On December 12, 2006, BEL issued a request for proposal (RFP) to defence manufacturers worldwide, asking them to submit tenders for 30,634 NVDs. (Business Standard is in the possession of this document).

BEL's miserable record with Gen-2 NVDs, and its inability to improve them with in-house R&D was overlooked. Instead of competing with other companies to supply NVDs for the military, BEL was handed the ownership of the NVD project.

Colonel HS Shankar, who was the Chairman of BELOP from 1997-2003, admits that BELOP made no effort to improve its NVDs but blames that on BEL's disinterest in funding R&D.

Now heading a private company that is bidding to supply NVDs, he points out that absorbing technology and improving it with in-house R&D would be an important goal of private companies.

But Singh points to BEL's record in giving it preference over its competitors, stating, "BEL already has the technology to manufacture Gen-2 NVDs. So getting them third generation technology is a natural progression. BEL will produce the II tubes after importing the technology."

On January 22, 2007, at a meeting in BEL, private vendors bidding to supply NVDs to the Army vehemently protested BEL being given the project. (The minutes of that meeting, issued by BEL, are in the possession of Business Standard).

This month, a CII delegation raised the issue with the secretary of defence production, who turned it down, ruling that BEL would play the lead role.

While MoD policies slowly evolve towards bringing the private sector into defence, the old co-exists uneasily with the new.

Laying down a policy that empowers the private sector on paper is easy; the difficulty lies in actually breaking decades-old patterns of patronising the labs and production units of the Department of Defence Production.

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Postby Singha » 27 Apr 2007 09:57

IA cant cry now, they wanted the T90 which met 301% of the GSQR !!

now I have no idea what this is, other than a attempt to spy on NAL ?

NAL To Organize Micro Air Vehicles Urban-Environment Demonstration For United States


Daily News & Updates
India Defence Premium
Dated 23/4/2007
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Aviation news journal 'Flight Global' reports that India's National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) is going to organize demonstrations for Micro Air Vehicles in an Uban Environment in March 2008.

Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) are a new breed of remotely controlled aircraft (UAV) that are significantly smaller than similar craft obtainable with the current state of the art. The target dimension for MAVs today is approximately six inches (15 centimeters) and development of insect-size aircraft is reportedly expected in the near future. Potential military use is one of the driving factors.

The U.S. Army is said to be requesting proposals for micro air vehicle technology demonstrators with the following capabilities:
-- autonomous route de-confliction
-- co-operative formation flying
-- vision-based navigation,
-- acoustic sensing
-- building interior mapping

MAVs with these capabilities would be used by the US Army for likely counter terrorism, counter insurgency operations in urban and congested environments.

Proposed demonstrators would be test flown at a six-day event planned for March 2008. The goal is to identify technology shortfalls that must be overcome to achieve these capabilities, as well as commercial off-the-shelf components that are applicable to urban-environment MAVs.

Three types of MAVs are under investigation. Airplane-like fixed wing model, bird- or insect- like ornithopter (flapping wing) model, and helicopter-like rotating wing model.

The range of Reynolds number they fly is similar to that of insect or bird (103 - 105). Thus some researchers think the understanding of bird flight or insect flight is useful in designing the MAV.

Bidders "deemed to be meritorious" will (reports Flight Global), subject to the availability of funds, be requested to submit proposals that could result in the award of grants, says the US Army. Candidate demonstrators would be flown at an Indian ministry of defence facility in Agra, northern India during the March event, which will be the first US-Asian demonstration and assessment of micro-air vehicle technologies.

India's National Aerospace Laboratories in Bangalore is organising the event for the US Army International Technology Center Southeast Asia Office, and is supported by the country's Defence Research and Development Organisation.

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Postby Singha » 27 Apr 2007 10:01

Print edition of TOI:

with existing UAV test facility in Kolar quite small and big UAVs of future likely to interfere with flight paths into devanhalli, there will be a new huge UAV test center setup in north karnataka and Govt has commenced survey of a site.

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Postby mandrake » 27 Apr 2007 11:48

Singha, Tha NAL MAV is not at a spying issue,

NAL is demostrating world class UAV's of which US Army can be buyer or Indian Army, now the show is being funded by US Army just like lockheed funded a lot in Aero India.

Just pray the students who will win the first prize, stays in India, because that is where they tends to move out..

and IA buys the MAV!! Formation flight of MAV's would be spectacular.

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Postby JCage » 27 Apr 2007 17:54

Singha wrote:IA cant cry now, they wanted the T90 which met 301% of the GSQR !!

now I have no idea what this is, other than a attempt to spy on NAL ?

NAL To Organize Micro Air Vehicles Urban-Environment Demonstration For United States

India's National Aerospace Laboratories in Bangalore is organising the event for the US Army International Technology Center Southeast Asia Office, and is supported by the country's Defence Research and Development Organisation.


Good first step to build relationships. The US will invariably try to subvert this process for enhancing R&D ties, though. Its a given. Its the way they are.

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Postby mandrake » 27 Apr 2007 18:42

Guys who are interested in knowing status of Arjun

IDF

Please refer to it :lol:

The NERA Armour is perfected beyond oexpectation. There is a honey comb design India has come up with. Its revolutionary and USA wants it badly... actually so do we. I think we will get it first though. I will post a picture (small tiny one) tomorrow. Anyways once the machiney is set for construction and component backup (all foreign ones) - it will become easy to produce and maintain. There is a team from Arizona that is here now.


Check the full out there, regards.

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Postby negi » 27 Apr 2007 19:20

Hey Joey what are you laughing at ?

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Postby mandrake » 27 Apr 2007 19:28

I aint laughing, that smiley i put as a sense of appreciation!

Did you checked it out? :eek:

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Postby negi » 27 Apr 2007 19:39

Yeah buddy ,but cant say the postor claims to be privy to some 'andar ki baat' refuses to divulge much,anyways anything good on Arjun will take that,btw IDF forum is very cluttered didnt like the looks of it (although it seems many BRFites do lurk there).

mandrake
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Postby mandrake » 27 Apr 2007 19:54

negi wrote:Yeah buddy ,but cant say the postor claims to be privy to some 'andar ki baat' refuses to divulge much,anyways anything good on Arjun will take that,btw IDF forum is very cluttered didnt like the looks of it (although it seems many BRFites do lurk there).


Denil was the first guy to let us know about Arjuns capabilities in broader manner.Just look the pics he provided!!

IDF forum is doing good!


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