Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

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Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SSSalvi » 30 Nov 2007 19:25

From : Times of India

Launch scheduled on 9th April

The Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft will be launched on a PSLV-XL, the workhorse of ISRO modified to carry heavier loads.

5 Indian and 5 International payloads to explore moon.
[quote]

Moon mission all set to lift-off in April ’08
TIMES NEWS NETWORK

Bangalore: India’s moon mission, Chandrayaan-1, will blast off on April 9, 2008. The date and month of the launch have been fixed by ISRO after taking into account the mission’s work schedule and meterological factors.
Senior ISRO Director K Shiva Kumar told a national conference on the moon mission on Thursday that ISRO was working at a feverish pace to keep to the target date. “Everything as of now is on schedule. Nothing should prevent us from launching on that date and fulfilling our mission objectives. We are confident of all systems working in tandem. Ofcourse we will keep our fingers crossed.â€
Last edited by Jagan on 22 Oct 2008 06:56, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: title updated

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Chandrayaan missions

Postby rbnataraja » 30 Nov 2007 20:27

Is there not a too much of rework here.
Chandrayaan 1

Chandrayaan 2

May be 3 later if it is started.


I believe ISRO should leverage on the success of the cryogenic test and comeup with a spacecraft which lives in the earth orbit and refuels from fuel pay load launched later and then can interface with new payloads which can later be launched with PSLV. Trying to maintain Reusabality as much as possible.

This can make "Chandrayaan N" machine possible. Ofcourse there is a limit on N. When we can recover the spacecraft.

I think ISRO should do more Reusabality experiments. Things Stopped with SRE 1. I guess there is another SRE2 at the end of 2008, which may well become 2009.

Just a thought.

Rajesh

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Postby SSSalvi » 01 Dec 2007 09:36

The Foreign payloads that are being carried by Chandrayan are as follows:

Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS)
Realized through ESA with collaboration between Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK and ISRO Satellite Centre, ISRO.
Part of this payload is redesigned by ISRO to suit Chandrayaan-1 scientific objectives. The primary goal of the C1XS instrument is to carry out high quality X-ray spectroscopic mapping of the Moon, in order to constrain key questions on the origin and evolution of the Moon. C1XS would use X-ray fluorescence technique (1.0-10 keV) for measuring elemental abundance of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ti distributed over the surface of the Moon.

Near-IR Spectrometer (SIR-2)
SIR-2 is developed by the Max-Plank-Institute for Solar System Science, through the Max-Plank Society, Germany and ESA.
It collects the Sun’s light reflected by the Moon with the help of a main and secondary mirror which hits a grating. The intensity of light dispersed by the grating is measured at the differentwavelengths. The wavelength range covered by the spectrometer is 0.93-2.4 μm with spectral resolution 6nm. Used to study detail the lunar surface in various geological/mineralogical and topographical units, vertical distribution of crustal material, crater formation on the Moon, Survey mineral lunar resources etc.

Sub Kev Atom reflecting Analyser (SARA)
SARA is realized through ESA, in collaboration with Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden and Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO. SARA consists of three units viz. SARA neutral atom sensor CENA (Chandrayan-1 Energetic Neutrals Analyzer), SARA solar wind monitor SWIM (Solar WInd Monitor), and SARA DPU (Digital Processing Unit).
It will image the Moon surface using low energy neutral atoms as diagnostics in the energy range 10eV-2keV. The SARA instrument is designed to detect with sufficient angular and mass resolution the atomic particles which leave the surface mostly as neutral atoms leading to studies in space weathering of Moon’s surface.

Radiation Dose Monitor Experiment ( RADOM )
RADOM Payload is from Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It is a miniature spectrometer-dosimeter containing one semiconductor detector of 0.3mm thickness, one charge-sensitive preamplifier and two micro controllers. It will qualitatively and quantitatively characterize, in terms of particle flux, dose rate and deposited energy spectrum, the radiation environment in near moon space.

Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR)
MiniSAR payload is from Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and Naval Air Warfare Centre, USA through NASA. The mini-SAR system will transmit Right Circular Polarization (RCP) and receive both Left Circular Polarization (LCP) and RCP. It operates in two modes, as a scatterometer and as a radiometer.
In scatterometer mode, the system will measure the RCP and LCP response in the altimetry footprint along the nadir ground-track.
In radiometer mode, the system will measure the surface RF emissivity, allowing a determination of the near normal incidence Fresnel reflectivity.
The synthetic aperture radar system works at a frequency 2.38 GHz with a resolution of 75m per pixel and weighs 6.5kg.

MOON MINERALOGY MAPPER (M3)
Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) payload is from Brown University and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA through NASA. The M3 scientific instrument is a high throughput push broom imaging spectrometer operating in 0.7 to 3.0 µ m range. It measures solar reflected energy using a two-dimensional HgCdTe detector array. The primary Science goal of M3 is to characterize and map lunar surface mineralogy in the context of lunar geologic evolution. This will improve the understanding of the early evolution of a differentiated planetary body and also provide a high-resolution assessment of lunar resources.

===========
S^3

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Postby ramana » 05 Dec 2007 01:19

S^3, Can the Hyperspectral camera and the mini Sar be usede as basis for Earth observation sats? Can that be a spin-off?

Also what is the vehicle guidance figure of merit for this lunar mission?

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Postby Bade » 05 Dec 2007 01:27

ramana wrote:Can the Hyperspectral camera and the mini Sar be used as basis for Earth observation sats? Can that be a spin-off?


ISRO already has a SAR payload planned for earth observationsRISAT.
http://www.ursi.org/Proceedings/ProcGA05/pdf/F08.6(01643).pdf

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Postby SSSalvi » 05 Dec 2007 21:37

I heard 2/3 yrs back that ISRO had plans to place a SAR on one of the INSAT for aerosol studies to know the environmental degradations. Don't know the current status of the project.

Also some friends from ISRO tell me that they point the Remote Sensing satellite cameras to stars for calibration purposes but since it ( calibration and evaluation processes ) has no concern for the general public it is not announced.

There are also star gazing telescopes on some satellites for calibrating spacecraft attitude.

Bade has already talked of RISAT in earlier post.

======
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Postby Sanjay M » 06 Dec 2007 12:02

Slightly OT, but China has been found to have doctored a photo from its lunar mission:

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/ ... 95870.aspx

What the hell for? Why move some crater like that?
Just for photoshop practice? Just to see if everyone was paying attention?

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Postby SSSalvi » 06 Dec 2007 21:25

Sanjay M wrote:Slightly OT, but China has been found to have doctored a photo from its lunar mission:

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/ ... 95870.aspx

What the hell for? Why move some crater like that?
Just for photoshop practice? Just to see if everyone was paying attention?


There is a very convincing reply by Ms. Lakdawala ( oh, again some desi name ! ) who has proved that it is not the image from American image.

She said that this the artifact created near the seams when the strips are joined together. This joining is necessary because generally the remote sensing data is acquired in strips and to cover a larger area many such strips are required to be joined together.

These things do happen when images are meshed together ( see Google Earth which has several of such instances ) but then a couple of questions do crop up:

1. There should have been some more repeatations in the image ... there seems to be none.. I tried to find seams in various directions but could not succeed.

2. The person who matches the images knows thoroughly well that there is some repeatation.. then why did the Chinese specialists say that a new crater has been found?

======
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Postby SSSalvi » 07 Dec 2007 21:32

We Indians like crowd ... see how many instruments are attached to this mission. :wink: :shock:

Image



Image source: ISRO
==========
S^3

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Postby manu.p » 08 Dec 2007 00:39

My first Post

Just a thought .....
Would the orbiter be able to take high resolution pictures of the Apollo landing sites and man made objects left on the moon ??
There is a lot of debris left behind ... rovers , instruments etc from the Apollo missions

I don't know if there has ever been an independent verifiable proof of Apollo missions , in terms of photographs from instruments of countries other than US.

THE APOLLO LANDING SITES

Apollo 11 Mare Tranquillitatis
Apollo 12 Oceanus Procellarum
Apollo 14 Fra Mauro
Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennines
Apollo 16 Descartes
Apollo 17 Taurus-Littrow

Is it possible that with the high resolution cameras , we can pick up something ?

Regards

Manu

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Photos of earlier missions

Postby SSSalvi » 08 Dec 2007 07:00

Yes it is possible if the resolution is very good ... alas.

The best resolution is for TMC sensor and it is 5m. Not much chance to detect the earlier equipment except perhaps as a speck.

Welcome to BR forum and kudos for the collection of all those details.

========
S^3

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Re: Chandrayaan missions

Postby SSSalvi » 10 Dec 2007 21:13

rbnataraja wrote:
I think ISRO should do more Reusabality experiments. Things Stopped with SRE 1. I guess there is another SRE2 at the end of 2008, which may well become 2009.

Rajesh


I don't think that they would stop with SRE-1. It could have been a study experiment to strengthen the knowledge base developed for that mission so that next time that database will form the ground work from which more complicated missions can be planned ( and executed ) .

Aren't such small scale experiments to build the base for future common in any field of scientific development?

Now they may be refining algorithms for reusable vehicles which are inevitable for economy of launch.

=======
S^3

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Postby samuel » 11 Dec 2007 20:06

What algorithms are going to be used for 3D reconstruction with TMC and is it fused with LLRI. Is LLRI a probe or a scanner? Any info is appreciated.

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Postby SSSalvi » 11 Dec 2007 20:55

Primary objective of LLRI is the determination of Topology. With the accurate height detrmination in conjunction with gravitational measurements will help in deducing the density and if any anomalies are found in this density then subsurface structure estimation studies
can yeild some interesting facts including cooling characterisation.

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Postby ramana » 11 Dec 2007 21:53

S^3, Whats the point of the Mini SAR? Its stated resolution is 75m from the descripion above and thats not much. There is no water vapor or clouds to obstruct the view on the moon. So whats the point of the SAR? Is the Mini SAR to map the darkside which is not illuminated? Even then the resolution of 75m per pixel makes for quite a blurry imagery.

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Postby Bade » 11 Dec 2007 22:17

A lunar orbiter being built by India may be hauling a U.S. radar experiment designed to help unravel whether the Moon's poles contain pockets of water ice.

The device is a small, lightweight, low-power imaging radar developed by the U.S. Department of Defense. It would be attached to Chandraayan-1, a lunar probe now being built by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) and headed for a September 2007 liftoff.

The miniature-synthetic aperture radar - mini-SAR --- would be delivered to ISRO as a flight module by February 2007. The miniature imaging radar instrument has been approved by ISRO for inclusion onboard Chandraayan-1, but awaits a U.S. State Department go-ahead.


http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/india_moon_050314.html

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Postby ajay_ijn » 12 Dec 2007 08:53

ramana wrote:S^3, Whats the point of the Mini SAR? Its stated resolution is 75m from the descripion above and thats not much. There is no water vapor or clouds to obstruct the view on the moon. So whats the point of the SAR? Is the Mini SAR to map the darkside which is not illuminated? Even then the resolution of 75m per pixel makes for quite a blurry imagery.

actually Unkil has a bigger plan.

http://ilewg.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc ... f/1153.pdf

Chandrayaan Mission to the Moon: India plans to launch the Chandrayaan mission to the Moon in September, 2007. This 550 kg spacecraft will enter a polar orbit and map the Moon for 2 years [14]. It’s core payload includes monochrome imaging at ~ 5 m/pixel, a hyperspectral imager (color camera) that images the Moon at 80 m/pixel, a laser altimeter (1 Hz freq.) and an X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer to map the light elements (e.g., Si, Al) of the surface. In addi-tion, an AO released by the ISRO last year invited proposals for additional international instruments. Of the over 20 proposals received, 5 were selected for flight in November, 2004; one of these was mini-SAR. We are currently seeking export-control approval for flight from the U.S. State Department.

Mini-SAR Instrument The mini-SAR will trans-mit Right Circular Polarization (RCP) and receive both Left Circular Polarization (LCP) and RCP. In scat-terometer mode, the system will measure the RCP and LCP response in the altimetry footprint along the nadir groundtrack. The system will measure the surface RF emissivity, allowing a determination of the near nor-mal incidence Fresnel reflectivity. Meter-scale surface roughness and circular polarization ratio (CPR) will also be determined for this footprint. This allows the characterization of the radar and physical properties of the lunar surface (e.g., dielectric constant, porosity) for a network of points. When directed off nadir the radar system will image a swath parallel to the orbital track by delay/Doppler methods (SAR mode) in both RCP and LCP.

Because ice in concentration exhibits the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE), which causes an increase in radar echo reflectivity and CPR en-hancement along the backscatter direction [4,6], mini-SAR will allow extensive data to be collected on the location and distribution of lunar ice deposits. At S-band, CBOE is sensitive to 1-10 meter-scale ice depos-its covered by up to 40 cm of dry lunar regolith. The technical parameters of the instrument are summarized in Table 1.

The Chandrayaan laser altimeter will collect new topographic data over both poles, providing a topographic control network for the polar regions of the Moon. It has been pointed out that such a control network, combined with long-lived baseline shadow mapping, will enable much more precise de-termination of the location and extent of the perma-nently shadowed terrain, allowing for seasonal and topographic corrections. Such information will allow a more precise estimate of the extent and location of the polar cold traps and hence, ice deposits. This informa-tion is important to evaluating the habitability of the lunar poles.

Imaging of the lunar surface by the SAR mapper precludes the imaging of the Moon by the other Chandrayaan-1 sensors, including the medium and high resolution imaging cameras. This is because the high data rates produced by both instruments precludes simultaneous operation. However, the Chandrayaan imaging campaign has a built-in hiatus every six months , permitting the two to operate in se-quence, alleviating this problem. In addition, space-craft power limitations preclude other instrument op-eration during the brief SAR passes. No SAR passes are anticipated during eclipse. Because the Moon ro-tates very slowly (~ 0.5 degree longitude per hour) and the Chandrayaan spacecraft is in a 2-hr mapping orbit , we do not have to take SAR image data on every orbit. A SAR swath taken every 3rd orbit will compile a complete polar mosaic (80° poleward) in about 2 weeks of mapping.

Data products from mini-SAR include maps of lu-nar surface scattering properties, including maps of CPR, indicative of ice. The polar backscatter maps will have a typical resolution of 1-2 km/pixel. In addi-tion, we will obtain complete SAR mosaics in both RCP and LCP of the polar regions at about 150 m/pixel. These images will display the locations of polar ice and the topography and morphology of the permanently dark regions around both lunar poles. Our experiment should answer to first order the broad questions about lunar polar ice, its extent and purity.

Image
If Chandrayaan lasts for an extended time in lunar orbit (nominal mission end is August, 2009), we hope to conduct a bistatic imaging experiment with the US Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Fig. 1). By transmit-ting RCP from the Chandrayaan mini-SAR and receiv-ing RCP and LCP on the LRO, we can image the polar deposits through the beta (phase) angle, providing de-finitive evidence for the presence of water ice at the poles. Monostatic radar can only image the deposits at zero phase (β=0) and thus, there is always an ambigu-ity as to the high back scattering being caused by roughness (surface) or ice (volume) scattering. Bistatic imaging can eliminate this ambiguity. Coor-dinated radar observations from Chandrayaan and LRO should be a high priority for these mission opera-tions.

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Postby samuel » 12 Dec 2007 09:12

SSSalvi wrote:Primary objective of LLRI is the determination of Topology. With the accurate height detrmination in conjunction with gravitational measurements will help in deducing the density and if any anomalies are found in this density then subsurface structure estimation studies
can yeild some interesting facts including cooling characterisation.


Not sure I follow.

- height fields and gravimetric measurements can be inverted to produce density fields, and that lithological reconstruction is well-studied in seismic imaging/geophysics. But that is somewhat besides the point.

LLRI is for determining height/depth/range. Either its a point laser or a laser that sweeps across as chandrayaan moves, like a moving scanner. If it is a point source (as the picture suggests), then the number of depth points it can provide can at best be the square-root of the tmc image size. This may not be enough to ground truth TMC, which is solving an inverse problem for height, which is resolvable upto a scale factor without calibration and therefore is sensitive to calibration. The Lased depth values may not be sufficient in number to recover from any calibration errors.

This is why I was curious to find out what algorithms they were planning on using for reconstructing topography with TMC. Many research groups are struggling with the camera-motion+spot laser fusion issue for terrain reconstruction and I wonder if ISRO has solved it. Anyone know which research group is working with TMC?

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Postby AshokS » 12 Dec 2007 19:03

Two excellent videos on Chandrayaan I


This one actually goes on to Chandrayaan II, manned missions as well. Not endorsed by ISRO based on the disclaimer, but someone put serious effort in putting this together....checkout the orbital path from the 4th minute onward...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipBOotJD ... re=related


Another one on Chandrayaan I, more of a documentary..but created by ISRO. Interesting details (among the other stated objectives, they will also explore the presence of uranium / thorium )...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00AvB-9R ... re=related

Does all of the downlinked data go to ISRO first or is it shared with other agencies as well?

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Postby Bade » 17 Dec 2007 20:17

[url=http://www.telegraphindia.com/1071217/jsp/frontpage/story_8677336.jsp]Robotic lander to drill moon surface
- India to send second probe in 4 years[/url]

Nice pics of the Bylaalu facility.

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Postby karthik » 04 Jan 2008 01:01

@AshokS

Really great video.. If that guy is a BRite then i really want to give a pat on his back for his inspiring work..

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Postby SwamyG » 04 Jan 2008 01:24

Link
[quote]SPACE

Mission mode

T.S. SUBRAMANIAN

With the launch date set for Chandrayaan-1, installation of a massive dish antenna to track the spacecraft is complete.

K. MURALI KUMAR

The dish antenna installed at Byalala village, 40 km from Bangalore

PROJECT Chandrayaan-1 has picked up speed with four out of 11 instruments of the spacecraft having been integrated and the installation of a dish antenna with a diameter of 32 metres to track the spacecraft completed. If the current momentum is sustained, a new and more powerful version of the Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, PSOM-XL, will lift off from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on April 9, 2008, and put Chandrayaan-1 in orbit on its 3.84 lakh-km journey to the moon. Chandrayaan-1 will weigh 525 kg in lunar orbit and will have a mission life of two years.

The objectives of the mission are to investigate the moon’s minerals and chemical properties, detect the presence of water, if any, on the lunar surface, systematically map the entire lunar surface, look for clues on the origin and evolution of the moon, create expertise in the development of detectors and sensors for future programmes to explore planets, and develop miniaturised spacecraft technologies.

With a resurgence of interest in the moon, India will be the third country in 2007-2008 to send a spacecraft to investigate it. Japan launched its Selene mission on September 14, 2007, and China sent the Chang’e-1 spacecraft on October 24, 2007. Russia is planning a moon mission and the United States has declared its intention to set up a base on the moon by 2024.

Since the date for the launch has been set, activities relating to the Chandrayaan-1 project have revved up at the ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore. In a spacious, ultra-clean, high-purity hall at the ISAC, spacecraft engineers are busy assembling and integrating the 11 payloads from six countries, including India’s six.

Four payloads – the Moon Mineralogy Mapper from the U.S.’ National Aeronautical and Space Agency; the Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar, also from NASA; the Radiation Dose Monitor (RODOM) experiment from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences; and the Near-Infrared Spectrometer from Max Plank Institute, Germany, have already been assembled. Elements of the propulsion system and power system of the spacecraft have also been integrated and tested.

The integration of the remaining payloads – the Sub Atom Reflecting Analyser (SARA) experiment through the European Space Agency (ESA) from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, and the Indian payloads – will begin in the fourth week of January and be completed in February.

M. Annadurai, Project Director, Chandrayaan-1, calls it “a national mission with international participation and with India as the captainâ€

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Postby Jayram » 04 Jan 2008 02:46

AshokS wrote:Two excellent videos on Chandrayaan I


This one actually goes on to Chandrayaan II, manned missions as well. Not endorsed by ISRO based on the disclaimer, but someone put serious effort in putting this together....checkout the orbital path from the 4th minute onward...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipBOotJD ... re=related


This is what the author has to say about himself
This Chandrayaan Animation was produced and directed by me (Dev Devendra), and was funded through my company Thejes (based in Mississauga, Canada).

My development team is based in Vizag, India at an allied company, InChi Studios.


We are currently planning the production of another video about Chandragupta Maurya (India's first Emperor).... which should commence shortly.

More information will be forthcoming shortly at my company website at: thejes dot com

The part about vizag caught my eye. More power to yindoos.
--Jayram

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Postby SwamyG » 05 Jan 2008 03:11

Not really related to the mission, but saw a reference to it here...12 Highly Anticipated Science and Technology Breakthroughs of 2008
Anticipated Science and Technology breakthroughs of 2008 #3 - Chandrayaan-1

The Chandrayaan-1, the first unmanned spacecraft designed to orbit the moon will conduct research on the moon and create a 3-D image of its surface. India plans to launch the CHandrayaan-1 in April of 2008

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Postby ramana » 25 Jan 2008 23:50

Up. Please start posting Chandrayaan news and discussions in this thread also.

Thanks, ramana

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Postby SwamyG » 13 Feb 2008 02:59

Awwwwwwwwww man. India's moon mission likely to be put off to June
It is being put off because there is an important mission in March/April. Come on, what can be far more important?

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Postby Anujan » 13 Feb 2008 04:46

SwamyG wrote:Awwwwwwwwww man. India's moon mission likely to be put off to June
It is being put off because there is an important mission in March/April. Come on, what can be far more important?

March/April launch of PSLV will launch Cartosat-2A, CanX-2, AAUSAT-II, Cute 1.7+APD-2, Compass 1, Delfi-C3, Seeds-2. The Cartosat-2A will provide less than 1 meter resolution. For map making and city planning tasks onlee. Map making is very important. Need to locate paan/mithai shops in chandni chowk for quickly buying paan and jalebis :P Hear it from Dr G. Madhavan Nair:

[quote]ISRO arm may get more satellite launch contracts

The ISRO Chairman, Dr G. Madhavan Nair, indicated as much. “We expect that in the near term, two major contracts will come through. We have already signed a contract for half a dozen small satellites,â€

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Delay in Ch-1 mission due to payload integration

Postby SSSalvi » 13 Feb 2008 07:56

The postponement of launch schedule is due to 'Technical Reasons'..

Some of the payloads are not in 'fully ready for launch state'

From Times of India 13th Feb 08:

MUMBAI: The much-awaited Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1 - slated for an April 9 lift-off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, has been postponed to June or July because of technical reasons.

"A number of issues relating to the integration of the scientific payloads with the main lunar orbiter are yet to be sorted out and this has caused the delay," Chandrayaan-1 project director Mylaswamy Annadurai said.

Annadurai said of the 11 scientific payloads - five Indian and six foreign - four international payloads have been integrated into the orbiter. "The remaining seven are in an advanced stage of integration, and the process will be completed by March end," Annadurai said.


Final launch date will be decided in a meeting of all Payload Partners during Feb 18-20.

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Postby amit » 13 Feb 2008 08:06

lakshmic wrote: Map making is very important. Need to locate paan/mithai shops in chandni chowk for quickly buying paan and jalebis :P



Can't wait for Cartosat-2A. Need to find some nice Mandi offering "Super" Basmati rice! :twisted:

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Postby SSSalvi » 13 Feb 2008 10:16

amit wrote:
lakshmic wrote: Map making is very important. Need to locate paan/mithai shops in chandni chowk for quickly buying paan and jalebis :P



Can't wait for Cartosat-2A. Need to find some nice Mandi offering "Super" Basmati rice! :twisted:


Paan and Basmati through Carto-2A are Not for we Civilians ..

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Postby Rudranathh » 13 Feb 2008 14:14

amit wrote:
lakshmic wrote: Map making is very important. Need to locate paan/mithai shops in chandni chowk for quickly buying paan and jalebis :P

Can't wait for Cartosat-2A. Need to find some nice Mandi offering "Super" Basmati rice! :twisted:

Could be put to better use in tracking nuke bombs and missiles brought by the khan network.

The last time India intercepted north korean ship containing missile parts enroute to pakisatan. I hope we will get to track more of these.

Not sure if the birds in the sky were used for the operation but surely some amount of satellite imagery was used, otherwise it would have been impossible to track such illegal & top secret WMD barter exchanges between North Korea and Pakisatan.

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Postby ashish raval » 13 Feb 2008 14:38

Rudranathh wrote:
amit wrote:
lakshmic wrote: Map making is very important. Need to locate paan/mithai shops in chandni chowk for quickly buying paan and jalebis :P

Can't wait for Cartosat-2A. Need to find some nice Mandi offering "Super" Basmati rice! :twisted:

Could be put to better use in tracking nuke bombs and missiles brought by the khan network.

The last time India intercepted north korean ship containing missile parts enroute to pakisatan. I hope we will get to track more of these.

Not sure if the birds in the sky were used for the operation but surely some amount of satellite imagery was used, otherwise it would have been impossible to track such illegal & top secret WMD barter exchanges between North Korea and Pakisatan.



My concern is that there is no news from ISRO-DRDO about development of Anti-SAT missiles or system. Why the heck should we not test the one and send signals to Chicoms about our capabilities. ?

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Postby ashish raval » 13 Feb 2008 14:38

My concern is that there is no news from ISRO-DRDO about development of Anti-SAT missiles or system. Why the heck should we not test the one and send signals to Chicoms about our capabilities. ?

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Postby Rudranathh » 13 Feb 2008 15:23

ashish raval wrote:My concern is that there is no news from ISRO-DRDO about development of Anti-SAT missiles or system. Why the heck should we not test the one and send signals to Chicoms about our capabilities. ?

Why waste precious money on something which will make India an villian in the eyes of the world for 'creating space debris' through an Anti-SAT test? Rather use time and energy on constructive technologies.

AFAIK the tech for the Anti-SAT system may already in place.
Check this link titled US intelligence and the Indian Bomb, that prashant posted in nuke nukkad thread.
In the pdf file provided in"Document 5: Central Intelligence Agency, Subject: Indian Government Policy on Development of Nuclear Weapon, October 24, 1964" it says,

Date: 22 October 1964
The Government of India (GOI) has all of the elements necessary to produce a nuclear weapon and it has the capability to assemble a bomb quickly.

The tech for the Indian nuclear bomb was ready as far back as in 1964 and yet India conducted an nuclear explosion only when it was necessary to do so. In the continuation of the same policy India will test the anti-sat system at the time it chooses and when extremely necessary.

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Postby prashanth » 13 Feb 2008 17:04

Rudranathh wrote:
ashish raval wrote:My concern is that there is no news from ISRO-DRDO about development of Anti-SAT missiles or system. Why the heck should we not test the one and send signals to Chicoms about our capabilities. ?

Why waste precious money on something which will make India an villian in the eyes of the world for 'creating space debris' through an Anti-SAT test? Rather use time and energy on constructive technologies.



Date: 22 October 1964

The tech for the Indian nuclear bomb was ready as far back as in 1964 and yet India conducted an nuclear explosion only when it was necessary to do so. In the continuation of the same policy India will test the anti-sat system at the time it chooses and when extremely necessary.


Exactly.China has the reputation for putting its foot in its mouth. During 1960 to 1980, both India and China suffered severe shortage of foodgrains and famine. At this time India chose not to aggresively pursue space programmes, let alone nuke weapons. China, on the other hand, wanted to do a big boss and tested nukes, a typical commie mentality. India's poverty was publicized worldwide and it received considerable foreign help,which saved lives of millions. At the same time millions died in china due to starvation, and it did not receive any foreign aid.

Sorry for being OT.

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Postby swapna » 13 Feb 2008 18:00

Would a Moon Rover be landed this time. I am eagerly waiting--

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Postby SwamyG » 13 Feb 2008 18:49

So it both technical reasons and "money" from the launch contracts. The sales guys at Antrix must be working overtime.

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Postby Sanjay M » 17 Feb 2008 07:58

prashanth wrote:Date: 22 October 1964

The tech for the Indian nuclear bomb was ready as far back as in 1964 and yet India conducted an nuclear explosion only when it was necessary to do so. In the continuation of the same policy India will test the anti-sat system at the time it chooses and when extremely necessary.


Exactly.China has the reputation for putting its foot in its mouth. During 1960 to 1980, both India and China suffered severe shortage of foodgrains and famine. At this time India chose not to aggresively pursue space programmes, let alone nuke weapons. China, on the other hand, wanted to do a big boss and tested nukes, a typical commie mentality. India's poverty was publicized worldwide and it received considerable foreign help,which saved lives of millions. At the same time millions died in china due to starvation, and it did not receive any foreign aid.

Sorry for being OT.


Well, given that Beijing's mandarins have never cared about the masses, I don't think they were terribly bothered by famines. That's like saying that Pak's ruling military elite would feel bad about the fact that they are destroying their youth thru madrassa brainwashing. When the masses and the youth are mere pawns to your own greater ambitions, such things don't really keep you awake at night. So they'd do it again, if given the chance.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission discussion

Postby sanjaychoudhry » 10 Jun 2008 14:47


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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission discussion

Postby Vidyarthi » 09 Aug 2008 12:12



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