Chandrayan-1 moon mission

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby ajay_ijn » 21 Jan 2009 21:53

70 scientists to review Chandrayaan-1 data
CHENNAI: Around 70 scientists including those from other countries will participate in the first meeting to review scientific findings from the data acquired from each instrument of the Chandrayaan-1 project at Bangaloreon January 29.

Speaking to The Hindu on the sidelines of a brainstorming session with schoolchildren at Chennai on Monday, Project Director Mayilsamy Annadurai said, “We expect something new about the moon to emerge during the first meeting of scientists associated with all the 11 instruments of Chandrayaan-1.”

One of the instruments of Chandrayaan-1, MiniSAR, has the objective of detecting water ice in regions on the lunar surface not yet studied. “We see something unique and if during the meeting in Bangalore the scientific findings provide a breakthrough in detecting water ice in the moon, it will be a goldmine,” said Dr. Annadurai. Such a breakthrough will be a stepping stone to setting up a colony in the moon, he added.

Apart from scientists from the country, eminent space scientists participating in the first meeting will include Paul Spudis, Carle Pieters, Ben Bussey, Stas Barabash, Christian Erd and Manuel Grande.

SARA, Sub keV Atom Reflecting Analyser, is the first ever such instrument to decipher what the planetary body contains. The data from SARA, Dr. Annadurai said, may also lead to new and interesting findings on the moon.

The scientists participating in the deliberations in Bangalore on January 29 are from organisations such as NASA, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Brown University, Johns Hopkins University and Max Planck Institute.

At the meeting, the findings of each instrument will be discussed by the scientists concerned in order to get a comprehensive picture of the preliminary results of the project, said Dr. Annadurai.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby shynee » 23 Jan 2009 02:51

Image

Image

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby ajay_ijn » 23 Jan 2009 19:39

C1XS Catches First Glimpse of X-rays from the Moon
The Imaging X-ray Spectrometer, one of the 11 payloads onboard Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, jointly developed by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and UK’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, has successfully detected the first X-ray signature from the Moon. This is the first step in its mission to reveal the origin and evolution of the Moon by mapping its surface composition. It may be recalled that Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was launched from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota on October 22, 2008 and entered the lunar orbit on November 8, 2008.

In orbit around the Moon, Chandrayaan-1 Imaging X ray Spectrometer (C1XS) detected the X-ray signal from a region near the Apollo landing sites on December 12, 2008 at 02:36 UT. The solar flare that caused the X-ray fluorescence was exceedingly weak, approximately 20 times smaller than the minimum C1XS was designed to detect. The X-ray camera collected 3 minutes of data from the Moon just as the flare started and the camera finished its observation. C1XS depends on radiation from the Sun to activate the detection of X rays. Though, the minimum in solar activity was expected to end in early 2008, however solar activity is yet to reach the anticipated increase. With the highly sensitive C1XS instrument, it has been possible to detect the X rays.

First lunar spectrum under flare

The camera - C1XS (pronounced “kicks”) – was designed and built at Space Science and Technology Department at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). It is an X-Ray Spectrometer that uses X-rays to map the surface composition of the Moon and will help scientists to understand its origin and evolution, as well as quantifying the mineral resources that exist there.

Chandrayaan-1 is the first lunar mission of ISRO and also the first mission with international partners. It is designed to orbit the Moon at an altitude of 100 km and carries 11 scientific instruments including radar and particle detectors as well as instruments that will make observations in the visible, near infrared and soft and hard X-rays.

Dr G Madhavan Nair, Chairman, ISRO said that the joint development and operationalisation of C1XS in Chandrayaan-1 between ISRO and RAL, UK is a major achievement. First signatures obtained from C1XS are highly encouraging.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Kumar_I » 24 Jan 2009 02:57

One Hundred Days Of Chandrayaan-1

There is tremendous anticipation whether Chandrayaan-1 can reveal and confirm traces of water which would make feasible ideas of building colonies on Moon. Traces of iron have been confirmed and extensive imageries of Moon's surface characteristics have been beamed by India's TMC camera on board Chandrayaan-1.
by Staff Writers
Bangalore, India (PTI) Jan 23, 2009
Hundred days after it was launched from Sriharikota on October 22, 60 scientists, including about 50 from the US and Europe, will conduct Chandrayaan-1's first high-level review on January 29.
The scientists will compare notes on data their respective instruments have gathered and generated on Chandrayaan-1. European Space Agency, Bulgarian experts, Nasa and perhaps the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Chandrayaan-1 team, would represent Europe, the US and India respectively.

An air of expectation hovers around the meeting as scientists are expected to announce new findings on the Moon. Some findings could also be of the nature of confirmation of findings from earlier Moon missions. Either way there is tremendous credit attached to the flawless operation of Chandrayaan-1 and expertise ISRO has demonstrated in its stability.

There is tremendous anticipation whether Chandrayaan-1 can reveal and confirm traces of water which would make feasible ideas of building colonies on Moon. Traces of iron have been confirmed and extensive imageries of Moon's surface characteristics have been beamed by India's TMC camera on board Chandrayaan-1.

Chandrayaan-1 project director M Annadurai told TOI: "We can't now say what data has been generated. Presentations by scientists on all instruments and their operation will tell us what the initial findings are and their implications. We're meeting on the completion of 100 days of Chandrayaan-1. We'll make clear what emerges from the findings so far.''

The mission has a life-term of two years and there is plenty of time left for new data to be generated. Nasa has in fact stated it has already got the first look into cold and dark craters through their instrument on Chandrayaan-1. Nasa was also the first to declare traces of iron on Moon. Its Jet Propulsion Laboratory has gone on record about Chandrayaan-1's confirmation of mineral traces and access it has lent to unexplored craters via Nasa instruments.

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/A_Hund ... 1_999.html

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby k prasad » 24 Jan 2009 07:31

Wow!!! beautiful photos there..... Google Earth now has a competitor - ANTRIX MOON!!! :D

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby krishnan » 24 Jan 2009 15:43

According to The Hindu it has detected aluminum, magnesium and silicon

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby SaiK » 24 Jan 2009 18:58

detected the X-ray signal from a region near the Apollo landing sites

hope its not from the reflector placed by apollo-11 team.
here is the link:
Image

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Amber G. » 24 Jan 2009 22:28

hope its not from the reflector placed by apollo-11 team.

BTW - The reflectors are are more or less ordinary mirrors, and one can use a fairly ordinary (inexpensive) laser light now a days to make it bounce from theses mirrors (if you point the laser in right direction) and make measurements etc - nice experiment for an undergrad etc...:)

On the other note, it will be nice to watch spectacular (total) eclipse of the earth from CY1 on July 22 of this year. .. I am sure, all cameras on CY1 will be pointed towards earth then... Nice thing is that is a long eclipse (longest in 21 st century - about 6 minutes), obviously visible from the whole moon.

The eclipse on Jan 26 might not be that spectacular but still, it will be fun to watch moon's shadow rushing past the earth...!

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Sahastra » 29 Jan 2009 10:04

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Heal ... 040315.cms

Chandrayaan probe pics silences sceptics

NEW DELHI: Scientists were a divided lot over sending onboard Chandrayaan-I the Moon Impactor Probe which later produced excellent pictures of the earth's natural satellite.

The Moon Impactor Probe (MIP), which crashed onto the lunar surface on November 14, was included as one of the 11 payloads of Chandrayaan-I at the suggestion of former president A P J Abdul Kalam.

However, some scientists were doubtful about including the 28-kg MIP as a part of the payload and favoured carrying some other experiments, said senior scientist Narendra Bhandari, who has been involved with Chandrayaan-I since its inception.

On the one hand there was one experiment that "would weigh 28 kg and crash on the lunar surface and on the other hand, we had 10 experiments with a total weight of 50 kg," he said.

Any given day, scientists would have preferred carrying more diverse experiments instead of one weighing 28 kg, Bhandari said.

But the breathtaking pictures beamed back on earth by MIP as it plunged towards the moon gladdened scientists. Never before had they seen pictures of the moon clicked from an altitude of 6 kms.


Interesting article in ToI. Any clues on those pictures from MIP? I keep reading about them but haven't gotten a chance to see one yet.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby vdutta » 29 Jan 2009 11:47

^ ^ ISRO has not been sharing too many pics with people. i was hoping to see all the 3000 pics sent by MIP and thousands more from CY1 but they arent available to us.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Amber G. » 30 Jan 2009 04:30

Meanwhile in the news is a story:
Mars Rover's Bizarre Behavior Puzzles NASA
NASA engineers are scratching their heads over some unexpected behavior from the long-lived Spirit rover, which began its sixth year exploring Mars this month.

Spirit failed to report in to engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., last weekend, prompting a series of diagnostic tests this week to hunt the glitch's source.
<snip>

Also interesting, if not already know, is this piece from the same story:
Sunday marked Spirit's 1,800th Martian day, or sol, exploring a region known as "Home Plate" in the planet's expansive Gusev Crater.

Spirit and its twin Opportunity were initially expected to spend just 90 days exploring the Martian surface when they landed in succession more than five years ago this month. Opportunity is currently headed for the monster crater Endeavour on the other side of Mars.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby SSridhar » 09 Feb 2009 16:15

Chandrayaan, a wakeup call, says Annadurai

After 2010 there will be many moon missions undertaken by other countries. Anticipating this, we wanted to complete ours before they began. When we step into the moon tomorrow, we should be leaders among the other countries, Project Director of Chandrayaan – 1 M. Annadurai said . . .

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Kailash » 09 Feb 2009 20:59

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Ahmedabad/Moon_mystery_unravelled_/articleshow/4096155.cms

Anyone knows if there has been any new videos, pics from Chandrayaan? Or any specific results from scientific conference?

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby ajay_ijn » 13 Feb 2009 10:27

Chandrayaan images released to public are of 100m resolution.
url
While the resolution of lunar images in the public domain is 100 metres, ours are five metres across. We shall also be mapping the moon in its entirety if all goes well. From a distance one often dreams of the moon as being cool and beautiful. Going near has shattered that poetic image forever. Instead it's a stark place, strewn with boulders, pockmarked by meteorites, something with which no fair face would ever bear comparison.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Gerard » 14 Feb 2009 04:49

ajay_ijn wrote:Chandrayaan images released to public are of 100m resolution.


No.
Previous images were 100m. The released ones from Chandrayaan are 5m.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Nitesh » 23 Feb 2009 12:34

moving ahead

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/plan- ... ht/426945/

Plan panel okays ISRO manned space flight

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Yugandhar » 01 Mar 2009 08:22

Special issue in Current Science on the Chandrayaan.
A goldmine for those interested in results.

http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/contents.htm

First Results from Chandrayaan
http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/feb252009/Cspread.pdf

Chandrayaan-1: India’s first planetary science mission to the moon


J. N. Goswami and M. Annadurai
492
Terrain Mapping Camera: A stereoscopic high-resolution instrument on Chandrayaan-1


A. S. Kiran Kumar, A. Roy Chowdhury, A. Banerjee, A. B. Dave, B. N. Sharma, K. J. Shah, K. R. Murali, S. R. Joshi, S. S. Sarkar and V. D. Patel

496
Hyper Spectral Imager for lunar mineral mapping in visible and near infrared band


A. S. Kiran Kumar, A. Roy Chowdhury, A. Banerjee, A. B. Dave, B. N. Sharma, K. J. Shah, K. R. Murali, S. Mehta, S. R. Joshi and S. S. Sarkar

500
The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) on Chandrayaan-1


Carle M. Pieters, Joseph Boardman, Bonnie Buratti, Alok Chatterjee, Roger Clark,
Tom Glavich, Robert Green, James Head III, Peter Isaacson, Erick Malaret, Thomas McCord, John Mustard, Noah Petro, Cassandra Runyon, Matthew Staid, Jessica Sunshine, Lawrence Taylor, Stefanie Tompkins, Padma Varanasi and Mary White

506 Near Infrared Spectrometer SIR-2 on Chandrayaan-1

Urs Mall, Marek Banaszkiewicz, Kjell Brønstad, Susan McKenna-Lawlor, Andreas Nathues, Finn Søraas, Esa Vilenius and Kjetil Ullaland
512 Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI): a tool for the study of topography and gravitational field of the Moon

J. A. Kamalakar, A. S. Laxmi Prasad, K. V. S. Bhaskar, P. Selvaraj, R. Venkateswaran, K. Kalyani, A. Goswami and V. L. N. Sridhar Raja
517 The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer

Manuel Grande, Brian J. Maddison, P. Sreekumar, Johani Huovelin, Barry J. Kellett, Chris J. Howe, Ian A. Crawford5, D. R. Smith and the C1XS Team
520 High Energy X-ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

P. Sreekumar, Y. B. Acharya, C. N. Umapathy, M. Ramakrishna Sharma, Shanmugam, A. Tyagi, Kumar, S. Vadawale, M. Sudhakar, L. Abraham, R. Kulkani, S. Purohit,
R. L. Premlatha, D. Banerjee, M. Bug and J. N. Goswami
526 Investigation of the solar wind–Moon interaction onboard Chandrayaan-1 mission with the SARA experiment

Stas Barabash, Anil Bhardwaj, Martin Wieser, R. Sridharan, Thomas Kurian, Subha Varier, E. Vijayakumar, Veena Abhirami, K. V. Raghavendra, S. V. Mohankumar, M. B. Dhanya, Satheesh Thampi, Asamura Kazushi, Herman Andersson, Futaana Yoshifumi, Mats Holmström, Rickard Lundin, Johan Svensson, Stefan Karlsson, R. Daniele Piazza and Peter Wurz
533 Mini-SAR: an imaging radar experiment for the Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon

Paul Spudis, Stewart Nozette, Ben Bussey, Keith Raney, Helene Winters, Christopher L. Lichtenberg, William Marinelli, Jason C. Crusan and Michele M. Gates
540 The Moon Impact Probe on Chandrayaan-1

Y. Ashok Kumar and MIP Project Team
544 Monitoring lunar radiation environment: RADOM instrument on Chandrayaan-1

T. Dachev, B. Tomov, P. Dimitrov and Y. Matviichuk

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby ajay_ijn » 02 Mar 2009 07:19

Chinkis crashed Chnage1, lets hope Chandrayaan would have taken some pics.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Shalav » 03 Mar 2009 04:40

Chinese probe crashes into moon - BBC

The Chang'e 1 lunar satellite hit the moon's surface at 1613 local time (0813 GMT) at the end of a 16-month moon-mapping mission.


That leaves the Kaguya and its 2 mini-orbiters + the Chandrayan in orbit now.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Anujan » 03 Mar 2009 05:34

There was some hoopla about overheating in Chandrayan. Does anyone know what happened to it ? Was it resolved ?

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Sanjay M » 03 Mar 2009 05:35

They shut down some unused instruments/systems, to reduce the heat load.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby harbans » 03 Mar 2009 06:07

There was some hoopla about overheating in Chandrayan. Does anyone know what happened to it ? Was it resolved ?

CY was supposed to alter inclination and send data back after every orbit. Due to overheating problems that is being done once in 3 orbits. It will take a little time more to map the entire surface, but as fuel on board is more than adequate due to precise orbital positioning, CY will complete mapping. The overheating issue was resolved a few weeks back. I'm keen to see the MIP pics though. Wish ISRO came up with a better website and PR. Credit though to ISRO though having released many dozens of pics and data from dozens of instruments as compared to say the Chang'e mission which was clouded in almost total secrecy. Not being negative, but somehow deep inside people expect much more from ISRO than of the Chinese in such matters. Chang'e was a surprsie as i'd heard they'd stay in lower orbit for another year or more just sometime back. Anyways ISRO this is work done really well and very inspiring.

They did activate some instruments at a later stage due to overheating problems, but AFAIK all instruments are GO on CY.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Kailash » 04 Mar 2009 23:35

As per wiki, the instruments are run one at a time after the re-orientation of Chandrayaan. May be this is the reason that there is no need to transmit data on every revolution.

Regarding capture of Chang'e I's crash, neither Kaguya nor Chandrayaan was able to capture the actual crash as there was no intimation from the Chinese. Typical of them

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16703-lunar-probes-crash-was-likely-not-well-observed.html

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Sanju » 05 Mar 2009 02:15

^^^ Or is it the cunning yindoos keeping quiet about it!!!!

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby SSridhar » 17 Mar 2009 11:02

Also x-posted in Indian Space thread.

From The Space Review
Chandrayaan II and Indian Space Program

Taylor Dinerman
Monday, March 16, 2009


India’s space program has come a long way since it was established in 1962 as the Indian National Committee on Space Research (INCOSPAR). Its successor, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), was set up in 1969, and six years later their first satellite, Aryabhata, was launched. Since then ISRO has matured into one of the “Big Three” Asian space agencies, alongside China’s CNSA and Japan’s JAXA. It is a significant partner in many international space projects.

The first ISRO Moon probe, Chandrayaan 1, was an important step away from ISRO’s previous focus on practical space technology applications, such as remote sensing, communications, distance learning, telemedicine, and security. These efforts were all aimed at supporting India’s national development goals. For many years the feeling was that everything they did had to have a direct payoff for the people and particularly for the impoverished masses. The mission was the first pure space science mission the Indian agency had even done.

The Insat series of communications satellites and the unique weather sensors that they carry are a good example of ISRO’s traditional approach. These satellites were at first launched mostly by Europe’s Ariane and are now being put into orbit by India’s own Geosynchronous Space Launch Vehicle (GSLV). The technology for the spacecraft themselves was almost entirely homegrown. ISRO’s policy was to use as little foreign input as possible, both in order to develop their own industrial base and—so they claimed—to hold down costs.

Chandrayaan 1 represented a major break from that tradition. It incorporated instrument packages from Britain, Germany, Russia, Sweden, and the US, as well as from India itself. This represented a major step forward in India-US cooperation. Overcoming the bureaucratic and political obstacles that have long stood in the way of such bilateral programs was a major achievement for all involved. On the US side breaking through the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) restrictions was only accomplished with a lot of hard work on the part of both NASA and the State Department. It would never have been possible without a commitment from the highest levels of government: former President George W. Bush and former Prime Minister A.B. Vajpayee deserve a lot of credit in this regard. In their joint November 2001 communiqué they announced that they had “…agreed to initiate discussions on Civil Space cooperation.”

Chandrayaan 2, scheduled for launch in 2011, is a lander/rover mission that ISRO is developing with some technological input from Russia. This summer they plan to ask the international scientific community for proposals for sensors and experiments to include on the rover. This may be a difficult because the final configuration of the mission has not yet been determined. The rover may weigh anywhere from 30 to 100 kilograms. Obviously there is quite a bit of “trade space” so the proposals, or at least the early ones, will have to include more than a bit of guesswork.

To meet the anticipated launch date India and its partners will have to work within some serious time constraints. By space mission standards 2011 is right around the corner and system integration has got to start as soon as possible. The Indian government has approved funding for the mission and for the advanced version of the GLSV launcher needed to get the probe onto the lunar surface.

Along with their recently announced independent manned space exploration program the Chandrayaan series of science missions show that India is determined to be a space power in the full sense of the term. This flows naturally from India’s emergence as a global economic and political power. Over many decades hundreds of thousands of high-quality scientists and engineers have been trained in Indian universities. These men and women have helped propel India to its new status, and giving them challenging and fascinating new space projects is a way for the Indian government to keep this talent at home and busy.

It will be interesting to see how ISRO uses the Russian technology that they are getting for Chandrayaan 2. We should also keep an eye on the laser imaging system that is being developed for the rover. Integrating these systems into the mission is not going to be easy, but if India pulls it off it will be an even more impressive achievement than Chandrayaan 1.

Taylor Dinerman is an author and journalist based in New York City.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby juvva » 03 Apr 2009 11:44


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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby svinayak » 03 Apr 2009 11:46




Can you see any stars in the sky?

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby juvva » 03 Apr 2009 11:50

Acharya wrote:



Can you see any stars in the sky?


No. Maybe the earth is too bright and is saturating the camera.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby svinayak » 05 Apr 2009 02:25


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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby James B » 05 Apr 2009 03:44


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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby shiv » 05 Apr 2009 06:55

Acharya wrote:Real moon surface
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnTm1iVkyok


With respect Acharya - given the bandwidth available to me - I clicked on the link and waited for it to load expecting to see images or videos from Chandrayaan - given that this is the Chandrayaan thread.

The video has no connection with Chndrayaan or this thread and has absolutely no relevance. May I point out that posting such links with no explanation only adds to a reputation that your links/posts need not be looked at as they have no relevance to the discussion?

At 384 kbps and unlimited downloads I consider myself as having better access than most in India and unless you are specifically aiming to put something across forAmerican or other forum members you are only inflicting a needless waste of time on the very people whom you claim to root for - Indians.

Would it have been so difiicult to type a few words to help people decide if the want to see the video at all? I come to this thread to see news of chandrayaan - not random space videos for which I can do a search on Youtube myself.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby rahul_r » 05 Apr 2009 20:25

India's Moon Dreamers

A 40 min interview with the scientists involved in the Chandrayan mission.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Amber G. » 08 Apr 2009 07:12

Can you see any stars in the sky?

To add to Juvva ...

If one looks at archived pictures of moon's sky at high resolution, one can see starts, but one can not (at least I have not seen) any stars in which earth is also shown in the same frame.

One can argue that due to lack of atmosphere (and no scattering) moon's sky would be black, and one could see stars even in "day" but it is a theory which does not take into account that eye can not see dim objects if it is adjusted to bright light. In the night, and when earth is full, I guess one can see the stars, if one tries with unaided eye (because eye can see quite high contrast) but ordinary cameras would not be able capture that high a contrast. the Earth would be about 100 thousand times brighter than a typical star in the Moon's sky. (Just try to take pictures of sky even with high ISO setting from a camera to see how difficult it is to take pictures of stars, specially on a full moon .. .. even the ones which looks quite bright with a naked eye)

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby svinayak » 08 Apr 2009 10:42

Amber G. wrote:
One can argue that due to lack of atmosphere (and no scattering) moon's sky would be black, and one could see stars even in "day" but it is a theory which does not take into account that eye can not see dim objects if it is adjusted to bright light.


Lot of discussion on the stars in the space
http://www.aulis.com/stars.htm
While defenders of NASA might say that the Apollo astronauts were simply emphasizing the blackness of space, and not the stars – we do know that the stars are indeed visible from the lunar surface. Of course the Apollo astronauts would have seen stars from the lunar surface as clearly and as vividly as did Mike Melvill.

(One cannot help but conclude that such statements are intended to help explain away the absence of any specific Apollo images taken by Hasselblad Lunar Surface Cameras of the canopy of stars visible from the Moon.)

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Amber G. » 09 Apr 2009 00:33

<<< Duplicate/ sql error - deleted. by author >>>
Last edited by Amber G. on 09 Apr 2009 00:37, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Amber G. » 09 Apr 2009 00:34

Acharyaji - To be honest I did not have enough patience to go through the whole link, ...too much pseudo science and conspiracy theories for my taste.

Any way to be clear, this is what, in my expert opinion, the status of visibility of stars from Moon's surface (or from a space station).
(Sorry, if this seems to be a repeat of what was said earlier)
If you don't believe me ask any astronaut who has seen it. :)

Sky will be black (not bule - as there is no Rayleigh scattering), stars (abput 10-15% brighter than earth) in night. In day, if one blocks the Sun (say, even with a hand, or look through a tube) and let eyes dark adjusted you can see the stars ... but not too near earth (if it is full as the the earth-light will wash it out).

With cameras, if the exposure (time and apperture) is set to get good picture of visible earth (or moon's day light surface).. all likelihood NO stars. With longer exposures (and faster ISO speeds etc ) one can see stars. .. This is so, as you can check out, NASA's archived high resolution photos..

Also true for Bollywood/Hollywood movies.. (virtually all night sky stars visible are special effects)

I am not sure what's you point exactly, but hope this helps.

juvva
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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby juvva » 21 Apr 2009 12:54

ISRO Going Full Blast With Chandrayaan-2

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/ISRO_G ... 2_999.html

Shalav
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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Shalav » 21 Apr 2009 23:32

the moon hoax conspiracy theorists have been rubbished over and over, but they always manage to find some new Dumas to write for them.

My challenge to conspiracy theorists is as below

One of the main pillars of the MHC is that there are no stars visible in the sky in photographs. So go out with a camera at night and click me a snapshot of the moon showing visible stars in the sky! None have succeeded so far.

Anyway this thread is about Chandrayaan - not about hoaxes. So please discuss all theories in the nukkad thread.

Viv Sreenivasan
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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby Viv Sreenivasan » 22 Apr 2009 08:51

And youd think that if it were a hoax they wouldnt be so stupid to not put in any stars in the sky. It just goes to prove that the mission was real. Honestly some of these conspiracy theories like moon landings and 9/11 belong in the nut case category.

harbans
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Re: Chandrayan-1 moon mission

Postby harbans » 20 May 2009 15:52

Some news about CY..

Orbit of Chandrayaan-1 raised

Chennai: After the successful completion of all the major mission objectives, the orbit of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, which was at a height of 100 km from the lunar surface since November 2008, has now been raised to 200 km.

The orbit raising manoeuvres were carried out between 0900 and 1000 hrs IST on May 19, 2009, says an Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) release. The spacecraft in this higher altitude will enable further studies on orbit perturbations, gravitational field variation of the Moon and also enable imaging lunar surface with a wider swath.

It may be recalled that Chandryaan-1 spacecraft launched from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota on October 22, 2008 by PSLV-C11, was inserted into lunar orbit on November 8, 2008. Over the last seven months, all the 11 payloads onboard Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft have been operationalised successfully and excellent quality data has been received.

The scientific community from India and other participating international agencies are analysing the data and already several interesting results have been obtained.

Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft operations are being carried out from the Satellite Control Centre (SCC) of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Bangalore and Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) at Byalalu near Bangalore. The science data from Chandrayaan-1 is being archived and disseminated from Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC), also located at Byalalu.


http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/00 ... 201531.htm


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