Chandrayan-1 moon mission

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby manoba » 24 Oct 2008 00:41

Scaring the poor flamingoes :cry: One more good Chandrayaan-I/PSLV-C11 launch video.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Gerard » 24 Oct 2008 01:16

BTW, the official live launch telecast wasn't upto the mark IMO, rocket's sound was almost muted. I am surprised there were no helicopter cameras around, that would have been awesome.


A camera on the side of the vehicle's would have been awesome. The recent Falcon 1 launch was telecast from an onboard camera.

link

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby p_saggu » 24 Oct 2008 01:27

You guys are forgetting who covered the Launch.
Our very own sarkari Doordarshan.
Or "Durdasha" in other words or If I may Be crass replace the first D with a B.

These assholes also cover the R day parade. And they "have" to show some stupid politician's or a vip's face just when some seriously heavy mil hardware is passing by.

There is a clear disconnect between Intelligence and workmanship for these fools.

The ISRO guys, bless their souls, haven't exactly woken up to the importance of really good PR. Hello if some ISRO guys are reading this = the 21st century has arrived already.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Gerard » 24 Oct 2008 01:37


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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby p_saggu » 24 Oct 2008 01:39

During the chandrayaan launch these buggers were running an old video of how the chandrayaan and the PSLV was assembled. They switched to LIVE video when the PSLV had blasted off and had entered the cloud cover.
Then sheepishly they showed the liftoff from a camera that was focussed too close to the first stage - The rocket had taken off but the camera lingered on the exhaust cloud for a painful few seconds, before the second camera caught the vehicle entering cloud cover.
Seriously Madras Doordarshan which to its credit has in the past adamantly covered cricket matches with two cameras when the indian viewer was already exposed to channel 9 cricket coverage, was responsible here too. I am sure they covered this momentous event in India's journey to the moon with only four cameras.

I wonder how much security would have been compromised if a more experienced broadcast crew had been let in to do the honours? Especially considering that this was a multinational mission with foreigners present in the premises, was likely to have been telecast all over the world, and this was a completely civilian mission.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Gerard » 24 Oct 2008 05:19

NASA along for India moon ride
NASA and the Indian space agency in 2006 signed a formal agreement cementing American participation in the mission, which will cost the New Delhi government $80 million and last two years. NASA has spent about $100 million for development and fabrication of the instruments, officials said.


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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby svinayak » 24 Oct 2008 06:32


I showed these videos to my American collegue. He was impressed. And then I showed the animation UTube video and said that India will colonize moon. He said Mccain will be pissed if he becomes the President but I replied it will be a joint project with US about colonizing moon.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby babbupandey » 24 Oct 2008 06:43

I love the way goras get paranoid.
America launched a manned mission 40 years back, compared to that - Chandrayaan I is only a toy. Yet, we get such news articles - from India's perspective, if everything goes as per plan we will have an Indian on moon only 2020, by that time, USA - if they wish can suck out all the moon and no one would be able to do anything!

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby gogna » 24 Oct 2008 06:45

Thank you ISRO, you have done us proud, may you continue with your success.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Angre » 24 Oct 2008 06:50

Gerard wrote:NASA along for India moon ride
NASA and the Indian space agency in 2006 signed a formal agreement cementing American participation in the mission, which will cost the New Delhi government $80 million and last two years. NASA has spent about $100 million for development and fabrication of the instruments, officials said.


Wow! $80mil for the entire spacecarft and a $100 for the 2 experiments! Next time outsource the experiment payload to ISRO.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby pradeepe » 24 Oct 2008 07:22

manoba wrote:Scaring the poor flamingoes :cry: One more good Chandrayaan-I/PSLV-C11 launch video.


The best one I have seen so far. Even more enjoyable hearing the youngsters joy. Looked like he was relaying it to his mom on the phone. Awesome!

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby ramana » 24 Oct 2008 08:34

So instead of flying an existing set of instruments NASA went on to develop a new suite. Very interesting.

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The real ' kamaal ' starts now

Postby SSSalvi » 24 Oct 2008 11:13

From: The Hindu dated 24Oct

Chandrayaan’s orbit raised

Special Correspondent

CHENNAI: The first manoeuvre to raise the orbit of Chandrayaan-1, India’s first spacecraft to the moon, was accomplished on Thursday when the spacecraft’s liquid apogee motor (LAM) was fired for nearly 18 minutes. The engine firing took the spacecraft from its initial orbit of 256 km by 22,866 km to a perigee of 305 km and an apogee of 37,900 km.
.
.

The LAM would be fired again on Friday (October 24) morning to take the spacecraft to an apogee of 73,000 km and a perigee of 300 km.


Well from now on the ISRO really needs to be complimented for every achievement on the Chandrayaan1 mission.

Till now it was in fact a more or less a routine launch of PSLV.
( PSLV has earlier launched satellites along equator apart from its intended application of Polar launches. Putting Chandrayaan in 305kms x 37900 kms is similar to a GTO transfer orbit. Such a maneuver was done earlier also using a PSLV )

So the real 'kamaal' of modelling and its execution starts now.

Going beyond Geosync orbit and overcoming the gap between Earth and Moon gravities and then placing the craft in Lunar orbit is something that needs to be lauded.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby hnair » 24 Oct 2008 12:04

A mail from an old friend (and benchmate in high school 8) ), publishing with his consent. This description is the most vivid I have read yet and thought it would be of interest to this forum. .

As ******* said, it is a success so far. The next real test is
transferring the spacecraft from the earth orbit to the moon orbit.
This is to be done around November 8. The spacecraft, which would be
on its second revolution around the earth by then, will have to be
'latched on' to the lunar orbit as the moon approaches on its
revolution around the earth. This is done by firing the thrusters of
the spacecraft. I am told this is an extremely difficult exercise and
the scientists have a window period of about 200 seconds to do this.

After that, sending the moon impact probe scuttling down to the lunar
surface would be more dramatic, but less cumbersome. The probe, with
the Tricolour painted on it, will crash on the moon's surface and the
spectrometer attached to it will collect the dust the impact kicks up
for study.

I am forwarding you links to a couple of reports from the Times Of
India team, separately.

As for the excitement, it was unmatched. I've been to Sriharikota for
half-a-dozen launches, but this was special.
The entrance to the spaceport, for the first time, was decked up with
banners and festoons by well-wishers.
It has been raining on and off
for the past five days. Thunder clouds were the biggest threats to the
vehicle as it takes off, Madhavan Nair had told me when I spoke to him
a week before the launch. When I left Chennai at 1.30 am on Wednesday,
rain was coming down in sheets. I called up contacts in Isro to ask if
the launch was on. I was asked to call back after 10 minutes (Later,
two hours after the launch, Madhavan Nair was to tell a press
conference that it was at 1.30 am that the launch authorisation board
gave its nod to go ahead).

I reached the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at 3.40 am and it was still
raining. Scientists told me that it was not the rains that they were
worried about-- the charged clouds are the villains.
A comprehensive
weather report, prepared from a combination of reports using Indian
science agencies' space, land and ocean facilities, has ruled out
lightning and thunder for at least six hours. This had the count down
going, despite the rain.

When I stepped into the Brahmprakash Hall, a few hundred meters from
mission control and 6 km from the second launch pad where the magestic
44.4-metre PSLV stood with the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in its
cephalus, it was T-2:15 (2 hours and 15 minutes for take off). I was
one of the first journalists to arrive, but in another 30 minutes, the
place was teeming with journos from all parts of the country. I could
spot a few foreign journalists too.

TV journos were to give live phone-ins and pieces-to-the-cameras every
few minutes, and they were facing the problem of lack of phone signals
inside the spaceport. BSNL signals were feeble, but there, and I
thanked my stars for once that I have a BSNL connection. It was when
journalists working with channels scrambled to borrow my phone that I
realised that I too am supposed to give a live commentary for Radio
Mirchi, one of Times' sister concerns.

We had all been working the previous day and had travelled through the
night to be here. Nobody had slept-- or had a good dinner. But nobody
was complaining. Having walked from our cars to the hall in the
downpour, many of us were drenched and the air conditioning inside the
hall was freezing us. Around 5.30 am, biscuits and hot tea were
served. Brittania never tasted so good!
Someone came with news that meant little scientific consolation: The
moon has peeped out of the clouds.

The huge LCD screens flashed live close-ups of the PSLV-C11-- rain
splashing the strap-on motors. A little after 6 am, with 20 minutes to
go, we all went to the open terrace from where we had watched the PSLV
thunder into the skies several times. It was dawn and the rain had
stopped, but the skies were too cloudy. With every passing minute, the
heart beats got faster. Through the public address system came the
baritone of a scientist: T minus two minutes. When the last minute
arrived, people held each others hands. T minus 30 seconds. Eyes fixed
in the direction of the launch pad, a row of pine trees blocking our
view (You get to see the vehicle a second after it takes off, atop the
canopy of trees). 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5.."ignition authorised"... Some
clapped with the countdown... 3,2,1... An crimson flash lit up the
clouds hanging heavily over the launchpad. The scienist counted "T
plus 1". The huge ball of fire, emanating from the PSLV's 12-tonne
solid propellant-carrying strap-ons, appeared over the trees, and in a
couple of seconds, the vehicle had disappeared behind the crowds.

We were unlucky.

My colleagues -- a photographer and a reporter -- who were outside the
spaceport, in a village by the Pulikat lake where luckier. They had a
good view of the PSLV ascending, the flame reflected on the lake,
which had some early morning pelicans and painted storks (no paper
carried this picture. Will try to send you one if it is not yet
archived and protected).

All of us rushed back indoors, where the trajectory of PSLV was shown
on a giant screen to which some 600 scientists remained glued to. With
every stage separation, the scientists applauded. So did the
journalists (This is one of those rare occasions when I have found
journalists joining the celebration)
8) . Even for a layman like me, it
was obvious that the launch has been a copybook affair, as the screen
showed the PSLV sticking meticulously to the desired path. After about
18 minutes, PSLV injected Chandrayaan-1 into an earth orbit.

It was then that Isro chairman Madhavan Nair stood up and hugged VSSC
director Radhakrishnan. Everybody started hugging everybody. It was
celebration time. "Our baby is on its way to the moon," Madhavan Nair
said, "But mind you, there is a long and tough journey ahead."
The real achievement will be around November 8 when the spacecraft
gets into the lunar orbit, but this may not be televised as much as
the PSLV launch.

Let's all wish our scientists the very best in thrusting Chandrayaan
into the moon's orbit. And look forward to Chandrayaan-2 in 2010 and a
manned mission to space by 2015.

Post script:

The one man at the spaceport who did nothing, but is most happy about
it, is V Krishnamurthy, the general manager of mission analysis and
range safety. During launches, he sits in a separate room, insulated
from commands from anyone including the Isro chairman. In front of him
is a red button. His job: Press the button if the space vessel veers
off its designated path and poses the threat of falling down. His is
an independent decision, which cannot be questioned by anyone.
Krishnamurthy, who has been with SHAR for about 30 years, had to press
the red button once when the GSLV-F02 strayed from its path some 45
seconds after take-off on July 10, 2006. That destroyed the vehicle
above the Bay of Bengal and sent the debris plunging into the sea.

This time, Krishnamurthy was happy that he did not have to extend his
hand, as he monitored the take-off from his solitary den in the island
by the sea.

Cheers!

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Raja Bose » 24 Oct 2008 12:30

hnair wrote:A mail from an old friend (and benchmate in high school 8) ), publishing with his consent. This description is the most vivid I have read yet and thought it would be of interest to this forum. .


Just one word comes to mind......Amazing! 8)

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Arun_S » 24 Oct 2008 13:18

hnair wrote:
Post script:

The one man at the spaceport who did nothing, but is most happy about
it, is V Krishnamurthy, the general manager of mission analysis and
range safety. During launches, he sits in a separate room, insulated
from commands from anyone including the Isro chairman. In front of him
is a red button. His job: Press the button if the space vessel veers
off its designated path and poses the threat of falling down. His is
an independent decision, which cannot be questioned by anyone.
Krishnamurthy, who has been with SHAR for about 30 years, had to press
the red button once when the GSLV-F02 strayed from its path some 45
seconds after take-off on July 10, 2006. That destroyed the vehicle
above the Bay of Bengal and sent the debris plunging into the sea.

This time, Krishnamurthy was happy that he did not have to extend his
hand, as he monitored the take-off from his solitary den in the island
by the sea.

Cheers!

I know how key is this job.
Eons ago in Kolkota I was in discussion with some one on using one type of computer for range safety. Key requirements were requiring HDLC interface (because the trackers had only that type of interface), and for computing the stuff in real time, ability to download and run CPU micro-code (yes, micro-code), showing the result on graphics display. The system computes not only the trajectory (versus the permissible envelop) but more importantly the estimated impact point of the projectile after destruct command is given.

Fortunately for me the deal did not materialize else I will have to be off site (in a hot and humid location) for many months to deliver the goods. One of those times when losing business is a bliss ;)

But it was fun to review the preliminary PSLV design docs (for its navigation & control system) for thesis consideration. Again a blessing that due to sarkari communication delay I did not do that, but instead got a chance to developed a new architecture for fault tolerant INS & mission avionics system at school's expense, one that was valued and appreciated by IAF.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Arun_S » 24 Oct 2008 13:31

Two related postes
SSSalvi wrote:Till now it was in fact a more or less a routine launch of PSLV.
( PSLV has earlier launched satellites along equator apart from its intended application of Polar launches. Putting Chandrayaan in 305kms x 37900 kms is similar to a GTO transfer orbit. Such a maneuver was done earlier also using a PSLV )

So the real 'kamaal' of modelling and its execution starts now.

Going beyond Geosync orbit and overcoming the gap between Earth and Moon gravities and then placing the craft in Lunar orbit is something that needs to be lauded.


hnair wrote:A mail from an old friend (and benchmate in high school 8) ), publishing with his consent. This description is the most vivid I have read yet and thought it would be of interest to this forum. .

As ******* said, it is a success so far. The next real test is
transferring the spacecraft from the earth orbit to the moon orbit.
This is to be done around November 8. The spacecraft, which would be
on its second revolution around the earth by then, will have to be
'latched on' to the lunar orbit as the moon approaches on its
revolution around the earth. This is done by firing the thrusters of
the spacecraft. I am told this is an extremely difficult exercise and
the scientists have a window period of about 200 seconds to do this.

After that, sending the moon impact probe scuttling down to the lunar
surface would be more dramatic, but less cumbersome. The probe, with
the Tricolour painted on it, will crash on the moon's surface and the
spectrometer attached to it will collect the dust the impact kicks up
for study.



The kamaaal is not just in modeling but also in getting modal parameters. ISRO did the right thing to choose a trajectory involving 5 earth orbits before injecting into Moon capture orbit. The first 5 orbits will allow capture of actual perturbation data, something that is impossible to do with computer only. The overall modal will then account for positioning/velocity inaccuracy as well as micro drift in micro gravitational field. Fortunately fro Chandrayan there is enough fuel in the craft due to its 2 years long operational life.

I am sure some cool but classified celestial navigation payload is at heart of this complex and sensitive job.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Rahul M » 24 Oct 2008 13:43

Rishirishi wrote:The issue has got HUGE covrage woldwide. Practically all newschannels have shown in on prime time. There has also been an extensive newspaper covrage.

People take note of such things. Definately it will help in improvening the image of the country. The country's image is very important when Indian companies try to sell their stuff abroad (high tech stuff).

The media covrage alone is probalby worth 5 times the cost of the launch.

Other benefits include building up scientific knowledge and infrastructure.

Money well spent, of you ask me.

exactly my thoughts when the project was originally proposed !
soft power all the way.

that and the inspiration it gives to students and the common man are things you can't put a price on.

btw, TOI readers did RK Laxman have a cartoon on chandrayaan launch ? possibly would be a good addition.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SSridhar » 24 Oct 2008 15:57

More info on the leak while filling liquid engines

George Koshy, Mission Director, PSLV-C11, which put Chandrayaan-1 in its initial orbit, said on Thursday that problems arose when manoeuvres were under way in filling the second stage of the rocket with liquid propellants.

There was a leak in the liquid propellant servicing facility established on the ground.

“We had to overcome that. It has nothing to do with the vehicle itself. It is a remotely operated facility. We corrected the problem,” he said.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Gerard » 24 Oct 2008 16:11

The direction of Chandrayaan-1 is found by using star-trackers and gyroscopes, both of which have been developed by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) laboratories. The star-tracker images the sky and gets the direction in which the spacecraft is travelling from ten stars

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Lalmohan » 24 Oct 2008 16:35

Gerard wrote:
The direction of Chandrayaan-1 is found by using star-trackers and gyroscopes, both of which have been developed by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) laboratories. The star-tracker images the sky and gets the direction in which the spacecraft is travelling from ten stars


these are well established techniques, I am sure that ISRO had these 'cracked' years ago

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SaiK » 24 Oct 2008 17:19

Krishnamurthy's red button role must be kept under wraps, for security reasons.. perhaps provide him with Z-category one for next launches.. there are about 9600 pakis escaped into India after time elapsed for their visas. never know what these guys can do.

That.. youtube video still remains alive in my mind.. the best video presentation. kudos.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SSridhar » 24 Oct 2008 17:44

SaiK wrote:Krishnamurthy's red button role must be kept under wraps, for security reasons.. perhaps provide him with Z-category one for next launches.. there are about 9600 pakis escaped into India after time elapsed for their visas. never know what these guys can do.


You said exactly what passed through my mind. Also, I hope that the island and his den there are extremely well protected with under water, perimeter and above water assets.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Singha » 24 Oct 2008 18:21

CISF has been asked to put any paki's head on a pike if found loitering around and feed
the rest to the dogs.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Nitesh » 24 Oct 2008 19:08

Deleted....
ramana

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby manoba » 24 Oct 2008 20:45


kit
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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby kit » 24 Oct 2008 20:52



Almost thought :lol:

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SwamyG » 24 Oct 2008 22:01

Far more enigmatic is the Chinese orbiter Chang'e 1. A lot of hoopla accompanied its launch about this time last year. But few details have emerged since then. A small contingent of Chinese scientists had planned to describe early results from Chang'e 1 at a scientific meeting last March, but they were no-shows.

Source: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/33213204.html

Is it possible for independent sources to confirm the chinese craft is doing what it supposed to be doing?

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby hnair » 24 Oct 2008 22:25

SSridhar, Krishnamurthy-saar is not AQ Khan :) I am sure ISRO has lots of backup personnel, if Krishnamurthy-saar gets the sniffles on that cold morning, many others will be there to take his place. Then there must be those wet-suited men in helicopters, with their feet dangling out like schoolchildren on a wall. Plus as Singha pointed out, the road from Pindi to Isloo will resemble the Appian way after Spartacus and his men decorated it.

The enemy#1 of a space program is static electricity.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby rsingh » 25 Oct 2008 01:03

Nitesh wrote
guys bad news:


No no please do not give such AAj-Tak type eye-catching headline.........I was almost paralyzed. We are talking about Chandrayan here. I do not care if some over engineered,too sensitive to note the obvious (like Japanese girls) probe fails to find water on moon.

Question to Gurus. Does the Apogee and Perigee stuff has some potential use in practicing evasive maneuver. I mean if a satellite is in Apogee period (or coordinate) is it possible to shoot it down? Imagine we put some of our satellites in orbit that have an Apogee over China? Communication satellites can saved in this way. Is it easy to shoot a satelite in deep space?

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Raja Bose » 25 Oct 2008 01:28

rsingh wrote:Nitesh wrote
guys bad news:


No no please do not give such AAj-Tak type eye-catching headline.........I was almost paralyzed. We are talking about Chandrayan here. I do not care if some over engineered,too sensitive to note the obvious (like Japanese girls) probe fails to find water on moon.


My heart skipped a beat when I saw the 'Bad News' headline. Nitesh boss, please no more faux-sensationalist headlines....dont want to become a heart patient at so young as age :)

Chandrayaan is a different animal designed built and launched independently by India. Lets not measure its performance by 'success' or lack thereof of other country's probes.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby ramana » 25 Oct 2008 01:45

Nitesh, What did that post have to do with Chandaryaan? Dont do such dumps.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Kakkaji » 25 Oct 2008 01:47

That headline almost gave me a heart attack! :evil:

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SSridhar » 25 Oct 2008 07:48

hnair, I am pretty sure about manpower availability within ISRO etc. My concern was more wrt terrorists.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Neshant » 25 Oct 2008 10:00

Definately it will help in improvening the image of the country. The country's image is very important when Indian companies try to sell their stuff abroad (high tech stuff).


On the day the successful launch was reported, I found more negative comments than positive from certain others. They seemed annoyed that India had made such strides.

I noted that the Chinese launch of a man in space did not generate such hostility.

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby Rahul M » 25 Oct 2008 10:36

which just shows that the chinese have been more successful in developing their soft power.
the debatable negative comments about poverty et al takes nothing away from the technological achievements of ISRO. frankly, what does a businessman in US cares about poor in India if he gets the best stuff at the cheapest prices.


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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby UPrabhu » 25 Oct 2008 12:12

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aj_PT2Cf5eM -- this itself is 10 times more return on the money spent... look at how this mission has inspired India's next gen ... I hope we are seeing the last of JHOLAWALAS .. well... may be we need to shut down JNU for that..

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Re: Chandrayan-1 mission launched succesfully

Postby SandeepA » 25 Oct 2008 12:26

UPrabhu wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fkhdmx-JxCs

Didnt realise Modi was this different from the regular Indian politician. The honesty and maturity shows. More power to this guy, will be a pity if we miss out on making him a PM.
You just got to envy the Gujaratis till then.


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