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PA Corps and Commanders - II

Mandeep
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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Mandeep » 19 Aug 2000 09:31

Sunil,That's a great catch - the list of SI(M) awardees that is. To understand this list it's neccessary to know the meanings of the abbreviations. Here are some:-<P>AFWC Signifies that the offr has passed the Armed Forces War College<BR>PSC Passed Staff College<BR>G+ The General Cadre are the group of senior offrs(Brig and above) who constitute the elite of the Army and can be posted to any position.Theoretically they can command any sort of formation practically they get command of Inf Bdes/Divs.All Inf and Armd Corps offrs are part of the General Cadre others are specially selected.The G+ offrs are the Special Elite of the Pak Army being high profile offrs chosen under the process of Deep Selection for out of turn promotion.<BR>AD Air Defence<BR>JSSC Graduate of the Joint Services Staff College

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 19 Aug 2000 11:29

Mandeep, <P>thanks for the G+ grade tip. I recall something similar being mentioned in Defence Journal but i forget where. <P>Incidently in india, there is a similar process called fast-track in the civilian services, so i presume there is something like that in the IA as well. <P>The fast-track promotions are usually in ~5 years or so.. what is the time frame for officers identified for Deep Selection process? I am trying to estimate the age for these fellows. <P>Incidently there are two more interesting reports last month concerning the PA and Interior security forces. <P>Firstly a PA Avn plane, a Mashak, crash landed at a field in Rawalkot, the public release said that the plane was on a `training' flight.. but the officers were identified as a captain (trainee) and a Colonel (Trainer).. it seems odd to me.. <BR>that such senior officers should need training.. i would expect more junior officers.. or is there a different system of ranks for PA Avn people? <P>Secondly, the Karachi Police and the Pakistan Rangers Sindh have jointly created to new rapid response forces. The first called the Quick Reaction Force comprises of 20 police mobile vans and 40 Rangers vans. They are given 9 liters of petrol and will respond to any breakdown of law and order. <BR>The other is called Rapid 15, it comprised of Karachi Police officers with `commando training' and Rangers troops. Rapid 15 can be reached at a special telephone number `15' and will take down complaints like the other emergency numbers but will respond only in the case of an extreme emergency. This measure has been taken to deal with the rise in armed crime in the sindh. <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 19 Aug 2000 11:45

Ask and we shall receive.. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/19/local8.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/19/local8.htm</A> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/19-08-2000/metro/k3.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/19-08-2000/metro/k3.htm</A> <P>look whos talking.. "Maj-Gen Tahir Mahmud Kazi, General Officer Commanding, Air defence Division". the ADD boys have been saddled with the job of cleaning up KESC and EIK. <P>August 19. <P>Corps Commanders and Principal Staff Officers Conference at Islamabad.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/19-08-2000/main/main3.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/19-08-2000/main/main3.htm</A> <P><BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Mandeep » 19 Aug 2000 12:12

Offrs are not directly commissioned in the Army Avn but join on volunteering from other arms at the level of Capt with about 3-5 years of service.So a trainee pilot of the Army Avn would dsfinitely be a Capt.<BR>The reason for the late entry is that offrs are expected to learn about the arms they would be supporting before they become pilots and thereafter to use that knowledge to further the aim of having army avn.

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Mandeep » 19 Aug 2000 21:40

Some more abbreviations<P>PTSC Passed Technical Staff College<P>SI(M) Sitara-I-Imtiaz(Military)<P>TI(M) Tamgha-I-Imtiaz(Military)<P>AC Armoured Corps<P>NDC National Defence College

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 20 Aug 2000 23:50

(http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/20/nat7.htm)<BR>Chairman of the Pakistan Steel Mill (PS), Lt-<BR>Col Mohammad Afzal Khan, <P>(http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000- ... main18.htm)<BR>***PA to enhance air defence capability***<P>ISLAMABAD: The meeting of corps commanders decided to enhance air defence capabilities of army, said an official statement on Saturday. The decision was taken in the concluding session of the two-day conference, chaired by Chief Executive General Pervaiz Musharraf. It is also learnt that the army would start its exercises at the corps level in the coming months. <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 23 Aug 2000 06:20

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/21/local23.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/21/local23.htm</A> <P>"Sources in the Border Military Police (BMP), which mans the tribal belt of Dera Ghazi Khan and Rajanpur" <P>(Yet another para-military unit????)<P> <A HREF="http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000aug.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000aug.html</A> <P>Air defense systems to be enhanced <P>Air defense systems to be enhanced: Major General Khateer Hassan: Islamabad, Aug 11: Government is working on many projects to enhance its air defense systems through efforts of its own, APP reported today. APP quoted Major General Khateer Hassan, head of the Army Air Defense Command, as saying the projects include upgrading 37mm and 57mm gun systems and automating its early warning and control systems into "real time". General Khateer told a conference of commanding officers that air defense will play an extremely vital role in the future. He said the air defense unit of Pakistan army shot down two Indian aircraft, two helicopters and damaged one Canberra aircraft during the conflict last year with India in Kashmir's Kargil sector. <P><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 22-08-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 25 Aug 2000 05:48

<A HREF="http://www.nation.com.pk/top7.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.nation.com.pk/top7.htm</A> <P>IV Corps(Lahore).<P>Corps Commander, Lt.-Gen. Khalid Maqbool and the General Officer Commanding, Major-General Tariq Majid.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.nation.com.pk/pak5.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.nation.com.pk/pak5.htm</A> <P>KOHAT - Maj. Gen. Tariq Bashir General Commanding Officer Kohat has urged the concerned officials to spend each and every penny allocated for the Poverty Alleviation Programme properly so that required results of the scheme could be achieved.<BR>He expressed these views while attending a briefing regarding PAP at Malam Welfare Centre Kohat on Monday. Brig. Atif was also present on the occasion.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/25-08-2000/main/main21.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/25-08-2000/main/main21.htm</A> <P>JCSC meeting to be held tomorrow <P>RAWALPINDI: A Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee meeting will be held here on Saturday (Aug 26) at Joint Staff Headquarters to consider important matters related to defence, national security and other professional aspects. <B> During the meeting, matters pertaining to three services like restructuring of Joint Staff Headquarters and defence wings of Pakistan missions abroad and merger of DGMP units will be discussed.</B> Chief Executive General Pervaiz Musharraf will preside. The meeting will be attended by the Services chiefs and senior officers of Ministry of Defence and the three Services. <P>Also from Jang. Pakistan Rangers(Sindh) have been tasked with the distribution of water in parts of karachi.<P> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/25-08-2000/metro/k9.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/25-08-2000/metro/k9.htm</A> <P>"and later they held a meeting with General Officer Commanding (GOC) Sindh, Major General Ehtesham Zameer.. Pasha said he visited the GOC office on Thursday and came to know through the Staff Officer Col Hassan that the GOC had discussed the matter with the Corps Commander, Karachi".<BR> <A HREF="http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000aug.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000aug.html</A> <P>the IDEAS 2000 coordination cell had also been set up at the Joint Staff Headquarters, which was being headed by Major-General Syed Ali Hamid as chief coordinator. Others who spoke at the presentation included Col Akbar A Sharif, Tan Hock and Ko Chee Wah. <P><BR>Senior Army officers headed by Inspector General Training and Evaluation of Pakistan Army Lt. Gen. Muhammad Afzal Janjua visited PAF Base Sargodha to have first hand knowledge about the training and skill acquired by the participating fighters and ground staff of the air force.<P>Lieutenant-General Abdul Qayyum, chairman, Pakistan Ordnance Factories Board.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000june.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.pakdefencenews.org/news/news2000june.html</A> <P>Later Brigadier Muhammad Afzal, Commandant of the college highly appreciated the achievements of the Atomic Energy Commission and the NDC towards making defence of the country invincible. <P> <A HREF="http://www.ideas2000.com.pk/launch3.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.ideas2000.com.pk/launch3.htm</A> <P>Photos galore.. <P><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 24-08-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby P Smith » 27 Aug 2000 02:38

<A HREF="http://www.stratmag.com/page04.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.stratmag.com/page04.htm</A> <BR>Commander of 31 Corps - Lt.Gen. Taheer Ali Qureshi<P>PA-Aviation Orbat - <A HREF="http://www.pakmilitary.com/army/inventory.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.pakmilitary.com/army/inventory.html</A>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 28 Aug 2000 02:14

Posted by DINESH.A on another thread.<P>First half of the article gives excellent insight about C&C in general.<BR>Although C4I issues has been discussed previously in BRF, I think it needs further debate.. Very little information is available about the existing/proposed Indian setup..<P>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<P>Evolution of command and control<BR>Dr Rifaat Hussain <A HREF="http://www.jang-group.com/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/oped/o6.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang-group.com/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/oped/o6.htm</A> <BR>While nuclear deterrence involves both intent and capability, command<BR>and control is essentially about behaviour. That is how individuals and<BR>organisations structures, which are involved in the handling of nuclear<BR>weapons, would behave during peace time, during crisis and in a<BR>situation of deterrence failure caused by the outbreak of largescale war.<BR>Shaun Gregory has defined command and control as "an arrangement of<BR>facilities, personnel, procedures and means of information acquisition,<BR>processing, dissemination and decision-making used by national<BR>command authorities and military commanders in planning, directing and<BR>controlling military operations." He mentions three distinct features of<BR>command and control:<P>• "command and authorities, nuclear control systems and command<BR>centres to analyse data, make decisions, carry out directions and<BR>control forces;<P>• sensors including intelligence systems, providing inputs of warning and<BR>attack characterisation; and<P>• communication links to distribute warning data and ensure the proper<BR>execution of command."<P>Stable deterrence requires, among other things, a safe and reliable<BR>command and control system that can assure contending parties both<BR>that an accidental or unauthorised launch in a time of crisis is next to<BR>impossible, and that retaliation in the event of a nuclear attack is<BR>possible. Command and control is critical in assuring deterrence because<BR>nuclear policy is implemented through the mechanism of the command<BR>and control of forces.<P>Any mismatch between command and control capabilities and nuclear<BR>policy needs weakens that policy. Such a mismatch is dangerous<BR>because a nuclear policy that cannot be executed is ineffective and may<BR>not achieve the desired ends. Any system must be able to convey the<BR>orders of senior decision-makers to military forces, in any environment<BR>across the spectrum of conflict, no matter how simple or complex the<BR>orders might be.<P>Nuclear command and control have assumed extraordinary significance in<BR>the contemporary era of "information revolution" and "information<BR>warfare". With its focus on such elements as command and control<BR>warfare, the military-technological revolution, net war, cyber war,<BR>electronic warfare, military discipline and disinformation, and<BR>communication security, information warfare, according to some, has<BR>introduced a "comprehensive paradigm shift in warfighting", rendering<BR>classical nuclear deterrence obsolete.<P>To be effective, the nuclear command and control system must remain<BR>and evolve into a dispersed, real time planning and dissemination system<BR>that will provide a true, survivable, redundant, flexible planning<BR>capability. It must be stressed that the major difficulties in developing,<BR>acquiring and deploying command and control systems are not primarily<BR>technical but conceptual, that is, what should the system do?<P>In the growing body of scholarly literature on the role of C3s in<BR>deterrence stability, it is being increasingly emphasised that command<BR>and control issues give rise to "certain dilemmas" which are independent<BR>of the size or sophistication of a country's nuclear arsenal. Peter Feaver<BR>has convincingly shown that all possessors of nuclear weapons, including<BR>new nuclear nations, confront a dilemma which he describes as<BR>"always/never" issue. The leadership requires a high assurance that the<BR>weapons will work when directed, in addition to a similar assurance that<BR>the weapons will never be used except under specific authorisation.<P>Because of their immense destructive power, nuclear weapons must be<BR>reliable, that is, unlikely to fail when needed; safe, that is, unlike to<BR>detonate accidentally; and secure, that is, resistant to efforts at<BR>unauthorised detonation. If authorities' control of the weapons is too<BR>loose, deterrence can "fail deadly" in the form of an unauthorised or<BR>accidental launch. But if control is too tight, deterrence can "fail<BR>impotent" if first strike against leadership short-circuits any chance of<BR>retaliation. Prevention of unwanted use is termed negative control, while<BR>assurance of wanted use is termed positive control.<P>The tension between these goals forces leaders to choose between a<BR>more "assertive" or more "delegative" control system. "Assertive" control,<BR>according to Feaver, is a command and control arrangement in which the<BR>decision to launch nuclear weapons is retained exclusively by top<BR>political leaders. The "delegative' control, on the other hand, is an<BR>arrangement in which subordinate commanders are authorised to make<BR>nuclear launch decisions under defined circumstances.<P>Given the "opaque" character of Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme<BR>before the country went overtly nuclear in response to the Indian<BR>nuclear tests in May 1998, very little is known about the history of<BR>plans, procedures and command structures that Islamabad had used to<BR>manage its "bomb in the basement." That does not mean that such<BR>specialised mechanisms did not exist; it only means that as a hedge<BR>against the possibility of a "pre-emptive" strike against its nascent<BR>nuclear force, Islamabad never disclosed these procedures.<P>According to former Chief of the Army Staff, Mirza Aslam Beg, a Nuclear<BR>Command Authority was an in-built feature of the Pakistani nuclear<BR>programme. This "national organisation" was "responsible for total<BR>management, control, development and safeguard of the nuclear<BR>programme. The NCA comprised the President, the Prime Minister, Chief<BR>of Army Staff and this troika formulated all nuclear policies including the<BR>1989 "decision to follow a path of nuclear restraint."<P>That Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme has been collectively<BR>managed by a large group of top civilian and military leadership of the<BR>country is also noted by a Pakistani analyst, Shafqat Ali Khan. According<BR>to him, the "main actors involved are, the government (the President<BR>and the Prime Minister), the Armed Forces (the Army, the Air Force, and<BR>the Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff Committee), the Ministry of<BR>Foreign Affairs and the nuclear bureaucracy (the Pakistan Atomic Energy<BR>Commission and the Kahuta Research Laboratories). The nature of<BR>interaction among these actors is not clear, but in all probability it is a<BR>highly symbiotic relationship."<P>In the same vein, Lt General (r) Talat Masood has observed that before<BR>the May 1998 tests, "all major decisions regarding nuclear matters<BR>including weapon systems" in Pakistan were taken by "a small group"<BR>comprising the "President/Prime Minister, Foreign Minister, COAS and the<BR>head of the nuclear establishment, with the Finance Minister<BR>occasionally being cooped". Functioning like a "corporate body", this<BR>"highest authority" provided "broad guidelines, approved short and long<BR>term plans and took decisions in a tight security environment based on<BR>the perceived nuclear threat from India." He further observes that "to<BR>reduce bureaucratic inertia and ensure speedy implementation" of such<BR>projects as "the creation of uranium enrichment facilities, the<BR>manufacture of weapon related components and the building of nuclear<BR>test facilities", the "nuclear establishment" was "given considerable<BR>autonomy."<P>Zafar Iqbal Cheema has identified five characteristics of the evolving<BR>command and control structures in Pakistan. First, even though the<BR>development of dedicated command and control technologies and<BR>associated infrastructure is not beyond Pakistan's technological<BR>capability, Islamabad, until recently, has heavily relied on those<BR>command and control procedures which were "originally developed for<BR>conventional military purposes."<P><BR>Second, the designated institutions of Defence Council (DC) and<BR>Defence Committee of the Cabinet (DCC) have not played a "decisive<BR>role in strategic nuclear decision making". Their role has been limited to<BR>ratifying "the overall thrust of Pakistani nuclear weapons policy."<P>Third, mainly due to their traditionally strong role in decisions about<BR>national security matters, the armed forces will "play a leading role in<BR>devising and managing the procedures that control Pakistan's nuclear<BR>weapons."<P>Fourth, "because of the growing involvement of all three of the armed<BR>services in operational and command and control matters, the Joint Staff<BR>Headquarters (JSHQ)" seems poised to emerge as "the most likely forum<BR>for dealing with nuclear command and control issues."<P>Fifth, given the relatively small size of the Pakistani arsenal, Islamabad<BR>would be constrained to devise a command and control system "that<BR>pre-delegates a minimum amount of authority to commanders of<BR>operational forces" and "because of the short distances and times<BR>involved", Pakistan would also "place an emphasis on developing<BR>surveillance and intelligence systems to supply early warning in<BR>peacetime." He stresses that the "high degree of professionalism in the<BR>Pakistani armed forces" would "mitigate" against the risk of unauthorised<BR>use inherent in this highly responsive nuclear command and control<BR>system.<P>Rodney Jones has identified two major issues that Pakistan would have<BR>to resolve even after the military "manages to successfully insulate" its<BR>"nuclear command and control system from political interference." The<BR>first issue relates to the problem of having fail-safe connectivity within<BR>the system. As he states, "...how to structure the chain of command<BR>and communication between the centralized decisions of the national<BR>command authority and subordinates to whom some decisions must be<BR>delegated--such as those involved in operational control over arming and<BR>launching procedures, custody over nuclear weapons, and alert and<BR>dispersal procedures during realistic training exercise and even more<BR>during actual military crises".<P>The second issue relates to the necessity of achieving horizontal<BR>coordination and integration among different branches of the armed<BR>forces in order to achieve the goal of a maximally nuclear deterrent<BR>posture. He writes: "Inter-service nuclear integration will be sensitive<BR>organisationally, since military dominance in the defence sphere in<BR>Pakistan has been Army dominance. The Army has had virtually sole<BR>responsibility for supervising the development of Pakistan's nuclear<BR>weapons, through a closely held defence research and engineering<BR>establishment. If the Air Force is to have specified nuclear deterrence<BR>missions and if the Navy is to coordinate its operations with the other<BR>armed forces in a potentially nuclear environment, how personnel<BR>specially trained in nuclear operations will have to be installed in each<BR>branch of the armed forces and linked to a central chain of command."<P>Casting off the veil of ambiguity surrounding its nuclear decision making,<BR>Pakistan announced on February 2, 2000 that it had set up a Nuclear<BR>Command Authority (NCA) to manage all aspects of nuclear activity.<BR>According to a background study, this was done partly to meet<BR>Pakistan's "obligations and responsibilities" as a nuclear weapon power<BR>and largely to meet "the need" for a "centralised institutional forum" to<BR>"exercise Command and Control" over the "strategic assets" "extending<BR>into the tri services domain" and to coordinate and direct "the activities<BR>of various strategic organisations" which had been working on the<BR>nuclear programme.<P>The NCA is responsible for policy formulation and exercised employment<BR>and development control over all strategic nuclear forces and strategic<BR>organisation. It consists of three distinct bodies: an Employment Control<BR>Committee (ECC), a Development Control Committee (DCC) and the<BR>Strategic Plans Divisions (SPD).<P>As an apex "politico-military" body, ECC, is chaired by the head of the<BR>government with the Minister of Foreign Affairs as his deputy. Its other<BR>members include: Minister for Defence, Minister of Interior, Chairman<BR>JCSC, services chiefs, director-general of SPD, and technical advisors as<BR>required by the Chairman.<P>The Development Control Committee (DCC) is a militia-scientific<BR>committee which controls development of strategic assets. It is also<BR>chaired by the head of the government and includes CJCSC (Deputy<BR>Chairman), Services Chiefs, Director General SPD and representatives of<BR>the Strategic Organisations and scientific community.<P>The Strategic Plans Division (SPD), headed by a senior army officer,<BR>functions directly under the CJSC. Besides acting as a secretariat for<BR>NCA, it performs the functions of planning and coordination and provides<BR>policy inputs for the task of setting up a reliable computerised, command<BR>and control, communications, intelligence and surveillance system (C 4I<BR>SR) to facilitate the exercise of command and control over the strategic<BR>assets by NCA during crisis situations.<P>In addition, Pakistan is also trying to evolve Strategic Force Commands<BR>in each service to take care of training, maintenance and custodial<BR>safety of their respective strategic assets. An Army Strategic Force<BR>Command (ASFC) has already been set up while the other two services<BR>are in the process of evolving their strategic commands. The operational<BR>control of these commands rests exclusively with the NCA.<P>The establishment of NCA by Pakistan underscores the seriousness with<BR>which Islamabad has tried to grapple with the "always/never" dilemma<BR>posed by its overt nuclearisation in May 1998. By vesting operational<BR>control of its strategic assets in the hands of the NCA, Islamabad has<BR>tried to ensure that nuclear decisions are not made on the basis of local<BR>circumstances. By focussing both on the need for establishing "hierarchy<BR>of command" and on the issue of delegation of authority for employment<BR>of nuclear weapons, Islamabad has tried to resolve the tension inherent<BR>in the readiness-control trade off issue.<P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 28 Aug 2000 02:26

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/27/top11.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/27/top11.htm</A> <BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/main/main16.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/main/main16.htm</A> <P>Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee's meeting <P>RAWALPINDI, Aug 26<P>Restructuring of defence wings of Pakistan missions abroad and certain other important tri-services matters like merging of directorate general military production units were also deliberated upon.-APP <P>The recommendations of the report prepared by Lt Gen Hamid Javed were implemented in all areas including the downsizing of the foreign missions, their trade and information wings, a senior official said.<P>"Now the JCSC has taken the decision to rightsize the defence wings, as Pakistan has more than 20 defence wings attached to its foreign missions," he added. The rightsizing of the defence wings would help make the working of these wings effective and would save expenditure.<P>The JCSC said the merging of directorate general, military production units, will also help deal with production matters under one directorate. Earlier, the envoys' conference was held in which Pakistani envoys from 13 countries and senior officials of the Foreign Office participated.<P><BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/27/nat20.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/27/nat20.htm</A> <P>GOC Maj-Gen Ehtesham Zamir at a press briefing about the performance of the army monitoring teams in all the five districts and special monitoring teams operating in civic bodies. <P>He also referred to "Rapid-15" emergency help centre set up to provide relief to people in emergency situations where 30 phone lines and 60 mobile vehicles had been provided and 480 personnel were being trained to do the needful. But, he said, despite its availability for 24 hours, people had not been getting due advantage from the facility. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/main/main11.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2000-daily/27-08-2000/main/main11.htm</A> <P>The first military officers' conference, held at the GHQ, decided to deploy 10,000 troops for preparing new electoral rolls, a senior official told The News on Saturday.<P>The conference was chaired by acting head of the Air Defence Command. All the chiefs of staff, military officers of the Brigadier rank, of all the corps headquarters, participated,<P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 27-08-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 31 Aug 2000 10:52

<A HREF="http://www.jang-group.com/thenews/aug2000-daily/31-08-2000/main/main3.htmLt" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang-group.com/thenews/aug2000-daily/31-08-2000/main/main3.htmLt</A> Gen Yousaf replaces Lt Gen Aziz as CGS<BR>Major reshuffle in Army on the cards<P>By Shakil Shaikh<P>ISLAMABAD: Corps Commander Multan Lt Gen Mohammad Yousaf has been appointed Chief of General Staff (CGS) in place of Lt Gen Mohammad Aziz, a senior official told The News on Wednesday.<P>"Lt Gen Yousaf will move to the General Headquarters as its top man after the army chief some time at the end of September," said the official. The new posting of Lt Gen Aziz will be announced in the first week of September, the official added.<P>Lt Gen Yousaf, who until his new assignment, was commander 2-Strike Corps, headquartered in Multan, is one of the senior officers of the existing lot of the three-star generals.<P>The official said Lt Gen Aziz, who remained CGS since October 1998 after being shifted from Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), would be given a new assignment shortly. Earlier, Corps Commander Rawalpindi Lt Gen Mehmood was shifted to ISI in December 1999, and in his place the then newly-promoted Lt Gen Jamshed Gulzar was given the command of 10 Corps.<P>Some military officials, however, said Aziz would be appointed commander, Lahore Corps, as he has not yet commanded a corps which is essential before one is promoted. Though officially nobody confirmed the reshuffle in the army, it has been learnt, when The News contacted several senior officers, that Lt Gen Aziz would replace Lt Gen Khalid Maqbool as Corps Commander Lahore. And Lt Gen Khalid Maqbool would be moved to either National Defence College (NDC) or the GHQ as a PSO.<P>The present Commandant NDC, Lt Gen Saeeduz Zafar, is due to retire in early October this year. Similarly, Lt Gen Afzal Janjua, principal staff officer in the GHQ as Inspector-General Training and Evaluation (IG&TE), will be retiring by the end of September this year. Officials said Chief of Staff Lt Gen Ghulam Ahmed, an officer of Armoured Corps, would succeed Lt Gen Yousaf as Commander Strike Corps Multan.<P>Lt Gen Ghulam Ahmed was appointed Chief of Staff to the Chief Executive, General Pervaiz Musharraf, some months back when Maj Gen Anis Bajwa got a UN appointment as commander of international peacekeepers in Georgia.<P>Two more three-star generals - Lt Gen Salim Haider, Master General Ordnance, and Lt Gen Mohammad Akram, Quarter Master General (QMG) - are also due to retire in December this year. Lt Gen Agha Jehangir, Corps Commander Gujranwala, is also due to retire in January next year.<P>Recently, two major generals - Munir Hafiz and Javed Hassan - have been promoted as lieutenants general, and these two officers are also likely to be adjusted in the on-going reshuffle, as one of them is expected to get corps.<P>It is also learnt that similar to Lt Gen Mohammad Yousaf of Multan Corps, the two years' tenure of Corps Commander Bahawalpur Lt Gen Tahir Ali Qureshi, Commander Karachi Corps Muzaffar Usmani, Commander Lahore Corps Lt Gen Khalid Maqbool, and a few others has been completed.<P>Informed military circles say with the retirement of four three-star generals by the end of December this year, at least four major generals would be promoted.<P>The top 6 major generals on the seniority list, said a senior official, are Maj Gen Zafar Abbas of Anti-Narcotics Force, Maj Gen Rizwan Qureshi, GOC Kharian, Maj Gen Ahsan Salim Hayat, posted in NDC, Maj Gen Sarfraz Ahmed, deputy QMG, Maj Gen Tariq Kiani, Signal officer-in-chief, and Maj Gen Tasneem, DG Ordnance.<P> how on earth was Aziz made CGS if he had no Corps level experience?.. also i was under the impression that the ANF was some half-a** paramilitary unit.. i had no clue it is an army unit and person of such seniority headed it!!!!!.. so i would appreciate any posts relating the ANF <P><BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 31 Aug 2000 11:12

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/23/local21.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/08/23/local21.htm</A> <P>QUETTA, Aug 22: Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) Balochistan in a joint operation with levies recovered over 50 kgs of fine quality morphine packed in polythene bags, on Tuesday. <P>According to sources ANF troops on a tip off conducted a joint operation in a village some 50 km north-east of Chagai, close to the Pakistan-Afghan border and seized the drugs. <P>The armed men guarding the consignment of morphine did not offer any resistance and escaped from the scene leaving the smuggled morphine. <P>Sources said that the drug traffickers having failed to carry drugs in large quantity have resorted to a new method in which drugs are transported in small quantities to Karachi through various transportation means. <P>The ANF also changed its raiding system and started joint operation with other law enforcing agencies and efforts are being made to interdict drugs on the border before it goes to built up areas. <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 06 Sep 2000 09:11

<A HREF="http://members.xoom.com/_XMCM/sabbi/pakarmy/articles/art_armoredge.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://members.xoom.com/_XMCM/sabbi/pakarmy/articles/art_armoredge.htm</A> <P>Pak armour has edge over India<BR>Training is the overall responsibility of the Inspector-General, Training and Education, in GHQ. Unlike many armies in which complex training methods are embraced at great expense, the Pakistan Army has maintained tried and tested methods. It relies largely on the efficient regimental system whereby each infantry regiment has its own training centre, as have corps such as armour or signals. <P>Initial training of officers (all male) of all arms and services is conducted mainly at the Pakistan Military Academy at Kakul, Abbotabad. Standards are adequate, although emphasis has to be placed on instruction in the English language. <P>The Army is short of officers. This is largely due to competition from more lucrative careers and because the social structure of the country is changing. The “old Army families” who supplied their sons as officers and soldiers can no longer be relied upon as a guaranteed source of recruits. The shortage is likely to continue for the foreseeable future, although the recent military takeover improved enlistments. Also, modern techniques of recruiting, with improvements in barrack living conditions, initiated by the previous Chief of Army Staff, General Karamat, and continued by the present chief, have had positive results. <P>Regimental and corps training is of a high standard but there is much learning by rote, which tends to reduce initiative. Instruction at Army schools (such as the School of Infantry and Tactics) is impressive and courses are conducted efficiently. This applies to the Command and Staff College, with one caveat: too much time is spent on researching previous years’ questions and answers rather than attempting to break ground with original thought and novel proposals. <P>Directing staff are high quality and the syllabus is sound. However, the culture of “chappa” — an anxiety to conform, resulting in emphasis on obtaining “correct” solutions from former students — produces uninspiring discussion and careful, but imitative papers. Despite this, the product is generally good. <P>Advanced technical training and graduate/post graduate studies are carried out under the aegis of the National University of Sciences and Technology, which involves the Colleges of Medicine, Signals, Military Engineering, and Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. These are linked with civilian, naval and air force institutions, and with Michigan State (US) and Cranfield (UK) universities. <P>Individual and collective training in units is conducted in an annual cycle, usually dictated by the timing of higher-level exercises. Sub-unit and unit exercises are generally held in summer, with brigade and divisional manoeuvres after the harvest and in winter. <P>There has been emphasis on computer-based war-gaming, with consequent improvement in staff-work, especially in logistics. In the 1965 and 1971 wars few formations were far from base facilities and supply dumps, and it is only comparatively recently that battlefield recovery and practice in forward supply have been allotted the importance they demand. Much training focuses on obstacle-crossing, as there are extensive natural and man-made water barriers on both sides of the border, especially in Punjab. In the 1980s a river-crossing was often judged to have been successful when the force lodged on the far bank had only first-line ammunition and arrangements for its sustenance were at best sketchy. Following the 1989 Zarb-e-Momin exercise it was made clear to commanders that logistics mattered, that resupply was not to be treated as “out of exercise” or “notional,” and that all exercises were to have a credible logistics plan. <P>The analysis of Zarb-e-Momin resulted in considerable restructuring, including the creation of the Air Defence Command and the Artillery Division. It was assessed that command, control and communication (C3I) had serious defects, especially in the passage of tactical information from higher HQ to unit level, but improvement in this aspect has been slower than desired, mainly because of financial constraints. Extensive use is made of satellite communications, and there have been notable advances in the development and production of secure systems, although these do not appear to be available other than in strike formations and independent forces. Subsequent exercises have tested the development matrix generated by Zarb-e-Momin, but budget limitations have precluded conduct of trials on the scale necessary to test, prove, and modify doctrine and procedures to the extent planned by GHQ. <P>Cessation of overseas training arrangements by developed countries as a result of their disapproval of Pakistan’s nuclear tests has not seriously affected professional knowledge or standards, but officers are now denied exposure to the wider horizons offered by such nations. Western influence has been reduced to the point of creating significant resentment, especially at junior level. <P>Increased anti-Western feelings have been manipulated by a small number of zealots within and outside the armed forces in an attempt to attract adherents to more rigid forms of Islam than is desired by senior officers, and the West. <P>Equipment and mobility: US military cooperation and supply of equipment stopped in October 1990 after US President George Bush refused to sign an annual declaration that Pakistan was not involved in a nuclear programme. (The US was aware that Pakistan had such a programme for many years but after Russia’s withdrawal from Afghanistan and the end of the Cold War, Pakistan was less useful to the US as an ally. Sanctions followed.) After some relaxation, strictures were reimposed in totality following Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May 1998. Results have been: <P>The movement of Pakistan further towards China and North Korea as suppliers and, in the case of China, co-producer, of weapons systems. <BR>The clandestine acquisition of equipment and spare parts worldwide. <BR>An increased domestic production of spare parts and ammunition. <BR>Heightened anti-Americanism in all services, but mainly and markedly amongst junior Army officers. <BR>This is spilling-over into general anti-Western sentiment. Fortunately for the Army, Pakistan declined to purchase the US Abrams main battle tank when it was offered in 1988. (It was following a demonstration of the Abrams that Pakistan’s then ruler, Gen. Zia-ul Haq, left the firing range at Bahawalpur in a Pakistan Air Force C-130 that crashed in mysterious circumstances, killing him, the US ambassador, the US defence sales representative and 20 senior officers.) Had the Abrams been obtained, a large part of the Armoured Corps, including the strike corps, would now be facing grave difficulties. <P>Reliance was placed on obtaining Chinese tanks, including the Norinco Type 85 (125mm smoothbore), of which over 400 are in service. Pakistan improved the current inventory by undertaking a major rebuild/upgrade programme at Heavy Industries Taxila (HIT, near Rawalpindi, improved and extended the tanks with significant Chinese assistance). There has also been gradual development, with China, of a new tank, the MBT 2000 or “Khalid”; and the acquisition, beginning in 1997, of 320 T-80UD tanks from Ukraine at a cost of $650m. The last of these were delivered at the end of 1999. <P>The introduction of newer and rebuilt tanks has taken pressure off the Corps of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, which was having difficulty maintaining older equipment for front-line use. Type 85s and T-80s form the major part of strike forces, with the work-horse Type 59 (105mm, upgraded), Type 69 (Centaur FCS), and M-48A5s in other units. Technology from the UK, Sweden and Belgium has resulted in improvement in advanced tank (and artillery) ammunition, which is produced in increasing quantities by Pakistan Ordnance Factories (POF) for domestic use and growing exports. <P>The Khalid MBT (120mm) four-phase programme appears successful, if slow. Its measured pace results from a combination of policy, and non-availability of systems and sub-systems from Western nations. The power pack (UK Challenger) and transmission (French Leclerc) were deemed satisfactory, but the outcome of negotiations on long-term development is unknown as there is pressure within the British government to cease defence co-operation with Pakistan. The programme contrasts favourably with India’s Arjun MBT project. <P>It appears that for the moment Pakistan could have a qualitative and even a quantitative edge over Indian armour, as Russian T-90 MBTs performed badly in trials last year in India, and acquisition is yet to be confirmed. Refurbishment of India’s 1,500 T-72s is well behind schedule, and there are critical maintenance and upgrading problems. The Arjun MBT has been ordered only in token number (124, with delivery to start in 2001). These problems, set against Pakistan’s novel armour tactics, improved air-to-ground cooperation, flexible command structure at corps and below, and a more structured approach to procurement and production, might point to a military balance less in India’s favour than bald inventories would seem to show. <P>Pakistan has a deficiency in mobility. There are too few armoured personnel carriers and self-propelled guns, both medium (155mm) and air defence, to properly equip all formations. There are only 900 M113s available (most produced at HIT under licence). <P>Both their production and armoured infantry fighting vehicle development have been affected by sanctions. The 155mm self-propelled artillery, essential for support in the fast-moving battles likely during the advance of the strike formations and in countering similar Indian thrust(s) into Pakistan, is limited to a dozen regiments-worth of US M-109s. In spite of US embargoes, spares are bought on the world market, with some manufactured at POF. As the barrels are well within their first quarter of life, there is no pressing need for replacement. The problem is in enlarging the holding, as the US is an unreliable supplier. There is no compatibility between the M-109 and the likely alternative, the Norinco 122mm SP gun. <P>Air defence: Until the early 1990s the Army paid insufficient attention to cooperation with the Air Force. Joint exercises were few, and were more demonstrations than tests. During obstacle crossings, soldiers from divisional air defence regiments were used as guides, making far bank AD almost negligible as there were no procedures for marrying-up troops with equipments after lodgement. They would also be so tired as to make them ineffective at the very time of major air threat. <P>Tactical liaison with the Pakistan Air Force was poor or nonexistent and the risk of mistaken engagement of own troops was unacceptably high. Procedures for weapons tight were not practiced. <P>The creation of the Air Defence Command, consisting of three anti-aircraft artillery (AAA) Groups (8 brigades), and emphasis on joint cooperation and training has gone far to rectify the unsatisfactory position. However, much remains to be done. <P>Unfortunately for the Army and the PAF, budget restrictions have cut the number of exercises that are necessary to practice and refine procedures to the required degree, although computer and dry training is conducted. Most equipments are towed guns, but study of AAA tactics worldwide has resulted in doctrine based on local airspace saturation. Hand-held/vehicle-mounted surface-to-air missiles, including Stinger, RBS-70 (180 launchers) and Chinese HN-5, are deployed mainly in strike units, and the cheaply produced Anza infra-red homing missile, a SA-7 “Grail” surface-to-air missile copy, is in wide service. <P> <A HREF="http://members.xoom.com/_XMCM/sabbi/pakarmy/articles/art_transtime.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://members.xoom.com/_XMCM/sabbi/pakarmy/articles/art_transtime.htm</A> <P>Command, tasks and grouping <P>The army's General Headquarters (GHQ) in Rawalpindi, 24km from the capital, Islamabad, houses a confusing mix of old-fashioned command and control. GHQ commands nine corps (21 divisions and the equivalent of another eight in independent brigades) without any intermediate HQ. <P>The army acknowledges the requirement for an 'HQ army group north' to command 1, 30 and 4 Corps, and a similar southern HQ to command 2, 31 and 5 Corps. However, their creation is impossible in light of present financial conditions. <P>1 and 2 Corps are the 'strike' formations: 30, 4, 31 and 5 are essentially defensive, as their infantry and artillery mobility is mainly wheeled. Independent armoured, mechanised and infantry brigades are well-placed and well-enough equipped to exploit gains made by strike formations, and to mount diversions and counter-attacks. <P>The western corps, 11 in North West Frontier Province and 12 in Balochistan, are direct command reinforcement elements, but would find movement east difficult after IAF interdiction of railways, combined with refugee-blocked roads. 10 Corps is responsible for operations in Kashmir, depth manoeuvre and counter-attack in Punjab. <P>In practice there is considerable devolution to corps commanders whose directives give much latitude, with the exception of strike penetration and exploitation, which are as dependent on political factors as they are on logistics and success in battle. <P>Command arrangements at lower levels are conventional and, from observation of several exercises, appear adequate and even expert. Regrouping of formations and subordinate elements cannot be practised often by any army but there is an apparent flexibility to a degree often preached but rarely permitted, especially in the pressurised atmosphere of assessed training, when personal efficiency reports loom large. <P>There is an army reserve of about 500,000 whose members have a triennial attendance obligation to the age of 45. Refresher training is as adequate as might be expected from a three week period, but reserve service seems popular. The 180,000-strong National Guard would be useful in guarding vulnerable points. It consists of the Mujahid Force of 60,000, organised in battalions, some with light air defence capability; the Janbaz Force of 100,000, whose members are intended to serve close to their homes; and the National Cadet Corps in universities and colleges. These elements have some value in providing poorly-trained but enthusiastic reinforcements for rear area units. <P>Paramilitary or civil armed forces are numerous and vary in efficiency. In peacetime most are subordinate to the Ministry of the Interior, but commanders and most other officers are seconded from the army. <P><BR>Article on Pakistan AD. <P>Northern Air Command (Peshawar)<BR>Central Air Command (Sargodha) <BR>Southern Air Command (Masroor)<BR> <A HREF="http://www8.50megs.com/wahcantt/images/airforce/ad1.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www8.50megs.com/wahcantt/images/airforce/ad1.html</A> (MAP!!)<P>Subordinate to it are four sector operations centers and subordinate to the SOC's are seven Control And Reporting Centers. The Sectors HQ are <P>North : Peshawar<BR>West : Quetta <BR>Center : Sargodha<BR>South : Karachi<P> Click Here to see the map <A HREF="http://www8.50megs.com/wahcantt/images/airforce/soc1.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www8.50megs.com/wahcantt/images/airforce/soc1.html[/b]</A> <P>There are 8 separate identified radar systems netted into the Pakistan Air Defense system. Of these, 5 are long-range and the remaining 3 are low-level. <P> <P><BR>Long Range Radar Systems<P>FPS-89/100 It is located at ten locations. It has a search range of 350 km.<BR>Type 514 This is a Chinese system acquired in 1985.<BR>Condor This high-level system was acquired from UK in 1986.<BR>TPS-43 G This is an advanced American radar system with a 275 mile range. These were commissioned in 1989 <BR>***Thompson CSF These are ATC radars that correspond to Pakistan's growing civil air traffic routes, but they are ideally placed to boost early warning from the Indian border.<P>Low Level Radars<P>AR-1/15Six AR-1 radars were installed in 1968-9. They have a range of 150 km.<BR>MPDR45 MPDRs were obtained from Siemens of Germany in 1979-80. They are controlled from six control and reporting centers which are also mobile. The three versions available with Pakistan are :<BR>MPDR 45 (with 45 km. range)<BR>MPDR 60 (with 60 km. range)<BR>MPDR 90 (with 90 km. range) <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 06 Sep 2000 10:58

From <A HREF="http://www.newmediainvestments.com/sViewBoardApp.php?action=showsub&id=297&subName=PAKISTAN%20NEWSPAPER%20ANALYSES%20\" TARGET=_blank>http://www.newmediainvestments.com/sViewBoardApp.php?action=showsub&id=297&subName=PAKISTAN%20NEWSPAPER%20ANALYSES%20\</A> <P>Name: Mohammed Akhtar Subject: PAKISTAN NEWSPAPER ANALYSES \"ROUTINE\" Date: 9.13.37 4 September 2000 <BR>PAKISTAN NEWSPAPER ANALYSES \"ROUTINE\" CHANGES IN MILITARY HIERARCHY. <P><BR>Text of report by Pakistani newspaper \'Jang\' on 1st September <P>The commanders of the three most important corps of the Pakistan army, namely Multan, Lahore, and Bhawalpur, have been changed and at the same time a new Chief of General Staff has been appointed to the General Headquarters (GHQ). This completes the process of routine changes and appointments in the Pakistan army. Further delay in the completion of this process could have negative impacts on the professional capability of Pakistan army. Chief of Army Staff General Pervez Musharraf upheld the army\'s traditions when he ordered the changes on Thursday [31st August]. These were the conclusions of the `Jang\' daily\'s special reporting cell following its contacts with military sources. <P>Contacts with military sources helped the special reporting cell to conclude that every army officer serves a four-year term after being promoted to the rank of three-star general (Lieutenant General). However, the officer is retired from service in case he reaches the age of 57 years before completing his term of office. As a three-star general, the officer has to serve in command and staff posts for two years respectively. For appointment to a command post it is essential for the officer to have served as a commander in the lower ranks as well. In the recent history of the Pakistan army, Gen (Retired) K.M. Arif was the only officer who had been exempted from these traditions. The late Gen Muhammad Ziaul Haq assigned him to a senior command post despite the fact that Gen K.M. Arif had no experience of serving in a command post at a lower level. Gen Ziaul Haq ignored the army\'s tradition and let Gen Arif serve at the senior command post for seven straight years. Lt-Gen Aziz Khan served as the Chief of General Staff for more than two years; therefore his transfer to another position is in line with the army\'s tradition. His appointment as Corps Commander Lahore is in fact an appreciation of his vast experience and the deep respect he commands within the army itself. Although it is not essential to have prior consultation with the concerned officer before appointing him to a new post, yet it is said that the situation was quite different in Lieutenant Gen Aziz Khan\'s case, who is believed to be the closest associate of Gen Pervez Musharraf. The head of Inter Services Intelligence (ISI), Lt-Gen Mehmood Ahmed; the Chief of Staff of the Chief Executive\'s Secretariat, Lt-Gen Ghulam Ahmed Khan; and Maj-Gen Muhammad Ehsan Khan of Military Intelligence are also considered to be close associates of Gen Pervez Musharraf. <P>Lt-Gen Mehmood Ahmed was in command of 10 Corps (Rawalpindi) on 12th October. It must be noted that the Triple One Brigade [III Brigade] of 10 Corps ensured the success of the military action of 12th October and that Lt-Gen Mehmood Ahmed supervised the operation in the face of a number of threats. Lt-Gen Ghulam Ahmed Khan played a key role in foiling the operation, launched by the deposed government to trigger an internal revolt against Gen Pervez Musharraf. At the time he [Lt-Gen Ghulam Ahmed Khan] was affiliated with another sensitive organization. Similarly, Maj-Gen Muhammad Ehsan Khan, considered to be one of the most outstanding officers of the Pakistan army, checked the involvement of foreign elements in the deposed government\'s operation, thus completely foiling the internal revolt against Gen Pervez Musharraf. <P>Lt-Gen Aziz Khan is the first member of Gen Pervez Musharraf\'s unofficial kitchen cabinet. He has been assigned to a post that is some distance from GHQ. However, his posting is nothing extraordinary in nature. Lahore Corps has extraordinary importance because it is simultaneously a defensive and a strike corps. In recognition of his services as NAB\'s [National Accountability Bureau] Chairman, Lt-Gen Syed Muhammad Amjad has been appointed as Corps Commander Multan. His new appointment is also in appreciation of his professional capabilities as a soldier in the armoured corps. Multan\'s corps is Pakistan army\'s second strike corps and is the biggest in size as compared to all the other corps, except Mangla\'s, which is considered to be equal to Multan\'s in size. <P>In recognition of his extraordinary professional capabilities, Lt-Gen Munir Hafeez has been appointed as Corps Commander Bhawalpur. Bhawalpur\'s Corps is undoubtedly the most important defensive corps in the Pakistan army. In the event of war with India, Bhawalpur\'s Corps will confront Indian army\'s 80th Corps with all its aggressive might. In other words, this corps is assigned the responsibility of preparing the graveyard for the enemy forces. The former Corps Commander Bhawalpur, Lt-Gen Tahir Ali Qureshi, was the most senior corps commander. He has been appointed as a principal officer in the GHQ in order to utilize his vast experience. Lt-Gen Muhammad Yousaf Khan will replace Lt-Gen Aziz Khan as Chief of General Staff. He is considered to be one of the most intelligent and skilled planners in the army. His appointment will completely transform his new post into a professional post, which will have a positive impact on the army\'s capabilities. <P>Like Lt-Gen Mehmood Ahmed, NAB\'s new head, Lt-Gen Khalid Maqbool, also comes from Faisalabad. He is a hardworking and honest officer. His appointment as NAB\'s new head will certainly enhance the performance of this institution. He is not only a hard worker himself but keeps his associates on their toes as well. It is hoped that the NAB will now emerge as a stern and effective institution. Once he joins NAB, his predecessor will arrange separate briefings for Lt-Gen Khalid Maqbool. The briefings will continue over a one-week period, during which he will be informed about the workings of various sections of NAB. Thus it would ensure that NAB will continue to perform effectively despite the change in leadership. The new Commandant of the National Defence College Islamabad, Lt-Gen Javed Hassan, may be assigned relatively important duties in the future. He shot to fame due to his excellent planning and valiant conduct during the Kargil conflict. His predecessor, Lt-Gen Saeeduz Zafar, will be assigned important administrative duties after his retirement from active duty. The process of changes in the Pakistan army during the current year was completed on Thursday when Gen Pervez Musharraf ordered new changes and appointments. More changes are now expected to come during the second quarter of next year. Gen Pervez Musharraf\'s confidence regarding the new changes can be gauged from the fact that they have come at a time when he is scheduled to leave the country on a foreign visit in less than a week\'s time. <P>Source: \'Jang\', Rawalpindi, in Urdu 1 Sep 00 pp 1, 2. <BR>BBC Worldwide Monitoring/ (c) BBC 2000. <BR> <P><BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 06 Sep 2000 11:00

Jang.com.pk - 1/9/00 <P>Army strategy not to alter but NAB may take new course <P>News Intelligence Unit <P>By Kamran Khan <P>KARACHI: The reshuffle in the top brass of Pakistan Army announced on <BR>Thursday by the General Headquarters (GHQ) will not alter the stance of <BR>General Pervaiz Musharraf\'s administration on key strategic issues such <BR>as nuclear, India, Taliban and the role of Jehadi forces in the Kashmir <BR>struggle or the return of democracy, but the induction of a new <BR>Chairman of National Accountability Bureau (NAB) may turn NAB into a <BR>\"business friendly\" investigative agency with a new focus on probe <BR>against controversial defence contracts, informed military officials said. <P>Lt Gen Mohammad Yusuf, the new Chief of General Staff (CGS), is <BR>considered as close to General Pervaiz Musharraf as was Yusuf\'s <BR>predecessor Lt Gen Mohammad Aziz Khan when Musharraf surprised the <BR>Army by picking Aziz as his CGS despite his position as the junior most Lt <BR>Gen in the Army in October 1998. Under the new arrangement, informed <BR>officials said, Lt Gen Aziz Khan, while acting as the Commander 4 Corps <BR>in Lahore, would also interact with the Government of Punjab as the <BR>Corps Commanders were doing in three other provinces. Earlier, because <BR>of the positioning of six corps in Punjab, there was some confusion <BR>between the military and civilian command in Lahore. <P>The military sources said besides sharing identical views on matters of <BR>national security and external affairs, Lt Gen Mohammad Yusuf and his <BR>predecessor Lt Gen Mohammad Aziz Khan fondly share their respective <BR>affinity to late General Mohammad Zia-ul-Haq. Yusuf\'s father, Colonel <BR>Hashim was considered one of the closest friends of Gen Zia-ul-Haq, <BR>who took personal interest in shaping Yusuf\'s career in the army. <P>Lt Gen Aziz, the new Corps Commander of Lahore, had served the <BR>deceased martial law administrator as his deputy military secretary, an <BR>appointment made on the personal orders of late Gen Zia-ul-Haq. Both <BR>Yusuf and Aziz also share their appreciation for the military acumen of Lt <BR>Gen (retd) Hamid Gul, the former ISI chief. Yusuf on his personal choice <BR>was picked by Gen Hamid Gul as his brigade major (BM), the position that <BR>goes to the choicest officer in a brigade, while Gul was commanding a <BR>brigade in Punjab. <P>Yusuf affectionately known as \"Joe\" amongst his colleagues, like Aziz, <BR>avoids the media glare and is widely known for his non-assuming low <BR>key-style of work. Before being nominated as the CGS, he was the key <BR>army person on the affairs of civil establishment. He is believed to have <BR>played a vital role in shaping GHQ\'s perception about the reorganisation <BR>in the civilian bureaucracy. <P>Lt Gen Mohammad Yusuf, who will soon be the second most important <BR>rank holder in Pakistan Army, would be Gen Musharraf\'s eyes and ears, <BR>particularly on military affairs. The CGS coordinates the military affairs <BR>with all the corps commanders, oversees military operations through the <BR>Directorate General of Military Operations and holds the pulse of army - <BR>and also of some key civilians - through the Directorate General Military <BR>Intelligence. <P>Sources said in June this year Gen Musharraf had decided to induct a <BR>new CGS, also because of Gen Aziz\'s desire to command a Corps, and <BR>Musharraf\'s first choice was Lt Gen Muzaffar H Usmani, the Commander 5 <BR>Corps in Karachi. Gen Usmani, however, could not take the new <BR>assignment owing to domestic reasons. <P>Though the induction of the new CGS will not bring any shift in the <BR>military government\'s position on key issues, military sources were <BR>certain that appointment of Lt Gen Khalid Maqbool as the new Chairman <BR>of NAB may shape a more \"business friendly\" accountability bureau. It is <BR>also expected the NAB will soon undertake serious investigation into the <BR>corruption of top-ranking retired military officials and allegations of <BR>kickbacks in major defence contracts. <P>A senior official informed the News Intelligence Unit (NIU) that Chief <BR>Executive General Pervaiz Musharraf has already asked the new NAB <BR>chairman that he wanted a thorough probe into the allegations of <BR>kickback and corruption of retired military officials highlighted by The <BR>News and Jang on August 29. Officials said that while serving as the <BR>Corps Commander Lahore, Lt Khalid Maqbool had emerged as central <BR>military figure who was seeking an amicable solution to business-related <BR>disputes between the businessmen and the military administration. \"He <BR>had literally flung open the doors of the corps headquarters for the <BR>business community,\" one official said. <P>Other sources said Lt Gen Khalid Maqbool also had reservations on the <BR>NAB\'s somewhat rough treatment of some key businessmen of the <BR>country. He was also considered close to Finance Minister Shaukat Aziz <BR>who was one of the key opponents of NAB\'s style of probing against the <BR>business community. Throughout his career Khalid Maqbool, an infantry <BR>officer, was known as \"a very disciplined soldier who only believes in <BR>executing orders with almost religious zeal\". He had also served the <BR>Pakistan mission in Washington as the country\'s defence attache. It is <BR>widely expected that under Khalid Maqbool, the NAB may soon witness a <BR>major reshuffle with a focus on its prosecution branch headed by <BR>increasingly noisy Major (retd) Farooq Adam, a personal friend of Gen <BR>Amjad from his army days. <P>Among the transfers announced on Thursday is removal of Lt Gen Tahir <BR>Ali Qureshi as the Corps Commander Bahawalpur. This transfer <BR>represented a phase in which all the Corps Commanders who had been <BR>posted before Gen Musharraf\'s appointment as the COAS in October <BR>1998 made way for the generals personally selected by Gen Musharraf to <BR>become the Corps Commander. Lt Gen Tahir Ali Qureshi had been posted <BR>as Corps Commander by the former COAS Gen Jehangir Karamat. <P>This recent reshuffle in Pakistan Army, however, highlighted the <BR>miserable state of importance attached to the premier defence <BR>establishment - the National Defence College (NDC). In a short period of <BR>two years, Lt Gen Javed Hasan would be the fourth commandant of the <BR>NDC, where the leadership changes have rocked the institution. <BR>Beginning June 1998 Lt Gen Mahmood Ahmed, Lt Gen Salahuddin Tirmizi <BR>and Lt Gen Saeeduz Zafar commanded the NDC for a period ranging from <BR>three to seven months.

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 06 Sep 2000 22:35

<A HREF="http://www-ec.njit.edu/~axz6893/army.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www-ec.njit.edu/~axz6893/army.htm</A> <P>Somewhat dated information.<P>The High Command:<BR>The Chief of the Army Staff (COAS), formerly called the Commander in Chief (C in C), is challenged with the responsibility of commanding the Pakistan Army. In 1994 this post was held by General Abdul Waheed. Currently, the chief of army staff is General Jehangir Karamat. The COAS operates from army headquarters in Rawalpindi, near Islamabad. The four principal officers assisting him in his duties at the lieutenant general level include a Chief of General Staff (CGS), who supervises army intelligence and operations; the Master General of Ordinance (MGO); the Quartermaster General (QMG); the Adjutant General (AG); the Inspector General for Evaluation and Training (IGT&E); and the Military Secretary (MS). The headquarters function also includes the Chief of the Corps of Engineers, the Judge Advocate General, and the Comptroller of Civilian Personnel, all of whom report to the vice chief of the army staff.<P>Structure of the Military Units:<BR>There are two main branches in which the army can be categorized. The arms category includes infantry, artillery, armor, engineers and communications, whereas the services category encompasses the ordinance corps, maintenance and repair corps, electrical and mechanical engineering corps, education corps, military police corps, and the remount, veterinary, and farm corps. A Corps usually consists of two or more Divisions. It is commanded by a lieutenant general. Each division, being commanded by a major general, usually holds three Brigades including infantry, artillery, engineers and communications units in addition to logistics (supply and service) support to sustain independant action. It, however, does not include any armoured units. Those are attached once the need arises. The most major of all ground force combat formations is the infantry division. Such a division would primarily hold three infantry brigades. A Brigade is under the command of a brigadier and comprises of three or more Regiments of different units depending on its functionality. An independant brigade would be one that primarily consists of an artillery unit, an infantry unit, an armour unit and logisitics to support its actions. Such a brigade is not part of any division and is under direct command of a corps. Each regiment is commanded by a colonel and has roughly 600 soldiers under his command. This number varies depending on the functionality of the regiment. A regiment comprises of four batteries each under the command of a major and comprising of individual subunits called companies.<P>Size, Organization and Equipment:<BR>The army is organized into nine corps. All of it sums up to twenty Infantry & two Armoured Divisions. Each corp is commanded by a 3-star Lieutenant General sitting at Corps Headquarters. Their stations are: <P>I Corps (Mangla) <BR>II Corps (Multan) <BR>IV Corps (Lahore)<BR>V Corps (Karachi)<BR>X Corps (Rawalpindi)<BR>XI Corps (Peshawar) <BR>XII Corps (Quetta) <BR>XXX Corps (Gujranwala) <BR>XXXI Corps (Bahawalpur)<P>There is also the Northern Area Command, headquartered at Gilgit, directly responsible to army general headquarters. <P>Army's active strength is at 565,000 personnel with another 500,000 in the reserves. Reserve status lasts for eight years after leaving active service or until age forty-five for enlisted men and age fifty for officers. The statics regarding the arms, armament and organization of the units is as follows:<P>Main Battle tanks: 2000<BR>Artillary pieces: 1700<P>Infantry Divisions: 20 <BR>Armoured Divisions: 2 <BR>Mech. Infantry Div: 1 <BR>Artillery Division: 1<BR>Independent Armoured <BR> Brigades: 6 <BR>Independent Infantry <BR> Brigades: 6 <BR>Artillery Brigades: 9 <BR>Engineer Brigades: 7 <BR>Armoured Recce <BR> Regiments: 1<BR>Air Defence Brigades: 8<BR>Special Services Group: <BR> Brigades: 1 (comprising of)<BR> Battalions: 3 <BR> Independant Counter-<BR> Terrorism Company: 1<BR>EQUIPMENT: <BR>---------- <P>MAIN BATTTLE TANKS<BR> <BR>CHINESE: 200 T85II APs, 51 T-55s, 250 T-69s, 1200 T-59s, 100 T-60/63s <BR> T-60/80 being produced at HMC Taxilla<BR>AMERICAN: 450 M-47/48s (being withdrawn)<BR> Work continues on MBT-2000 Al-Khalid<BR> <BR>ARMOURED PERSONNEL CARRIERS:<BR>820 M113s, 120 BTR 70s. M113s manufactured at HMC Taxilla<BR>ARTILLERY PIECES:<P>1,566 towed and 240 Self-propelled artillery pieces.<BR>AMERICAN: 105/150/255mm. Self Propelled and TOWED Howitzers.<BR>CHINESE: 85mm/122mm. guns. Some Bofors.<BR> Additional M-198 Howitzers being deliverd from the US <BR> under the Brown Ammendment.<BR> <BR>ARMY AVIATION <BR> <BR>20 AH-1 COBRA Gunships, Mi-8s, French Alloute IIIs,<BR>PUMAs, Mi-17s, UH-1s, Bell-47, Cassena O-1Es. <BR> <P>ARMY AIR DEFENCE <BR> <BR>2000 AA guns ZU-23/33 30, 36, 37mm., SAMs CROTALEs,<BR>400 RBS-20, SAM-7, 350 Stingers and Redeyes, 500 Anza mk II. <BR> <BR>SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILES<BR> <BR>Work Stopped on indegenous HATF-I,II Reportedly CHINESE M-11s acquired <BR>clandestinely form China. Currently have 8 HATF missiles.<BR> <BR>PAKISTANI OFFICER'S RANKS: ENLISTED RANKS:<BR>Field Marshal (5-Star) Subedar Major<BR>General (4-Star) Subedar<BR>Lieutenant General (3-Star) Nayeb Subedar<BR>Major General (2-Star) Hawaldar<BR>Brigadier (1-Star) Lance Hawaldar<BR>Colonel Naek<BR>Lieutenant Colonel Lance Naek<BR>Major Sipahi<BR>Captain Jawan<BR>Lieutenant<BR>Second Lieutenant<P>The change in Afghanistan also helped in putting a large amount of reserves at the disposal of the Pakistan Army, a factor which has been significant in neutralising the otherwise Indian numerical superiority in ground forces. Pakistan, for instance, has 10 Divisions in reserves, including 8 infantry and 2 armoured divisions. These large reserves ensure that Pakistan today is better equiped to fight both offensive and defensive battles. Conversely, India has 18 divisions deployed on the borders with Pakistan, China and Bangladesh, while 16 are in reserve, out of which approximately 10 are deployed in counter insurgency operations in Kashmir, Punjab and Assam. <P>Strategy and Logistics:<BR>The second element which has been important for the Pakistan Army in recent years is the new doctrine of "offensive-defence" which was tested during the Pakistan Army's biggest-ever manoeuvres during late 1989, code-named "Exercise Zarb-e-Momin". Under this strategic concept, the Pakistan Army is viewed as a force capable of undertaking a strategic offensive on land, including the possiblity of taking the war into enemy territory, rather than waiting to be hit.<P>The Pakistan Army today is in better shape than before which is evident from the fact that it has 45 days of reserve ammunition and fuels in stocks as compared to 1965 when it only had 13 days of stocks. <P>Another element which has added to the Army's professional capability is the extreme stress on professional education, training and career planning. Priemier institutes like the Command and Staff College, Quetta, and the National Defence College are world renowned for their elaborate and contemporary curricula. About 200 officers from the Army are sent annually to foreign countries for training with 75% going to USA. Today, the Pakistan Army has more than 50 Ph.Ds.<P>Paramilitary Organizations:<BR>Paramilitary organizations, which were mainly of symbolic importance, included the 185,000-member National Guard, comprising the Janbaz Force--locally recruited militia mainly charged with air defense--and two programs similar to the United States Reserve Officers Training Corps, the National Cadet Corps and the Women Guard. The Women Guard, unlike the National Cadet Corps, included individuals trained in nursing, welfare, and clerical work. There were also some women in the Janbaz Force, and a very small number of women were recruited into the regular service in limited numbers to perform medical and educational work. <P>Paramilitary internal security forces were organized on the provincial level but were subordinate to the Ministry of Interior and were commanded by seconded army generals. These forces were in effect an extension of the army for internal security duties. The Pakistan Rangers, headquartered in Lahore, dealt with unrest in Punjab, while the Mehran Force performed similar functions in Sindh. In 1994 their strengths were 25,000 and 24,000, respectively, divided into "wings" of approximately 800 men each. The Frontier Corps, with a strength of 65,000, was based in Peshawar and Quetta with responsibility for the North-West Frontier Province and Balochistan. The corps was responsible to both the Ministry of States and Frontier Regions and to army headquarters. The corps was divided into twenty-seven local units--fourteen in the North-West Frontier Province and thirteen in Balochistan--and included the Chitral Scouts, the Khyber Rifles, the Kurram Militia, the Tochi Scouts, the South Waziristan Scouts, the Zhob Militia, and the Gilgit Scouts. There was also a Coast Guard, subordinate to the Ministry of Interior and staffed by army personnel. <P>Peace-time Activities:<BR>In times of natural disaster, such as the great floods of 1992, army engineers, medical and logistics personnel, and the armed forces played a major role in bringing relief and supplies. The army also engaged in extensive economic activities. Most of these enterprises, such as stud and dairy farms, were for the army's own use, but others performed functions beneficial to the local civilian economy. Army factories produced such goods as sugar, fertilizer, and brass castings and sold them to civilian consumers. <P>Several army organizations performed functions that were important to the civilian sector across the country. For example, the National Logistics Cell was responsible for trucking food and other goods across the country; the Frontier Works Organization built the Karakoram Highway to China; and the Special Communication Organization maintained communications networks in remote parts of Pakistan<P><BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 07 Sep 2000 06:19

From. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.hindustantimes.com/nonfram/070900/detNAT21.asp" TARGET=_blank>http://www.hindustantimes.com/nonfram/070900/detNAT21.asp</A> <P>It is learnt that the winter exercise plan for the Rawalpindi-based 10 Corps (which is responsible troop deployment along the LoC) this year is based on the limited war concept with a nuclear backdrop. <P>The Indian perception was firmed up by intelligence inputs, indicating that Pakistan has been shifting missile regiments and earmarked areas of deployment in case of hostilities breaking out. For instance, Pakistani M-11 missiles are being stored at Sargodha, and Gujranwala, Ohkara and Multan have been earmarked as areas of deployment. Shaheen I and Ghauri missiles are stored at Fatehjung and Jhelum, and areas of deployment are Rawalpindi, Karachi and Peshawar. Hatf-I missiles are being stored at Attock, and the area of deployment is Kahuta. <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Mandeep » 08 Sep 2000 02:34

Good work Sunil!<P>Irked by reports of the Indians knowing all the details of the Pakistani DCB forward of the BRB(Ichhogill) Canal like the locations of bunkers,concrete emplacements,tank firing points, command posts and gaps etc the Pakistanis have deployed the National Guard units all along the Wagah Drain to keep away any and all non-Army personnel from coming too close.

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 08 Sep 2000 04:41

From the Jang, coverage of Defence Day celebrations. <P>PESHAWAR:<P>Garrison Commander Nowshera Major General Zakauddin Malik placed a <BR>wreath on the Mazar and offered Fateha. Smartly turned-out <BR>contingents of the battalions of the Sindh Regiment and the Northern <BR>Light Infantry presented the salute to pay respects to their great warrior <BR>officer. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/sep2000-daily/07-09-2000/metro/i1.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/sep2000-daily/07-09-2000/metro/i1.htm</A> <P>Our Larkana correspondent adds: Defence Day was observed in Larkana for the first time under the auspices of 40 Wing Shahbaz Rangers in its local headquarters. The main feature was the display of arms and weapons. <P>Addressing the function Commandant Shahbaz Rangers Col Tanveer-ul-Hassan said: "The Defence of Pakistan Day is a day to review pledge and also a day to remember the martyrs and pay tributes to them."<P> <A HREF="http://www.syberwurx.com/nation/pak3.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.syberwurx.com/nation/pak3.htm</A> <P>OH the b*****d!! <P>Wreath-laying ceremonies: <B> At Singhori, Major General Salahuddin Satti, General Officer Commanding,</B> laid a floral wreath at the Yadgar...<P>and the rest.. <P>Major General Rizwan Qureshi, General Officer Commanding, laid a floral wreath on the Mazar of Major Raja Aziz Bhatti Shaheed in Ladian and offered Fateha.<P>Major General Muhammad Anis Ahmad Abbasi, General Officer Commanding, laid a floral wreath and offered Fateha at the monument of <BR>Major Muhammad Akram Shaheed.<P>At Mahfoozabad (Pind) Malkan, Brigadier Inayat Ul IIyas, Commandant, Punjab Regimental Centre, laid a floral wreath at the Mazar of Lance Naik Mahfooz Shaheeed and offered Fateha.<P>Birgadier Muhammad Anwar ul Haque, Commander Divisional Artillery, laid a floral wreath at the Mazar of Sawar Muhammad Hussain Shaheed and offered Fateha.<P>Major General Ahmad Nawaz Saleem, General Officer Commanding, laid a floral wreath and offered Fateha at the Mazar of Major Shabbir Sharif Shaheeed at Miani Sahib Lahore.<P>At Verhari, Brigadier Aziz Ahmad Chattha, Brigade Commander, laid a floral wreath at the Mazar of Major Muhammad Tufail Shaheed and offered Fateha.<P>At village Nava Kali Tehsil Swabi, Major General Zakaud-Din Malik, Garrison Commander, laid a floral wreath at the Mazar of Captain Karnal Sher Mohammad Shaheed and offered Fateha.<P>Major General Muhammad Safdar Hussain, Commander Force Northern Areas, laid a floral wreath at the Mazar of Havaldar Lalak Jan Shaheed and offered Fateha<P><BR>OH HELLO it looks like there is a new FCNA!<P>Still more from Frontierpost <A HREF="http://www.frontierpost.com.pk/2000/Sep/city/06/4city.asp" TARGET=_blank>http://www.frontierpost.com.pk/2000/Sep/city/06/4city.asp</A> <P>"The General Officer Commanding Kohat, Maj. Gen Tarik Bashir". <P><BR><B> Artiller Bde identifed</B><P>The function was also attended by five Independent Artillery Brigade, Brigadier Zafar Iqbal, <P>BTW. Tarar visited the Mohmand Rifles HQ at Peshawar. <P>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 07-09-2000).]<p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 07-09-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Mandeep » 09 Sep 2000 03:56

Brig Aziz Ahmed Chattha is the Comdr of 326 Inf Bde.

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 10 Sep 2000 22:50

Jang.<P>Army team visits CMC hospitals<P>LARKANA: Incharge District Army Monitoring Cell Lt-Col Muhammad Amjad visited the CMC hospitals along with his team on Saturday and expressed dissatisfaction over ill sanitation and lack of accommodation in the Children's Hospital. <BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby ramana » 11 Sep 2000 22:34

B Raman's profile of Lt. Gen Aziz, "Mulla's blue-eyed general" at saag.org.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.saag.org/papers2/paper146.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.saag.org/papers2/paper146.html</A>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby rrikhye » 14 Sep 2000 05:08

Mandeep as usual continues to astonish. Have you all seen his ordersofbattle post on Indian and Pakistan tank/mech bdrigades? You are missing something if you havent.<P>Mandeep: where is 326 Brigade and when was it raised? Parent formation? Where is your post for this week?<P>Johann has a different theory on why the WW2 armd divisions were disbanded - will post it to you for your comments, but I will also post it as is for Sunday, with your comments if I get them in time!<P>All best, and Sunil, keep up the good work. Ravi<P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 18 Sep 2000 00:25

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/09/17/nat7.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/09/17/nat7.htm</A> <P>some info about Pak Rangers Sindh. <P>"HYDERABAD, Sept 16: <B> Lt-Col Syed Khalid Waseem Qadri Wing Commander of the Rangers 60th wing </B>has stated that the deputy superintendent of rangers, Hussain Mustafa Shah, who has been accused of trying to enter a girls hostel at LMC and of beating up a visitor, did not commit any immoral act but "had stepped out of his domain." .... CONDENSED FOR BREVITY.. The boy was a 4th year student. Hot words were exchanged between the two on which the boy, who was later identified as Masroor, allegedly took out a knife and attacked the officer. Col Qadri said the officer gave the boy a beating and took him to <B> the company headquarter, Jamshoro,</B> along with the police as the attack by a knife was a "cognizable offence." "<P>More on the ANF. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/09/17/local6.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/09/17/local6.htm</A> <P> <P><BR> <P> <P> <P> <P><BR> <BR>17 September 2000 Sunday 18 Jamadi-us-Saani 1421 <P><BR>Please Visit our Sponsor (Ads open in separate window)<P>LAHORE: 86kg heroin, 1.30 tons hashish seized <P><BR>By Our Staff Reporter <P>"LAHORE, Sept 16: The Anti Narcotics Force (ANF) has seized a major haul of contraband - 86kg heroin and 1.30 ton of hashish - and arrested five people. <P>Speaking at a news conference here on Saturday, Punjab ANF regional director Brig Riazullah said the seizure was made on Friday. "<P> <A HREF="http://www.nation.com.pk/inset.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.nation.com.pk/inset.htm</A> <P>5 anti-drug courts next month <BR>ISLAMABAD (NNI) - Five special courts to try narcotics-related cases have been set up that will start functioning next month, Director General Anti Narcotics Force (ANF) Major General Zafar Abbas said Saturday.<BR>Addressing the premiere show of television serial "Inkar", jointly produced by Pakistan Television and ANF, Abbas said judges had been appointed to these courts set up at Peshawar, Quetta, Karachi, Lahore, and Rawalpindi. These courts will be dedicated to trying narcotics-related offences, he said.<BR>Talking to this agency after the function, the ANF chief said his organisation was striving hard to purge Pakistan of the menace of drugs. Supported by aid agencies, ANF has met success in throttling smuggling and arresting production of heroin, he said. The success, he said, was reflected in the fact that produce of opium in the country had gone down from 800 tons to a mere 7 tons a year, which substantially went into medicine production.<BR>Pakistan has lived up to its promise of cleansing its soil of drug production by year 2000, Major General Zafar Abbas asserted, maintaining there remained not a single heroin production unit in the country, and almost all the notorious drug dealers including Ayub Afridi, Iqbal Baig, etc are serving their time behind the bars. He said ANF arrested the wrongdoers only after obtaining incontrovertible proofs of their misdeeds, and made sure they were not let loose by the court.<BR>Shedding light on the composition of the organization, Abbas said it drew half its strength from serving military officers, while the other half was made up of police and ANF officials, all of whom were highly motivated to cleanse Pakistan of the drug menace.<BR>ANF is also working for rehabilitation of people fallen prey to drug addiction, said the Abbas, adding that ANF cooperation for the production of "Inkar" was part of these efforts. He said the population of drug addicts in the country was estimated between 3.5 and 4 million.<BR>The establishment of these special courts dedicated to trying narcotics-related cases will go a long way towards making Pakistan a drug-free society, said Major General Zafar Abbas, hoping that the goal will be achieved soon.<P> <P><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 17-09-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 19 Sep 2000 20:38

<A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/sep2000-daily/24-09-2000/national/n6.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/sep2000-daily/24-09-2000/national/n6.htm</A> <P>GOC witnesses police parade<P>HYDERABAD: The General Officer Commanding (GOC) Hyderabad on Saturday witnessed a parade and demonstration of Jawans and officials of Sindh police at the police line ground. This group of police force that has been named as Rapid Force-15 will deal with criminals, dacoits and anti-social elements in Hyderabad. <P>Briefing the visiting GOC Hyderabad Major General Khalid Muneer, Brigadier Syed Shakeel Hussain and DIG Hyderabad Saud Mirza, the chief of the Hyderabad Police, Moazzam Jah Ansari, said the Rapid Force's three squads would be deployed at central points, covering City-Phulleli sub-divisions, Cantonment-Latifabad sub- division and Qasimabad sub-division. <P>The Rapid Force will come into action immediately when someone will dial 15, as a 10-line exchange has been established, with two wirelesses and three Rapid Force mobile vans, the SSP said. <P>These squads will be equipped with G-3 rifles, sub-machine guns, finger prints kits, first-aid box, megaphone, water cooler, walkie talkie, gas masks, fire extinguisher, besides other necessary things, Ansari added. <P>He said the tasks for the Rapid Force have been fixed as combating terrorism, robberies, and domestic violence, violence against women and natural disasters and helping old people in distress. <P>GOC Major General Khalid Muneer said the Rapid Force has been established in Hyderabad to combat anti-social elements. Lauding the efforts of Hyderabad police for combating crime, the GOC said the Rapid Force would be a good beginning and help the police force in tackling the criminals, kidnappers and anti-social elements. He said it would help in nabbing the culprits on the spot, as it did last week, when it secured the safe release of a kidnap victim. <P><BR>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<BR><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 24-09-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 24 Sep 2000 20:42

somewhat sentimental pieces.. but i can place a value judgement on them just yet. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/apr/mosaic.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/apr/mosaic.htm</A> <BR> <A HREF="http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/may/army-mosaic.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/may/army-mosaic.htm</A> <BR> <A HREF="http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/june/army-mosaic.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/june/army-mosaic.htm</A> <BR> <A HREF="http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/july/mosaic.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.defencejournal.com/2000/july/mosaic.htm</A> <P> Ravi, please note there is a lot of historical/anecdotal stuff in this, might be somewhat useful for your book <P><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 27-09-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 28 Sep 2000 05:34

from the dawn. <P>Gen. Aziz takes over as corps commander Lahore. <P>LAHORE, Sept 26: Lt-Gen Muhammad Aziz Khan on Tuesday took over as Lahore corps commander, replacing Lt-Gen Khalid Maqbool who has been appointed as chairman of the National Accountability Bureau (NAB). <P>On his arrival at the corps headquarters, he was given a guard of honour. Before his new assignment, Gen Aziz was the chief of general staff, a position now given to Lt-Gen Yousaf Khan, who till now was the Multan corps commander<P> <A HREF="http://www.ideas2000.com.pk/visits.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.ideas2000.com.pk/visits.htm</A> <P> <BR>Some JSHQ people identified.. incidently it appears some of these guys went prancing all over the world looking at defence exibitions <P>The photograph (left) is taken at Singapore, where Mr. Aasim A. Siddiqui, Managing Director and Colonel (Retd.) Akbar A. Shareef, Executive Vice President of Pegasus Consultancy (Pvt.) Ltd., along with the Joint Staff Headquarters Officials, <B> namely, Major General Syed Ali Hamid, Chief Coordinator and Brigadier Saleem A. Moeen,</B> were accompanying the Chief Executive of Islamic Republic of Pakistan, General Pervez Musharraf, who was on an official visit to South Asian Countries<P>As a regular marketing and promotional campaign, the IDEAS team visited Defence Services Asia (DSA) from 11 - 14 April 2000. <B> The team led by Brigadier Abdul Ghafoor, Director Operations Joint Staff Headquarters, comprised of Brigadier (Retd.) Saleem Moeen, Mr. Aamer Khanzada, Director and Wg. Cdr. (Retd.) Akhtar Shahzad, G.M. Operations Pegasus Consultancy.</B><P> <BR>A VISIT TO Eurosatory 2000, FRANCE <P> <P>The IDEAS 2000 team had a visit to Eurosatory, France from 19 - 21 June 2000. The group consisted of Mr. Aasim Siddiqui, Managing Director and Mr. Aamer Khanzada, Director Pegasus Consultancy <B> plus Joint Staff Headquarters team led by Major General Syed Ali Hamid, Chief Coordinator, Lt. Col. Bakhtiyar Khan, Assistant Deputy Coordinator and Brigadier (Retd.) Saleem A. Moeen. </B><P>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<P>A VISIT TO FARNBOROUGH 2000, UNITED KINGDOM<P><BR> <P>The IDEAS team also had a chance to visit Farnborough , United Kingdom, from 24-30 July 2000. The Farnborough show mainly consisted of a Static Display of various military aircrafts. The team consisted of Mr. Aamer Khanzada, Director of Pegasus Consultancy, and <B> Major Shahid Malik, Resident Manager of IDEAS 2000 </B> in the Islamabad office<P><B> A series of Fourth Steering Committee meetings, presided by Major General Syed Ali Hamid was held from 23-25 August 2000 at the Hotel Marriott, in Karachi. These meetings had the permanent presence of the IDEAS 2000 Coordination Cell at the Joint Staff Headquarters team namely, Brigadier Salim A. Khan, Brigadier Riaz A. Toor, , Brigadier Naveed Rahman, Lt. Col. Bakhtiyar Khan, accompanied by Brigadier Aftab, Brigadier Shoaib and Brigadier Aslam (representing the 5-Corps),</B> <P> along-with the Pegasus Consultancy team namely, Mr. Aasim A. Siddiqui, Managing Director, Mr. Aamer Khanzada, Director, Wg. Cdr. (Retd.) Akhtar Shahzad, GM Operations, Col. (Retd.) Akbar A. Shareef, Managing Director of Rakaposhi Tours, Mr. Michael Liew, Senior Vice President of Times Conferences & Exhibitions and Mr. Ko Chee Wah, Managing Director of CityNeon Exhibition Services. <BR> <P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 27-09-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby ramana » 30 Sep 2000 03:19

Subash Kapila thinks the recent re-shuffle of PA commanders does not change anything. It reinforces the Islamists in PA. <A HREF="http://www.ipcs.org/issues/articles/416-pak-kapila.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.ipcs.org/issues/articles/416-pak-kapila.html</A>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 01 Oct 2000 20:55

ANF again. (Director ANF Baloachistan identified). <P>DAWN 01 October 2000 <P><BR>200kg drugs, arms seized near Turbat <P>QUETTA, Sept 30: The Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF), Balochistan, seized over 200 kilograms of hashish and opium, a vehicle, and one machine gun, following a heavy gun battle with drug traffickers in Nag area, some 100km north-west of Turbat, on Saturday. <P>"The value of the seized drugs in the international market may be estimated to be Rs 250 million," Brigadier Abdul Razaq Baloch, Regional Director, ANF, Balochistan said while confirming the successful corporation against drug traffickers. <P>Sources said, that the source of the drug was Chotto, a notorious narcotics market in the Helmand province of Afghanistan, and was destined for western countries via Iran. <P>The ANF troops intercepted the convoy of drug traffickers in Nag area and chased them for many kilometres while firing on the fleeing smugglers' vehicles. The trailing vehicles received dozens of bullets but traffickers continued to move on to escape, but when the front of their vehicle was blasted it stopped. <P>The drug smugglers dismounted and took up positions at nearby heights and started indiscriminate fire with rocket-launcher, machine guns, and AK-47 assault rifles. The gun battle lasted for half-an-hour, during which thousands of bullets and dozens of rockets was were fired by both sides. <P>The smugglers failed to carry the drugs they were carrying for its onward shipment to foreign countries. <P>also. <P>Garrison Durbar at Sialkot. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/01-10-2000/main/main1.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/01-10-2000/main/main1.htm</A> <P>also from the same site. <P>AMT-Sukkur boss talks.. "'PAP schemes to finish in time'"<P>SUKKUR: The development schemes being carried out under Poverty Alleviation Programme (PAP) in Khairpur district will be completed in time, Commander Army Monitoring Team Sukkur Brig Sartaj Mirza said during his visit to the site of these schemes on Saturday. Major Saeed of District Monitoring Team, Deputy Commissioner Khairpur Khawaja Shafiq Ahmed and concerned engineers were also with him. Brig Sartaj urged the concerned officers to ensure quality of work, failing which strict action would be taken against them. <P>and Desilting work<P>SUKKUR: Incharge District Monitoring Team Khairpur Col Umar Khitab, along with the concerned officers, visited all channels and minors of the district to inspect the desilting operation being carried out there. Col Khitab hoped that the desilting work would benefit growers regarding supply of irrigation water.<P><BR> <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby rrikhye » 01 Oct 2000 21:08

Sunil, the tone of the news articles regarding Pakistan Army officers doing this that and the other reminds me very much of the Emergency (1975-77) days and the news items of the time. As far as I am concerned, every hour that Col. X and Brig. Y spends on overseeing desilting and anti-drug work is one hour less he spends on training his men to fight India. Its one more hour that brings him into close touch with the corruption of the civil sector and increases the chance he is corrupted further.<P>As far as I am concerned: Col. X and Brig Y, carry on the good work! <P>Message to General Mushy: Sir, my friend who stayed at the PTDC lodge at Kalam in Swat says that his morning tea was too sweet. Can you kindly look into this? Yours Sincerely, RR

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 02 Oct 2000 05:11

Ravi, <P>That little bit has been something on my mind as well. If these chaps are all out there `monitoring' stuff.. who the hell is doing all the training and planning. <P>One possibility is that they are not fielding their able officers. The AMT stuff is left to second liners of some sort. The stars just sit on the sides at JSHQ or some other place... because yaar its not just this.. they have actually seconded actual army personnel into civilian organisations... it is amazing.. something like 400 personnel according to one report into the KESC alone.. something doesn't quite make sense... how can they afford this kind of manpower dispersion. <P>I am still waiting for news about the corps level exercises due in october. <BR> <BR>Do you recall anything about these exercises from the past? btw what's your take on Zarb-e-Momin..? (that iirc was the last big one.. right). <BR> <BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 06 Oct 2000 22:03

Dawn.<P>LAHORE, Oct 4: Army joined the Faisal Town multiple murder probe on Wednesday. "My men have gathered all details of the massacre," Lahore army monitoring cell in-charge Brig Nadeem Ejaz told newsmen. <P>HYDERABAD, Oct 3: The chief executive, Gen Pervez Musharraf, has said that Pakistan is facing both internal and external threats as the enemy was trying to destabilise the country internally and was mounting pressure along the Line of Control as well. <P>He was speaking at the regimental darbar of the Sindh Regimental Centre here on Tuesday, which coincided with the Nishan-i-Haider celebrations and a two-day biennial conference of the centre. <P>Earlier, Brig Zamir Raja, commanding officer of the centre, narrated the history of the centre in his welcome speech. <P>Lt-Gen Saleem Haider, Col Commandant of the regiment; Maj-Gen Khalid Munir, GOC Hyderabad; all the COs of the regiment and the top army brass attended the darbar besides hundreds of jawans and officers. <P>JANG. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/06-10-2000/main/main5.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/06-10-2000/main/main5.htm</A> <P>The JCSC meeting was the first of the series of defence and national security-related meetings scheduled this month. The corps commanders conference, said a senior official, will be held on October 17 and it is also expected that the first meeting of the National Security Council, since its re-constitution, will be held this month.<P><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 06-10-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 07 Oct 2000 00:52

Helloo.. look whose talking.. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.frontierpost.com.pk/articles.asp?id=3&date1=10/6/2000" TARGET=_blank>http://www.frontierpost.com.pk/articles.asp?id=3&date1=10/6/2000</A> <P>Defence industry of Pakistan<BR>Jamshed Ayaz Khan <BR>Updated on 10/6/2000 10:03:56 AM <BR> <BR>At the time of independence of India and creation of Pakistan in August 1947,Pakistan inherited no industrial base. <P>All the Ordnance factories established by British before Independence of India and Pakistan were situated in areas which formed part of India. <P>Out of 40 ordnance depots, only five came to Pakistan. <P>Even the civil sector industries were located in India. <P>A weak industrial base, therefore, created major problems for Pakistan right at the time of its creation. <P>In the early years of Pakistan, Pakistan armed forces had therefore, to depend on imports for defence requirements. <P>The first Prime Minister of Pakistan, Mr Liaqat Ali khan immediately realised the necessity to establish own defence industry and thus, as a first step towards self reliance, the Pakistan Ordnance Factories or POFs as it is called, was established at Wah in 1952 for the manufacture of small arms and ammunition. <P>Subsequently during the conflict with India in 1965 and 1971, a need was felt to initiate a programme for greater self reliance. <P>Resultantly, Defence Production Division (DP Division) was established in 1972 to provide a co-ordinating base for self-reliance in the production of defence stores and equipment. <P>Defence production Division is the second Division of Ministry of Defence and has its own Secretary who is assisted by an additional secretary, three Joint secretaries and five Deputy Secretaries. <P>In total, there are fifteen sections in the DP Division, each headed by a section officer. <P>Pakistan Ordnance Factories (POFs Wah) basically meet the requirement of small arms and ammunition of the three services. <P>The spare capacity is utilised for export purposes, in which field, POFs has done reasonably well considering the competition. <P>Certification of ISO 9000 ensures strict quality assurance. <P>In small arms, POFs basically produce Rifle G-3 MG 1A3 Machine Gun, Mp-5A2 Sub Machine Gun and 12.7 mm Anti-Aircraft gun. <P>Besides the small arms, POFs produces ammunition for small arms including 5.56 mm calibre, ammunition for artillery, Aircraft, Anti Aircraft Guns, Anti Tank Guns and Mortars. <P>Besides, various types of explosives, propellants and clothing for the Army personnel are also produced in POFs Wah. <P>The other major industrial unit is the Heavy Industries at Taxila (HIT). <P>Initially established for the basic purpose of overhaul and rebuild of tanks held in the inventory of the Pakistan Army, now it has grown into a giant industrial Establishment. <P>It is presently in the process of manufacturing Pakistan’s Main Battle Tank (MBT 2000) called Al Khalid which is being done in collaboration with the Chinese. <P>It also assembles and rebuilds tracked vehicles including Armoured Personnel carriers (APCs). <P>HIT is now planning to design and manufacture a totally indigenous APC. <P>It also produces gun barrels and other support equipment of tanks. <P>For the Pakistan Air Force, a rebuild facility was established at Kamra. <P>This establishment known as Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC Kamra) rebuilds and overhauls Aircraft of Chinese and French origin aircraft and produces two types of trainer aircrafts, the basic trainer Mushshak and its improved version, the Super Mushshak, and the jet trainee the K-8 which is being done in collaboration with the Chinese. <P>Lately, the Super Mushshak and K-8 have become very popular and has been ordered by a number of Middle East countries. <P>PAC also produces Radio warning Receivers and Drones that are used for target practice by the Air Defence. <P>As far as Navy is concerned Pakistan has established the Pakistan Shipyard Under the civil sector and the Pakistan Dockyard under the Defence Sector, both at Karachi. <P>Under a contract concluded with the French, 3 Agosta 90B submarines were to be inducted into the Pakistan Navy. <P>According to the contract the first was to be built in France - this has joined Pakistan Navy, and the second and third are to be built in Pakistan Dockyard under French Supervision. <P>Work is progressing satisfactorily on both these submarines and Pakistan. <P>Engineers and technicians are now well trained. <P>The facility so established and these trained men are now available to other countries of the areas who want to induct this submarine in their Navy. <P>This will of course be done in collaboration with the French. <P>Realising the importance of research in the field of Defence, the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DESTO) was established in DP Division to carry out innovative research with emphasis on applied research, so as to enable the defence forces to use this research in development of stores and equipment subsequently to be used by the three services. <P>DESTO has a number of laboratories covering various fields and has performed exceedingly well during the last few years. <P>Besides DESTO, there are other research organisations doing specialised work; These include:- a) Military Vehicles Research & Development Establishment (MVRDE). <P>MVRDE deals with the research and Development work connected with vehicles and engineering equipments including development, modification of Military Vehicles and study of industrial potential of the country for utilising it for indigenous production. <P>b) Armament Research & Development Establishment (ARDE). <P>ARDE deals with the Research & Development activities relating to weapons and Ammunition. <P>Their major research activities include indigenous Development of Armament stores and related equipment. <P>c) Institute of Optronics (IOP). <P>Manufacture/Assembly of night Vision Devices, individual served Weapon sight and other allied equipment’s are manufactured by this institute. <P>d) Margalla Electronics (ME). <P>Assembly and rebuild of Radars and Electronic Equipments and their maintenance is the main role of this set up. <P>The Private Sector has to play a very dynamic role in the industrialisation of the country. <P>This policy is in fact absolutely in line with the developments taking place all over the world in the economic field. <P>The shift in managing industries from the public sector to the private sector is based on sound economic rationale. <P>The private sector, motivated as it is by profit, is aware of the need for productive utilisation of resources and elimination of wastage’s with the result that its cost conscious approach leads to high productivity and little idle capacity. <P>The private sector has inherent advantages of flexibility in responding to emerging opportunities. <P>It can quickly mobilise capital, reducing the financial burden on the Government for setting up new industries. <P>It has the necessary latitude to determine the product line keeping in view the market and cut losses without being hampered by extraneous considerations. <P>Thus the public exchequer is saved the drain on resources usually imposed by the public sector on account of persistent losses & inefficiencies. <P>In Pakistan the defence industry has remained almost exclusively concentrated in the public sector. <P>The role of private sector in the defence industries has been restricted to the development and production of low cost and low technology items or as vendors for the production programmes of public sector organisation. <P>But now the defence production division has embarked on a massive programme of indignation through the involvement of the private sector. <P>Its organisation, Directorate General Munition Production (DGMP) has therefore, been so tasked. <P>POFs, HIT and PAC Kamra have also tasked the private vendors to support them in reducing imports by assisting them in development of equipment, stores and spare parts locally. <P>(The author is a serving General officer). <BR> <BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 07 Oct 2000 22:49

<A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/07-10-2000/national/n2.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/07-10-2000/national/n2.htm</A> <P>The site is so aggravated that it has not only jeopardised security of the installation/safety of the public, its impact will result in paralysing economy of the country if any mishap occurs. Keeping these vital points in view the General Officer Commanding Corps Reserve 5 Corps, Major General Ehtasham Zamir, visited the area on Thursday and gave on-the-spot directions to Special Task Force. Its work includes improvement of the area, shifting of staging section out of the city and ensuring security of the oil installations.<P>'Govt to provide basic amenities of life to masses'<P>QUETTA: Corps Commander Lt-Gen Mushtaq Hussain has said providing basic amenities of life to people is the top priority of the government which is adopting concrete measures in this regard. <P>'Army may withdraw from Wapda this year'<P>By our correspondent <P>HYDERABAD: HESC0 Chief Executive Brigadier Mohammed Ali has hinted that army officials might be withdrawing from Wapda later this year. <P>from the NATION. <P>Army to leave Wapda by Dec <BR>KARACHI-Army has decided to return to barracks from WAPDA by December this year. Companies' command and intelligence network, however, will be retained by military.<BR>Informed sources disclosed here that it was decided that all the commissioned and non-commissioned officers would be sent back from WAPDA. However, it is one sided decision and may be reconsidered only by the government.<BR>The Army was called in to improve the overall performance of WAPDA in January 1999 and it was to do it job within two years that ends in December. However, in a high-level meeting in February 2,000, all the concerned high officers appreciated the military role in WAPDA and were satisfied that they had accomplished their job.<BR>Keeping in view that version, Army has proposed to GHQ that Army may be called back but government and top brass agreed to allow it to continue till the approved two years that end in December, 2000.<BR>Now, it has been decided that in service Brigadiers would continue to head the Distribution Companies and the officials of Intelligence Network responsible to check power theft and delinquent staff.<BR>If the decided plan was not changed by the government, the military would start returning from December 18 and all concerned would return <P>LB polls arrangements reviewed<P>LARKANA: A high level meeting presided over by Lt Colonel Tahir here on Friday reviewed arrangements regarding forthcoming local bodies elections-2000 in Larkana District<P><BR>From the NATION.. OP-ED<P>Defence purchases <BR>Ikram Sehgal <P>Our politicians have reacted to reported kickbacks in defence deals like a pack of hounds taking off after a fox in a fox-hunt no sooner the trumpet is blown. On the receiving end of accountability for the past year, it must be satisfying for the politicians to see the catchers themselves in the rye. Unfortunately their contention that corruption in arms trade is an evil confined to Pakistan alone in time and/or space is wrong, industrial conglomerates like the Germany's Krupps actually orchestrated wars between nations at one time or the other in order to facilitate sales of their products. Remember Basil Zaharoff? Only a short time ago, the US Congress reverberated with revelations about $600 toilet seat covers and $120 screwdrivers, etc. In France former Defence Minister Cheysson is facing prosecution. Many major US firms have run afoul of the "Foreign Corrupt Practices Act". Garage-to-riches wonder US businessman Ray Guerin of International Signal Corporation (ISC), the maker of cluster bombs (among other things), went to jail for fraud in the early 90s (that some senior officials from our Ministry of Defence were involved is another story).<BR>After a MI-8 helicopter accident in 1970, I was shocked to learn that a canvas pitot tube cover, costing about Rs 10-12 in Massey Gate Rawalpindi, was to be replaced by the (not-so-capitalistic) Russians by one costing nearly $50. The Indian defeat on the McMahon Line in 1962 at the hands of Chinese revealed massive corruption in procurement deals. Very recently in Kargil, the Indian Army faced similar deficiencies in everything, from socks to boots to gloves and ammunition,that is, And there was no corruption? Arms and equipment procurement worldwide has historically been a tainted exercise, the Indian Bofors case is quoted as an example everywhere. In SIPRI's book edited by Ravinder Singh Pal, "Arms Procurement and Decision-making" Volume I, pertaining to India, China, Israel, Japan, South Korea, and Thailand, he identified, "four damaging consequences of excessive confidentiality in decision-making: a) insufficient examination of the rationale for weapon system procurement, b) greater likelihood of corruption in arms procurement, c) inadequately analyzed procurement policy leads to inefficiency and unhealthy consequences for national security, and d) opacity in decision-making processes damages public confidence in the armed forces which are consequently subjected to needless controversies. The military's professional credibility and objectivity of government claims consequently suffer." One of the world's foremost anti-corruption experts, Joe Roeber of Transparency International, has done pioneer work in unearthing corruption in arms trade.<BR>Prosecution of corruption cases in arms trade can be equated to that of rape. Most countries have enacted laws (or are in the process of enacting them) making it obligatory for the prosecution not to identify the rape victim in public since the victim has already suffered considerable physical and mental anguish at the hands of the perpetrator/s. Held up as an object of shame in some callous societies, she could very will suffer death for having "shamed the tribe". Who but the Armed Forces are the victims when kickbacks are taken in arms procurement? While the guilty certainly have to pay for their crimes, national security reasons require it cannot be done by public trial except behind closed doors by Accountability Courts specially constituted by the military themselves. But the guilty must not be allowed to hide behind the mantle of "national security", exposure of defence deals "may be motivated to malign the Army" but that is a Catch-22 proposition. Under this fig-leaf camouflage, have the corrupt a God-given right to defraud the army and the nation? Our problem is that of varying standards and selective amnesia, with a public schoolboy's concept of honour which restrains him from reporting wrongdoings about his classmates. Depending upon area, school/college of education, Pakistan Military Academy (PMA) Course, Arm or Service, Regiment, friendships, relationships, etc. a corrupt person has a "protection" of sorts, a somewhat similar association applies in the case of civilian personnel and that of the PAF and the Navy. Retired military men really started to become agents (sometimes called 'consultants') during the mid-70s, sometimes on 'retainer' (if maybe $2000-3000 per month) as well as commission.<BR>Defence purchases in Pakistan from abroad normally stipulate that no commission should be paid. Where commission is to be paid, it is declared as a very small percentage of the actual sale price, disbursed on a pro-rata basis in Pakistani Rupees alongwith the encashing of L/C. In theory, this makes the person liable to pay taxes and also makes it difficult for him (or her) to disburse large sums of money (kickback, bribes, etc.) from the books of accounts without accounting for them. Therefore acting as an agent of an arms and/or equipment manufacture is legitimate if the rules are adhered to, one cannot call every agent or consultant a crook.<BR>Obtaining the General Staff (GS) Requirements and creating 'test and trial' reports in his own hand for the user units is not a legitimate part of such business. Take the example of a person acting a sales consultant for a sniper rifle (cost about $3000). With commissions closer to 20 per cent, that is, $600 per unit (or Rs36000 at today's rate of exchange), sales of several thousand units would gross almost Rs13 crore in commissions and that too only one item of purchase. This amounts to $2 million in a secret account abroad.<BR>One particular person operates under the camouflage of a very miserly existence to foster this sophisticated deception, this martyr "works out of sheer patriotism" and "love for the Armed Forces". Garnering sympathy from former military associates and friends, he utilises it to get access while generally avoiding the dishing out of large sums of money as bribes. This also helps to avoid taxes in Pakistan, and for that matter in UK (or elsewhere).<BR>So if the person has $2 million in a UK account, and remits to himself only Rs one lac a month as kitchen money for expenses, he would still have well over $1.5 million (over a 10 year period) not counting the sales to police, and other para-military forces. Unfortunately because of the double standards inherent in our culture, he 'belongs'. So it is no surprise he became a high priest in NAB, never officially, as anonymous as the letters to the editor he churns out under different names. So what if he is guilty of bribery, corruption, tax evasion, foreign exchange violations, perjury, etc, his friends will shield him. That such a person is supervising accountability of others sums up not only the lack of the credibility in our accountability process but to an extent our dilemma, who is to cast the first stone? Fortunately for Pakistan, the people involved in such corruption are only a handful and if the keepers of our conscience do not apply selective standards they can be taken to task. On the same logic that protects rape victims, we need to protect the real victim of this rape, the Pakistan Armed Forces. Subjecting the uniformed lot to defamation and ridicule, and making ourselves the laughing stock of the world can be avoided by creating a special cell pertaining to corruption in defence purchases since some issues may well transgress national security. And making sure the cell is not staffed by cronies. Adverse publicity will invariably used by the enemy, this has to be avoided.<BR>Only those found liable should be brought before a closed-door Military Accountability Court headed by senior retired military officer appointed as adhoc High Court Judge by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from a panel of non-controversial retired officers of known integrity, competence and impartiality. Like in rape cases we have to protect the victim, in this case we have to protect the Armed Forces, from being 'raped' by motivated media attention.<BR>In a vacuum of both information and knowledge, false accusations can also be made, some may well be exaggerated. When he says publicity is meant to malign the Army, the CE may well be right but failure to take action against the handful of corrupt is also not being fair to the honest, silent majority of uniformed personnel. The matter must be handled maturely, in a controlled transparent manner and in a balanced, sensible way that will preserve the fabric of integrity that holds the Armed Forces and the masses together.<BR>Any person who has secreted money abroad through commissions out of defence purchases is a traitor, so is anyone who protects him from retribution. As much as someone would like, public school moralities do not apply here, real-life integrity at the national level is a different ball game. Samuel Johnson rightly said, "patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel". To retain their credibility the military hierarchy shall have to root out such scoundrels from this very convenient sanctuary<P><BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 07 Oct 2000 23:01

<A HREF="http://www.pakobserver.com/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.pakobserver.com/</A> <P>ISLAMABAD—A graduation ceremony of 104 Flying Instructors Course was held here at the Flying Instructors’ Schools at PAF Academy, Risalpur on Friday.<P>Air Vice Marshal Syed Qaiser Hussain, Air Officer Commanding Northern Air Command was the chief guest on the occasion.<P>The ceremony included award of certificates to the successful participants of the qualified Flying Instructors Course. Flight Lieutenant Waqar won the trophy for best all round performance in the course. GOC Army Aviation Command Best in Academics trophy also went to Flight Lieutenant Waqar. <P> A total of 23 officers qualified the course, which includes 16 officers from Pakistan Air Force, 5 officers from Pakistan Army and 2 officers from Pakistan Navy. <P>Gujranwala. <P>The Army Monitoring Team headed by Col Khalid Kamal took the review of the arrangements and has expressed full satisfaction over the arrangements. Dr Arif Jamal representative of World Health Organisation (TB Dots Programme) has appreciated the hectic efforts of Dr Akhtar Ali for making the polio campaign successful.<P>HESCO boss serving army officer identified. <P>HYDERABAD—Hyderabad Electric Supply Company (HESCO) has geared up its efforts to recover its outstanding dues running in millions and required to be cleared by 10,81,915 of the consumers.<P>This was stated by HESCO Chief, Brigadier Muhammed Ali giving details of the outstanding arrears of federal and provincial government departments, domestic, commercial, agriculture and industrial consumers of the company in a press conference here Friday.<BR>Paknews. <P>Defence officials visit Met Office <BR> <P>ISLAMABAD, Oct 5 (Online): Maj. General Shahzada Alam, Additional Secretary defence accompanied by Mrs. Nargis Sethi, Joint Secretary Defence, visited Meteorological Office Karachi on Thursday. They visited different units of Meteorological Department, which include weather radar section, meteorological workshop, training institute (Institute of Meteorological & Geophysics) of the department, data communications section and weather-forecast facilities. <P>Dr. Qamar-uz-Zaman Chaudhry, Director General Met Services gave briefing to the senior officers of the Ministry of Defence about the working of the department. The senior officers discussed various options for the improvement of the department. <P> <P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 08 Oct 2000 22:03

<A HREF="http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/08-10-2000/metro/k15.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/oct2000-daily/08-10-2000/metro/k15.htm</A> <P>Rangers buy flats in Saddar<P>By our correspondent<P>KARACHI: Pakistan Rangers (Sindh) has acquired 86 residential flats in Saddar for Rs 220 million from the State Bank of Pakistan, a press release of the Rangers said on Saturday. Major General Abdul Quadir, Director General Pakistan Rangers (Sindh), handed over a cheque for Rs 220 million to Dr Ishrat Hussain, governor of the bank. Rangers' officers would use the flats located at Preedy Street, Saddar, the press release added. Quadir thanked the governor for handing over the flats to Pakistan Rangers and said that acquisition of the flats would solve the long-standing problem of accommodating officers, which would certainly enhance the efficiency of Rangers. He expressed the hope that this deal would go a long way in strengthening mutual understanding and friendship between the two organisations. Dr Ishrat said it was a matter of great satisfaction to have a mutually agreed deal with Pakistan Rangers who were looking after the law and order situation in Karachi. Quadir also presented a shield to the governor as a memento of his visit.<P>Kunda elimination operation in Surjani Town<P>By our correspondent<P> KARACHI: Major-General Tahir Mahmud Qazi, GOC, 4 Army Air Defence Division, inspected the Kunda-infested localities in Surjani Town and appreciated the ongoing operation against these by KESC in the area. Major-General Qazi during his visit to the areas where Kunda removal operations are under way, also met the area residents, says a KESC press release. The managing director, KESC, Brig Syed Shahid Mukhtar Shah and KESC Chief Engineer Khalid Iqbal and other senior officials of the electric corporation accompanied him. Gen Qazi was shown around the Kunda-infested areas in the locality and was informed that on successful completion of the current project other areas would also be taken up in phases for eliminating the Kundas. Under a pilot project, a scheme is being undertaken in which nearly 5,000 illegal connections in Surjani Town are being replaced by proper new connections, while networking of overhead lines and installation of concealed PMTs (pole-mounted transformers) are being carried out in order to beat the Kunda menace technically.<P>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 10 Oct 2000 04:42

Dawn. <P>RAWALPINDI, Oct 8: The UN commanders have lauded the role and performance of Pakistan troops for the restoration of peace and normalcy in East Timor. <P> A Pakistan Army delegation headed by Maj Gen Tariq Javed visited East Timor and held a joint meeting with Lt Gen Boonsrang Niumpradit and Maj Gen Mike Smith, commander and the deputy commander of the UN peacekeeping force respectively, said an ISPR press release here on Sunday. <P>During his stay in East Timor, the General also visited the Force Communication Unit at the Obrigado barracks and addressed the troops. The delegation was received by Commanding Officer of the battalion. In his address to the troops of the unit, Major General Tariq Javed expressed satisfaction on the work they are doing. <P>While Pakistan Army Engineers are busy in development of road network in the Western sector, Pakistan Army's Signal Unit is providing telecommunication cover to the UN Force deployed in the area and is renamed as Force Communication Unit. <P>The communication provided by the Pakistan Army Signals is helping to provide social uplift and development in the area. Pakistan Army is providing New Digital System to link the United Nations elements deployed in sectors East, Centre and West. Troops have been extended with a totally integrated communication system through state-of-the-art equipment introducing satellite communication that has enabled the force to use Internet apart from offering facilities like telephone exchanges and High Frequency communication networks. <BR>

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 17 Oct 2000 22:26

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/16/top4.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/16/top4.htm</A> <P>Nuclear arsenal secure, says Dr Qadeer <P>ISLAMABAD, Oct 15: Pakistanis may differ on the military regime's performance, but few would contest the speed with which it moved to put in place security systems around the nuclear and missile arsenal. <P>"General Pervez Musharraf was cognizant of the international community's apprehensions about nuclear weapons," according to Dr Qadeer Khan, considered the architect of the country's nuclear programme. <P>"That is why he decided to establish the National Command Authority (NCA)," Khan told Deutsche Presse-Agentur (dpa) while commenting on the military regime's first year in power. <P>The NCA, aimed at creating command and control mechanisms for Pakistan's nuclear weapons and missile systems, was established in February. <P>It is responsible for policy formulation, employment and development control over all strategic nuclear forces and strategic organizations. <P>Khan said the NCA had become all the more necessary after the six nuclear tests that the country conducted in May 1998 in response to the five carried out by India. <P>The creation of the NCA had helped in allaying fears that if pressed by India, a military government may resort to a reckless use of nuclear weapons, Dr Khan said. <P>The NCA comprises an Employment Control Committee (ECC), a Development Control Committee (DCC) and a Strategic Plans Division (SPD), which will act as secretariat. <P>Additionally, Musharraf has also established a Strategic Force Command (SFC) led by a serving army general responsible for deployment of strategic missiles. <P>Pakistan possess two versions of a medium range missile called Gahuri. Shaheen-1, and Shaheen-11 also belong to the same class of missiles. <P>The SFC is reportedly busy identifying locations in northern, central and northern Afghanistan to be used in future for launching these missiles, defence sources say. <P>Mr Khan said the country had enough weapons to defend itself but their numbers, and the amount of weapons-grade fissile material continues to remain a mystery. <P>With the chief executive, the head of the government, at its head, the ECC comprises the Minister of Foreign Affairs as deputy chairman, Minister of Defence, Minister for Interior, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee (CJCSC), chiefs of the armed forces, the director general of the SPD, and representatives of the scientific community. <P>"The SPD will act as the secretariat for the NCA and will perform the functions of planning and coordination, in particular for establishing a reliable command, control, communication, computers and intelligence network for the NCA," an announcement marking the establishment of the NCA said. <P>Ever since it went overtly nuclear in May 1998 in competition with India, Pakistan has been pressed by the United States to create a command and control system.-dpa <P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by sunil sainis (edited 17-10-2000).]

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Re: PA Corps and Commanders - II

Postby Sunil » 18 Oct 2000 04:23

<A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/17/local20.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/17/local20.htm</A> <P>HYDERABAD: Mobile teams to issue NICs <P><BR>Bureau Report <P>HYDERABAD, Oct 16: The director of National Database and Registration Authority, Sindh, Col Ashfaq, has directed the registration officers of Hyderabad and Mirpurkhas divisions to ensure the accessibility of mobile teams at each union council of their jurisdiction for the issuance of national identity cards to the remaining people so that they should not be deprived of their right of vote in the forthcoming elections. <BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/15/top2.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/15/top2.htm</A> <P><BR>Gen Musharraf said this while addressing a large gathering of serving and retired officers, JCOs and Jawans of the Special Services Group (SSG), after being installed as the first-ever Colonel-in-Chief of this elite arm of the army. <P>In a simple but impressive ceremony held at the SSG Headquarters, Chirat, Lt-Gen Mohammad Yousaf Khan, Chief of General Staff and Lt-Gen Tahir Ali Qureshi, Inspector-General, Training and Evaluation, Pakistan Army, pinned the badges of rank on to the shoulders of Gen Musharraf and presented him with the SSG barret.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/15/nat6.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/15/nat6.htm</A> <P>Task force not in favour of ban: Non-prohibited bore arms <P><BR>By Our Correspondent <P>ISLAMABAD, Oct 14: The government has been suggested by the Task Force on De-weaponization that at least non-prohibited bore weapons should not be banned which are mostly used for the self-defence. <P>Talking to Dawn on Saturday, a member of Task Force said the government had been suggested that 12 bore guns and 30 bore licensed pistols should not be banned as these arms are also kept by law-abiding and respectable citizens of society for their self-defence. "If a person keeps a licensed pistol in his house, he feels safe and secure in the present time when dacoities are on the rise," he added. <P>The task force was formed by the government to make society weapon-free. The member of the force said the government had also been suggested to legalize all gun-making factories in tribal areas and the owners of these factories must be bound to manufacture only non-prohibited weapons and stop manufacturing lethal arms. <P>The official said recently senior army officials and chairman of Pakistan Ordinance Factory (POF) board, Lt. Gen. Abdul Qayyum visited to Dara Ademkhel, a tribal area famous for arms manufacturing, and invited gun makers, to produce non-lethal weapons for the POF. These gun-makers were also invited for manufacturing parts of automobiles, tractors and other accessories not only for the local needs but also for the export purposes. They were also offered to make parts of weapons which were being manufactured in Wah and its other ordnance factories. Similarly, they were also offered training courses spread over four to six weeks from Dara in the POF polytechnic institute which has recently been opened for candidates from all over the country. <P>POF board chairman has offered to provide quality raw material like good quality steel to produce durable and marketable arms and cartridges. <P>The POF is reportedly to be considering establishing its branches in Peshawar, Kohat and other districts by making use of existing arms factories. <P>A study done by the POF said that Dara Ademkhel has 60 arms manufacturing factories employing some 1200 to 1500 persons and 300 workshops with a workforce of 1200 to 1300 people. <P><BR> <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/14/local22.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/14/local22.htm</A> <P><BR>MULTAN, Oct 13: The National Database and Registration Authority will start the preparation of identity cards in Multan division on Saturday. <P>Nadra Director Col Fazal Mehmood said here on Friday that special teams had been organized to collect NIC forms at union council level for their door-to-door delivery. <A HREF="http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/11/nat10.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.dawn.com/2000/10/11/nat10.htm</A> <P>NOTICE ISSUED: A senior civil judge issued a notice to an army officer to appear before the court for allegedly interfering in the court proceedings and contempt of court. <P>Judge Maula Bux Khoso summoned Col Tariq Saeed on Wednesday for he had allegedly written a letter to the court on Sept 25 asking it to dispose of a suit between a landlord and tenant till Sept 28. <P>


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