Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Abhaey
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Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Abhaey » 02 Aug 2002 01:56

I spent a few days at Farnborough last week, and was saddened and disgusted to walk away having not come across any Indian representation at all- no DRDO, no HAL, no NAL, no ISRO, no MoD, no Export Promotion Board, nothing! Even countries like Chile and Korea had a notable presence at the event, and Japan- forbidden by its constitution to export its own weapons- proudly displayed its country’s achievements in aerospace for all to witness for themselves.

At one stage, my eyes lit up when I read in the show programme that ‘ADA’ was in the list of exhibitors, but as soon as I arrived at the designated stand, I felt cheated to discover that it was some irrelevant subsidiary of a random British company, and not our very own ADA.

This, I feel, is merely characteristic of one of India’s major deficiencies: her failure and/or inability to market herself. Despite so much substance in our great, great nation, we nearly always let ourselves down in this regard. I feel tempted to digress, but I won't.

There is no reason why we couldn’t have had a Dhruv flying at Farnborough this year, as well as a model and information centre for the LCA, Saras, Brahmos, AVATAR, and Autolay. I had tears in my eyes just imagining that there could be an LCA flying amongst the F18s and Grippens and Eurofighters in two years time, but why is it that I feel that we will be let down yet again ? And why couldn’t we have come to a deal with Sukhoi for them to send a SU-30 as an IAF plane, thus preventing it from being impounded by that Swiss debt collector. That would have been a show-stealer for India, the IAF and Sukhoi.

India needs to actively start marketing its big-ticket defence items now. This should be the phase of information and education about the LCA, the Dhruv, Brahmos, and Saras, in preparation for when we have the capacity to build and deliver these items for customers in a few years time. Our people also need to start networking at the major events like Farnborough and Le Bourget, and needn’t be afraid of competing with the Boeings and the Lockheeds, even though many of our products are still being developed. Indeed, they need to rise and then live up to the challenge of competing with these companies on a commercial level, as well as a technological level.

If anyone comes across any articles related to the marketing of our defence items, please post them here. I think that HAL plans to exhibit and possibly fly the Dhruv at Le Bourget, but I’ll have to get confirmation of that.

George J

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby George J » 02 Aug 2002 02:26

Originally posted by Abhaey:
..... we have come to a deal with Sukhoi for them to send a SU-30 as an IAF plane, thus preventing it from being impounded by that Swiss debt collector. That would have been a show-stealer for India, the IAF and Sukhoi.
1)The Russians have already crashed one prototype of the MKI in an airshow.

2)Coz they are still being assembled, we got all of four kits.

3)Not yet operationalized. That takes time.

4)Only if you are happy with the product can you think of showing it off, that takes time.

5)Only if you got enuf capacity for domestic consumption and export do you need to show off, that takes time.

6) Give it some time you will see the MKI and its brother MKM or whatever MK you want in airshows.

7) Apply this to any of the aforementioned indian product and it still works.

oh one final thought.......

IB4TL

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Abhaey » 02 Aug 2002 02:29

Who mentioned the MKI ? Please re-read what I wrote.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby saint » 02 Aug 2002 02:35

whatever... q? is if it can't show off, can it fight off?, where the showing is more!!! :) .
*please take it on the lighter side*

George J

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby George J » 02 Aug 2002 02:45

You wanna fly 97/98 vintage IAF Su-30MK in 02? Err.....ok. I havent the faintest idea what you gonna gain by that. There is more to be gained by showcasing the Mig-21-93.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby manpreet » 02 Aug 2002 03:03

Abhaey

Don't be so hard on yourself (or India).

I saw a really mean looking mig 21 in the static display. Since mig21 usually conjours up an image of something from the era of the sopwith camel, this one did not look to bad. In fact it looked reasonably mean and ready for business!!!!

Ok, I give you, it did not match the F16 which had the shoulders of an american football player but I am sure we are getting there.

Guest

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Guest » 02 Aug 2002 05:31

I don't have much knowledge on marketing strategies, especially when it comes to defence products, and my opinions could be far-fetched Anyway, here are my thoughts. To get immediate customers, we should target countries like Bangladesh, who don't even have the money to maintain a few Mig-29. HAL which has racked up tremendous knowledge in the production of Mig-21 should sell a few to these kind of countries, who are looking for cheap, ready to use airplanes, countries like Bangladesh. Although it may look foolish, we naturally are gaining something. This small step could pave way to a brighter future.

Guest

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Guest » 02 Aug 2002 18:21

Pakistan exports "Super" Mushshaks.
link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/2167887.stm

One hell of a plane :rotfl: . What's more amazing is look at the customers :lol:

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Abhaey » 08 Aug 2002 04:57

Found this on a Google search:

www.business-standard.com

BAe, Israel Aircraft keen to market Indian chopper

Our Bureau in Bangalore

British Aerospace Systems and Israel Aircraft Industries Ltd are in talks with Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd to market India’s advanced light helicopter (ALH) globally.

“The two organisations have said they would like to join hands and do marketing of ALH. They want to put their equipment on ALH platform and sell them to customers globally,” HAL chairman and managing director N R Mohanty told a seminar on defence aerospace organized jointly by HAL and the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).

Mohanty said both the organisations have been asked to submit commercial proposals. He said the domestic requirement for ALH was around 300.

He said HAL expects to cross Rs 5,000 crore in turnover in three years. Its current turnover (2001-02) was Rs 2,730 crore.

He said HAL expects a turnover of Rs 100 crore during 2002-03 compared with Rs 67 crore in the previous year.

The government had sanctioned Rs 500 crore for HAL to establish facilities for production of India’s ambitious light combat aircraft. Initially, HAL would produce eight LCAs under limited series production.

Mohanty said HAL had taken up manufacture of Sukhoi-30 MKI under technology from Russia.

In all, 140 numbers would be manufactured, with the first one expected to roll out in 2004 and the last in 2017. The whole project entails an investment of Rs 22,000 crore, he added.

A proposal for the development of light attack helicopter, a spin-off of the ALH, had been submitted to IAF, which is currently examining it, he said.

Mohanty said HAL would protect the interest of vendors by placing orders for five years should the quality and delivery schedules be good.

He said the Indian private sector would supply ground handling equipment to Russia for its Sukhoi-30s as their prices were extremely competitive.

Chairman of CII’s national committee on defence Atul Kirloskar said the government should jointly with the industry develop a product strategy and supplier development strategy.

He said these strategies have to be followed by developing an enabling purchase policy and control mechanism.

Kirloskar said that without the government support and certain level of business commitment, industry cannot take on the role of indigenisation or development on its own.


More on the same

LCA to be ready for production in a year: Fernandes

Defence Minister George Fernandes on Monday said the country's ambitious Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) might be ready for serial production in a year's time and that New Delhi might opt for "consortium approach" in production and marketing of the aircraft.

...

The Defence Minister said his Malaysian counterpart during his recent visit here had also shown interest in the LCA indicating that the project could be an export earner for the country.
Infosys ties up with ADA for defence software: Exclusive team to market Autolay

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Abhaey » 08 Aug 2002 05:02

Originally posted by manpreet:
Abhaey

Don't be so hard on yourself (or India).

I saw a really mean looking mig 21 in the static display. Since mig21 usually conjours up an image of something from the era of the sopwith camel, this one did not look to bad. In fact it looked reasonably mean and ready for business!!!!

Ok, I give you, it did not match the F16 which had the shoulders of an american football player but I am sure we are getting there.
I'm no expert, but I know that was an upgraded Israeli version, virtually identical to our upgraded MIG21s.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Umrao » 08 Aug 2002 06:45

Could be Romanian MiG-21s too, they were the first to get upgraded by Israel.

Regarding DRDO products they are top notch secret products to be displayed everywhere, the Paki spooks will get know everything about them!!

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby shiv » 08 Aug 2002 09:35

I do not know the real reason why HAL did not participate - but I have some general observations.

Airshows such as Farnborough, the Paris air show and later the Singapore, Bangalore and Dubai airshow are 5% Tamasha and 95% serious business efforts in which one expects prospective customers to see one's products. There is also some competition between these airshows - with participating firms deciding on which airshow may give them maximum exposure to their specific customers.

Then there is the question of budgeting for such a show - and on ths issue I would prefer to see a well designed and customer friendly and expensively large stall in one major airshow rather than a many half hearted attempts in many airshows, each with a hole of a stall, sleepily manned and brochure exhausted in the first 3 minutes of the show. Let a good show be put up in one or two of many airshows in which the maximum potential customers are attracted.

The Farnborough show is fantastic - but has definite drawbacks for the cash strapped 3rd world customer, whose country may need aircraft and helicopters - but has to spend a bomb just staying in Londion and paying gazillions for sandwiches and coke and transport to and from the airshow without being sure of whether any deals can be done. In that sense - the Brits are good at making money - but some customers are discouraged.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Sunil » 08 Aug 2002 10:31

Actually iirc farnborough and paris are more north atlantic affairs.

Singapore, dubai and bangalore are more in our neck of the woods.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Vikram Rathore » 11 Aug 2002 11:28

The first step in marketing anything (whether a soap, shampoo or fighter jet!) is understanding clearly who the target audience is, and what their needs are. Next comes defining what we can offer that would meet these needs- and finally, how do we go about actually delivering on these. Let me take a crack at each of these 3 questions.

1. Who should we target for our defence products?

The answer to this depends on several factors:
(a) Which markets would not be closed to us on political grounds
(b) which markets would not have a huge barrier on buying from a `3rd world country'
(c) markets which have the economic capacity to be regular customers v/s one off buyers

This rules out the western bloc, but leaves open several potential markets viz:
a) In SE Asia- Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand
b) Africa- Egypt is firmly in the US sphere of influence as far as weapons go, Libya probably closed due to political reasons, SOuth Africs is a potential candidate.
c) Latin/South America- Peru comes to mind- if only because of the remarkable similarities in their air force ORBAT and the IAFs (Mirage 2000, MiG 29)

2. What do we have to offer?
This depends essentially on where we can offer any distinctive proposition ie. either better, cheaper....Here are some thoughts:

Small craft (eg. Khukri class)- would be ideal to market to Malaysia and Vietnam- both of whom have important maritime interests, and the Khukri would offer great bang for buck.

LCA- once in service, becomes a great option for markets like Vietnam- whose AF is largely approaching obsolescence and could help fill the gap after the Su-27 at the top end.

ALH- This should find customers in either military or civil versions.....

Maintenance/overhaul facilities- this is important, as our long experience in operating types like MiG-29s/Mirage 2000s and the lack of reliable service from Russia make the overhaul/maintenance of planes in Malaysia, Peru, Vietnam a pretty attractive proposition. Ditto for the Thai Harriers, which are now gathering dust.

3) How do we deliver?

This is where we hit a wall- there are countries out there we could approach- there are products and services we could offer (the list above is by no means exhaustive) but the problem lies in the lack of a conscious and professional approach to marketing our expertise. The solution may lie in hiving off a separate unit, whose sole deliverable (and criteria for evaluation) will be exports. But I suspect the problem is tougher to crack than that.....part of the issue I suspect is lack of any real incentives (or disincentives) to market our defence products aggressively- I think too often we look at defence with very narrow blinkers of TSP on...and ignore the fact that the defence sector can play a much, much bigger role than just taking on TSP.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby saint » 16 Aug 2002 00:29



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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Vick » 21 Aug 2002 02:07

Since the SA-80 is being scrapped, maybe the OFB should send over a few INSAS for the Brits to try out :)

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Aditya G » 23 Aug 2002 13:20

India recently supplied 2 choppers to a CIS state which borders Afganistan.....These were probably ex-IA/IAF/IN Cheetahs/Chetaks.

Do we pay any royalties to france for Lancer?

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Shankar » 28 Aug 2002 12:13

Marketing of high value ,hitech defense product just cannot be done by a few stalls and half hearted approach to customers who are seeing the best the world has to offer right in the same venue.A task force need to be formed with all concerned ministry presence and significant level of spending authority overseas locations and connections to call in technical personnel,pilots ,actual users from our armed forces to convince the customers and clinch a deal.The customers are convinced only when actual users/designers ineract with them with indepth knowledgr and never give a second hearing to people who dont know what they are talking about or dont have the authority to make basic commitment on price etc.
To start with let us aggressively market ALH,INSAS system


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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby csharma » 06 Sep 2002 02:57

Can anyone give me India's defence export figures and alos growth rate over the years? Thanks

Guest

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Guest » 06 Sep 2002 04:53

Can anyone give me India's defence export figures and alos growth rate over the years? Thanks
I don't have the exact "official figures", but this should answer most of your questions.

link: http://www.expressindia.com/fe/daily/19970716/19755523.html

This report is verrrrrrrryyyyyyyyyy old (1997)!! I will look for more recent ones.

According to defence ministry sources here exports from defence PSUs were expected to be more than doubled in the next five years and touch the figure of Rs 300 crore. Defence exports have been registering a steady though slow growth. From Rs 69.35 crore in 1995-96, defence exports rose to Rs 126.34 crore during the last financial year.
You might also want to check out this link: http://mod.nic.in/product&supp/body1.htm#d3e

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Umrao » 06 Sep 2002 05:36

there are many a defenders of OFB, HAL on this forum. ( I am just a whiner :) )

Read this eloquently written paragraph of about our MOD factories. coupled with the fact HAL is going export SPMs which was supposed to be HMT's forte!!! Some of the forum members made a economic case (make /Buy) when the news broke that India was to import AK-47 ammo!!

Despite such a miserable show in the sphere of defence related exports, the publicity hype of the performers, all government controlled companies, seems to have overshadowed their actual performance. The Bharat Electronics(BEL) with nine electronic units spread all over the country in one of its publicity bravados asserts that exports play a key role in the company’s strategic perspective. The company claims to have supplied radar sub-assemblies to UK, Switzerland, Holland and Sweden, night vision goggles to Israel, semiconductor devices and electron tubes to the Asia Pacific rim countries including the USA and so on. The Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) with more than half a dozen manufacturing plants, was awarded "Regional Top Exporters’ Shield" for the fifth consecutive year by Engineer Export Promotion Council. On the contrary, the official facts and figure speak otherwise. The defence public sector undertakings and the ordnance factories all put together have made exports of mere Rs 76 crore as against the modest target of Rs 189 for the year 1988-99.
(in the above should not read 1998-99?

above from
http://www.ipcs.org/issues/articles/299-mi-pant.html

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby darshand » 06 Sep 2002 09:59

Originally posted by rahul r:
This is music to my ears!!!

India to sell Chetak and Sukanya Class vessel to Sri Lanka
The issue referred to in the post is an old one - Sept.2001. Same for the 2 news items from the above site posted in the IAF News Folder.

The stratmag site was last updated in Feb.2002. The sukanya and the chetak were delivered to SL. A lot of "political" bashing followed - declaring the sukanya OPV being a "white elephant" and tying up a lot of resources for its defence. IIRC SL had an option for a second sukanya class which they did not exercise.

Darshan

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby JCage » 06 Sep 2002 14:14

John,
Perhaps you should look up more data.Ie whether BEL's *not* inexpensive products had any buyers in the first place during times when resources are still being stretched.
I'd suggest you pay particular attention to BEL-DELFT.Despite being set up quite a few years back,they managed to get decent orders only last year or so.Why?Because high quality 2nd generation Image Intensification tubes are expensive.And most of the Army's budget goes into salaries not capex.
Regarding "capabilities",they manufacture the Indra 1 and 2.IAF likes the 2.The Navy's sonars HUMSA,HUMVAAD...
EW devices for all three services.
So tell me how many sonars does the navy buy each year.
Or how many Indra-2's can the IAF afford?

Net dont mixup lack of orders for lack of capability.Both are distinctly different.

I do agree with the need for OFB to get its act together.Perhaps privatisation if BMS types let it happen. :roll: But OFB despite being under DPSU's isnt BEL,HAL,SAIL,MIDHANI,MDL.Despite hiccups and glitches the latter still do far better than the run of the mill OFB which are frankly overstaffed,have lots of old eqpt and are run by appointees too bored/tired to change the status quo.

However,at the end of the day its money which decides the "fate" of the order book.

HVF Avadi has an installed capacity of min. 200 T72M1's per year.The Army ordered a max of 75-80 over the years.
The lack of "trickle down" hits all the establishments which cater to HVF's T72M1 line.All the way to dehradaun.

-------------------

Regarding exports...frankly we dont have the capability yet to compete neck to neck vs the israelis and the yanks...in the "bulk" market like thermal imagers,diverse RF items etc.

In areas like radars,sonars and EW where we do have a base..i dont think the IAF would like Indonesia to have Indra-2's or the Navy would like Thailand to get Panchendriya or Ajanta.

Regards,
Nitin

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Rangudu » 30 Oct 2002 07:53

Interesting article in Stratfor.com on Indian Defence Export potential.

Subscription site so article posted in full.

India Furthers Strategic Goals by Reaching Out to Arms Markets

Summary

Seeking to increase its arms sales tenfold within the next year and to increase its market influence in Asia and Africa, India is dropping a blacklist that prevented some nations from buying Indian weapons systems. New Delhi needs to increase arms sales in order to spur development of its domestic defense industry, exert greater regional influence and further its goals toward becoming a major regional power -- something that Indian leaders hope will translate into economic and political strength.

Analysis

India is eliminating a blacklist that barred certain countries from buying domestically produced weapons, because the nation's defense ministry hopes to increase weapons sales tenfold over the next year. In an interview with the Indian press, Defense Minister George Fernandes said India is looking for new export markets and intends to sell more advanced weapons systems -- including warships, helicopters, aircraft and electronic warfare systems.

New Delhi's aggressive arms export goal is an attempt to service several strategic aims. India's domestic arms industry has a history of lackluster performance, and increasing sales to foreign countries will fund the research and development budgets for individual firms. New Delhi also could expand its reach and influence in Asia, Africa and the Middle East through increased arms sales -- something that would serve both to counter China's reach and to accelerate India's own drive toward becoming a regional power.

Yet as New Delhi reaches into new arms markets, it may find itself bumping up against not only China, but even its nominal ally, the United States.

Since becoming defense minister in 1998, Fernandes has worked to grow India's defense exports -- in terms of both products and buyers. Yet repeated calls to drastically expand the amount of exports have come to little thus far; instead, Indian defense exports have declined since 1998, when they peaked at around $38.5 million. A year later, they dropped to $28.4 million. Earlier reports put the current export figure at $51.5 million, but Fernandes offered a substantially lower number of less than $20.7 million. In contrast, Fernandes says the government would like exports to hit around $200 million over the next year.

New Delhi has taken several steps to try to beef up arms sales by opening the defense sector to private investment, giving attention to joint development of weapons systems with other nations -- particularly Russia, South Africa and Israel -- and forging a deal with Moscow to allow New Delhi to repair and upgrade weapons systems no longer manufactured by Russia. Now, New Delhi also is abandoning its blacklist of potential weapons-buyers.

These moves are designed not only to expand the sales of Indian weapons systems, but also to improve the research and development of new advanced weapons technologies by domestic defense contractors. India's state-run defense industry often struggled with developing new and improved weapons systems due to extremely nationalistic -- almost xenophobic -- development programs. The results were often massive expenditures on systems development, followed by the purchase of a similar system from a foreign supplier when it became clear that indigenous development was stalling.

Beyond boosting indigenous defense capabilities, Indian officials have a strategic goal in mind -- furthering New Delhi's ability to become a regional power while countering China's expanding reach. Both India and China compete in the small arms market, and New Delhi has admitted that its push into Southeast Asia -- part of a broader economic Look East policy -- is taking place with an eye toward checking Beijing.

India, which from a geographic standpoint naturally should be the dominant power in the Indian Ocean basin, is working to become so and to extend its power outward to the South China Sea, the Arabian Sea and down the coast of Africa. For New Delhi, the dilemma has been in balancing its maritime goals with its terrestrial security needs. The global war on terrorism has expanded India's diplomatic and security reach deep into Central Asia, shoring up its defensive position. At the same time, New Delhi has aggressively pursued its Look East policy -- which is designed to achieve deeper economic integration with Southeast Asia, through such projects as a road network stretching from India into Indochina and participation in regional anti-piracy efforts.

By selling advanced arms or offering to service old Soviet-supplied equipment, Indian officials hope to expand the nation's own leverage in Southeast Asia while simultaneously undercutting China's position. In August, an official from the Department of Defense Production and Supplies told the Indian press that New Delhi already was offering small arms and ammunition, patrol ships, light field guns, helicopters, trucks and aircraft parts to Southeast Asian states at reduced prices -- with all supplies of better quality than comparable Chinese equipment. And the Defense Ministry, in order to accelerate the pace of exports, is subsidizing the industry and considering whether to offer soft loans to purchasing nations.

Over the next decade, India intends to produce weapons systems China cannot, including an indigenously developed air defense ship -- basically a small aircraft carrier. Through subsidies, loans and higher technology, New Delhi hopes to supplant China as a major regional arms supplier. It also can take advantage of underlying concerns about China within Southeast Asia, touting Indian weapons systems as free from the risks of being swallowed by an aggressive China in the future.

Ultimately, India's defense exports may bring it into contention with not only China but also the United States. New Delhi's sales drive inevitably will feed into the ongoing arms race in Asia, raising the stakes in any regional confrontation and making flare-ups between states more likely. For Washington, the ability to freely traverse Asian waters is vital to U.S. strategic interests, and maintaining a sense of stability in Asia is thus a priority -- albeit one that Washington has ignored in recent years. Were India to sell small aircraft carriers to Southeast Asian nations, the potential for clashes in the contested Spratly Islands or the increase in purchases of anti-ship missiles could spell trouble for U.S. operations in and through the region.

For New Delhi, the first priority is boosting its domestic defense industry, spurring innovation and advances in technology and design. Ironically, the quickest way to ensure the industry is capable of producing modern and sophisticated weapons systems -- thus freeing India from dependence on foreign suppliers -- appears to be opening up the sector to foreign involvement in the near term. But as New Delhi continues to advance its domestic arms industry and its military capabilities, the nation's strategic planners will keep a wary eye on China: India's strategic competitor -- militarily, politically and economically -- in Asia.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby vverma » 30 Oct 2002 12:02

Good article but not one piece of useful information. Too strategic and not enough tactical focus. Nothing that "analyzes" the needs of South Asian nations and matches one-to-one India's production capability with other countries's needs.

We need a specific article for BR Monitor that talks about specific examples like HAL selling Lancer's to Nepal for its Maoist insurgency problems. I don't believe they have AAA or AAM, so it would be pretty effective.

How about Brahmaputra class for Vietnam?

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Kakkaji » 12 Nov 2002 05:01

Defence Ministry Arms Itself For Export Thrust

http://financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=21595

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Kakkaji » 12 Nov 2002 20:11

Adm. Nadkarni on the dream of exporting Indian Arms

http://www.rediff.com/news/2002/nov/12nad.htm

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Kakkaji » 12 Nov 2002 23:41

HAL to export transport aircraft to Nigeria, Zambia

http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/holnus/06122218.htm

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Krishna » 10 Dec 2002 09:42

Published in Newindpress.com

‘Sanjivani’ will detect debris-trapped

KOCHI: In what can be called a remarkable example of converting scientific spin-off for the common good, the Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory (NPOL) here has invented a gadget that can detect people trapped in debris in quake-hit areas.

Aptly christened ‘Sanjivani,’ this life-detector is soon going in for mass production, with various State Governments and police departments evincing interest in it. The NPOL has transferred the Sanjivani technology to its partner Keltron for mass production. About 100 units will be rolled out soon and these would be delivered to the Delhi Government.

‘‘The Delhi Government and the police contacted us after hearing about the success of the Sanjivani in quake-hit Lattur and Bhuj and we were only too happy to help in its mass production,’’ sources told this website's newspaper.

The NPOL had dispatched a team of scientists under the leadership of senior scientist H R S Sastry to the quake-hit areas immediately after the catastrophe. ‘‘We were able to save seven lives trapped under piles of concrete. Had we reached earlier, more lives could have been saved,’’ an official said.

The equipment works on simple sonar technology. It sends signals that can direct you to a trapped life.

It can also capture minute decibels like scratching on the wall or feeble breathing. ‘‘Once we record even a weak signal of life, we immediately direct rescuers to that particular point. We can even give them a somewhat accurate position of the trapped person,’’ sources said.

The Sanjivani is an easy-to-handle gadget that looks like a mine- detector. The main unit can be strapped onto the waist. A long handle with a sensor called probe, leads the search. It transmits low-decibel sounds to a headphone.

‘‘It’s highly user-friendly and doesn’t demand any extra specialisation for handling. We are told that the authorities of quake-prone areas are planning to buy the Sanjivani for deployment immediately after a calamity,’’ sources said.

The equipment costs about Rs 12,000. Sources, however, expressed the hope that the cost would come down once its demand went up. ‘‘With several areas in the country being identified as quake-prone , the Sanijvani would come quite handy in launching rescue operations. It can detect life even below 10 to 12 feet,’’ sources said.

The inability to track people trapped under debris has been one of the major reasons for loss of life in quake-hit areas. India had to seek international assistance to launch proper rescue operations several times in the past.

‘‘The NPOL scientists always suggest a useful application to any possible spin-off of their research activity.

‘‘Some time back we had developed small sonars that would help lead fishermen to a good catch.

‘‘This sonar is being used on several boats,’’ sources said.

Manne
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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Manne » 10 Dec 2002 10:44

Originally posted by krishna_kss:
‘‘Some time back we had developed small sonars that would help lead fishermen to a good catch.

‘‘This sonar is being used on several boats,’’ sources said.
If that is the case, can IN float several such small boats on the western front to detect TSPN Agostas ? A pretty big fish it will be :D

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby daulat » 10 Dec 2002 16:15

Originally posted by Manne:
Originally posted by krishna_kss:
[b]‘‘Some time back we had developed small sonars that would help lead fishermen to a good catch.

‘‘This sonar is being used on several boats,’’ sources said.
If that is the case, can IN float several such small boats on the western front to detect TSPN Agostas ? A pretty big fish it will be :D [/b]
perfect application for distributed sensor and signal processing!! can work it off GSM networks in coastal areas (as keralan fishermen regularly use GSM to pre sell their catch before landing), for deeper waters, might have to rely on regular radio

any suspicious tracks can be investigated by air

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Joeqp » 10 Dec 2002 19:16

<I><B>Originally posted by Daulat:</B>
as keralan fishermen regularly use GSM to pre sell their catch before landing</I>

Can you post some detailed info about this? Maybe not in this thread, but I'm very interested in hearing about how high-tech is making a difference in very "low-tech" places.

George J

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby George J » 10 Dec 2002 22:45

Originally posted by Manavendra:

Can you post some detailed info about this? Maybe not in this thread, but I'm very interested in hearing about how high-tech is making a difference in very "low-tech" places.
http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~sinha/Misc/WirelessIndia.htm

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Manne » 12 Dec 2002 10:07

Reliance looking to buy 10 choppers

Can Dhruv do the job here ? If yes, why is Dhruv not in the race ?

Manne
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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Manne » 12 Dec 2002 16:17

India keen to export sonars and sensors

Stating that India had been receiving lot of enquiries on the sonars, he said avenues would also be explored on co-producing and jointly marketting them to other countries.
Final trials of Brahmos in two months

He said "Lakshya" aircraft had been successfully demonstrated in a foreign country, which was expected to place orders for a dozen planes soon.

George J

Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby George J » 12 Dec 2002 19:11

Originally posted by Manne:
Reliance looking to buy 10 choppers

Can Dhruv do the job here ? If yes, why is Dhruv not in the race ?
Coz all of the 11 Dhruvs produced every year can serve the country better with the armed forces rather than tranporting some corporate honcho. (Do I sound like a jingo or what?)

Coz the Dhruv was first meant to replace military choppers and then if there are any left, they were meant for the export and civilian market. But I think the Indian military needs about 200 (?) of these birds. 200/11 a year = 18.2 year production run just for the military.

Coz Reliance needs 10 choppers NOW..not in 18 years and they have the resources to buy from any mfg. from anywhere in the world.

Coz Reliance would rather go in for tested, realiable choppers with proven safety record, while Dhruv is still new and yet to prove itself.

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby Aditya G » 12 Dec 2002 19:46

did you guys know that Pawan Hans also operates Mi-8s? :cool:

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Re: Marketing of Indian Defence Products

Postby member_4672 » 13 Dec 2002 03:02


Originally posted by Manne:
Reliance looking to buy 10 choppers

Can Dhruv do the job here ? If yes, why is Dhruv not in the race ?
I can understand the preference for the IA in supplying the choppers, considering the fact hat HAL's primary objective is to serve the Indian Armed Forces. But, in doing so with such a stubborn outlook only defeats another important objective : self-reliance and cash flow. Its not always that somebody will need 12 birds and that too for domestic use.

Moreover, since RIL's choppers are for civilian use, their requirements wont be as stringent as IA's. It might not require the same time and effort as the IA. If HAL wants to really play a big role in the market it has to find a way to serve domestic market too before dreaming about foriegn markets. And it can be done, but it needs Initiative, and you know the rest.... :mad:

Kumar.


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