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Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Jagan » 29 Jun 2008 04:22

THE FINAL SALUTE TO SAM BAHADUR

Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passed away on Friday. A MAIL TODAY pick of the many faces of a soldier’s soldier

by Suman Sharma

FORMER Indian Army chief Field Marshal Sam Hormusji Framji Jamshedji Manekshaw died at the military hospital in Wellington in Tamil Nadu on Friday. The 94- year- old was suffering from acute bronchopneumonia. In arare gesture, the government decided to accord Manekshaw astate funeral, complete with a21- gun salute (right). Though defence minister A. K. Antony condoled the death, he didn’t attend the funeral. Instead, minister of state for defence M. M. Pallam Raju attended the last rites of the officer who scripted India’s 1971 military victory over Pakistan. When asked about Antony’s absence, ministry officials hinted at the paucity of space which would have made it difficult to accommodate the minister and his entourage.

The three service chiefs, who are all four- star officers and junior to the late field marshal, also chose to stay away from the funeral ceremony which was held at Coonoor Tamil Nadu. They sent their representatives. President Pratibha Patil, the supreme commander of the armed forces, is on an Indore tour and sent her condolence message. Calling him one of India’s greatest soldiers, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said Manekshaw has inspired several generations of Indian soldiers over the past half acentury. am sure his legacy will continue live with us for years to come,” Singh said.

Former Navy chief, Admiral (rtd) Arun Prakash told MAIL TODAY :“Field marshals don’t retire, the rank is given for life. The nation honoured him for his military achievements when he was alive, so he also deserves the highest honour after death.” A senior officer said, “The state funeral should’ve been held in the Capital and all dignitaries should have been there.” Manekshaw was buried beside the grave of his wife Siloo Bode in Udhagamandalam as per his wish. The funeral of India’s most decorated soldier was aprivate affair with only close relatives and members of the Parsi community in attendance.

Though there is aParsi tradition of keeping the body in the open and allowing vultures to feed on it, Manekshaw’s body was buried. Amass was held in the graveyard where family members paid floral tributes to the departed soul. The rites lasted about an hour. Hundreds of people atop buildings and trees adjacent to the graveyard watched the last rites. Security was tight in and around the graveyard with police and army officials controlling the public and the traffic. Earlier, the body was brought to the graveyard in an open flower- bedecked military truck from Wellington. Manekshaw, who became ahousehold name after the 1971 victory led the creation of Bangladesh, had been hospitalised at the Wellington Military Hospital for some time due aprogressive lung disease. His condition had become serious in the past few days and he was being treated in the intensive care unit.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby shiv » 29 Jun 2008 06:34

I believe this thread needs archival for all the articles and links posted.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Jagan » 29 Jun 2008 11:27

The NDTV discussion on whether Manekshaw should be given the Bharat Ratna. Chaired by Ajai Shukla and has Gen VP Malik and MP Manvendra Singh and Lt Gen JFR Jacob. Its nearly 18 min long.

http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/vi ... x?id=32363

While I was never enamoured with the reputation of the Bharat Ratna in the first place, Ajai Shukla makes a very compelling argument "Its not Sam Bahadur whose reputation will be enhanced by the Bharat Ratna, but that the reputation of the Bharat Ratna will be enhanced by including Sam in the receipents"

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby sumit-mia » 29 Jun 2008 16:20

I salute to our late beloved Muktijoddha Sam Bahadur for a precious gift to us "Bangladesh". Bangladesh will remember his contribution forever.

Some Reactions from Bangladesh:

Bangladesh pays rich tributes to Manekshaw

Dhaka (PTI): Bangladesh paid glowing tributes to the iconic former Indian army chief Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, recalling his "signal contribution" to its 1971 Liberation War.

"The people and the government of Bangladesh will always recall with warm gratitude his signal contribution to our War of Liberation and his association with a glorious epoch in the history of Bangladesh's evolution," Foreign Adviser of the interim Cabinet Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury said in a letter to External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee.

"Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw combined in him the rare qualities of a great soldier, military strategist and a leader of people he worked with."

Army chief General Moeen U Ahmed mourned the death of the celebrated master strategist of the 1971 war, saying "Bangladesh Army recalls his contribution with gratitude and pays rich tribute to the departed soul."

"The successful leadership of Field Marshal Manekshaw as the chief of Bangladesh-India allied forces helped Bangladesh achieve the quick victory during the War of Liberation in 1971," Ahmed said in a statement.

The 1971 veterans and researchers also paid their tributes to Manekshaw as a military strategist. Many recalled his landmark call for the surrender of the Pakistani troops, "lay down your weapons", through All India Radio.

"His military strategy and talented leadership as the chief of the allied forces quickened our victory in the Liberation War," deputy chief of staff of Bangladesh's Liberation Forces Air Vice Marshal (Retd) AK Khondkar said.

"We all are deeply shocked ... his role in the our Liberation War will always be remembered with gratitude."

Liberation War researcher Harun Habib called Manekshaw a "super strategist", saying his able leadership expediting surrender of Pakistanis without further resistance saved many lives, particularly in Dhaka.

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/00 ... 281204.htm

Contribution of Manekshaw to War of Liberation recalled
Staff Correspondent

More organisations yesterday expressed profound shock at the death of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, who was the chief of Indian army during the Liberation War of Bangladesh in 1971.

In a statement, President of Gono Forum Dr Kamal Hossain and Acting General Secretary Advocate Subrata Chowdhury recalled with gratitude the contribution of Manekshaw to the liberation war as the chief of the allied force, saying that his contribution helped Bangladesh achieve a quick victory in the war.

South Asian People's Union against Fundamentalism and Communalism, Sammilita Samajik Andolon, Bangladesh Muktijoddha Sangsad, Amra Muktijoddhar Santan, Bangladesh Muktijoddha Ainjibi Parishad, Jatiya Gonotantrik League and Bangladesh Nari Mukti Andolon also expressed deep shock at the death of war veteran.

Bangladesh has lost a sincere friend at his death, they said and prayed for salvation of the departed soul and conveyed sympathy to the bereaved family.

Communist Party of Bangladesh, Jatiya Samajtantrik Dal, Bangladesh National Awami Party, Bangladesh Mahila Parishad and Bangladesh Muktijoddha Nou Commando Association also paid tribute to Manekshaw.

The people of Bangladesh will always remember him with respect and love because of his association with a glorious epoch in the history of the country's independence, they said in separate messages.

In another message, Mujib Nagar O Muktijoddha Officer-Karmachari Kendrio Kalyan Samity called on the government to build a memorial to the Indian soldiers who were killed during the War of Liberation.

http://thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=43394

Death of Manekshaw condoled
Star Report

Various organisations and individuals yesterday expressed deep shock at the death of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, who was the chief of Indian army during the Liberation War of Bangladesh in 1971.

UNB adds: Foreign Adviser Dr Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury expressed condolence at the death of the war veteran.

In a message to Indian External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee, the foreign adviser said Field Marshal Manekshaw combined in him the rare qualities of a great soldier, military strategist and a leader of people he worked with.

"The people and the government of Bangladesh will always recall with warm gratitude his signal contribution to our War of Liberation and his association with a glorious epoch in the history of Bangladesh's evolution," he said.

Army Chief General Moeen U Ahmed has also conveyed his condolence to the bereaved family of Manekshaw and also to the Chief of Staff of the Indian Army.

In a condolence message, the Bangladesh Army said Manekshaw's successful leadership as the chief of the allied force in the Liberation War in 1971 had helped Bangladesh achieve a quick victory in the war, said an ISPR press release.

Bangladesh Army also recalled his contribution to the liberation war with gratitude and paid deep respect to his departed soul.

In a press release yesterday, the Sector Commandars' Forum said the role of Manekshaw in the liberation war is inseparable from the history of Bangladesh's independence.

Liberation War Museum has also expressed deep shock at the death of Manekshaw and opened a condolence book at the museum to facilitate the people to pay tribute to the war hero.

Jatiya Samajtantrik Dal President Hasanul Haque Inu and General Secretary Syed Zafar Sazzad in a statement said Bangladeshis would always remember the contribution of Manekshaw to the Liberation War.

Jatiya Party Secretary General Sheikh Shahidul Islam in a statement said Bangladesh has lost one of its sincere friends at the death of Manekshaw.

Sammilita Sangskritik Jote and Muktijoddha Sangram Parishad also condoled the death of the war veteran.

http://thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=43240

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby gogna » 29 Jun 2008 17:50

Rest in peace son of punjab

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Prabu » 29 Jun 2008 18:36

May god bless his soul.

I would like to re call my personal meeting with Great Field Marshal. This was almost a decade back.

It was a private get together in Coonoor, The Nilgiris, Tamilnadu and every one was having their cocktails. He attended along with his beloved wife. I think he was sipping a whisky (if my memory serves me right!) . We were siting in the same sofa jest next to each other. I wished him Good evening Sir, and started the conversation. It was very brief. He asked about me and what do i do. And he asked me do I know him. I replied him Yes sir, The General who fought many successful wars for India. He again asked how do I know him. I said,"through news papers". ( But it was a bad tinme to tell that. Ask me why. That was the time when he was linked to some bribes given to extremists, Through a TATA firm (i think calcutta) and his reportedly taped audio conversation was flashed in national news papers.) He smiled back to me. before i could talk some thing further, he was called by some one else and he was to leave quickly.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby rahul_r » 29 Jun 2008 20:23

I have had the honor of marching in front of this great soldier during my NCC days. A moment I cherish till this day. God bless his soul for his dedication and service to our nation.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Sanju » 30 Jun 2008 03:09

Is there any possibility to get access to the "lay down your arms" call on AIR By the Late FM to the Pakistan Army?

Why don't we play this piece every Army Day on National TV to remind the new generation of that Great Victory and the many who laid down their lives and their youths for it?

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Rahul M » 30 Jun 2008 03:13

times now was playing it. you can try their website.
or even mail mayurica.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Rishi » 30 Jun 2008 03:45

:cry:

Old soldiers never die.... they just go to that great Mess house in the Sky.

Here is a documentary on Sam Bahadur, taken in 2003 under UNESCO and Parzor Foundation auspices (47 min length) by Jessica Gupta and his grandson, Jehan Manekshaw on occasion of his 90th birthday.

http://www.unescoparzor.com/samcd.html

'In War and Peace - The Life of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, MC'


Image

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Jagan » 30 Jun 2008 05:49

http://www.timesnow.tv/frmVideoDialog.a ... V10577.wmv

Heres the video with the surrender call. (thanks rahul)

Should be downloadable from this link i guess http://www.timesnow.tv/VideoGallery/NV10577.wmv

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Rahul M » 30 Jun 2008 05:53

Jagan wrote:http://www.timesnow.tv/frmVideoDialog.aspx?VName=NV10577.wmv

Heres the video with the surrender call. (thanks rahul)


can it be saved on BR's page on Sam Bahadur ? with Times' permission ?

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Karan Dixit » 30 Jun 2008 08:27

A hero, a liberator, a warrior, a leader and a true patriot. May his soul attain Nirvana!

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby vina » 30 Jun 2008 10:52

NY Times Obituary.. I never imagined that something like NY Times could be bothered about this.. But hey, here it is.

The New York Times
Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By

June 30, 2008
Sam H.F.J. Manekshaw Dies at 94; Key to India’s Victory in 1971 War
By HARESH PANDYA

Field Marshal Sam Hormusji Framji Jamshedji Manekshaw, India’s best-known soldier and the architect of the country’s victory in the 1971 war with Pakistan that gave birth to Bangladesh, died in Wellington, India, on Friday. He was 94.

The cause was pneumonia, India’s Defense Ministry said in a statement.

Field Marshal Manekshaw first drew notice as a captain in the British Indian Army during World War II. He was severely wounded on Feb. 22, 1942, in a counteroffensive against the Japanese on the Sittong River in Burma, now known as Myanmar. But he kept exhorting his soldiers, and he continued fighting until he collapsed.

Fearing the worst, the English commander, Maj. Gen. D. T. Cowan, pinned his own Military Cross on Captain Manekshaw and was quoted as saying, “A dead person can’t be awarded a Military Cross.”

But the young officer survived, and a storied military career began. He not only recovered from his wounds but went back to Burma later in the war and was wounded again.

In 1947, as colonel in charge of operations, he oversaw Indian forces in fighting that broke out between India and Pakistan over Kashmir, the territory claimed by both new nations.

With a military mustache guarding a genial face, he was known as a stern disciplinarian with a common touch. He once insisted on doing folk dances with his troops even though he had a sprained ankle. By the end of the night, the sprain had turned into a fracture.

He instilled a sense of duty, efficiency and professionalism in the Indian Army, and he taught officers to stand up to political masters and bureaucratic interference. His wit, sometimes bordering on sarcasm, did not go over well with many in power.

In 1961, he had a falling out with the defense minister, V. K. Krishna Menon. But by then a general, he was vindicated late the next year when Indian troops were overrun by Chinese forces that swept down from the Himalayas. Mr. Menon resigned and Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, who had been close to Mr. Menon, rushed General Manekshaw to the front. There he rallied the retreating Indian forces until a cease-fire was declared.

He became the eighth chief of the Indian Army in 1969, and in 1971 led India’s forces in the war with Pakistan that ended with the creation of Bangladesh from East Pakistan. According to articles published in Indian newspapers after his death, General Manekshaw firmly resisted demands by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in the spring of 1971 for an immediate invasion of East Pakistan in support of rebels there. He insisted that a campaign be put off until after the monsoon season ended and the armed forces were better prepared.

Just before the conflict began that December, the prime minister asked him, “General, are you ready for the war?” He replied, “I’m always ready, sweetie.” Less than three weeks later, Pakistan was defeated.

General Manekshaw became a national hero and a household name after this triumph, and in 1973, two weeks before his retirement, he became India’s first field marshal. He had already received India’s highest civilian awards — Padma Bhushan in 1968 and Padma Vibhushan in 1972.

He was born into a Parsi family, his father a doctor, in Amritsar in Punjab on April 3, 1914.

He briefly pursued a degree in medicine and studied at Sherwood College, in Naini Tal, and Hindu Sabha College, in Amritsar, before joining the first class of the new Indian Military Academy at Dehra Dun in 1934. It had been opened to train Indians for commissioned ranks in the British Indian Army. He was first attached to the Royal Scots regiment. He later joined a Ghurka regiment and wore the Ghurka cap even after becoming the army’s chief of staff.

He met Siloo Bode at a gathering in Lahore, in what is now Pakistan, in 1937, and they were married in 1939. She died in 2001. He is survived by his daughters, Maja Daruwala and Sherry Batliwala, and three grandchildren.

Like many officers of his generation, he had an affection for British military traditions. A 1971 article in The New York Times noted that upon waking at 5:30 every morning, he liked drinking a small glass of whiskey, listening to the BBC news and puttering in his garden before going to work.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Lalmohan » 30 Jun 2008 17:14

gogna wrote:Rest in peace son of punjab


Son of India

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Sanju » 30 Jun 2008 18:34

Rahul M wrote:times now was playing it. you can try their website.
or even mail mayurica.


Thanks Rahul M & Jagan for posting the link.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Philip » 30 Jun 2008 18:53

As I was travelling back to India over the last few days,the deeply distressing news of Sam's death was learnt only today.Thankfully I was able to shake the great man's hand some time ago.A dear friend in the army was in charge of his health over the last year and every time we met regaled me with some of Sam's inimitable wit and zest for life despite his declining health.Sam's uprightness and principled approach to his profession,also gave him an equally great victory over the conspiracies of babudom and dimwit politicos-the quicksand that stifles Indian decision making and promotes arthritis in our most important institutions.Thankfully Sam during his career survived the slings and arrows of lesser mortals and one must remember Mrs.Gandhi with equal thanks for believing and listening to Sam during our time of great crisis.That great combination,Mrs.G and Sam,put paid to Nixon and Kissinger,Mao, Yahya and Zulfie Bhutto and carved out an immortal Indian victory.In the pantheon of great Indians in history,FM Sam Manekshaw MC is a giant of an hero!

Sam above all was the people's Field Marshal,needing neither the Anthony's of the day or babudom to lend colour at his funeral.They will fly forgotten as a dream,but Sam Bahadur will live forever in our memories !

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Manne » 30 Jun 2008 21:02

Rishi wrote::cry:

Old soldiers never die.... they just go to that great Mess house in the Sky.

Here is a documentary on Sam Bahadur, taken in 2003 under UNESCO and Parzor Foundation auspices (47 min length) by Jessica Gupta and his grandson, Jehan Manekshaw on occasion of his 90th birthday.

http://www.unescoparzor.com/samcd.html

'In War and Peace - The Life of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw, MC'


Image


Rishi,

Thanks for this info. I spoke to Ms. Perin Pandey few minutes ago and am likely to meet her next weekend to pick up the VCD. I have also told her about BR/BRF. Let's see if we can make the VCD available in BR store. Need to speak to Kaps as well about that.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby ASPuar » 01 Jul 2008 00:58

Manekshaw funeral: Antony's face-saving exercise
29 Jun 2008, 1945 hrs IST,PTI

NEW DELHI: Defence Minister A K Antony and three services chiefs will sign a condolence book on Monday in memory of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw after controversy erupted over their absence at his state funeral in Udhagamandalam on Friday.

Defence Ministry sources said that apart from Antony, the services chiefs Admiral Sureesh Mehta, Air Chief Marshal F H Major and General Deepak Kapoor would be the first to put down their tributes in writing in the book that will be kept at the Martyrs' Memorial near India Gate in New Delhi.

The condolence book would be open for the general public to record their messages for the Field Marshal from 9.30 hours to 16.30 hours from June 30 to July 2, Ministry sources said.


Manekshaw, the architect of India's victory over Pakistan and the creation of Bangladesh in the 1971 war between the two countries, breathed his last at the Military Hospital in Wellington in the Nilgiri hills of Tamil Nadu in the early hours of Friday.

In a rare gesture, the government had announced a state funeral for Manekshaw.

Criticism mounted over the low representation from the government and the tri-services at the funeral, and the delay from the services chiefs to condole the death of the Field Marshal.

The Monday's event is seen as a face-saving exercise from the Defence Minister and the Services chiefs in view of the open criticism of their absence at the funeral.


Heads up, Delhi BRFites...

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby JaiS » 01 Jul 2008 02:46

Hundreds throng India gate to sign Manekshaw condolence book

Hundreds of people thronged to India Gate today to sign the condolence book to mark their grief on the passing away of the country's first Field Marshal SHFJ Manekshaw.


The condolence book was placed next to the martyr's memorial at India Gate and Defence Minister A K Antony led the nation and was the first to sign the condolence book in which he described Manekshaw as the "Marshal who led from the front".


The country's sole surviving Marshal Arjan Singh, who is the Marshal of the Air Force, was next and he termed Manekshaw as one of the leading field commanders in India's history.

The three service Chiefs, Admiral Sureesh Mehta, who is also the Chairman of Chiefs of Staff, General Deepak Kapoor and Air Chief Marshal F H Major also signed the condolence book.

Other distinguished people who had lined up to sign the book which was placed at Martyr's Memorial at 0900 hours included former service Chiefs, Principal Staff officers at the Army, Navy and Air Headquarters, Defence attaches, politicians, Members of Parliament and others.

A large number of mourners along with their families also lined up the broad vista in front of India Gate. Among them were war veterans of the Burma campaign and the three wars which the country has faced since 1947.

"I want to salute the great son of the soil" said one ordinary civilian who had come all the way from Dehradun to pay his last respects to Sam Bahadur.

The book will remain open from today to July 3 between 0930 to 1600 hours, an army spokesman said.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Gerard » 01 Jul 2008 03:24

People from all walks of life pay homage to Sam Manekshaw

Image

Defence Minister A.K. Antony paying homage to Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw with Marshal of the Air Force Arjan Singh; Air Chief Marshal F.H. Major; Army Chief, General Deepak Kapoor; and Navy Chief Sureesh Mehta at India Gate in New Delhi on Monday.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby sunilUpa » 01 Jul 2008 06:10

'Sayonara Field Marshal, you made us proud

A legendary soldier and formidable leader of men and women who made great contribution to our liberation war in 1971." That is how India's first Field Marshal SHFJ Manekshaw was described by Bangladesh High Commissioner to New Delhi A Liaquat Chaudhari today (June 30).

"For this contribution Manekshaw will always be remembered by us," the envoy wrote in the condolence book opened to public to mark their grief on the passing away of 'Sam Bahadur', next to the Martyrs' memorial at India Gate.

The Bangladesh High Commissioner was among hundreds of people who braved sultry weather and rains to record their remembrance of the man who led the Indian Army in its finest hour in the 1971 war, which led to creation of Bangladesh.

The mourners were led by the Defence Minister A K Antony who wrote,"Manekshaw was the commander who led his men from the front."

"The Indian Army salutes its bravest son," wrote the Army Chief, General Deepak Kapoor. But the most moving comments came from hundreds of anonymous mourners, who had lined up to
record their grief.

The commoners' grief was summed up by an anonymous civilian who wrote "Sayonara, the people's Field Marshal."


How apt and true.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby svinayak » 01 Jul 2008 07:05

Later, Gen. Kapoor announced the dedication of a project for higher military learning in Delhi to the memory of the Field Marshal.

This centre will also house an Army-backed think tank, the Centre for Land Warfare Studies.

http://www.hindu.com/2008/07/01/stories ... 261300.htm

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby disha » 01 Jul 2008 10:13

Manekshaw funeral: Antony's face-saving exercise


I do not like the way media is trying to create an issue where none exists! I am just too miffed at media at this stage.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby A Arun » 01 Jul 2008 12:10

http://www.barackobama.com/2008/06/30/obama_statement_on_field_marsh.php

Obama Statement on Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw
Chicago, IL | June 30, 2008
Chicago, IL – Senator Barack Obama today released the following statement of condolence on the passing of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw.

"I offer my deep condolences to the people of India, on the passing of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw. He was a legendary soldier, a patriot, and an inspiration to his fellow citizens. Field Marshal Manekshaw provided an example of personal bravery, self-sacrifice, and steadfast devotion to duty that began before India's independence, and will deservedly be remembered far into the future."

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Lalmohan » 01 Jul 2008 13:58

there is an irony in the use of "Sayonara", considering it was the Japanese who almost killed him in Burma!

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby HariC » 01 Jul 2008 18:36

Manekshaw's secret, Indira's plans a '71 mystery

LONDON: Field Marshall Sam Manekshaw's death robs Indians of a vital source of information on one of recent Indian history's unresolved questions- did New Delhi have secret plans to dismember Pakistan in the west after comprehensively defeating it in the east?
India's plans in the western sector toward the close of the 1971 war over Bangladesh have long been a matter of controversy and speculation by historians and others. American declassified documents say President Richard Nixon and his Secretary of State Henry Kissinger believed Prime Minister Indira Gandhi wanted to dismember West Pakistan.
Equally, some Russian commentators have said they dissuaded her from doing so. But some leading Indian as well as Pakistani diplomats and strategic experts say if Gandhi had wanted to march in to Pakistan, she could have done so. They attribute the American and Russian claims to interventionist zeal.
The hero of the 1971 war, Manekshaw, was a garrulous man. But he never spoke publicly about the issue.The divided opinion found an echo at a just-ended conference on India and Pakistan organised by the Tehelka media group in London.
"Mrs Gandhi never had a territorial ambition, but she did want to finish off Pakistan's military capability," former Pakistan foreign secretary Tanvir Ahmad Khan told IANS. "But that would have ultimately led to the break up of Pakistan. There would have been chaos," he added.
Khan's assessment is similar to that of the late Nixon and Kissinger, who is a prominent commentator in the US media.Declassified US documents claim that details of a briefing given by Gandhi to members of her cabinet in early December 1971 were leaked to the US intelligence.
A summary of the documents by the State Department says: "Gandhi outlined her war aims, she would not accept a settlement until Bangladesh was liberated, the 'southern area of Azad Kashmir' was liberated, and the Pakistani armoured and air force strength was destroyed to prevent any future challenge to India.
"Nixon and Kissinger took this as proof that India planned not only to foster the independence of East Pakistan, but to use the opportunity of the crisis to inflict a crushing military defeat on Pakistan, which would lead to the break-up of West Pakistan. Kissinger attributed to the Gandhi government the goal of Balkanizing West Pakistan."
With the Bangladesh war seen in Cold War terms by the Americans and Russians, exchanges between Nixon and Kissinger sometimes bordered on the paranoid. The two men even contemplated using nuclear weapons against Russia if China entered the conflict. The US archives quote Kissinger as telling Nixon: "If the Soviets move against them (the Chinese) and we don't do anything, we will be finished."
"Nixon asked: 'So what do we do if the Soviets move against them? Start lobbing nuclear weapons in, is that what you mean?' Kissinger responded: 'If the Soviets move against them in these conditions and succeed, that will be the final showdown... and if they succeed we will be finished'.
"He added that 'if the Russians get away with facing down the Chinese and the Indians get away with licking the Pakistanis... we may be looking down the gun barrel.' In the end, they concluded that the projected confrontation with the Soviet Union would not involve a "nuclear exchange."
But at the London conference June 26-27, at least two former senior Pakistani figures, spy chief Lt Gen Assad Durrani and finance and foreign minister Sartaj Azeez , were not sure if Indira Gandhi would have wanted to dismember Pakistan.
"There was neither the intention, nor the capability. The relative strength of Pakistan on the western front would not have encouraged a major Indian invasion," said Durrani."You wouldn't turn your guns to the western sector when the bulk of your forces were in Bangladesh, and achieve a strategic result," he added.
Sartaj Azeez said both the US and the Soviet Union "overstated the case" in order to give their impression that it was their intervention that had stopped the Bangladesh war from spiralling out of control."In any case, Pakistan would have been ready for such an invasion as the bulk of our troops, something like 600,000 men, was in West Pakistan," Azeez said.
The late Indian foreign secretary Jyotindra Nath Dixit too has dismissed Nixon's and Kissinger's claims.
"The Indian government's attitude after the war disproved the theory of those who still believed that India had opposed the existence of Pakistan," he is quoted as saying in British journalist Victoria Schofield's book, "Kashmir in Conflict: India, Pakistan and the Unending War".
"Had India wanted to dismember Pakistan completely, the army could have marched straight on to Rawalpindi," Dixit said.
Whether Indira Gandhi ever contemplated such an invasion, or whether the claims were part of an elaborate Cold War drama played out by the Americans and Russians is something that still awaits clarity.
And Sam Manekshaw isn't telling. He never did tell.

1 Jul, 2008, 1534 hrs IST, IANS

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby HariC » 01 Jul 2008 18:37

British journalist fondly remembers Manekshaw
Tuesday, July 1, 2008 (London)
A British journalist, who was based in New Delhi and covered India-Pakistan war, remembers late Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw as his favourite military leader.

''I have cherished the memory of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw as my favourite military leader ever since reporting on the Indo-Pakistan war of 1971,'' said Harold Jackson, who was The Guardian's correspondent based in New Delhi during the 1971 war.

Jackson, who reported the Indo-Pak war that led to the liberation of Bangladesh, recalled his association with Manekshaw following his death last week.

''The military hazards in Kashmir and East Pakistan turned out to be child's play compared with my grim battles against Indian bureaucrats in New Delhi and their Bengali brothers in Dhaka: by the time I flew back to Delhi, they had almost reduced me to a gibbering wreck,'' he said.

''I arrived just in time to hear rumours that the Pakistan army had surrendered - unfortunately accompanied by one of Delhi's power cuts.

''The defence ministry phones were all engaged. In desperation, I rang the chief of staff's direct line,'' he recalled. 'Manekshaw here', came the reply from other side.

'''Harold Jackson of the Guardian. Nobody here seems sure if you've won the war or not.''' Jackson said.

'''Oh yes, we've won all right. General Niazi signed the surrender at 4.31 this afternoon. Is that all? Anything else I can help you with? No. Well I'm afraid I'm rather busy just now. All the best.' Manekshaw replied.

''He was one of a kind'', he said.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Philip » 01 Jul 2008 18:45

We will now see a flurry of intense activity on a "war" footing from the PMO,MOD,babudom,etc.,etc., with "Manekshaw Marg","Manekshaw Mansion","Manekshaw Military Museum","Manekshaw Institute of Military Affaires",etc.etc.,meaningless "mea culpas" from the moronic midgets who pass off as leaders and IAS asses in our fair land! When he was alive,they delayed his pension for decades debating endlessly whether he was still in service as a Field Marshal or not,paying him nothing until Kalam visited him and even then mercilessly,like the Japanese Bullets which struck him,slashed the amount due to him cutting away "back taxes" to add insult to injury.What a bunch of ****s.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby anupmisra » 01 Jul 2008 19:29

vina wrote:
“I’m always ready, sweetie.”


Quotable quote: Speaks volumes on Sam's positive attitude.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Rishi » 01 Jul 2008 19:31

anupmisra wrote:
vina wrote:
“I’m always ready, sweetie.”


Quotable quote: Speaks volumes on Sam's positive attitude.


He looked at Indira Gandhi as a yongster. "...I've always referred to her as girl" as he says in the VCD.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby ramana » 01 Jul 2008 21:29

From Pioneer, 1 July 2008

Man with a swagger

Rahul Datta
It will not be wrong to say Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw ranked along with military leaders like Rommel, Montgomery and Patton who led brilliant campaigns and raised the morale of their men when faced with tremendous odds while at war

For all his iconic stature, Field Marshal Sam Hormusji Framji Jamshedji Manekshaw's critics would say he had created a halo of bravado around himself. The swagger, the reputation for blunt-speaking, the hail-fellow well-met cheerfulness, the cap worn at a jaunty angle atop a pink face with a trademark moustache, was all there for effect.

Granted for a moment, his critics are correct. But what's wrong about it all? Leaders even go out of their way to cultivate such attributes. In fact, that's what good public relations professionals are supposed to be doing for great leaders, military or civilian.

Having taken a full burst of machine gun fire in his stomach as a young captain during the Burma campaign in World War II, Sam, who later walked with a slight slouch due to the wounds, had every right to demand the best from his men. And they could not refuse their commander as he had faced death from close quarters and earned a Military Cross for this daring act.

But let not such matters come in the way of any cold assessment of the man. Sam Bahadur, as he was also known because of his connection with the Gorkha Regiment as its Colonel, and the way he espoused their cause, once said there was a thin line between promotion and dismissal or something to that effect.

Asked to go take East Pakistan -- what is now Bangladesh -- in April 1971, he had the courage to tell then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to her face at a Cabinet meeting, to which he had been invited, that he could not do it because he was poorly prepared for a war-like operation. He did not have the required number of tanks, and he did not have the men either.

What Manekshaw must have meant was that such matters like timing of war operations are best left to military brains in the operations room rather than to Cabinet meetings.

Sam chose his own timing. A war, which could have been a long drawn affair, was over in a swift fortnight in December 1971. It was a great triumph for the Indian Army when Gen AAK Niazi appended his signature to the surrender document along with his 90,000 Pakistani troops and handed his revolver to India's Eastern Army commander, the late Lt Gen JS Arora.

The story goes that when Richard Nixon, the then President of the US, whose Seventh Fleet was in menacingly close waters, asked his Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen Westmoreland how long it would take for the Indian Army to take East Pakistan, his considered assessment was one-and-a-half months.

No one knows if Gen Westmoreland could look straight into his President's eyes after the Dhaka surrender. The Indian Army redeemed some of the izzat it had lost less than a decade in the India-China conflict.

For all his bluff and bluster manner, Sam Bahadur was also a serious military thinker. Policy decisions are best left to lawfully established civilian authority. This is a principle, which our Army has adhered to, and something which is the envy of many other countries.

However straightforward, or disagreeable their advice in matters professional, they have never become over-ambitious. Cases of people in the top echelons of the officer corps bending to please civilian authority have eroded pride and propriety, or izzat. But Generals like Manekshaw, who would speak their mind rather than compromise on matters military, cannot be accused of such pettiness.

There were soldiers of great competence in the Army hierarchy during Manekshaw's time. But Sam had special qualifications that gave him an edge and ensured his rise to the top at Sena Bhavan.

Men like Manekshaw are very special iconic personalities who shape history with charismatic leadership in their chosen profession. Sam Bahadur has done the profession of arms in India proud by his leadership.

His services to the nation will be remembered for a long time to come and inspire youth to join the profession of arms at a time of officer shortage in the three services. Money is not all. There is still some izzat left and the way of life that drew Manekshaw to the Army can again be given another chance.

In fact, it will not be wrong to say Sam Bahadur ranks along with military leaders like Rommel, Montgomery and Patton who led brilliant campaigns and raised the morale of their men when faced with tremendous odds.

Montgomery had to make special efforts to inspire his Eighth Army when they were overawed by the charisma of Rommel, the 'desert fox', in Africa. Driving around the battlefront in an open jeep while bombs rained all around him and machine gun fire raked the armoured carriers, Rommel's well-executed tank battles and fast thrusts into enemy territory had left the British clueless in World War II.

Montgomery rallied his men around after facing several reverses and used to come out of his mobile cabin without helmet and stand amidst artillery barrage by the Africa Korps. This act, no doubt, meant to charge his men, required sheer guts and the British soldiers went on to fight back and rest is history.

Patton's dash through Europe when the Germans were giving hell to the Allied Forces, besiders the brandishing of his service revolver and firing at the Luftwaffe fighter planes, are part of military history and folklore. All these three military leaders and our Sam Bahadur had that something extra, be it charisma, bravery or strength of character, to turn things around and get the job done when the country demanded them to do so.



Interesting article. He makes statements and does not articulate the thoguhts that lead to the statements. And interesting that he compares FM Manekshaw to flamboyant Western commanders. And has wasted the space in that. He might have his reasons.

I think FM Manekshaw was an entity in his own right and beyond comparison. His task was much harder thant that od those examples considering that India in the early 70s was just emerging from the disastrous 60's.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby ASPuar » 01 Jul 2008 23:28

Read an anecdote in a short biography, wherein an American Diplomat asked Gen. Manekshaw, "So, general, when are you taking power"?. Pat came the answer, "Why, right after Gen. Westmoreland takes over, of course!"

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby hnair » 02 Jul 2008 00:56

ASPuar wrote:Read an anecdote in a short biography, wherein an American Diplomat asked Gen. Manekshaw, "So, general, when are you taking power"?. Pat came the answer, "Why, right after Gen. Westmoreland takes over, of course!"


Thanks for that one, ASPuar. Am yet to hear any quote about the late FM that does not contain this lesson: Plan well with what you have, but always take the fight to the enemy and reduce them to a mere joke.

In this single exchange, he tarnished this early version of a proto-equal.equal that was being gradually build up with respect to Pak. Pity no one else in the political leadership took up his cue and started stomping that campaign into the ground. Would have excused us from the stupid Clinton era theatrics of SD staffers.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Mort Walker » 02 Jul 2008 09:38

May Field Marshall Manekshaw's atma find shanti. God bless this great man.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby ASPuar » 02 Jul 2008 12:09

PAraphrased from Maj. Gen. VK Singh's book, "Leadership in the Indian Army":

After retirement, Sam Bahadur came to Indore, where the citizenry had organised a civic reception in a public auditorium. Manekshaw was mobbed by crowds shouting "Manekshaw ki jai", and reached the podium with difficulty.

The keynote speaker began a speach in Hindi, running to the effect that:

"We have in our midst today, a soldier whose very name is synonymous with valour. He makes us remember Rana Pratap, Jhansi ki Rani, and the gallant Shivaji, whose deeds form our national heritage". When we hear him speak, the blood courses through our veins with greater speed", etc. for the next hour or so.


Sam was then requested to speak. He too, spoke in Hindi, saying:

"I have only one request. Could I have an English translation of the speech I just heard? I want to give it to my wife. Whenever I tell her that I am a big man, a great man, she doesnt even listen. Perhaps after reading this, she will believe me!"


This brought the house down, and the ovation went on, ad infinitum.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby Philip » 02 Jul 2008 13:56

Sam Bahadur certainly had the same charisma that inspired his men as much as Patton or Rommel could.He however was not a prima donna like Patton or poseur like Monty.With Sam,it came from within as it was with Rommel.

Montgomery had the huge advantage at El Alamein in that the British had broken the German code and he knew exactly where his enemy lay.Many say that Gen.O'Connor was a far better general than Monty.
Excerpt of his success in Africa."The campaign had been a remarkable success. The 13th Corps (as the western Desert Force was renamed on Jan. 1, 1941) had never exceeded a strength of 31,000 men. Between Dec. 9, 1940, and Feb. 7, 1941, it had advanced more than 500 miles and captured more than 130,000 prisoners, about 400 tanks, nearly 850 guns, and thousands of wheeled vehicles. The 13th Corps’ own losses were about 500 killed, 1,373 wounded, and 55 missing." However O'Connor's plan to march on and capture Tripoli was scuppered by the German's intervention in Greece and the British hadn't enough troops for both fronts.O'Connor was later captured by a recce unit of the immortal Desert Fox,Rommel!

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby ramana » 02 Jul 2008 20:00

Exactly Philip. F.M. Manekshaw was quite different than all those greats. He was great in his own way and truly end of an era when we had gentleman soldiers of the Victorian era. WWII ended all that and made it accessible for commoners as can be seen by the backgrounds of the Chiefs after 1980s.

Meanwhile Pioneer Editorial 2 July 2008, after the Delhi ceremony.

Slighting Sam

The Pioneer Edit Desk

Govt should apologise, and keep quiet

Adding insult to injury, the Government has now put forward the dubious claim that the Prime Minister, the Defence Minister and three services chiefs missed the funeral of Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw because he did not figure in the warrant of precedence. Apparently the Field Marshal -- a five-star General rank that has its equivalents in the Navy and the Air Force -- does not figure in the warrant of precedence. Hence, the Government argues, there was no automatic declaration of a state funeral; this was granted, almost as if it were charity, by the Prime Minister upon the request of the Defence Minister. Hence also no lowering of the national flag, no travel plans for senior officials to give Sam Bahadur, as India's best-known modern warrior was known, the last salute. What this facile reasoning fails to explain is how a Union Minister, the then Chief Minister of Karnataka and the three service chiefs made it to Field Marshal KM Cariappa's funeral in 1993. Not every well-known Indian figures in the warrant of precedence. There are many private citizens -- business barons, civil society leaders, scholars and cultural artistes -- whose death merits national mourning and tribute from the Indian state. This comes not from a narrow, legalistic interpretation of the person's official designation -- and place, if any, in the warrant of precedence -- but from sensitivity of the Government and the political class. Perhaps it is a question of priorities. When Baba Amte, great man as he was, died earlier this year, he was given a state funeral, with two Union Cabinet Ministers in attendance. Did he find mention in the warrant of precedence?

A political establishment is, in the end, a reflection of the cherished hopes and beliefs of its people. In insulting Sam Manekshaw and deciding he did not merit a suitable farewell -- never mind what the silly rule-books may have said -- the Government and the political leadership have let down India. The warrant of precedence is a bureaucratic roster, to decide who should sit or be introduced before whom at public functions where two or more VIPs are present. It cannot become the arbiter of how the nation must treat its heroes. It defies reason why, instead of taking resort to monumentally silly excuses, the Government cannot simply admit it messed up, and apologise to the memory of Sam Manekshaw, to his family and to the people. There is no divine injunction that holds that the Government must never say sorry.

While the UPA Government must shoulder responsibility for this colossal act of boorishness, the Opposition cannot escape censure. The BJP prides itself for being a nationalist party, alive to the security challenges and the strategic concerns of India. Yet, it did not deem it fit to depute even one senior functionary to Sam Manekshaw's funeral. At a time when the Indian Army is facing a serious scarcity of officers, when its pay and remuneration regime is being perceived as appallingly poor in comparison to competitive white collar professions, the manner in which politicians have treated Sam Manekshaw will not help win new recruits. Mid-ranking or even potential officers cannot be blamed for wondering, 'If they can do this to India's most celebrated General, what can't they do to me?'



I guess Lord Curzon had the last laugh on Lord Kitchner thorugh thte IAS bureaucrats! This gradual degradation of the militray in the official heirarchy is the mark of an unsure national elite that is scared of the sinews of power. Since 1947 this has been happening and is has to be reversed as a national interest. We can take this up in the Army discussion thread. The DDM also has a role in this devaluation and cannot be excused.

BTW the UPA excuse of warrant of precdence shows how the bureaucrats/politicians have become the primary decision makers. The RM has stepped down a notch in my views. The BJP is anyway lost in the bushes.

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby mandrake » 02 Jul 2008 20:10

RIP to a great warrior of India!
May you born again and again and lead us as you did!

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Re: Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw passes away

Postby vonkabra » 02 Jul 2008 21:13

JaiS wrote:

The condolence book was placed next to the martyr's memorial at India Gate and Defence Minister A K Antony led the nation and was the first to sign the condolence book in which he described Manekshaw as the "Marshal who led from the front".



I hope we get a chance to write entries in the honourable Defence Minister's condolence book soon. Seriously, is there any online petition which we can sign to have India's greatest soldier conferred the Bharat Ratna?


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