Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby member_201 » 02 May 2003 17:05

Please observe the following guidelines:

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby maz » 04 May 2003 02:15

Cusat confers MSc degree on Naval officers
(Newindpress.com, 04 May 2003)


KOCHI: Eighteen Naval officers, on completion of their specialisation course at the Signal School, recognised as the Centre for Defence Communications and Electronic Warfare, were awarded the MSc degree in Telecommunications by the Cochin University of Science and Technology (Cusat) on Friday. The degree was conferred by Dr N Unnikrishnan Nair, Vice-Chancellor of the University. Vice Admiral Madanjit Singh, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Naval Command, Captain Anand Iyer, Officer-in-Charge, Signal School, and Commodore Vaz spoke at the function. The graduation ceremony was attended by the senior officers of Southern Naval Command and the members of the Academic Council of Cusat.

The curriculum included instructions on electronic warfare, information technology, information warfare, practical training on networking, a capsule on tactics and international maritime law, a one-week sea attachment phase, exposure to the industrial infrastructure through organised visits to public and private sector undertakings, research projects and dissertations. Eleven out of the 18 officers scored more than 80 percent and secured an outstanding grade. The post-graduate degree helps open up new vistas for these young officers to pursue higher studies and doctoral programmes. The proposal for civil recognition by Cusat was first taken up by Signal School in November 2001. With personal guidance by the Vice-Chancellor and effective steering by the Headquarters, Southern Naval Command, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Signal School and Cusat on May 28 last year.

This also led to the recognition of the Southern Naval Command as the Command for Military and Strategic Studies. Consequently, each training establishment under Southern Naval Command is now recognised as individual centres of excellence in their respective fields. A total of 68 courses for officers and sailors are recognised by Cusat for awarding various degrees, diplomas and certificates. Concurrently, Southern Naval Command has constituted a Strategic Forum for the faculty members of Cusat to interact with the Indian Navy on various issues concerning global security and international law.


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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Avid » 04 May 2003 04:16

CGS Durgabai Deshmukh Commissioned
India Press Information Bureau, 01 May 2003)


NEW DELHI --- Coast Guard ship Durgabai Deshmukh, the second of the new generation fast patrol vessel designed has been commissioned by the Governor of Kerala Shri Sikandar Bakht at Kochi on 30 April 2003. The ship was built by Goa Shipyard Limited. Director General of Coast Guard and Vice Admiral Suresh Mehta and senior Coast Guard and civil officials were also present on the occasion. The ship is 48 meters long with 260 tons displacement and capable of doing a speed 35 kts, which is the fastest in its category. The ship is fitted with 30 mm gun at forward with machine guns on either side and state of the art navigation and communication equipment. Options are also available to fit naval established gun system of various makes with multi sensor stabilized integrated system as well as night vision devices. The vessel is powered by 2720 W MTC diesel engines driving independent Kamewa water jets. All systems onboard are fully computerized.

The ship can withstand rough sea conditions upto sea state 6 and can stay at sea for prolonged periods with a range of 1500 nautical miles. The Commissioning of this fast patrol vessel will provide the Coast Guard the capability of quick response for search and rescue operations, fisheries protection and patrolling against law breakers. The ship is commanded by Comdt Kalpit Dixit and has a complement of 05 officer and 35 sailors.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Kakkaji » 07 May 2003 00:19

INS Chatak decommissioned
(The Hindu, 06 May 2003)


Mumbai: After 26 years of glorious service, INS Chatak, one of the `killer' squadron boats, finally bid adieu to the Indian Navy at an impressive ceremony at the Naval Dockyard here. Vice-Admiral, Arun Prakash, the second commanding officer of the ship from 19 February 1978 to 27 December 1978, was the chief guest yesterday at the ceremony, which was witnessed by flag officers, officers and sailors from ships and submarines of the Western Naval Command.

Commissioned on 09 February 1977 at Calcutta, INS Chatak was acquired from the erstwhile Soviet Union under Project 205 ER. Lt. Cdr. SC Ghildyal (retd.) had the privilege of being the commissioning Commanding Officer of the ship. INS Chatak was also known as one of the 'killer' squadron boats in the naval fraternity for its ability to inflict deadly blows on the enemy.

The ship was aptly christened 'Chatak' after a form of lightning which means 'brilliance'. This compact ship carried a formidable punch, which included four surface-to-surface missile launchers and two rapid-fire anti-aircraft guns. During its 26 years of glorious service, INS Chatak participated in all the major naval exercises. It had the unique honour of serving with the western and eastern fleet. The ship was awarded unit citation by the Chief of Naval Staff in the year 2000.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby JTull » 08 May 2003 21:08

US scare in French Scorpene deal
(Intelligence Online, 07 May 2003)


Frightened by a US decision to export diesel submarines, major players like France, Germany and Sweden are quickly sealing deals, but India is unkeen to finalise the contract for six French Scorpenes costing $2.1 billion, despite the French defence minister, Michele Alliot-Marie's visit last month. The Scorpene deal that includes transfer of technology is pending with the cabinet committee on security and would be finalised in due course, but the French fear US companies would force their products on confirmed buyers, as it has happened with the British Hawk AJT fighting competition from a Czech-American joint product, L-159. France assesses that Pakistan may cancel the Agosta submarine deal under US pressure and is, therefore, desperate to save the Scorpene deal. The first Indian-built Scorpene is expected to be ready in 2010 and the sixth in 2016.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby JTull » 08 May 2003 21:35

Ships in Shape
(Defence India, 05 May 2003)


Amidst the cacophony and the media hype of the Iraq war and SARS, an important recent event went mostly unnoticed. The Indian Navy launched its first stealth frigate, the Type 17 ship Shivalik, at Mazagon Dock, marking one more step in the Navy's successful and steady march towards self-reliance. Indian Navy's road map and the implementation of its ship construction programme is surely an object lesson on how these things should be done. Over the past 50 years, while other indigenisation programmes have either failed or got bogged down, the Navy in partnership with the three defence shipyards has steadily produced a whole range of ships from frigates to missile vessels, from survey ships to landing crafts (tank) and from submarines to seaward defence boats. Had the go-ahead been given ten years ago, the Indian Navy could have had a home-built aircraft carrier in service by now. Both in the presidential reviews of 1989 and 2001, whole lines of Indian-built ships took the pride of place.

The Navy's quest for indigenisation began more than 50 years ago. At that time the Navy had neither the expertise in designing nor any dedicated shipyards to build the ships it wanted. In fact, well into the Sixties the Navy got all its major ships from abroad. For lack of any senior officers the Indian Navy had to have British officers at its head and they made sure that new ships were ordered on British shipyards. It was only after they had departed was a serious effort made to build ships in India. In the Fifties, the Navy began to build its design organisation around a small group of dedicated UK-trained constructor officers. A small start was made by designing and building very small vessels such as small landing craft and seaward defence boats. The inexperience was telling. These small ships were nothing home to write about. They had many defects in engineering and design but valuable lessons were learnt. By the Sixties the Navy was ready to make its first major effort in indigenisation. Today, the Indian Navy has one of the best ship design organisations in the world capable of designing any kind of ship.

The first step was to have some dedicated defence shipyards where expertise in shipbuilding could be accumulated. With this in view the government in 1962 acquired Mazagon Dock in Mumbai and Garden Reach Workshops in Kolkata. These yards belonged to the British India company and were primarily ship repair yards. They had never built major ships, leave alone sophisticated naval ships. Knowing its lack of expertise and experience, the Navy decided to build the first ships with foreign collaboration. It was decided to build the British Leander class frigates in collaboration with the two major UK shipyards, Ms Vickers of Barrow and Ms Yarrow. The agreement was signed in 1964 and the keel of the first ship laid in 1966. Over the next six years, six ships of the class were built at Mazagon Dock. The choice of a frigate as the first major warship to be built in India was also appropriate. These ships of about 2,500 tonnes are neither too big nor too small. They are highly sophisticated and contain the same armament as ships of even larger size. They are ideal ships on which to build a yard’s ship-building skills.

Although the first ship, Nilgiri, was built exactly as its counterparts in the Royal Navy, the Navy was not happy to continue its building programme with the same design. It carried out major design changes for the second Leander, this time taking the help of a Dutch design bureau. The weapons and sensors were changed and major changes were made to the superstructure of the ship. The second ship, Himgiri, was a major departure from the original design. Soon the collaboration with Vickers and Yarrow ended and the Navy was on its own. By the time the fourth ship, Dunagiri, was completed, the Navy was in a position to undertake major design changes. The last two Leanders were a departure from the first four. They were broadened and lengthened, thus enabling them to embark the massive Sea King helicopter on board. The Godavari class, which followed the Leanders, were the first ships to be totally designed and built in India. For the first time a ship of this size was able to embark two Sea King helicopters on board. The ships drew praise from professional quarters when they visited abroad. From now on there was no looking back. The Godavari class was followed by the even more impressive three ships of the Delhi class, the 6,500 tonne all-gas turbine destroyers fitted with surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles. In between, the Navy also designed and built the smaller Type 25 Corvettes, small but powerful ships carrying missiles.

Ship construction was not confined to Mazagon Dock alone. The other defence shipyard, Garden Reach Workshop was also kept busy with designs and orders. The yard built survey vessels, large landing craft and the fleet tanker. They also built the Type 25 Corvettes and the Brahmaputra class frigates, the follow-on of the Godavaris. In 1966, the ministry of defence acquired the erstwhile Portuguese shipyard in Goa and renamed it Goa Shipyard. This small shipyard has also been a success story having built small ships from missile vessels to fast patrol craft. They have also produced a number of offshore patrol vessels for the coast guard. From the very start, side by side with ship construction, the Navy undertook the indigenisation of equipment. At first, this was done by bringing about collaboration between foreign manufacturers and Indian companies. This policy has borne fruit and today, all major equipment of the ships are made in India. The boilers, main engines, electrical switchboards and air-conditioning of the first ships were made in India. Bharat Electronics built the radars and operations room control equipment. Most of the fittings were manufactured within the country. The LM 2500 gas turbine built in collaboration with General Electric of the US, which will go into the Shivalik, is the latest example of this effort. It was built at Hindustan Aeronautics.

The Navy's building programme is in sharp contrast with other defence projects such as the Arjun tank or the LCA aircraft which have been beset with problems. The DRDO's policy of taking on prestigious projects, starting from scratch, have been one reason why these projects have been plagued with cost and time overruns. One of the wisest things done by the Indian Navy was to keep DRDO well out of its building programme. The whole thing was kept within the Navy and its building collaborators, the three defence shipyards. In fact, the only time the DRDO managed to get in the programme was when they decided to develop and provide the surface-to-air missiles for the frigates. The Trishul missile destined for the Brahmaputra frigates was expected to be delivered in 1992. The missile is still carrying out successful trials ashore and the Navy, unable to wait any longer, has had to make alternative arrangements.

The Navy too has also made a few mistakes along the way. In the early Eighties the Navy lost an opportunity to replace the out of date steam turbine machinery with gas turbines. The Indian Navy today is possibly the only Navy in the world going around with ships with steam machinery. Similarly, whereas we have built ships and their machinery in India, we have yet to produce any weapons within the country. As of today, no guns or missiles are produced in India and have still to be procured from abroad. Yet, these shortcomings should not lessen the major achievements of the Indian Navy and the defence shipyards, which have successfully produced a whole fleet of ships for the country. India can be proud of them.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby JTull » 08 May 2003 21:48

Former Indian Navy Vice Chief to advice Lankan Govt
(Defence India, 05 May 2003)


The Sri Lankan Prime Minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, told parliament on Tuesday that Vice Admiral (Rtd) PJ Jacob, former Vice Chief of the Indian Navy, would be advising the Sri Lankan government on issues relating to the ceasefire in the sea. Wikremesinghe said that in recent days, certain issues had arisen in regard to the dis-engagement between the Sri Lankan Navy and the LTTE's naval wing, the "Sea Tigers". The Sri Lanka Monitoring Mission (SLMM) was addressing these issues and the two parties had been asked to respond. It was in this context that the government had obtained the services of Vice Admiral PJ Jacob, former Vice Chief of Naval Staff of the Indian Navy, to advice it on the issues involved, the Prime Minister said.

Adm Jacob, who had commanded the Indian Navy's Western Fleet, was already in Colombo, sources said. In regard to the High Security Zones (HSZ) and de-escalation in the Jaffna peninsula, the Sri Lankan Prime Minister said that the government had obtained relevant expertise from India. The Indian expert, Lt Gen (Rtd) Satish Nambiar, one time Commander of the UN forces in Bosnia, and present Director of the United Services Institute of India, would be bringing his report today, the Prime Minister said. Gen Nambiar would meet him, the President, the Defense Minister, and the Commander of the Sri Lankan Army.

Wickremesinghe said that the army's decision to move out Subhash and Gnanam hotels in Jaffna town would not amount to any dilution of the HSZ, in Palaly, the Jaffna peninsula's only airport, but was limited to arrangements within Jaffna town. Indian Admiral Jacob's entry into the scene assumes importance in the context of the problems in safeguarding the sea frontiers of Sri Lanka, which is an island country. The LTTE's controversial demand for parity between its "Sea Tigers" and the Sri Lankan Navy, and its demand that parts of the sea off the North Eastern coast be designated as a de facto exclusive preserve of the Sea Tigers, have put Sri Lanka's and India's security in jeopardy. Sri Lanka's sovereignty has also been threatened, according to the government and defence experts.

India is extremely concerned about the determined efforts of the LTTE to enhance its military power North East Sri Lanka, both on land and sea. Like Sri Lanka, India too considers the HSZs in the Jaffna peninsula to be vital for the defence of Jaffna town, Palaly (the only airport) and Kankesanthurai (the only fair sized port). North Sri Lanka is only 30 kms away from the Tamil Nadu shoreline. New Delhi is also worried about the possible consolidation and quasi legitimisation of the Sea Tigers, because these will add another naval force in the area, a force that will not be strictly under the ambit of international law.

Sources say that the Indians did some tough talking when the Norwegian Foreign Minister Vidar Helgessen was in the Indian capital last weekend. The sources said that India was also concerned about the Scandenavian-staffed Sri Lanka Monitoring Mission's bid to tout the LTTE's case in the sea through its Initial Discussion Paper and subsequent suggestions on this issue. The SLMM is keen on establishing balance of forces on sea, analogous to the balance of forces on land, for the sake of a durable peace.


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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Gerard » 10 May 2003 17:18


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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Kakkaji » 10 May 2003 19:57

Navy to begin building carrier by year-end
(The Hindu, 10 May 2003)


Kochi: Construction of the much publicised Air Defence Vessel for the Indian Navy, to augment its air power, is expected to begin at the public sector Cochin Shipyard limited (CSL) here by the year end and will be completed in seven years time, Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Madhavendra Singh said today. Talking to media persons here, he said sanction for indigenous building of the Rs 2,000 crore aircraft carrier, had been received from the Centre and facilities for its construction were being made at the CSL.

The Navy would be acquiring 15 new Dornier aircraft and 16 Sea King helicopters soon apart from the new indigenously built Advance Light Helicopters(ALH), he added. The Navy's only aircraft carrier INS Viraat, acquired from the Royal British Navy in 1987, is a half-century-old vessel and would be able to serve the Navy barely for another ten years with proper maintenance said. Asked about the vulnerability of the southern side of the west coast to security threats, Admiral Singh said with various types of nefarious activities including smuggling taking place along the coast, steps being taken to curb such anti-national activities.

Decade of Growth

Admiral Singh also felt that the Indian Navy, which has gone through shifting periods of consolidation and growth over the past more than half a century, was presently undergoing a decade of overall growth. He said the success of the Navy in any operation lay in its capacity to rule both the waves and the sky and for that matter, the naval air power was of utmost importance in the present day set up. He also hoped that the Indian Navy would be able to reach dizzy heights in the next 50 years which would take it to new places in the years to come.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Sridhar » 11 May 2003 18:56

User trials for heavy weight torpedoes by November
(The Hindu, 11 May 2003)


Visakhapatnam: The first-ever indigenously built heavy weight (HW) torpedo will be put to user trials by November with technical trials for it in the offing. On the occasion of celebrating 'National Technology Day' today, Rear Admiral S Mohapatra, Director, Naval Science and Technological Laboratory (NSTL) here, said these torpedoes would be fitted with thermal engines, using specially made fuel oils, replacing the conventional use of large batteries. The trials were proposed from next month.

India is third in the comity of nations to produce thermal engines in torpedoes. This would be saving running costs of the thermal engines by using the specially-made fuel oil, produced at Laitpur by Bhagat Explosives Ltd, which was unlike using the conventional batteries, that needed replacement once in five years. Each battery costs Rs 1 crore. Rear Admiral Mohapatra announced that the entire underwater weaponry needs like torpedoes missiles, mines of the Indian Navy would be met by the NSTL soon.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Sridhar » 11 May 2003 18:58

Navy displays its airpower
(The Hindu, 11 May 2003)


Kochi: Navy's airpower was on display at an air show and fly past organised here today on the occasion of the Golden Jubilee celebrations of naval aviation. Kerala Governor Sikander Bakht, who was the chief guest at the function, also released a 'special postal cover' to commemorate the occasion. The highlight of the show was the manoeuvres by Kiran aircraft and demonstration of the special characteristic of the Sea Harrier aircraft that have been specially flown to Kochi for the purpose. Three 'Sea King' helicopters took off from the runway of the Naval Airport in a formation to position themselves in the air for the fly past.

As the helicopters cleared the runway, two Sea Harriers commanded by Cdr Rohit Gupta closely followed by a three aircraft formation of 'Sagar Kirans' lead by Cdr Surendra Ahuja took to the skies. As the airspace over the runway got cleared, the two Sea Harriers displayed some thrilling manoeuvres, enthralling the gathering which broke into applause. The unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) 'Searcher' recently inducted into the Navy and the Light Advanced Helicopter 'Dhruv' also participated in the exercises. Vice Admiral Madanjit Singh, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Naval Command and P C Baburaj, Post Master General, were among those who addressed the gathering.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby Amitabh » 14 May 2003 22:27

From Maritime Sentinel to Multimission Enabler
(Jane's Navy International, 1 June 2003)


The article is about the US' future maritime reconnaissance programs, but a table on future Lockheed-Martin projects suggests that India is interested in 8 service life extended P-3Bs.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

Postby maz » 16 May 2003 21:13

Future of Indian Navy bright
(The Hindu, 10 May 2003)


KOCHI: The possession of world-class war capabilities such as airborne attack and land attack make the future of the Indian Navy bright, the Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Madhvendra Singh, said in Kochi today. He was inaugurating the Golden Jubilee celebrations of Naval aviation. Admiral Singh said five decades was not a long period in the history of Navy or Naval aviation. "It is still young and many more years of growth are ahead."

Nevertheless, half a century was an important occasion. It is the time to learn about mistakes and also to look ahead into the future. The Naval aviation wing had flown 23 different types of aircraft so far. With the present strength of six air stations, 14 squadrons and 167 aircrafts being flown by 693 pilots and observers, the growth had been remarkable in the last 50 years, he said. "Navy was going places. The Naval aviation will take the Navy places,'' Mr. Singh said. It has been a saga of sacrifice and daring dedication for the Navy which was soaring to new heights with the acquisition of modern aircrafts such as Sea Harriers, UAVs and ALHs, he said.

In his keynote address, Admiral (retd.) R.H. Tahiliani, said the naval aviation took its first steps in Kochi on INS Garuda on 11 May 1953. Institutions were built by the efforts of many, but the first commissioning was a pacesetter. Narrating different cases of courage and commitment, Mr. Tahiliani said the Navy could legitimately be proud of its operations. Several aircrew may have lost their lives in flying accidents, but naval aviation can't be accident-free, he said. Earlier, Vice-Admiral Madanjit Singh, FOC, Southern Naval Command, said India was one of the few countries having a Navy capable of operating aircraft carriers.

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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Re: Indian Navy -- News Folder -- May 2003

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