PRC Political News & Discussions

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Hu tightens grip over Shanghai faction

Postby satya » 05 Feb 2008 21:32

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/JB06Ad01.html

For first time in CCP history , leadership is going in hands of Chinese Youth League ( most ideological driven organization pre Cultural Revolution ) .


At stake is more than the resolution of the longstanding slugfest between the two major CCP cliques - the Shanghai boys under ex-president Jiang Zemin versus the Communist Youth League (CYL) faction under Hu. In Hu's calculus, reining in Shanghai's notorious centrifugalism will go a long way toward establishing the party-and-state headquarters' authority over the nation's "warlords", a reference to recalcitrant regional cadres who refuse to heed Beijing's edicts.

This is despite that many outside the CYL cabal are disturbed by the fact that Hu has planted his underlings in more than half of China's 31 provinces and directly administered cities. Hu, also CCP general secretary and chairman of its Central Military Commission (CMC), has entrusted the job of taming Shanghai to Politburo member Yu Zhengsheng, who took over from "Fifth-Generation" rising star Xi Jinping as party boss of the super-rich city three months ago


Should Hu succeed in taming various factions , Chinese moves at international stage will be devoid of inner party politics and it will have a profound effect on PLA .Most likely Hu will continue as Chairman of CMC after his retirement in next CCP's Congress to ensure PLA doesnt sprung up surprise and play Kingmaker against relatively new CYL faction in politburo .

The Shanghai-based Gang of Four, led by Mao's wife Jiang Qing, managed to not only dominate local politics but also install Shanghai cadres in senior posts in Beijing. The Shanghai faction had their heyday from 1990 to 2002, when former Shanghai party secretary Jiang Zemin was CCP general secretary and president. Jiang was even able to pack the Politburo Standing Committee with Shanghai faction affiliates such as Wu Bangguo, Zeng Qinghong, and Huang Ju - all former party secretaries - on his retirement from the top party post in 2002.

Since Jiang's retirement from the CMC chairmanship in September 2004, however, most Shanghai faction heavyweights have either retired or crossed over to the Hu-Wen camp. It is a mark of Hu's "magnanimity", as well as his cautious observation of the CPP tradition of "not beating up a dog which is already down in the water", that most of the tainted Shanghai faction affiliates - as well as their kinsfolk - will likely escape punishment


It is understood that in return for Hu not going after the cronies and relatives of selected Shanghai faction heavyweights, the latter have agreed to unreservedly profess their loyalty to his new reign.

Some observers believe that Hu does not want to alienate the Shanghai faction too much because he seems to be following in the empire-building footsteps of ex-president Jiang by vastly expanding the clout of the CYL faction. In the run-up to and after the 17th CCP Congress last October, Hu and the CCP Organization Department had appointed Hu's allies to senior slots in cities and provinces including Beijing, Shanghai, Guangdong, Sichuan, Guizhou, Shaanxi and Shanxi.

Moreover, several of the new leaders of strategic regions, such as the party secretaries of Guangdong and Sichuan - Wang Yang and Liu Qibao, respectively - had barely served in their former posts for two years or so. This has given the impression to observers that Hu has put the aggrandizement of his own clique above the efficient deployment of talent


Recentralization of powers is a major reason behind the imminent formation of a number of "super-ministries" in fields including energy, finance, agriculture, transportation and the environment

ramana
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Postby ramana » 05 Feb 2008 22:50

We need an org chart with short bios of the PRC leadership. That would help in understanding what their stance means.
For starters round up pics and bios. THe data can be put together as pdf file for later use.

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Postby ramana » 06 Feb 2008 02:20

x-posted...
Naresh wrote:Mudy Ji :

There have been many discussion in various Forums in respect of the Killings by Mousey Dug and his cohorts of the Communist Party of China Killing Millions upon Millions of Chinese who opposed the Chinese rule in the Fifties - most propabily by Starvation.

Her is some information which I have been able to glean :

CHINA POPULATION INFORMATION AND RESEARCH CENTER : HOME PAGE

TOTAL POPULATION OF 1949 - 1998

You will note from the above Population Page that China’s Population kept increasing from 1949 to 1959 by 130,400,000 i.e. at an average rate of about 13 Million.

However, the Population Decreased from 672,070,000 in 1959 to 658,590,000 in 1961 i.e. a DECREASE of 13,380,000 or shall we say over 13 Million.

The Population should have increased by 27 Million [color=red]thus the real decrease in China’s population between the Years 1959 and 1960 was Forty Million.


This is per the Figures of the Government of the Peoples’ Republic of China’s Census Department :

China Population Development and Research Center
P.O.Box 2444, Beijing 100081
P.R.CHINA
Tel: (86) 10-62173519 Fax: (86) 10-62172101
Email:info@cpirc.org.cn


Being a Chinese Government Organization they will not exaggerate the Decrease but might tone it down.

So we have it from the Chinese Government’s Population Development and Research Centre that the Decrease was Forty Million!

I used to consider the Figure of Thirty Million but some commentators-writers have indeed quoted the Figure of Chinese Population Decrease to Sixty Million - due to forced starvation so as to get the People to Obey their Communist Masters like Mousay Dung and his obedient bunch of Sycophants and Bootlickers!!

Now you have it!!!

Cheers :beer:


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Postby Sanjay M » 20 Feb 2008 17:19


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Postby Mahendra » 20 Feb 2008 17:30

Foreign Cartoons Banned in China


Does it mean the Bakshish seeking Baki Politicos and Faujis are banned too

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Postby bart » 20 Feb 2008 17:46

vaman wrote:
Foreign Cartoons Banned in China


Does it mean the Bakshish seeking Baki Politicos and Faujis are banned too


:rotfl:

Hope that applies to CPIM cadres and Hindu correspondents as well. :mrgreen:

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Postby Sanjay M » 21 Feb 2008 03:32

Activists target

China's 'Genocide' Olympics

Now there's an event where China can take home all the medals

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Postby shyamd » 26 Feb 2008 16:29

With only months to go before the Olympic Games, Beijing seems intent on playing the peace-maker in the region and has assigned its intelligence agencies to work to achieve a diplomatic breakthrough with North Korea.

-------------------
Performing in France since last November, the Beijing Circus is traditionally the object of discreet surveillance by the local authorities. The Chinese intelligence uses the circus to conduct operations.

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Postby vsudhir » 29 Feb 2008 07:49

China may scrap one-child policy, official says

Seems the gender imbalance seems to be hurting after all. Scrapping the 1-child policy shud produce enough girls for the next generation.
But what abt this one?? Perhaps, like our own low income Haryanvis and punjabis have figured out, the solution may be in importing BD brides....

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Postby alokgupt » 29 Feb 2008 08:36

Ever wondered where does LTTE get its weapons:

http://www.dailymirror.lk/DM_BLOG/Secti ... ARTID=7859

Intelligence reports claim that the LTTE had acquired arms from foreign arms dealers in Burma, Indonesia and Eriteria. They further state that the Tigers still have direct deals with arms dealers in those countries.

Last year the military found that the artillery and mortars in the possession of the LTTE, and other weapons used by them had been manufactured by the Chinese state owned arms manufacturer - China North Industries Corporation (NORINCO).

However, when the Sri Lankan government inquired from the NORINCO regarding this matter, it was revealed that this type of arms had been sold to the Eriterian government as a government-to-government deal. A highly placed defence official confirmed that after thorough investigations it was later revealed that several top ranking officers of the Eriterian armed forces had direct links with the Tigers and had re-sold those NORINCO manufactured war items to the LTTE.

In a report prepared by the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee it was alleged that the Eritrean government was providing direct assistance to Sri Lanka’s separatist Tamil Tigers.

The same situation was reported from Burma as a top Burmese General had supplied arms to the Tigers.

Intelligence units claim that these deals are still taking place between the LTTE and these top officials and due to the tough security blanket covering the eastern coast these arms are being brought to Kilinochchi through Tamil Nadu.

Intelligence Agencies believe that the rebels have used the same channels to bring down their latest stock of arms. However no confirmation had been received though the Tigers apparently commenced using this stock early last week.

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Postby Karan Dixit » 01 Mar 2008 08:28

vsudhir wrote:China may scrap one-child policy, official says

Seems the gender imbalance seems to be hurting after all. Scrapping the 1-child policy shud produce enough girls for the next generation.
But what abt this one?? Perhaps, like our own low income Haryanvis and punjabis have figured out, the solution may be in importing BD brides....


There is yet another option, Chinese men can marry Aussie ladies.

I was talking to an Aussie girl the other day. She informed me that girls outnumber boys in Australia.

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Postby Sanjay M » 21 Mar 2008 07:44

I ask again,

Could Tibet Crackdown Sway Upcoming Taiwan Electoral Vote?

China has spent a lot of painstaking effort to advance its fortunes by backing its KMT proxies in the Taiwan elections. Now, the brutal crackdown in Tibet threatens to wreck its carefully made plans.

I hope that this does occur, in addition to China's humiliation at the Olympics, so that the latest atrocities in Tibet aren't all for nothing.

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Postby Sanjay M » 22 Mar 2008 00:05

Who does Uncle privately favour for winning the Taiwan elections? Who is better for Uncle's interests?

It seems that DPP would still be more favourable, in spite of their provocative independence posturing in the past, because their new leader Hsieh is much more moderate and less of a firebrand than his predecessor Chen. Meanwhile, the KMT is increasingly going to the other extreme of becoming a pro-Beijing puppet. This time, I feel that it's KMT which poses a danger destabilizing the region rather than DPP, because KMT is looking to unify ties so much that it could seriously jeopardize Taiwan's autonomy, and cause the island to succumb to absorption sooner rather than later.


Has anyone ever wargamed a civil-war scenario within Taiwan?

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Postby Sanjay M » 22 Mar 2008 12:22


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Postby Sanjay M » 22 Mar 2008 22:46

Taiwan Elects KMT Candidate Ma

Heh, looks like Uncle is being shafted from all sides, since the KMT Nationalists won't buy the weapons systems that Uncle was trying to sell them.

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Postby Karan Dixit » 23 Mar 2008 09:05

China is now at war. Its territory is being claimed not by invading armies but by expanding deserts. Old deserts are advancing and new ones are forming, forcing Beijing to fight on several fronts. And, worse, the growing deserts are gaining momentum, occupying an ever-larger piece of China's territory each year.


http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0813-06.htm

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Postby Sanjay M » 24 Mar 2008 07:08


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Postby Sanjay M » 25 Mar 2008 06:59


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Postby Karan Dixit » 25 Mar 2008 11:50


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Postby Sanjay M » 30 Mar 2008 22:25

A highway that binds China and its neighbors
By Thomas Fuller
Published: March 30, 2008



The network, several sections of which were still unpaved as late as December, is a major milestone for China and its southern neighbors. The low-lying mountains here, the foothills of the Himalayas, served for centuries as a natural defensive boundary between Southeast Asian civilizations and the giant empire to the north. The road rarely follows a straight line as it meanders through terraced rice fields and tea plantations.

Today, those same Southeast Asian civilizations alternatively crave closer integration with that empire and fear its sway as an emerging economic giant. China, in turn, covets the land, markets and natural resources of one of Asia's least developed and most pristine regions.

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Postby Johann » 31 Mar 2008 01:12

Ma Ying-jeou of the KMT is not heavily pushing a reunification strategy.

He is the first KMT figure to make it clear that independence is a choice for the Taiwanese public, and that the KMT would respect such a choice; this is a radical departure.

He also said 2 weeks ago that Taiwan might boycott the Olympics if the Tibetan situation continued to escalate.

It is this balance to the KMT message of normalising tourist/business/travel links with the Mainland that has won over many DPP voters.

Native Taiwanese heavily outnumber descendents of Mainland refugees - unless the KMT keeps their sentiments in mind it can not win elections.

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Postby Sanjay M » 31 Mar 2008 01:23

KMT speaks with forked tongue. They will say whatever they have to, in order to win elections. The comments about Tibet and the Olympics were just PR posturing. Meanwhile, the KMT will resolutely pursue their same agenda by stealthy and indirect means. They know that Taiwanese are concerned about the economy, and they will prey upon that fear in order to promote closer ties with the mainland, using economic relations as a selling point. This is identical to the strategy pursued by Beijing, to entangle Taiwanese in an inextricable web.

I think that ultimately there would be a civil war in Taiwan, as local Taiwanese rise up in desperation against the dominance of mainland-descended KMT supporters.

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Postby Muppalla » 31 Mar 2008 06:20

Brahmaputra jitters from China project

OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

New Delhi, March 30: Hints have emerged from China that it may be gearing for a project on the Brahmaputra that threatens drought in India’s Northeast, environment experts and Indian officials claim.

Delhi, however, has decided to ignore the developments and instead volunteered to pay Beijing for help in avoiding floods in the region, government sources here said.

China, despite official disclaimers, has long been suspected of planning to divert the waters of the Brahmaputra — which originates in southwest Tibet as the Yarlung Zangbo or Tsangpo —to its thirsty northwest.

Experts have warned that such a project could trigger an ecological disaster in India’s Northeast and Bangladesh.

In recent weeks, a flood of technical articles has appeared in China backing the diversion plan, indicating Beijing is setting the stage for the project, Indian officials said. They said the Chinese government had also built an airstrip on the river’s banks close to a potential diversion point where a dam could come up.

Himanshu Thakkar of South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers & People, an NGO, said the Chinese project could divert 200 billion cubic metres of water annually to the Yellow River, leaving Assam dry during the lean season.

However, the Union water resources ministry secretary, Umesh Narayan Panjiar, said: “There are no concrete developments. We are watching.â€

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Postby Arun_S » 03 Apr 2008 02:08

AoA
Living-in GUBO relationship with the LEPER PIG, and Chinese contract the Leper disease.

FOILED ATTEMPT TO BLOW UP PLANE FROM URUMQI
INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM MONITOR--PAPER NO. 385

B.RAMAN

It may be recalled that on March 7,2008, the Chinese authorities had claimed to have foiled an attempt by three Uighurs to blow up a plane of the China Southern Airlines flying from Urumqi, the capital of the Xinjiang province, to Beijing. The persons involved had allegedly managed to smuggle inside the aircraft gasoline concealed inside a can of soft drinks. The plot was foiled by alert security guards on board the plane and two of the perpetrators were arrested. A third was arrested subsequently. Here is the English translation of an interesting account of it in the Chinese language found in a blog site. The identity of the narrator, who has given his name as Ding Bu, is not known:


In Search of Eyewitnesses for CZ6901 Incident
(Southern Weekend) Searching for Eyewitnesses for CZ6901 Incident. By Ding Bu (??). March 11, 2008.
[in translation]
Once again, this was an extremely urgent situation. Late at night on March 10, I received a telephone call assigning me to write the story of the "attempted hijack of China Southern Airlines flight CZ6901 on March 7." "This story must be included in this issue!" said the voice on the telephone. Oh my God! The cutoff would be Wednesday morning. I knew nothing about this incident, and I had only 24 hours left. There were more than 200 passengers on that airplane and they are somewhere out there amongst the hundreds of millions of Chinese citizens. Our goal was to find these eyewitnesses in order to report what happened. This was like searching for the proverbial needle in a haystack.
Recently, I seemed to be involved with the subject of airplane hijacking. I had just worked on one story last week about hijacking.
So I started to think. I know that two fellow alumni are working at two different airports. I can try to contact them first thing tomorrow morning. Another former colleague is now working in a key position at a web portal and he can help me locate eyewitnesses through a blog over there. Another current colleague has a younger fellow alumnus working at China Southern Airilnes and he can inquire too. That night, I sent an SMS to that former colleague and expressed my hope that he would publicize this as a "major incident" for a blog. But at this point in time, I still had not established a blog at that website.
Early morning on March 11, I established a blog that my former colleague highlighted in bold red on the front page of the web portal. The title was . I posted my mobile telephone number there. Meanwhile, my fellow alumni gave me the bad news -- they were not present at the Urumqi, Lanzhou or Beijing airports and therefore they have not seen the so-called from the China Civil Aviation Administration. But I was able to obtain a clue from the Internet -- over at the Shumu Community forum, a netizen with ID "Luckie" had posted from Zhongchuan airport in Lanzhou on March 7 and described his experience during more than ten hours there.
So I asked a fellow alumnus for his Shumu ID and password and I sent an email to Luckie. I prayed that he would agree to be interviewed.
A colleague then sent me an SMS with the name and mobile telephone number of a first-class passenger on CZ6901 that day. The colleague said that the standard procedure at China Southern Airlines is to retain information about passengers for only three days. Therefore, this fellow alumnus friend working at China Southern Airlines would ordinarily not have that information. But this particular passenger had reserved an extra ticket, which explained why his information was retained for a longer time. The heavens were helping me!
I called that number immediately. The voice over there was hesitant: "How did you find my number? It is not appropriate for me to speak. The relevant authorities will disclose the information. It is not appropriate for me to speak ..." I tried emotional and rational appeals for more than ten minutes. This passenger was steel-willed and refused to talk. I hung up the telephone in extreme disappointment.
It was 12:11pm. Half a day had gone by already. Suddenly an unfamiliar telephone number appeared on my mobile telephone. But the person hung up after one ring.
I called back. The other party said: "I was on that airplane. I read your blog."
Oh my God! I had published my blog post at 9:04am. In three hours' time, a targeted person had found me. I was astonished by and grateful for the speed of modern communication methods.
The following is what that person told me:
On March 7, the airplane was scheduled to depart at 10:30am. The airplane was delayed for about 10 minutes. At that time, everybody was already on board, so we must be waiting for the permission to take off. The flight was normal thereafter.
After flying for about an hour, a passenger remarked that there was the smell of gasoline. The attendant also smelled it because it was too strong.
We were flying on a Boeing 757 that day. The plane was not big, and the rest rooms were located between the first-class cabin and the economy cabin. There were more than 200 passengers. The airplane was not full, because there were two vacant rows of seats in the rear.
I was seated towards the back, and I heard a quarrel. An Uyghur woman about 20 years old was on her feet. This Uyghur woman was seated towards the front to my right. She was probably in the fourth or fifth row of the economy-class cabin.
A man went over there. My guess was that he was the security guard. He held the woman down and found a bottle. He removed the bottle and then escorted her to the restroom.
We had no idea what was happening. There was no announcement. During the entire process, there was no chaos. It was very calm. At least I felt very calm. Someone in the rear slept through the whole thing without being aware at all.
At past noon, we began to feel that the airplane was descending. An announcement came that there was an emergency situation and the airplane was going to land at Zhongchuan Airport in the city of Lanzhou. A few minutes after that announcement, the airplane touched ground.
According to the flight schedule, the airplane was due to land in Beijing at 2:05pm. Instead it landed in Zhongchuan airport (Lanzhou city) at 12:46pm.
reported that the China Civil Aviation Administration issued an internal urgent notice that the suspects had intended to ignite inflammable material inside the restroom in order to blow up the airplane. However, the flight crew foiled the plot in time.
There were two suspects. The notice said that the preliminary investigation showed that there were major gaps in airport security in Xinjaing which almost allowed a tragedy to occur.
After the airplane landed, the Uyghur woman was taken away.
Xinjiang Autonomous Rule Region chairman Nur Bekri was attending the two Congresses in Beijing. He said that the unscheduled landing was due to "people attempting to create an air disaster." He said: "Based upon what is known at this point, there was an attempt to create an air disaster. Fortunately, the flight crew took decisive action. They discovered the plot in time and prevented the action. This incident had just happened. We are investigating who these people are, where they came from, what their purpose is and what their backgrounds are."
After the airplane landed, netizen Luckie's post mentioned: "The airport personnel said: We cannot let a single suspect go to Beijing. We must get to the bottom of this in Lanzhou."
The earliest post from Luckie was posted at 6:10pm on March 7. The post appeared at the New Express area of Shumu Community. The post said: "I was flying from Urumqi to Beijing. Halfway there, someone was found to be carrying gasoline and behaving oddly. The airplane was forced to land in Lanzhou. The police took away four Uyghur persons (note: this remains to be confirmed). We went through a new round of inspection at the airport. Many people were interrogated. We have been waiting for six hours already. We don't know when we can leave. Everybody is extremely agitated. What rotten luck!"
Periodically, Luckie would use his notebook computer and wireless card to post from the airport.
When asked "if the airport inspection did not discover it, then how was it uncovered on the airplane?" the explanation from Luckie at 6:20pm was that "the bottle was opened on the airplane and many people smelled gasoline. That traveler took the gasoline into the restroom and remained in there for a long time."
Then at 6:20pm again: "They are registering information about everybody right now. I don't know if I can get back to Beijing today ... the female passenger who carried the gasoline had used perfume to cover up the smell. It must have been intentional."
"I am lucky to have escaped," reflected Luckie.
6:53pm: "It's been six-and-a-half hours. Everybody has been registered. They say that they have to issue new tickets to us. I don't know if we can leave today. More than 200 people are stuck here. They are not even providing decent service."
8:38pm: "it's been eight hours already. They have just distributed rice boxes. This matter has alarmed the public security bureaus of several provinces as well as the National Security Ministry. Supposedly, four cans of gasoline had been found."
8:49pm: "Among the four individuals were foreigners, who are believed to be Eastern Turkestan elements."
9:04pm: "We have been on the ground for eight-and-a-half hours and we are not going anywhere. I guess we won't make it back to Beijing tonight. The airport personnel said: We cannot let a single suspect go to Beijing. We must get to the bottom of this in Lanzhou."
11:22pm: "Eleven hours have gone by. They are still taking down statements from people. Through our strong insistence, they have provided Chinese chess sets and poker cards. I don't know if they intend to keep us here overnight."
11:32pm: "It was obviously a case of sloppy inspection, but we get to suffer the consequences."
As Luckie wrote, the obvious problem was just how several canisters of gasoline got through airport inspection. There was not much technical subtlety with this type of method.
The information showed that since May 1, 2007, the China Civil Aviation Administration has required that all domestic airline passengers may carry not more than 1 liter of non-alcoholic liquid when they travel. The liquid must be inspected before being allowed on board.
On May 7, 2002, a China Northern Airilnes McDonnell 82 airplane was flying from Beijing to Dalian. At 20 kilometers to the east of Dalian airport, that airplane plunged into the sea. The ensuing investigation showed that a passenger brought inflammable liquid onto the airplane. As the airplane got ready to land, the liquid caught fire and the airplane went out of control.
On February 5, 2003, the Civil Aviation Administration issued the . The rules require rigorous inspection of the fluids brought by passengers in order to ensure safety in the skies.
Nevertheless, the new rules of 2007 were still unable to prevent this case from happening.
During the two Congresses, China Civil Aviation Administration chief Li Jiaqiang was interviewed by the media and said the fact that this airplane eventually landed safely with the passengers and crew intact showed that the overall safety measures in air transportation in China are rigorous.
He said: "Over the past years, the safety level of Chinese civilian aviation is amongst the world leaders. We have the ability to guarantee air transportation safety across our vast country."
The information that I obtained later from Beijing airport was that CZ6901 landed there at 6:02am the next morning.
That day, I also contacted a colleague working in Lanzhou media. He explained the entire process by which Zhongchuan airport handled the case and even had some photographs. But he wanted to consider whether the information ought to be disclosed. The Southern Weekend editors also contacted an anti-terrorism expert in China. Other colleagues did their best to locate persons close to the incident. But none of this matters anymore, because on the afternoon of March 11, this story was aborted for reasons that everybody knows about. [Translator's note: This is the standard terminology to describe a ban order from the Central Publicity Department or some other relevant department]
What a pity!
Latest news: Today, China Southern Airlines chairman Liu Chaoyong said that a female passenger came out of the restroom and passed by the flight attendant who detected a suspicious smell. The attendant alertly sensed that the smell was suspicious. Then she smelled the scent of perfume and gasoline in front of the restroom. The attendant immediately searched the restroom and ultimately found an inflammable substance inside the garbage bin of the restroom.
The attendant notified the airplane security guard immediately. Based upon how the female passenger spoke and acted, they realized that the male passenger next to her was a companion. The two individuals were sequestered. The airplane crew then moved the suspicious substance into the special container bin for handling such materials. The airplane made an unscheduled stop at the Lanzhou airport. The two suspects were taken away by the police.
Liu Chaoyong said that the preliminary analysis was that the two individuals intended to stow away the inflammable material and then take action at the appropriate moment. Fortunately, the flight attendant foiled the plot in time.

(The writer is Additional Secretary (retd), Cabinet Secretariat, Govt. of India, New Delhi, and, presently, Director, Institute For Topical Studies, Chennai. The writer is also associated with the Chennai Centre For China Studies. E-mail: seventyone2@gmail.com )

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Recent chinese incursions

Postby G Subramaniam » 04 Apr 2008 08:35

[b]We may have already lost several hundred square kilometre in the past few years,â€

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Vietnamese defenses against China

Postby G Subramaniam » 04 Apr 2008 09:42

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/war/prc-vietnam.htm

The Vietnamese responded to the Chinese campaign by turning the districts along the China border into "iron fortresses" manned by well-equipped and well-trained paramilitary troops. In all, an estimated 600,000 troops were assigned to counter Chinese operations and to stand ready for another Chinese invasion. The precise dimensions of the frontier operations were difficult to determine, but its monetary cost to Vietnam was considerable.
----

How does the Indian defense against China compare ???

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Postby krishnan » 04 Apr 2008 10:09

Send in pranab mukharjee :P

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Chinese DNA analysis

Postby G Subramaniam » 04 Apr 2008 10:31

DNA analysis shows that Han men killed off south chinese men and raped most of the women


http://pmsol3.wordpress.com/2008/01/24/chinese-y-chromosome-testing/

Han Chinese Y Chromosome Test Results
24

01

2008
This is not shocking, I’ve seen many test results that show Northern Chinese tend to group with North East Asians (Japanese and Koreans) and Southern Chinese tend to group more with Southeast Asians. The populations also have distinct (but often overlapping) appearances. Many of my Chinese friends have told me it is due to diet and climate. I do not think so.

The early genetic research (The History and Geography of Human Genes, 1996) of Dr. Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza showed that Northern Chinese could be grouped with other Northeast Asians (Koreans, Tungusic groups, Japanese) and that Southern Chinese grouped more with Southeast Asians, making the Han Chinese aggregate an intermediate population between the two, which matches their location geographic location. This new report gives us some detail as to the way this population cline occurred.

Based on what I know of Chinese history, Southern China was settled by the Han much later than the North and the people in the South were considered “barbarianâ€

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Indian misreading of chinese history

Postby G Subramaniam » 04 Apr 2008 10:40

Historically, pre-1962, Indians have a good opinion of Chinese
The common buddhist heritage and so on

During Tang times, 700AD, relations were exceptionally cordial

The only thing is people never understood that Tang was buffered by Tibet
and Yunnan and south east asia

Every local south east asian culture , Vietnames, Thais etc, has a very violent race memory of the Han


China can best be compared to Rome
Civilized yes but also relentlessly expansionist

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Cult of yellow emperor

Postby G Subramaniam » 04 Apr 2008 20:23

A lot similar to Hitler and the Aryans

http://www.economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10961867

Chinese nationalism
Land of the Yellow Emperor

Apr 3rd 2008 | BEIJING
From The Economist print edition
The dangers of confusing patriotism with ethnic pride

...

Official insensitivity to ethnic minorities is evident in attempts in recent years to foster a cult of the Yellow Emperor, a mythical ancestor of the Han race, who supposedly lived 5,000 years ago. Senior leaders have taken part in ceremonies paying homage to him. Last October officials arranged for groups of ethnic minorities, including Tibetans, to join one such rite at a shrine in Shaanxi province where the Yellow Emperor is said to be buried. After passing through Tibet, where officials fear it could spark more protests, the Olympic torch will be carried to the shrine in July.

Yellow Emperor-worship will enjoy a boost from the introduction this week of a new public holiday known as Qingming, Tomb Sweeping Day. This is a festival at which Chinese traditionally pay their respects to ancestors. Governments in Shaanxi and in Henan province, which claims to be the emperor's birthplace, are competing (and reportedly spending millions of dollars) to make their respective Yellow Emperor shrines pre-eminent. Officials in Henan say they are expecting 20,000 emperor-worshippers this month.

That ethnic minorities have no interest in the Yellow Emperor is occasionally noted by Chinese commentators. But many Chinese officials see the cult as a useful way of promoting patriotism. Just before the Lhasa riots four advisers to China's parliament proposed that presiding over Yellow Emperor ceremonies should become an annual duty for state leaders. This, they said, would help “unite and consolidate forces from all sidesâ€

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Russian encroachment on China

Postby G Subramaniam » 05 Apr 2008 08:55

1860 - Outer Manchuria ( Vladivostok etc )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Manchuria.png

1911 - 1914 ( from fall of Manchu empire to WW1 )
Russia annexed Tuva


1921 - Russia detached Outer Mongolia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:ROC_Administrative_and_Claims.jpg

It is interesting that despite the Russian revolution, WW1, Civil war, WW2
The change from the tsars to lenin to stalin
Russia had a consistent policy to detach these areas from China

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Xinjiang between the soviets and mao

Postby G Subramaniam » 05 Apr 2008 09:02

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_East_Turkistan_Republic

Second East Turkestan Republic
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Second East Turkistan Republic)
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Ili, Tarbagatay and Altay Districts of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of People's Republic of ChinaThe Second East Turkestan Republic, usually known simply as the East Turkistan Republic (ETR), was a short-lived Soviet-backed separatist republic which existed in the 1940s ( November 12, 1944- October 20, 1949 ) in three northern districts ( Ili, Tarbaghatai, Altai ) of Xinjiang province of Republic of China, what is now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China.

Contents [hide]
1 Background
2 Rebellion
3 Negotiations
4 Abolition of the East Turkistan Republic
5 See also
6 Sources



[edit] Background
From 1934 to 1941 Xinjiang was under the influence of the Soviet Union in a way similar to Outer Mongolia. The local warlord Sheng Shicai (盛世æ‰

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Postby Karan Dixit » 05 Apr 2008 10:29

Something is very sinister about this video of Chinese nuclear test.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJbt1-7m ... re=related

Note the dog (or is it a coyote?) at the end.

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Postby Karan Dixit » 05 Apr 2008 11:13

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice criticized the Chinese government Thursday for sentencing human rights activist Hu Jia to jail and said the United States will launch new human rights talks with Beijing.

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiap ... index.html

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Postby Sanjay M » 06 Apr 2008 04:33

Unrest in Xinjiang: China Seeks Musharraf's Good Offices

No, China must be seeking his good orifices, since he has almost no office left.

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The menace of the Han diaspora

Postby G Subramaniam » 06 Apr 2008 07:16

The Han diaspora is showing ummah like characteristics

This has come out into the open in the behavior of the han diaspora during the tibet protest

The 1958 Malay commie insurgency was also led by the hans

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Postby Karan Dixit » 07 Apr 2008 09:13

Guanxi is the Chinese word for connections and having friends in high places. Nothing in China of any significance is done without it. If you want a raise and promotion in a state-owned enterprise, you need it. If you want to build a new upscale housing development that will displace hundreds if not thousands of poor local residents, you need a lot of it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/viewpoint/vp_metz/20080314.html

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Postby shyamd » 10 Apr 2008 04:41

Barely had the new president of Taiwan, Ma Ying-jeou , been elected than the island’s intelligence and security committee closed ranks to prevent détente between Beijing and Taipei and the overhaul of the secret service that such a diplomatic turn could bring.

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Postby satya » 11 Apr 2008 16:47

Tibet Unrest and China’s Power Struggle

TIBET: Dangers of Backlash

Olympic Torch to Everest: Neo Red Guards Prevail

Above three articles by Sh. Bhaskar Roy & Sh. B. Raman provides some good insight on various factions and PLA's role in currten Tibet crisis.

It will be helpful if we can find information about current Chinese Foreign Minister & Chinese interculator handling border negotiations with India. Are they related directly to PLA or served in it anytime b4?

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Postby satya » 13 Apr 2008 20:15

China's new intelligentsia

The Chinese like to argue about whether it is the intellectuals that influence decision-makers, or whether groups of decision-makers use pet intellectuals as informal mouthpieces to advance their own views. Either way, these debates have become part of the political process, and are used to put ideas in play and expand the options available to Chinese decision-makers. Intellectuals are, for example, regularly asked to brief the politburo in "study sessions"; they prepare reports that feed into the party's five-year plans; and they advise on the government's white papers.

The new right was at the heart of China's economic reforms in the 1980s and 1990s. Zhang Weiying has a favourite allegory to explain these reforms. He tells a story about a village that relied on horses to conduct its chores. Over time, the village elders realised that the neighbouring village, which relied on zebras, was doing better. So after years of hailing the virtues of the horse, they decided to embrace the zebra. The only obstacle was converting the villagers who had been brainwashed over decades into worshipping the horse. The elders developed an ingenious plan. Every night, while the villagers slept, they painted black stripes on the white horses. When the villagers awoke the leaders reassured them that the animals were not really zebras, just the same old horses adorned with a few harmless stripes. After a long interval the village leaders began to replace the painted horses with real zebras. These prodigious animals transformed the village's fortunes, increasing productivity and creating wealth all around. Only many years later—long after all the horses had been replaced with zebras and the village had benefited from many years of prosperity—did the elders summon the citizenry to proclaim that their community was a village of zebras, and that zebras were good and horses bad.


The balance of power in Beijing is subtly shifting towards the left. At the end of 2005, Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao published the "11th five-year plan," their blueprint for a "harmonious society." For the first time since the reform era began in 1978, economic growth was not described as the overriding goal for the Chinese state. They talked instead about introducing a welfare state with promises of a 20 per cent year-on-year increase in the funds available for pensions, unemployment benefit, health insurance and maternity leave. For rural China, they promised an end to arbitrary taxes and improved health and education. They also pledged to reduce energy consumption by 20 per cent.


In February 2007, Hu Jintao proudly announced the creation of a new special economic zone complete with the usual combination of export subsidies, tax breaks and investments in roads, railways and shipping. However, this special economic zone was in the heart of Africa—in the copper-mining belt of Zambia. China is transplanting its growth model into the African continent by building a series of industrial hubs linked by rail, road and shipping lanes to the rest of the world. Zambia will be home to China's "metals hub," providing the People's Republic with copper, cobalt, diamonds, tin and uranium. The second zone will be in Mauritius, providing China with a "trading hub" that will give 40 Chinese businesses preferential access to the 20-member state common market of east and southern Africa stretching from Libya to Zimbabwe, as well as access to the Indian ocean and south Asian markets. The third zone—a "shipping hub"—will probably be in the Tanzanian capital, Dar es Salaam. Nigeria, Liberia and the Cape Verde islands are competing for two other slots. In the same way that eastern Europe was changed by a competition to join the EU, we could see Africa transformed by the competition to attract Chinese investment


Yu Keping is like the Zhang Weiying of political reform. He is a rising star and an informal adviser to President Hu Jintao. He runs an institute that is part university, part think tank, part management consultancy for government reform. When he talks about the country's political future, he often draws a direct analogy with the economic realm. When I last met him in Beijing, he told me that overnight political reform would be as damaging to China as economic "shock therapy." Instead, he has promoted the idea of democracy gradually working its way up from successful grassroots experiments. He hopes that by promoting democracy first within the Communist party, it will then spread to the rest of society. Just as the coastal regions were allowed to "get rich first," Yu Keping thinks that party members should "get democracy first" by having internal party elections.

The west still has multi-party elections as a central part of the political process, but has supplemented them with new types of deliberation. China, according to the new political thinkers, will do things the other way around: using elections in the margins but making public consultations, expert meetings and surveys a central part of decision-making. This idea was described pithily by Fang Ning, a political scientist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He compared democracy in the west to a fixed-menu restaurant where customers can select the identity of their chef, but have no say in what dishes he chooses to cook for them. Chinese democracy, on the other hand, always involves the same chef—the Communist party—but the policy dishes which are served up can be chosen "à la carte."


And in this era of globalisation and universal norms, the most striking thing about Chinese strategists is their unashamed focus on "national" power. The idea of recapturing sovereignty from global economic forces, companies and even individuals is central to the Chinese worldview.


Like many Chinese scholars, Yan Xuetong has been studying ancient thought. "Recently I read all these books by ancient Chinese scholars and discovered that these guys are smart—their ideas are much more relevant than most modern international relations theory," he said. The thing that interested him the most was the distinction that ancient Chinese scholars made between two kinds of order: the "Wang" (which literally means "king") and the "Ba" ("overlord"). The "Wang" system was centred on a dominant superpower, but its primacy was based on benign government rather than coercion or territorial expansion. The "Ba" system, on the other hand, was a classic hegemonic system, where the most powerful nation imposed order on its periphery. Yan explains how in ancient times the Chinese operated both systems: "Within Chinese Asia we had a 'Wang' system. Outside, when dealing with 'barbarians,' we had a hegemonic system. That is just like the US today, which adopts a 'Wang' system inside the western club, where it doesn't use military force or employ double standards. On a global scale, however, the US is hegemonic, using military power and employing double standards." According to Yan Xuetong, China will have two options as it becomes more powerful. "It could become part of the western 'Wang' system. But this will mean changing its political system to become a democracy. The other option is for China to build its own system."


For the next few years, China will be decidedly bourgeois. It has decided—with some reservations—to join the global economy and its institutions. Its goal is to strengthen them in order to pin down the US and secure a peaceful environment for China's development. But in the long term, some Chinese hope to build a global order in China's image. The idea is to avoid confrontation while changing the facts on the ground. Just as they are doing in domestic policy, they hope to build pockets of an alternative reality—as in Africa—where it is Chinese values and norms that increasingly determine the course of events rather than western ones.


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