Indian Railways Thread

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby ashish raval » 17 Jul 2009 14:05

^^ I agree that Congress is trying to abuse people power to strengthen its own base. It is really sad state of affairs. BTW, I agree that if they modernise stations in WB now they will concentrate on other states at a later date which I believe is atleast better than "never" option.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby ashish raval » 17 Jul 2009 14:17

Rahul M wrote:ashish, don't want to get into this again but remember that the large SER also caters to this region, so take it into account while comparing data for WR and ER.

rayc sir, you have (again) edited ashish' post instead of quoting it ! :lol:


Ok combined revenue of ER and SER becomes slightly higher than WR, However SER covers 3 states. I dont disagree on that front but it still does not mean that a state should have highest proportion of development wrt rest of India.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Rahul M » 17 Jul 2009 18:30

does not mean that a state should have highest proportion of development wrt rest of India.

no disagreements on that point ! :wink:

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Abhi_G » 17 Jul 2009 19:41

ashish raval wrote:Ok combined revenue of ER and SER becomes slightly higher than WR, However SER covers 3 states. I dont disagree on that front but it still does not mean that a state should have highest proportion of development wrt rest of India.


Relax my friend! We have to see that whether whatever is promised is ACTUALLY implemented on the ground! Mantris make noises and then they drag their feet on implementation. But as an aside, without going into comparisons between states, please look at the history of the South Eastern Railway. The proximity of mineral rich areas in Bihar and MP and the early development of steel plants (TATA, IISCO etc.) led to the need of development of a huge railway network in this region. That is just the industrial angle. I am sure there are other factors that come into play. The past industrial activity has faded away since 1970s in comparison to western states, thanks to you know who! But looking at the past history, amount of "current" traffic, Kolkata being an important port on the east and an important point of entry to the Himalayan and the north eastern region (although railways do not exist there much), the three stations need immediate upgradation. We have lost geography to a "friendly" and "peaceful" neighbourhood and the influx of population into WB has to be looked into to understand the demand and supply relationship between the population density and resources. Just look at the strategic imperatives here along with the usual "politics". :)

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby ashish raval » 17 Jul 2009 20:43

^^ I can look into stratetic gains only if they will actually make any gains. India's foreign policy seems to be non-existant.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Sathish_A » 23 Jul 2009 18:09

WARNING - Not for weak hearted !!! Graphic Content

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=fc0_1243424473

Halting a train with brakes to save a life in short distance span, might be not a good idea. But switching of power supply for 5 minutes???

Worse, I can see an $..kin police constable jumping out of the coach to save his skin, when someone started yelling "Aag lag rahi hai"

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby RayC » 23 Jul 2009 19:35

Rahul M wrote:ashish, don't want to get into this again but remember that the large SER also caters to this region, so take it into account while comparing data for WR and ER.

rayc sir, you have (again) edited ashish' post instead of quoting it ! :lol:



Silly me!

Which one?

You computer savvu Mods keep changing the format and you still don't know how to make it user friendly! ;) :)

Apologies Ashish!

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby viveks » 24 Jul 2009 11:27

SSridhar wrote:Train in Kashmir

Image


I like this photo. Somebody who travelled the whole lot in Kashmir plz take some more photos. I think it shall be very picturesque to see them.

Cant wait to get the stuff and travel in that.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby SSridhar » 25 Jul 2009 10:00

Chennai Metro Rail to invite bids for EMU cars
Each four-car train set will have two motor coaches and two trailer coaches with flexibility to convert to a 6-car rake. The flexibility to form a train set by a combination of six coaches with the addition of one motor car and one trailer car in future, must be ensured.

The rolling stock will be of stainless steel and aluminium, air-conditioned, light weight, with three-phase AC drive having variable voltage variable frequency (VVVF) control and regenerative braking.

The cars are for underground, elevated and at grade alignments and shall operate on 25 kV through an overhead catenary (cable) system.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Verma » 25 Jul 2009 12:08

Indian Rail's just a snail


Thank God there's Rabindranath Tagore [ Images ], so Mamata Banerjee [ Images ] could quote him to spice up her 2009-10 railway budget speech. And thank God there's China, so we can compare notes and check out how good her fare really is. And what we find is that it is old fast-food cooked anew, instantly palatable but a potential killer.

In a growing economy, can we afford to ride a snail? We need a railway system that's fast, dynamic, and expanding. We don't have one and won't have it till the time non-stop trains continue to be the best we can think of. Will they run fast? Faster than India's current fastest, the Rajdhani and the Shatabdi expresses, whose average speed is no more than 80 km per hour? If they don't run fast, they won't make much of a difference. In a country where any train that runs at 55 km per hour or more is called super-fast, we'll only have a few more. In plainer language, only a few more gimmicks.

How fast are our goods trains? No more than 19 km to 30 km per hour in different part of the country. In eight years from now, when some 3,000 km of dedicated freight corridors ( forming only a tiny segment of our total network) are expected to be in service, a few of them could - just could - be running at 100 km an hour. Some benchmark indeed for 2020 India!

Look at China. After six reviews and continuous upgrading, the average speed on the Chinese railways has shot up to 200 km per hour from 55 km per hour in 1997. There will be 35 high-speed routes by 2012, with trains running at between 200 km and 350 km per hour.

At least 50,000 km of dedicated high-speed passenger railways will be on the ground by 2020. Thus, existing tracks will be freed up for cargo trains, whose average speed is already 120 km per hour.

The difference between the two countries is even more glaring when it comes to new construction. Mamata Banerjee's budget provides for only 250 km of new lines in the current fiscal year. The provisions for the previous two years were for 350 km and 155 km of new lines, respectively.

Is that enough for a country whose economy is expected to grow by 8-9 per cent a year and which wants a fair geographical distribution of growth? We've gone through almost two decades of economic reforms, but our route length has grown from 62,367 km in 1990 to only about 63,350 km now. Do you call that progress? Can we go on flogging a limited network without sacrificing speed and efficiency and adding to congestion?

More than 75 per cent of India's railway goods-traffic moves on about 20,000 km of fully saturated, over-utilised, and low-capacity lines. One day, it will simply choke.

In China, on the other hand, over 2,500 km of new lines were built in 2008 and another 3,450 km will be built in 2009. The new goal is to add 6,000 km of new tracks every year till 2020. China's network currently stands at 80,750 km, making it the third-largest in the world after the US and Russia [ Images ]. By 2020, it will have hit 120,000 km, of which 50 per cent will be double-tracked and 60 per cent electrified. What will India have by then?

Network expansion has naturally meant more business for the Chinese railways. They have three times the number of wagons India has - 600,000 against 200,000 - and moved 3.3 billion tonnes of cargo last year, against India's 833 million tonnes. What is India's target for 2009-10? No more than 882 million tonnes. For a vast and growing economy like India's, it's nothing but a joke.

The other difference is that the Chinese know the value of time. We don't. Beijing's [ Images ] 126-acre West station, commissioned in 1996 and said to be the largest in Asia, was built in three years.

Work on the 1,318-km. Beijing-to-Shanghai high-speed railway, a brand new line meant to cut travel time between the two cities from 14 hours to five - mark that - began in April 2008 and is to be completed by 2013. What's our schedule, say, for making 50 of our stations 'world class'? We don't know. The budget doesn't say anything on that. The budget debate has revealed that many past promises have remained unfulfilled so far.

So, you may draw your own conclusions. Mamata says it's a continuous process, whatever that means. And, as the previous railway minister, Lalu Prasad, admits, not all promises are meant to be implemented.

Thus, while China goes on to cover the entire country with high-speed trains to bolster its economic growth, we are happy to tinker with whatever we have, much like a child playing with his toy-train set, adjusting it here and there and deriving pleasure from it. It's a game we play, rolling out new promises to hide old failures, with no sync with the real economy.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby SSridhar » 26 Jul 2009 18:05

viveks wrote:Somebody who travelled the whole lot in Kashmir plz take some more photos. I think it shall be very picturesque to see them.


Here is a video on the train service in Kashmir

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby viveks » 27 Jul 2009 13:44

That video was not I was after.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Katare » 27 Jul 2009 22:52

Look at China. After six reviews and continuous upgrading, the average speed on the Chinese railways has shot up to 200 km per hour from 55 km per hour in 1997.


No way, no how!

200Km average speed for entire chinese railway or any railway would be impossible.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby SBajwa » 29 Jul 2009 18:59

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/200907 ... /main1.htm
Engineering Marvel on Track

A train trip can be a fascinating experience for people of all ages. Imagine a journey between, around and through mountain curves and long, winding tunnels, over high bridges and dangerous khuds, over and along rivers, through thick forests, green fields and rich meadows. Every rolling vista is more beautiful than the previous one.

For aficionados of such journeys, where every bend in the track offers unheard of surprises, the Jammu-Udhampur rail journey provides panoramic views.

The track for this awesome journey took 21 years to build as engineers had to conquer one challenge after another. It has many engineering feats, including the region’s highest rail bridge — Gambhir bridge. Apart from the 2-km-long bridge, it also has a nearly 2.50-km tunnel, which is even longer than the historic Jawahar Tunnel.

The Jammu-Udhampur track is the part of the 340-km-long Jammu-Udhampur-Srinagar-Baramula rail project.

The project has a long and chequered history. It was conceived over 110 years ago. In 1898, the Maharaja of Jammu and Kashmir, Partap Singh, visualised linking Jammu and Srinagar via a train line.

But the very idea of a train running through a seismic zone did not find any takers a century ago as the route crossed major earthquake zones, and inhospitable terrain.

British designers suggested many routes, including a railway track along the historical Mughal road.

During the Raj days the Railways had been only able to run a train up to Udhampur from Jammu and between Baramulla and Srinagar.

There was also a proposal that the train on this route can be run on electricity through various hydropower projects that had been conceptualised enroute. After several years of planning, the project had to be abandoned, mainly because of the treacherous nature of the route and its huge cost.

The project remained forgotten even after Independence for a long time till about mid 1980s when the authorities once again thought of it and the work on it started.

The 54-km-long Jammu-Udhampur line was inaugurated three years ago. It took 21 years and Rs 515 crore ($130 million) for its construction. The line has 20 major tunnels and 158 bridges.

The train starts from Jammu and winds through the city presenting a spellbinding view of the historic Bahu Fort and Mubarak Mandi. One of the first tunnels is right under the Bahu Fort, around which the Jammu city developed.

The tunnel that was built right under it, without damaging the old fort, has been dubbed as an engineering marvel.

The train then climbs up to provide a panoramic spectacle of the Tawi river and the valley.

Chief Administrative Officer, Northern Railways, S R Ujlayan and Deputy Chief Engineer Vinay Tanwer, who worked on this tough and challenging project, have published their experiences in a book on International Conference on Tunneling Experiences.

"The rail project was one of the most challenging we ever undertook. Some portion of the tracks had to pass through the undulating and highly difficult terrain of the young Himalayas. The engineers tried all modern methods but eventually the traditional system of drilling proved effective," they add.

The officers reveal that the ground moved many a times and rocks, stones and other debris became loose. The area is earthquake-prone because of which the material used to construct tracks had to be very powerful and strong. The design and alignment of the rail track, too, changed many a times to prevent collapsing of the tunnels and the bridges.

Interestingly, the rail track has been laid in a gentle ascent. The ascent is so less (in mm) that it looks almost flat and the train runs at quite a high speed as if it is running in plains. Although if one sees the Jammu-Udhampur road that zigzags through the mountains, one can see how difficult it was to lay a track that had so few curves.

"There was immense seepage on the route due to nullahs flowing above the tunnels, which had almost jeopardised the entire project. The engineers had to build stronger and thicker concrete structures to prevent it. Their width went up to 25 metres on each side of the tunnel and also above it. Besides that structures were laid on the hilltops so as to regulate the flow of water," the officers add.

But this hard work has been worth the effort, claim the travellers, who have undertaken this enchanting journey.

"The experience of travelling in a train on this track was spellbinding," says Mohan Patel. He was travelling with his wife and three children.

"Last year, I had come to Vaishno devi shrine when someone told me about the enthralling train journey. So I travelled on the train myself to check the authenticity of this statement. The journey was indeed beautiful. So this year, I brought my children along. The return journey from Udhampur is even more enchanting. We would be travelling in the special aerodynamic DMU train, which makes the journey more enriching."

The train ride may be fun for tourists but for the residents of villages situated along the track, it has come as a great blessing. Vishal Bhat, who belongs to Bajalta, the first station after Jammu, can now commute to his village daily. Situated less than 20 km away, the Bajalta residents can now reach Jammu in 15 minutes. Earlier they had to take a long road route that took over one and half hours to reach Jammu.

Vishal commutes daily now instead of going home on weekends. There are hundreds others from Udhampur who commute daily now. Earlier they had to spend more money and time to reach their offices in Jammu. The DMU travel just costs Rs 9 one side while the general ticket in the Express train costs Rs 32.

Bajalta, Singar, Manwal and Ramnagar are thinly inhabited villagea along this rail track. Each has its own unique railway station. Some offer a view of the Himalayas, others of the deep valleys or sprawling meadows.

Rural art is evident in the houses along the track, as the train chugs leaving behind clusters of mostly kutcha and a few concrete houses. One can see the mud walls painted in bright colours and etched with lovely drawings.

For traders at Udhampur, the train has come as a lifeline. It provides easy transportation of fuel, vegetables and other goods which otherwise took long time via the road route.

Ramanand Bahria, a trader of Udhampur, says the train line has revolutionised their life and work, " We now dash to Delhi directly from Udhampur and Delhi businessman too, reach here easily in a short time and with less hassles. Earlier, they had to get down at Jammu and then travel by road."

Suresh, an MBBS student from Udhampur, is one of the hundreds of students who travel daily to Jammu from Udhampur and the villages enroute to pursue his education dream. Earlier many of them just could not dream of higher education due to the high cost and time involved.

Udhampur being the base of Northern Command, one sees hundreds of soldiers and officers commuting to and fro. Even the movement of a regiment has become easier as special army train can now take it to its new deployment place anywhere in the country.

The train may have made the life of people easier but for hundreds of security personnel, guarding the 20 tunnels over 150 bridges, is a tough task. These guards live in makeshift tents, their only entertainment being the sight of the passing train, whose safe passage is the aim of their deployment there.

For travellers journeying on this route there is some good news in the offing as the Railways is in the process of providing more facilities to them. Divisional Traffic Manager Railways Ashok Sharma says, as the route is quite popular among tourists the track has been extended to Katra. Due to flooding of a tunnel the operation has been delayed. Once it is cleared, train tourism would get a new fillip in the region," he adds.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby rachel » 30 Jul 2009 20:11

While not denying that Indian Railways needs plenty of improvement, I will point out that China is known for hyperbole and exaggeration, and as a dictatorship and not a free country, there is no way to confirm their tall claims.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Verma » 30 Jul 2009 20:51

rachel wrote:While not denying that Indian Railways needs plenty of improvement, I will point out that China is known for hyperbole and exaggeration, and as a dictatorship and not a free country, there is no way to confirm their tall claims.

When MMS visted Beijing-Tianjin 350km/h high speed railway in Jan 2009, the IR have been keeping in touch with China Ministry of Railway, hoping to introduce chinese devices and talents of HighSpeedRailway. United States also contacted China for technology of HSR.
There are some HSR stations under construction in China, Changsha and Hohot are 3-tier small citis.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=218503&page=74
Be careful of the ballastless track system, that's means trains will be running on it at 350km/h.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby putnanja » 04 Aug 2009 05:37

CAG confirms, Rlys took you for a ‘ride’ to fund DFC

...
In its latest report, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India has pointed out that the Railway Ministry, despite discontinuing the levy of the safety surcharge from April 1, 2007, collected the same amount in the form of a “development charge” to fund the Dedicated Freight Corridor (DFC). The Indian Express had first reported on the move in 2007.

While discontinuing the surcharge would have cut passenger fares by Re 1 to Rs 100 in different classes, Railway, by including it as development charge, ensured that passengers paid the same surcharge under a different name.
...

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Drevin » 12 Aug 2009 10:06

Recently returned from a vacation in North India. The catering service on the train was exemplary. They are very punctual and the food is nicely packed in aluminium foil and is steaming hot. You also get a choice of food combos. For chai/coffee they serve almost 8-9 times a day. Soup, snacks packed biskoot, all do the rounds. Superb. I really was impressed.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Sachin » 12 Aug 2009 12:10

Drevin wrote: Soup, snacks packed biskoot, all do the rounds. Superb. I really was impressed.

In many trains the catering is now out-sourced to some agency. For more revenues/profit these contractors have increased the options in the menu, and try to provide more quality food. I have noticed that the vendors selling the stuff constantly moving back and forth the train to get the maximum sales done. But at the end if all this makes the customer happy, why worry :D.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Rahul M » 17 Aug 2009 08:23

snaps of konkan railways, came by email.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby sanjaychoudhry » 17 Aug 2009 11:02

The waterfall shown above is Dudhsagar ("sea of milk") in Goa. It is on an old rly line laid down by the Portuguese that connects to Indian rly network at Londa in Karnataka. It is not konkan railway.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby RayC » 17 Aug 2009 13:53

As I see it Bengal has tremendous potential for tourist traffic.

It is just that Mamata Bannerjee and the Communist govt are freakish and brain denied.

There are the mountains, plains, terracotta temples and the sea and wild life in North Bengal and the Sunderbans. and Tea mtourism!

All it requires is a non Bengali to work it out and reap the harvest!!

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby ashish raval » 17 Aug 2009 15:10

^^ I know this Ray since I have visited Darjeeling. The North Bengal area is a tourist goldmine. Sundarbans is also very nice but I guess things have to be worked out in a way that Bengal can get a sustainable tourism like switzerland or else the beauty will be lost.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby SSridhar » 23 Aug 2009 10:43

Image

Derailment near Malkajgiri.

Near the other track, one can see an earlier derailed wagon still lying.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby RayC » 23 Aug 2009 13:09

If derailment is the problem on this stretch, what is the reason for it and how can it be rectified?

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Rahul M » 23 Aug 2009 16:44

An extension of the kolkata metro was inaugurated yesterday.

http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news ... ey/505832/
Kolkatans cheer new route train on its maiden journey
In the 5.887-km route of the 8.657-km extension, the train passes through four stations, including Netaji (Kudghat), Masterda Surya Sen (Bansdroni) and Geetanjali (Naktala).

The extension project was sanctioned in 1999-2000 during Mamata Banerjee’s earlier tenure as the Railway Minister. At a cost of Rs 1,032 crore, the major part of the railway track in this section has been constructed on an elevated structure, adding six new stations and bringing South 24-Parganas closer to Kolkata’s main centre.

Metro authorities said to run the new service, 13 new air-conditioned rakes from Integral Coach Factory, Perambur, were needed of which two are expected to be acquired by March 2010, with the rest coming by September next year.

The fare for the new stretch is relatively modest. Up to five km it is Rs 4, from five km to 10 km it is Rs 6, from 10 km to 15 km it is Rs 8, from 15 km to 20 km it is Rs 10 and for more than 20 km, the fare is Rs 12.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/arti ... 832057.cms
New gauge may cripple Metro convergence


http://www.dnaindia.com/money/report_te ... es_1278035
Texmaco plans greenfield plant for metro coaches

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Singha » 23 Aug 2009 18:54

dudh sagar comes in the bangalore-vasco_da_gama route. they use 2-3 diesel engines in the hilly section.

about the old derailed goods wagon, they dont usually bother to recover one or two...there are lots in NFR lying and rusting.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby harbans » 23 Aug 2009 19:28

If derailment is the problem on this stretch, what is the reason for it and how can it be rectified?

I think they'll have to put a bump underneath the rail rack so trains slow down at the curve. With a marking a few meters before the bump. :P

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Katare » 23 Aug 2009 22:32

I always dreaded those lines at reservation counters, finally it seems people have an alternative to standing on those lines for getting their ticket.

Every third rail ticket now reserved online

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby nelson » 23 Aug 2009 23:28

^^^ Commendable indeed.

Two aspects of rail reservation if facilitated online will help get that score even higher.
1. All armed forces personnel and families traveling on railway warrants and concession vouchers must be able to exchange their warrants/vouchers online. this will lead to a quantum jump in online rail reservation and also benefit service personnel immensely.
2. Concession given to disabled must also be made available online (just like sr citizens). it does not make sense to give some concession and make people toil (by commuting and standing in queue) to avail the same.

anyway, Kudos for what has been achieved.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby vasu_ray » 23 Aug 2009 23:32

this might have been discussed already, why isn't railways getting double decker coaches for both day trains and long distance trains?

Here is an image, http://railroadpictures.net/Trains/Calt ... 7.jpg.html

Imagine 24 coaches ...

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby rahulm » 24 Aug 2009 06:05

Double decker carriages were used in India since at least circa 1863 http://www.irfca.org/gallery/Heritage/mys-museum/mys_musuem/8_jpg.jpg.html and http://www.irfca.org/gallery/Heritage/museum-hwh/ERMuseum/21.jpg.html

The Flying Rani (Surat - Mumbai) and Singhagad express - some coaches (Pune - Mumbai) both in WR were double decker services. Of these, I think only the Rani still has some double decker services.

Apparently, the double decker format was not liked much by the patrons and were scrapped which if true is self defeating for the patrons. Dwell time at stations is higher but should be offset by the increased passenger volume.

Double decker sub urban and intercity services are common and accepted in many parts of the world (Sydney, Paris, Holland, Sweden). However, I have not seen these services in Japan which is probably closest in passenger throughput and crush density to Mumbai.

The London tube does very well with non double decker formats, perhaps, they are hindered by the tube design which is more than 100 years old.

Considering that the Sydney Tangara double decker coach only seats fractionally more than a single decker train ( increased rake cost) the issue appears complex. For sub urban services where short journey times rule, it makes better sense to have singer decker trains with more standing than sitting space (Tokyo, London, Delhi, KolKotta, Hong Kong, Singapore). The Flying Ranee Dounble decker rake was cruel on people over 6 feet high.

It may make sense to have Double decker services for intercity trains with journey times of 8-10 hours (Shatabdi's and day express trains).

Some encouraging noises here http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/NEWS/India/Railways-may-start-double-decker-AC-trains/articleshow/1427325.cms but this will probably happen at typical babu speed (not as lucrative as opening new lines in party constituencies).
--
A WR Fyling Ranee http://www.irfca.org/gallery/Carriages/100_1471.jpg.html

A CR Double decker Sinhagad Express http://www.vimeo.com/1993225. The train now has only single deck cars.

A Sydney intercity double decker V sets http://martin-bennet.fotopic.net/p59819390.html and http://martin-bennet.fotopic.net/p59819344.html. An older sub urban L set http://martin-bennet.fotopic.net/p59819492.html, Tangara sub urban double decker http://www.flickr.com/photos/hurstville1/3845145920/, Millenium sub urban double decker http://www.flickr.com/photos/sydney_gunzel/3845258780/ and http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/3dfc81/

Stockholm double decker http://www.traveljournals.net/pictures/198578.html and http://www.panoramio.com/photo/4285651

Paris metro double decker http://www.flickr.com/photos/etiennemille/2748141908/

Dutch double decker http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:V-IRM-station-amsterdam-centraal.jpg
Last edited by rahulm on 24 Aug 2009 07:19, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby vasu_ray » 24 Aug 2009 06:49

I think the flying Rani has seating that has the patrons position their legs in a tray above people's heads seated beneath, nobody would like that, Two separate floors are better with stairs at both ends of a coach

agreed for short journey times, single deck's are better, Double Decker suburban trains on overhead rails increase the height of their center of gravity and hence not a good design, I think the trade off is between frequency of the trains vs. seating capacity

if we think that intra state travel is higher than inter-state travel, hourly trains in routes that have 8-10 hour journey time are better and they can have fewer double decker coaches

cal-train in USA with its double decker coaches increases the seating capacity by 3/4ths

for long distance trains, from the typical 6+2 berth system change to 4+2;4+2 with double decker coaches which is better when we account for the RAC headache

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby rahulm » 24 Aug 2009 07:26

I had not thought of the feet over peoples heads issue with would be unique to India and would require a desi solution.

Perhaps, an edict by His Holiness the Shankaracharya that its OK to have people place their feet above you in a double decker train would be a cost effective solution :mrgreen:

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Gagan » 24 Aug 2009 07:37

Oh c'mon there are double decker coaches in IR, specifically the Black Diamond express (Howrah to Dhanbad) has several such seating coaches.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby rahulm » 24 Aug 2009 07:50

I think the debate is about their wide spread use. Currently, their use is insignificant.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Rahul M » 24 Aug 2009 08:28

has anyone travelled on these things, either in India or abroad ?

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby vasu_ray » 24 Aug 2009 08:41

well, I used to travel on Caltrain and the Double Decker coaches are sufficiently roomy

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Prasad » 24 Aug 2009 08:43

Rahul M wrote:has anyone travelled on these things, either in India or abroad ?


I have. On the Flying Rani. Was a nice ride to Surat from Bombay. We could have such trains for the <5-6hours train journeys. Would help carry more people, especially on crowded routes like madras-madurai which has nearly 5-6 trains and all of them run full capacity nearly througout the year.

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Re: Indian Railways Thread

Postby Sachin » 24 Aug 2009 14:58

Rahul M wrote:has anyone travelled on these things, either in India or abroad ?

In India, No. I have travelled in Double decker coaches when posted to Netherlands, and also in Germany. The coaches were made by a company Bombardier, and I felt it was quite comfortable and well designed. There are stairs on both end of the coaches. The people sitting on the ground floor, have to take two-three steps down to enter the lower deck. All most 95% of the trains I saw in Netherlands had this double decker coaches.


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