F-16, F-18, Grip, MiG-35 and Rafale Technical Resource Only

All threads that are locked or marked for deletion will be moved to this forum. The topics will be cleared from this archive on the 1st and 16th of each month.
NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

F-16, F-18, Grip, MiG-35 and Rafale Technical Resource Only

Postby NRao » 30 May 2007 03:10

Please observe the following guidelines:

I am starting this thread on a trial basis.

PLEASE POST ONLY TECHINCAL - Sourced - ARTCILES

NO DISCUSSIONS AT ALL PLEASE

PLEASE DO NOT post a news article without the proper heading and the URL. Your HTML coding must enable the news link to open in a new browser/window. Also kindly refrain from posting links to other forums which are discussing a news story, as that does not count as news.

PLEASE DO NOT post an entire article unless there is no archiving available on the news site. In the absence of a link, kindly post the entire article providing the title, the source, the author (optional), and the date. This initial heading must be displayed in bold font.

PLEASE DO NOT paste excerpts from the news link in the news thread, as that violates copyright laws. Also kindly refrain from any comments and/or discussion on the news articles posted in the news folder.

PLEASE DO NOT add smilies, other animated graphics and pictures in the news folder.

Thanking You in advance for your cooperation.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 30 May 2007 03:12

AWST:

Thales Announces Slimmed-Down Recce Pod
Aviation Week & Space Technology
05/07/2007, page 42

Joris Janssen Lok
Paris

Slimming down Reco-NG camera pod opens opportunity for use on F-16

Printed headline: 'Reco' Redesign

Thales is redesigning its new Reco-NG airborne electro-optical reconnaissance system so that it can be integrated on smaller types of fighter aircraft such as Lockheed Martin's F-16.

This would provide F-16 users with the option to acquire a multirole imagery intelligence capability, according to Thales. The system would include full day/night, long- and short-range reconnaissance plus real-time imagery downlink performance, combined with ground stations fully equipped for rapid imagery interpretation and intelligence exploitation.

At this time, 20 Reco-NG airborne units are on order to enter service by early 2009 on Dassault Rafale F3 standard fighters in the French air force and navy. The pod has so far been cleared for carriage by the Rafale and Mirage 2000. It will also be possible to integrate the 1,020-kg. (2,244-lb.) heavy pod on Tornado and "some U.S. and other nations' fighter types," says William Lebelle, airborne optronics project manager at Thales's Land & Joint Systems Div. in Guyancourt outside Paris.


Thales hopes a smaller version of its Reco-NG pod could allow it to win orders from F-16 customers.Credit: DASSAULT AVIATION/V. ALMANSA

"The current pod requires a certain ground clearance below the aircraft which the F-16 cannot provide," Lebelle says. "We're working on a different configuration so that it will become possible for the pod to be carried on the centerline pylon of the F-16."

He refused to identify potential customers for the slimmed-down Reco-NG variant. However, there has been growing interest among F-16 users in a high-performance, multirole electro-optical/infrared reconnaissance capability.

In principle, the redesigned version of Reco-NG would retain all capabilities offered by the baseline pod. These include stand-off high- or medium-altitude dual-band electro-optical photography; short-range low-level/high-speed infrared line-scanning photography; a dual Ku-band data link for real-time or deferred imagery transmission, and a backup UHF data link.

Reco-NG can be operated autonomously (based on pre-flight mission planning), but the pilot or weapons system operator can also take manual control to respond to targets of opportunity. The pod is equipped with a digital data-recording and reconnaissance management system.

The main challenge for the redesign is to change the mechanical aspects of the forward-placed rotating camera bay that holds the DB-STARS dual-band sensor for long-range, high- to medium-altitude operations. In the current system, this 400-kg. section rotates to point the camera window toward the target; inside, the camera itself also rotates to switch between wide- and narrow-field-of-view lenses.

Reco-NG was developed under a 2000 contract from the French armaments agency. In 2005, Thales received the series production contract for 20 pods (12 for the air force and eight for the navy) plus six ground stations (four for the air force and two for the navy, including one for installation on the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle). Last year, qualification of the Reco-NG on the Mirage 2000 was completed, while the first three ground stations were delivered.

This year, Reco-NG is to be fully qualified on the Rafale, which will be the only aircraft to carry Reco-NG in French frontline service. In 2008, qualification trials with the navy are planned, resulting in operational capability to be achieved by early 2009, Lebelle says.


Image

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 30 May 2007 06:55

OK.

AWST:

Eurofighter has begun a series of
Aviation Week & Space Technology
04/09/2007, page 18

Eurofighter has begun a series of Typhoon test flights with an MBDA Meteor environmental data gathering missile, covering both fuselage and wing-station carriage.

Two further contracts have been placed with Saab, extending the use of the Gripen as a test platform for the rocket-ramjet radar-guided Meteor missile until 2010. The trials include firing and radar tests in the U.K. and Sweden.

Spain's Typhoon instrumented production aircraft No. 4 was used for five flights in late March, with the missile carried on each of the semi-recessed fuselage stations. Vibration, load and temperature data were gathered. This month, an Italian aircraft is scheduled to fly with a Meteor on an outboard wing station for the first time. This flight will examine the flutter and vibration environment.

Along with beginning to make headway on the eventual integration of the Meteor on Typhoon, the four Eurofighter partner nations also finally have managed to sign an agreement covering the first of two near-term upgrade packages. Britain, German, Italy and Spain have been haggling with industry over the $1.6-billion package.

The so-called Phase 1 Enhancements chiefly bolster the Typhoon's air-to-ground weapons delivery capability. The primary arsenal additions come through the planned integration of Raytheon Paveway IV and EGBU-16 laser/GPS-guided bombs, as well as a laser-designator pod capability.

The upgrade program is supposed to be fielded around 2011-12 on Tranche 2 aircraft, according to industry officials. The U.K., however, will get its laser designator pod capability early, having embarked on a fast-track program to have that feature available next year. The U.K. has opted for the Rafael Litening III pod.

Other weapons capabilities also will be accommodated, such as newer versions of the Raytheon AIM-120 Amraam air-to-air missile. Also, to be accomplished is full-digital integration of the MBDA IRIS-T dogfight missile being used by Germany, Italy and Spain.

Industry and government officials are still negotiating the terms for integration of the Meteor ramjet-powered beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile on the fighter. It is yet to be determined whether Meteor integration will be included in the Phase 2 Enhancement package, which will include the likes of the Storm Shadow and Taurus cruise missiles.

Also being upgraded under the enhancement program is the pilot-aircraft interface, to ease operations in the dual air-to-air and air-to-ground modes. Upgrades to the Link-16 Multifunction Information Distribution System are a central element of that change. The Eurofighter consortium says its Spanish partner has delivered the first Spanish air force Block 5 aircraft, SS011, which is from the latest version of a Tranche 1 Typhoon.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 30 May 2007 06:56

Flight tests are underway
Aviation Week & Space Technology
05/21/2007, page 22

Flight tests are underway to implement short- and long-term improvements to the Eurofighter Typhoon.

The Italian air force's first front-line Typhoon squadron has started testing the IRIS-T imaging infrared guided dogfight missile. The unit, based at Grosetto in northern Italy, may deploy with the missile to the test range at Decicmomanu in Sardinia in October for firing trials. Operational test pilots also will be involved.

Meanwhile, the initial flight test series of the Captor Active Electronically Scanning Array Radar (Caesar) for future Typhoons was completed last week. First flight was conducted May 8 in Germany on DA5, a development aircraft, after delays from last year caused by integration problems with the "plug-and-play" concept and in obtaining flight clearance. The radar combines the traditional Captor-M back end with an active electronically scanned array using more than 1,000 transmit/receive modules.

Caesar (see photo) promises greater performance--including simultaneous multi-mode operations--but Eurofighter COO Brian Phillipson believes the shift to electronically scanned technology will be driven more by improved reliability than any other factor. Typhoon core customers (the U.K., Germany, Italy and Spain) have yet to commit to Caesar, which was developed by EuroRadar, a consortium of EADS, Selex Sensors and Airborne Systems, Galileo Avionica and Indra.

The German government has been funding the development program. Additionally, Norway signed an anticipated letter of agreement with Eurofighter for further technological cooperation. The agreement could be worth up to €75 million ($101.25 million) in the coming years. Oslo plans a fighter replacement next decade and is staying financially involved with the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Saab Gripen and Typhoon programs to avoid pre-judging the outcome of the coming competition.


Image

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 30 May 2007 07:09

Thales says it has
Aviation Week & Space Technology
04/30/2007, page 19

Thales says it has completed flight tests of an active electronically scanned array radar antenna on a Mirage 2000 testbed, preparing the way for integration trials on the new-generation Rafale fighter in the second quarter of this year. Following final development and production engineering, the AESA radar is scheduled to enter series production in late 2010 as part of a package of enhancements, dubbed Post-F3, agreed to late last year.

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5342
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Postby Kartik » 30 May 2007 09:30

Oh you sexy little thang !

Mirage-2000 with a RBE-2 radar when it was being used as a testbed. possibly the PESA RBE-2 and not the AESA RBE-2

saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

RBE2 - AESA for the RAFALE

Postby saptarishi » 30 May 2007 10:23

the RAFALE
TOPICS & FEATURES
Armored vehicles
C4ISR & Net Centric
Combat Aircraft
Fire Support
Future Combat Systems
Homeland Security
Infantry Warfare
Logistics & Support
Naval Systems
Precision Strike
Protection & Survivability
Special Operations CT
Training & Simulation
Unmanned Systems
Defense Exhibitions



Relevant Links:

Aero India 2007



Recommended Features:


Thales has developed the RBE2 AESA, an enhancement of the multi-function radar installed on the Naval Rafale. This radar is already designed to accomodate AESA front end. Thales launched the development of an AESA derivative for the Rafale in 1997, the program began developmental testing with Rafale aircraft in 2003 and 2004.

As of April 2007, Thales AESA RBE2 entered production engineering, following the conclusion of a series of flight tests on Mirage 2000 test-bed aircraft. Integration and testing of the AESA radar on board the Rafale are planned for the second quarter of 2007. Series production start-up is scheduled for late 2010. In October 2006, the French Defence Procurement Agency (DGA) and the industry team behind the Rafale program agreed to a roadmap that will deliver Rafale fighters equipped with a new generation of sensors, including the AESA RBE2 radar, to the French Air Force and Navy by 2012.

Thales has been working with United Monolithic Semiconductors (UMS), a Franco-German enterprise owned by EADS and Thales, developing and producing microwave T/R modules. UMS optimized the gallium arsenide modules forming the radar’s antenna.

AESA design offers electronic scanning of the radar beam on both plans, (vertical and horizontal) offering new capabilities beyond the reach of conventional radars. These systems enable the simultaneous designation of multiple targets to different air-to-air missiles, while performing searches in directions completely independent of the target tracks. The level of situational awareness provided by AESA radar far exceeds anything available with conventional radars. RBE2 uses electronic scanning technologies to improve the aircraft low-altitude penetration capability by generating 3D ground map covering a wide area forward of the aircraft, supporting terrain following and maneuvers in the horizontal plane within the area scanned by the radar. The radar will also offer a high resolution ground mapping mode.

http://www.defense-update.com/features/ ... rafale.htm

saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

Postby saptarishi » 30 May 2007 14:02

MiG-35
Multi-Role Combat Aircraft


http://www.defense-update.com/products/m/mig35.htm

Based on the MiG-29M OTV, MiG-35 (Nato reporting name Fulcrum F), is equipped with advanced avionic suite comprising of a modern glass cockpit designed with three 6x8 inch flat-panel LCDs and full HOTAS controls, digital map, helmet-mounted sight. The latest Zhuk-AE active electronically scanning array (AESA) radar is mounted on this aircraft. This radar was developed with modular approach, enabling upgrading existing Zhuk ME/MSE radars, into the phased array equipped MFE/MSFE standard, deployed in MiG-29/Su-27 platforms.





The MiG-35 is fitted with western standard Mil-1553 bus and advanced Russian made weaponry. Reliability and serviceability have been improved, reducing operating cost and improving serviceability by 2.5 times (compared to older MiG-29s). MiG-35 is equipped with an optronic target tracker, identical to the system used on the Su-30MKI. For precision air-to-ground attack missions, the aircraft can be equipped with a conformal electro-optical targeting module, installed under the right air intake. The aircraft is equipped with radar warning, electro-optical missile launch warning and laser warning sensors, and integral active self protection (jamming, chaff and flare) as part of the integral self-defense system. The aircraft has four additional hardpoints and can haul an external payload in excess of six tons.

Most of the systems introduced in the MiG-35 can be applied to older MiG-29s through upgrading programs.

The aircraft is powered by two RD-33 MK engines digitally controlled smokeless engines, producing 9000kgf of thrust each. This type is an improved and uprated version of the standard RD33 engine. The engine was developed to power the carrier based MiG-29K and modernized version MiG-29M/M2. The prototype demonstrated in Bangalore did not have thrust vector exhausts, but, according to the manufacturer, these can be installed in production aircraft

saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

Postby saptarishi » 30 May 2007 14:15

http://www.airforce-technology.com/proj ... ectID=3067

F-16I Soufa Fighter and Ground Attack Aircraft, Israel

The F-16I Soufa ("Storm") is a modified variant of the F-16D Block 50 and 52 fighter and ground attack aircraft, with the avionics and weapons systems capability modified to meet the requirements of the Israeli Air Force. Israel ordered 50 F-16I aircraft in 2001 and signed the agreement for an optional additional 52 aircraft in September 2001. The Israeli Air Force has selected the F16I in a two-seat configuration only.

The production program, Peace Marble V, is the fifth acquisition of F-16s and will increase the number of Israeli Air Force F-16 aircraft to 362, giving the IAF the largest fleet of F-16 fighters apart from the USA.

The F16I Soufa made its maiden flight in December 2003. The first two aircraft were delivered to the IAF at the Ramon Air Base, in February 2004. Deliveries will be completed at a rate of about two per month over four years, with final delivery in 2008.

There is a significant level of airframe co-production and avionics component production in Israel for the Soufa and for other variants of the F-16. IAI and Cyclone Aviation Products Ltd in Carmiel manufacture the ventral fins, rudders, horizontal stabilisers and engine access doors. The aircraft are assembled at the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics facility in Fort Worth, Texas.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER DESIGN
The F-16I is fitted with a pair of removable conformal fuel tanks provided by IAI. The conformal fuel tanks (CFT), holding 450 US gallons of extra fuel, are mounted on both sides of the upper fuselage. The very low drag configuration CFTs have a very small effect on the aircraft's agility, handling quality and flight limits. The use of the conformal tanks increases the aircraft's mission range and combat endurance.

The fitting of conformal tanks makes the two wing inner store stations normally used for external tanks (stations 6 and 4, each rated at 4,500lb capacity) available for weapon carriage, doubling the aircraft's air-to-ground weapons capacity.

The F16I is fitted with a dorsal avionics compartment. The first version produced with the dorsal compartment was the Israeli two-seat Block 30 F-16D aircraft, produced in the late 1980s. The large dorsal compartment extends from the rear of the cockpit to the fin and houses additional avionics systems, chaff and flare dispensers and the aircraft's in-flight refuelling receptacle.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER COCKPIT
The front cockpit is for the pilot and the rear cockpit is configured for the weapons systems operator or, with the change of a single switch, for a pilot instructor.

The Elbit Dash IV Display and Sight Helmet System enables the pilot to aim the weapon by looking the target. Dash IV shortens the lock-on procedure time for engagements. The helmet measures the pilot's line of sight to the target so the sensors, avionics and weapons are slaved to the target. Dash IV improves situation awareness by helping the pilots to visually detect targets at high angles off the nose of the aircraft, providing critical information in any direction the pilot looks.

The Soufa is fitted with a wide angle head up display from Elop and high definition (120ppi) 4in x 4in colour multi-function displays supplied by Astronautics C.A of Petah Tikva, Israel. Other new features include a colour moving map display, digital video recording equipment, cockpit lighting and external strip lighting compatible with night vision goggles and a high capacity data transfer set.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER AVIONICS
The Soufa has an advanced avionics suite including general avionics computer, colour display processors and interfaces all produced by Elbit Systems.

The communications systems include a Rafael UHF/VHF radio and an HF radio, Elta satellite communications and an IAI integrated tactical video data link.

The navigation system includes a combined ring laser gyro inertial navigation system and global positioning system (RLGINS/GPS) and a digital terrain system. Rafael developed the algorithms for the digital terrain system.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER WEAPON SYSTEMS
Elbit is supplying the aircraft's central mission computer, the signal processing unit for the displays and the stores management systems. RADA Electronics Industries in Netanya, Israel, and Smiths Aerospace, USA, have developed the aircraft's data acquisition system with an advanced digital data server and data recording system. Israel Military Industries supplies most of the weapons pylons and racks and the external fuel tanks.

The mission data and video is downloaded to a ground debriefing station provided by RADA. The system has potential for three-dimensional, multi-aircraft mission creation.

The Rafael Litening II targeting and navigation pod is equipped with a third generation forward looking infrared (FLIR), charge-coupled device (CCD) television, laser spot tracker and rangefinder and infrared marker. The system enables the pilot to detect, identify, acquire and track ground targets for the delivery of conventional and precision guided weapons, such as laser guided or GPS guided bombs.

The aircraft is also equipped with the Lockheed Martin LANTIRN navigation pod which provides night navigation and all-weather automatic terrain following.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER AIR-TO-AIR MISSILES
The air-to-air missiles will be the short range Python 4 and Python 5 and the short range to beyond visual range radar-guided Derby, both supplied by Rafael.

The all-weather Derby has an active radar seeker, look down / shoot down capability, lock on before or after launch, and programmable electronic counter countermeasures (ECCM). The lock on before launch mode is deployed for tight dogfights.

The F16I will be equipped with the Rafael Python 5 air-to-air missile when development has been completed. The Python 5 is capable of lock on after launch and uses imaging infrared guidance. The new seeker uses a dual wavelength focal plane array and is equipped with robust infrared counter countermeasures capability.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER AIR-TO-GROUND SYSTEMS
The air-to-surface weapons are carried on the two pairs of inboard underwing stations and include anti-ship missiles, anti-radiation missiles, laser guided bombs, GPS guided bombs and Israeli Military Industries (IMI) runway attack munitions. The F-16 aircraft has been used in carriage trials of IMI's STAR-1 anti-radiation weapon which is in the development phase.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER COUNTERMEASURES
The electronic warfare suite, being supplied by Elisra, includes radar warning receivers, missile approach warners and jamming systems, including the Elisra SPS 3000 self-protection jammer which is installed in the large spine. The chaff and flare dispenser is supplied by Rokar.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER RADAR
The aircraft has the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-68(V)9 multi-mode radar, which has five times the processing speed and ten times the memory capacity of the previous APG-68 radars on the F-16. Elta is involved in the co-production of the radar.

The modes of operation include high resolution synthetic aperture (SAR) ground mapping and terrain following. The radar provides autonomous, all-weather, stand-off precision weapon delivery. Air-to-air modes include range while search, air combat mode, multiple target track while scan, cluster resolution, single target tracking and target illumination pulse Doppler tracking. The radar increases the air-to-air detection range by 30% compared to earlier generation systems.

F-16I SOUFA FIGHTER ENGINES
The Soufa is powered by the Pratt and Whitney F100-PW-229 Increased Performance Engine (IPE). This new, more powerful engine allows the aircraft a maximum take-off weight of 23,582kg. The aircraft is also fitted with heavyweight landing gear.

SaiK
BRF Oldie
Posts: 36416
Joined: 29 Oct 2003 12:31
Location: NowHere

Postby SaiK » 31 May 2007 02:24

Battle of the radars


AESA - The AGile Radar

The AESA radar link talks about all competing a/cs and its AESA radars.


Russia & CIS Observer / Archive / â„– 3 (10), September 2005 / DEFENSE / MiG-29 Evolves into MiG-35 /
For some time, the Indian Air Force was believed to have focused on both the Zhuk-ME and Bars-29 radars. The former is installed at the carrier-based MiG-29K/KUB naval fighters. Russia's Phazotron Corporation - designer of Zhuk-ME - reports that its slot array antenna will soon be changed for the active phased array antenna (the Zhuk-MFE modification). The Bars-29 with a passive phased array antenna is developed by Russian NIIP as a scaled-down version of the Bars radar installed on Su- 30MKI fighters. ELTA Systems' EL/M-2052 radar with an active phased array antenna is believed to be the third contender.

http://www.ato.ru/rus/cis/archive/10-20 ... 6d7af1800d

arpan
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 6
Joined: 28 Dec 2006 19:07
Location: Gurgaon, India

New MiG-35 Optical Locator System (OLS)

Postby arpan » 31 May 2007 02:56

New MiG-35 Optical Locator System (OLS)

Only most attentive experts have spotted the new shape of the onboard OLS (optical locator station) and some new elements on the plane. It says a lot for the specialists. MiG corporation team didn’t make a secret out of it - on the airshow in Bangalore MiG-35 has presented completely new Russian product - OLS. It has attracted a lot of specialists’ attention, today in the world there is no similar systems.

MiG engineers have defined basic points of the optical locator system development:
- multispectrality. System should work both in visible and IR ranges
- integrity. TV and IR systems, laser ranging system should be united in one solid construction
- system should work on wide angles, up to 360 and identify shapes of aerial and ground targets


OLS, as well as radar, allows to detect targets and aim weapon systems. But, unlike the radar, OLS has no emission which means - can’t be detected. OLS works like a human eye - it gets picture and analyzes it. Usually it’s been said radars are the eyes of the plane. But to be exact, it’s more locator device, like whales has. But OLS is really the eyes of the plane and they are very sharp.

OLS works not only in visible bands. Very important part of “plane visionâ€

rkhanna
BRFite
Posts: 1162
Joined: 02 Jul 2006 02:35

Postby rkhanna » 31 May 2007 03:26

This dosnt have a source..from WAFF.. Courtesy Thunder

(Hope posting pictures is allowed)

Rafale optimisation is not a vain word or empty commercial argument.

The aircraft aerodynamic is way more developed than that of the previous design, the Rafale A.

After Rafale A flew first on 4th July 1986, it served its purpose as demonstrator, validating the close-coupled delta-canard formula.

In particular, it meet all of ACX requierements for high maneuvrability and STOL performances, climb rate, sustain dash speed etc.

The proposed Navalised version, ACM was to meet more stringuent requierement from Marine Nationale after a Carrier trial period:

Increased sink rate with a 16* AoA and better downward visibility than the A were among MN demands after Carrier trials.

Design have to evoluate further and Dassault designers didn't do things half-way.

Image

The A wings were similar to that of the Mirage IIING, a crancked delta plan which allowed the A to sustain M 2.0 and provided with good qualities at high AoA.

Image

In some instances (as in the case for the EAP), this wingplan can lead to assymetric dispacement of Cl at supersonic speed, the center of lift of the two parts of the wings moving back backward at a different rate. (It depends on wingsweep).

There were also gains to be made by repositioning the wings from low-shoulder to mid-fuelage and this unlocked several other design options starting with a reduction in wave drag:

Image

1) This allowed the designers to give the aircraft a sharply sweept LEX which not only gives an increae in lift but also is shaped for supersonic performances.

2) The surfaces of the canard was increeased by 30* and their root shaped so that they can deflect fully at 30* and increase the effect of the deflected airflow above the wing.

3) The LEX leading edge were designed sharper with a tri-dimentional shape, a constant sweept and progressive adrenal

Image

The LEX are rooted at the point where the inlets diffuser shock hits the inlet leading edge, and beneficiate from the same weaker shock wave which triggers their own while minimising its intensity.

At lower speeds they provoc several vortexes, one of which is clearly visible here, resulting on a significant increase in lift.

4) There was a marqued increase in wing-fuselage junction volume too, with a more blended shape which reduces wave drag and increases internal fuel volume.

Accessorly this feature is also reducing the aircraft RCS.

While this would have been more than enough for most design houses, it wasn't so for the Dassault aerodynamicians.

During the Mirage 4000 flight-tests, they notices that the nose cone and front fuselage could be used to accomodate better pressure control and increase overal aerodynamic efficiency around the inlets.

This resulted in the characteristic V-shaped fron fuselage and inlet arrangement which optimises the airflow in front of the diffusers

This arrangement allows for a higher supersonic performances and a less complex inlet design.

But AGAIN this wasn't enough for Dassault, when they were given the word "OPTIMISEZ"!!!

Using their experience on the Mirage series they developed the conceipt of pressure and wave control even further:

Using the principes of compressive and expensive waves they channeled the boundary layer to the exact point where they wanted these phenomenons to occur: At the limit of the wing root.

There are sdeveral advantages in doing so:

First they do away with the Mirage 2000 strakes, as they are notably unstealthy and offers less control over the boundary layer.

These are normaly rooted at shoulder-level and dynamises the airflow around the fin at high AoA offering increased Yaw stability.

In the case of Rafale, by shaping the inlets in a V, they made it possible to energise BOTH that of the wing at its root and the fin's simultaneously, retain a sleek aircaft and low RCS.

Image

These shock takes place from the transonic regime, at point A where the airflow is separated, (part of it recycled by the engine IR-suppressant channel).

The shock created there is of the compressive type, and results on an increase in temperature, pressure and density, the airflow velocity becoming lower which means higher energy.

From point D and E, where it matters most, this same airflow is submited to another Shockwave, this time of the Expensive type.

Image

A new Mach line is created, resulting on lower pressures, density, temperature but a higher velocity which energises the airflow coming from the canard surfaces and the rest of the airframe.

This particular feature works so WELL thats its effects can even be seen when the aircraft is stationary due to paint tear and wear

So to finish, the Supersonic optimisation of the wing.

Many tends to think that a 50*+ sweept angle would allow for better "performances".

Well it's true and untrue at the same time, the wing of a Mirage 2000 will drag more and have a lower lift coefficient at higher AoA.

There are advantages for higher sweept wings, higher Critical Mach is one but you need an accordingly overal reduced drag wave to take advantage of this.

For example: Mid-fuselage mounted wings and well blended fuselage wings areas, Rafale have this too...

Lower mid-to-high supersonic drag is another but this can be CONTROLED with different design features.


saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

Postby saptarishi » 31 May 2007 10:59


Drevin
BRFite
Posts: 408
Joined: 21 Sep 2006 12:27

Postby Drevin » 01 Jun 2007 13:24


NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 01 Jun 2007 17:12

Shankar wrote:does this mean no discussion on mig 35 in this forum -well ok


The original intent was to model this thread after the "News" threads. We may relax the discussion requirement IF the thread proves to be civil.

As a recap:

1) Only technical material
2) Material that is about 3-6 months old
3) IF URL is accessible, provide URL (with proper heading, etc) ONLY - as in do NOT quote articles or parts of it
4) IF article is not accessible, then post entire article (with Author, date, references to original publisher, etc- subject to change by BR Admins) in QUOTES

5) Certainly NO Propaganda. ALL ACs are equal in this thread.
6) Oh, also, this is NOT a M/MRCA thread.

Thanks.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 02 Jun 2007 02:53

News Breaks

MBDA last week performed a
Aviation Week & Space Technology
05/28/2007, page 24

MBDA last week performed a high-altitude control-and-dispersion firing of its Meteor rocket/ramjet air-to-air missile, the first shot to be carried out in the U.K. A Saab Gripen was used for the test firing from the Defense Ministry's range in the Hebrides Islands off the northwest coast of Scotland. Further flutter trials of the Meteor are also underway, examining missile characteristics when fitted to wing stations of the Eurofigher Typhoon. Alenia Aeronautica is leading the flutter tests. These are being conducted at test centers in Turin and Decimomannu, in Sardinia. The trials will assess performance at subsonic and supersonic speeds, up to Mach 1.8.

The high-altitude shot was carried out at 42,650 ft., with the Gripen aircraft being flown at supersonic speed. Following "a couple of seconds in the boost phase" the missile's ramjet was successfully ignited. The munition then carried out a series of pre-planned maneuvers, including bank-to-turn control. The planned flight profile lasted "several minutes," according to MBDA, and examined the missile's endgame performance at maximum kinematic ranges. Along with the Gripen, the Tornado F3 is also to be used as part of the Meteor test program. Guided firings from an F3 are due beginning in 2009. Qinetiq will modify two F3s for the program. The F3 is being used to cover for the lack of availability of the Typhoon for the guided firing trials. The missile is now expected to enter service with the Typhoon in 2013.


Image

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 02 Jun 2007 03:01

News Breaks

Eurofighter has begun a series of
Aviation Week & Space Technology
04/09/2007, page 18

Eurofighter has begun a series of Typhoon test flights with an MBDA Meteor environmental data gathering missile, covering both fuselage and wing-station carriage.

Two further contracts have been placed with Saab, extending the use of the Gripen as a test platform for the rocket-ramjet radar-guided Meteor missile until 2010. The trials include firing and radar tests in the U.K. and Sweden.

Spain's Typhoon instrumented production aircraft No. 4 was used for five flights in late March, with the missile carried on each of the semi-recessed fuselage stations. Vibration, load and temperature data were gathered. This month, an Italian aircraft is scheduled to fly with a Meteor on an outboard wing station for the first time. This flight will examine the flutter and vibration environment.

Along with beginning to make headway on the eventual integration of the Meteor on Typhoon, the four Eurofighter partner nations also finally have managed to sign an agreement covering the first of two near-term upgrade packages. Britain, German, Italy and Spain have been haggling with industry over the $1.6-billion package.

The so-called Phase 1 Enhancements chiefly bolster the Typhoon's air-to-ground weapons delivery capability. The primary arsenal additions come through the planned integration of Raytheon Paveway IV and EGBU-16 laser/GPS-guided bombs, as well as a laser-designator pod capability.

The upgrade program is supposed to be fielded around 2011-12 on Tranche 2 aircraft, according to industry officials. The U.K., however, will get its laser designator pod capability early, having embarked on a fast-track program to have that feature available next year. The U.K. has opted for the Rafael Litening III pod.

Other weapons capabilities also will be accommodated, such as newer versions of the Raytheon AIM-120 Amraam air-to-air missile. Also, to be accomplished is full-digital integration of the MBDA IRIS-T dogfight missile being used by Germany, Italy and Spain.

Industry and government officials are still negotiating the terms for integration of the Meteor ramjet-powered beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile on the fighter. It is yet to be determined whether Meteor integration will be included in the Phase 2 Enhancement package, which will include the likes of the Storm Shadow and Taurus cruise missiles.

Also being upgraded under the enhancement program is the pilot-aircraft interface, to ease operations in the dual air-to-air and air-to-ground modes. Upgrades to the Link-16 Multifunction Information Distribution System are a central element of that change. The Eurofighter consortium says its Spanish partner has delivered the first Spanish air force Block 5 aircraft, SS011, which is from the latest version of a Tranche 1 Typhoon.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 06 Jun 2007 02:39

AWST :: June 3, 2007 :: Super Hornet Demonstrates Unpiloted Approaches

As FYI:

The test was aimed at validating three crucial areas: networking of advanced radios between the aircraft carrier and aircraft, autonomous flight of dark and bad-weather carrier traffic patterns, and integration of aircraft position data into the shipboard air traffic controller's console.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 06 Jun 2007 02:53

World News & Analysis

F/A-18E/F To Get New Air Combat Sensor
Aviation Week & Space Technology
06/04/2007, page 30

Andy Nativi
St. Louis

Enhanced electronic warfare systems drive U.S. Navy to improve F/A-18E/F sensor suite

Printed headline: Bug Eyes

The U.S. Navy wants to upgrade its F/A-18E/Fs with an infrared search-and-track system out of concern that increasingly sophisticated electronic jamming systems could thwart the fighter's radar system, leaving pilots "blinded" in air-to-air combat.

Although the service has been upgrading the fighter's radar, and the latest version (the APG-79 with active electronically scanned array) should have enhanced ability to nullify hostile jamming, Navy officials are worried about the proliferation of X-band electronic countermeasures systems, which could degrade radar performance. In particular, China's expansive spending on electronic warfare equipment is being carefully monitored. The service fears this build-up could compromise their own freedom to operate in the Pacific.

The addition of an infrared search-and-track system (IRST)--already standard on many Russian and western European fighters--would provide "spectral diversity" to the Navy. Even if the radar is jammed, a pilot would still be able to spot targets using the IR sensor. Also, the new subsystem could augment the radar by helping to detect hard-to-see targets, such as low- and slow-flying cruise missiles. Spotting such weapons can be a challenge for radars due to ground clutter, but missile engine exhaust plumes should be clearly visibly with the IRST.

The service is planning to field 150 of the new device on F/A-18E/F Block 2s in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Start-up development funds of $157.7 million are in the budget request now before Congress.

F/A-18 prime contractor Boeing has chosen Lockheed Martin to provide the sensor. A first prototype is set to be tested on a Super Hornet early next year through a company-funded risk reduction and capabilities demo effort. Enhanced versions of the AAS-42 electronics and optical units used on the F-14 (already available on South Korea's F-15K) will be repackaged in a modified 480-gal. fuel tank. The equipment will also feature an off-the-shelf thermal control unit.

Boeing opted for a podded solution to save money. "Originally, we considered integrating the IRST into the aircraft fuselage, on the upper nose, or on the gunbay doors, but these solutions required significant structural, electrical and cooling system modifications and, in both cases, called for relocating existing antennas," says Chris D. Wedewer, Boeing's F/A-18E/F IRST program manager. "We also investigated the possibility of putting an IRST pod on the right fuselage station, opposite the fuselage-mounted Raytheon [Advanced Targeting Forward-Looking Infrared] targeting pod, but this option came with too many operational limitations in terms of field of view," in particular when weapons are being carried, he adds.

Those limitations drove the decision to place the sensor on the centerline weapon station, traditionally the spot for the fuel tank. Since a fuel tank has already been cleared for that station, using such a device to house the IRST was seen as the next logical step. The IRST will also function as a fuel tank, with a part of a pod still able to accommodate 330 gal., Wedewer notes.

The main change to the external fuel tank will be to the front section, which will house the IRST. A fixed window will be installed, as well as a ram-air intake to provide air flow for the environment control system. The demonstrator system will provide a large air "scoop," but the operational version is supposed to be more streamlined.

One design challenge will be adjusting for weight-distribution center-of-gravity constraints. With most of the IRST hardware in the nose-section of the pod, that will not be easy and designers, as a fallback, are considering simply adding ballast in the rear section of the device to restore equilibrium. On the aircraft side, the installation addition of the IRST should be a non-issue if the F/A-18E/Fs have Advanced Mission Computers; a software upgrade is required, though.

Keeping the cost down--to around $2.5 million per pod--creates operational drawbacks, however. There are field-of-regard restrictions with this installation, which is why fighters generally have IRSR mounted on the radome. Such an installation may come in the future, Wedewer says. On the other hand, using a pod provides flexibility because they can be distributed among fleet users as needed. Initially, pods will likely be deployed with squadrons still flying the older APG-73 radar, which provides fewer counter-countermeasures capabilities than the newer model.

Pilots will have a choice of opting for the radar to cue the IRST or vice versa. A key advantage of IRST is that it remains passive, and by cross-cueing the two sensors a pilot can minimize use of the radar to just before firing a missile.

The IRST uses a long-wave sensor, operating in the 8-12-micron range for maximum detection. The device will provide targeting quality data, although not an imaging capability.


Image

Image
Boeing would modify an external fuel tank to fit the F/A-18E/F with a centerline-mounted IRST. Lockheed Martin would provide the critical optics.Credit: BOEING CONCEPTS

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 06 Jun 2007 02:58

Industry Outlook

DGA Fires Sagem AASM on New Rafale Fighter
Aviation Week & Space Technology
06/04/2007, page 13

Edited by Patricia J. Parmalee

Printed headline: First AASM Firing for Rafale

French armaments agency DGA announced that on Apr. 23 it carried out the first complete firing of the Sagem AASM precision standoff weapon (see photo) on the new Rafale fighter. The mission involved several standoff firings--including one 90-deg. off-boresight, and a three-weapon salvo--from an undisclosed standoff range. Sagem notes that all targets were hit with required precision. The Rafale OSF forward-looking IR tracking system provided real-time observation and video debrief of the strikes. Three more air force firings and at least one naval test are planned before the weapon is qualified on the fighter at year's end. Previous qualification firings on a Mirage 2000 showed a range of 50 km. (31 mi.) at high altitude and 15 km. in low-altitude configuration, with higher-than-expected impact accuracy.


Image

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 06 Jun 2007 03:09

News Breaks
Africa
South Africa's Denel Optronics
Aviation Week & Space Technology
06/04/2007, page 22

South Africa's Denel Optronics has been awarded a 200-million-rand ($28-million) contract to supply 450 pilot head tracking systems for the Eurofighter Typhoon. BAE Systems is letting the contract as part of a defense industrial participation program resulting from South Africa's purchase of the BAE Systems Hawk jet trainer and Saab Gripen fighter.

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 06 Jun 2007 17:46

Nothing new, just a nice recap of the MiG-35 from AI07:

MiG-35 Launches New Strategy

Feb 7, 2007
By Show News

The MiG-35 being unveiled on the world stage at Aero India might look like a MiG-29, and it could be overlooked as the loosely bandided about but never defined "MiG-35 for India."

In fact, it is neither.

The MiG-35 at Aero India is a brand new aircraft inside the familiar shared airframe. RSK-MIG has developed the most capable multifunctional combat fighter to emerge from its stable.

But the MiG-35 also is a concept that embraces the 1980s MiG-29 and the latest MiG-29K for the Indian Navy within a common family approach. Whatever has been incorporated in the MiG-35 can be applied to older and new-production marks to provide an air force with unprecedented commonality of systems, the company says.

The fly-by-wire "4++" generation MiG-35 incorporates the new Phazotron Zhuk AE active electronic scanning array radar, marking the first time that a non-U.S. fighter has been fitted with such AESA capability.

New-generation technologies, some developed for Russia's space program and never before been available for export, have been incorporated into the aircraft's passive electro-optical systems.

And some parts of the aircraft's avionics systems have reached fifth-generation level, the company claims. Non-Russian avionics and weapons also can be integrated, it adds.

Externally, the MiG-35 has four additional hardpoints and can haul an external payload in excess of six tons. Reliability and serviceability have been improved, and the per-hour cost to operate a MiG-35 or MiG-29K is 2.5 times less than for an older MiG-29, the company claims.

The much-vaunted all-aspect thrust vectoring that enabled the MiG-29 OVT demonstrator to show unprecedented super-maneuverability is available as an option on the MiG-35.

All future MiGs will be produced as unified family members, according to RSK-MIG. "The family itself is just at the initial stage of its life cycle and will be improved over a long time with its avionics and weaponry capabilities.

"RSK-MIG is going to offer its customers the new upgrade packages to bring the previously built aircraft close to the MiG-29K or MiG-35 capabilities," it notes. Or it will take them in trade for new aircraft.

JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 06 Jun 2007 18:07

The key issues with the MiG-35 in terms of TOT & technology:

1. GOST standards vs western standards (to reapply for Indian programs)
2. The level of integration of proprietary Russian microelectronics vs COTS used in other programs
3. Testing & qualification- to achieve advertised figures for MTBF, TBO in reality.

These are based on discussion with folks previously involved in Russo-Indian programs, so FWIW for this thread.

JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 06 Jun 2007 18:13


JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 06 Jun 2007 18:17

Defense News


[quote]Typhoon Slowly Assumes Combat Roles in Italy

By TOM KINGTON, GROSSETO AIR BASE, Italy
05/13/07

It was only after landing his Eurofighter Typhoon on May 12 that Italian pilot Ivan Laudizi realized he had just flown the first real mission involving the flagship European fighter.
Laudizi’s jet was already in the air with a second Typhoon after a training scramble from Groseto Air Base when they were ordered to intercept a Tunisian A320 over Sicily. After climbing to 40,000 feet and reaching 0.9 Mach, the two aircraft arrived in 30 minutes, descending to 30,000 feet to make the intercept.
“It was pretty much like many other interceptions I have made, although this one was much easier,â€

ksmahesh
BRFite
Posts: 209
Joined: 10 Jan 2007 17:55
Location: Mt Everest - its the coolest one

Postby ksmahesh » 06 Jun 2007 18:49

12.5 hrs/mnth = 150 hrs
IAF standard = 180 hrs/month


Does "I" here mean Indian (for comparison)?

JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 06 Jun 2007 19:34

Yes.

Raman
BRFite
Posts: 276
Joined: 06 Mar 2001 12:31
Location: Niyar kampootar onlee

Postby Raman » 06 Jun 2007 19:52

I think you mean 180 hrs/year

ksmahesh
BRFite
Posts: 209
Joined: 10 Jan 2007 17:55
Location: Mt Everest - its the coolest one

Postby ksmahesh » 06 Jun 2007 19:54

180hrs/months is 6hrs/day with 7 day week. Perhaps it is year.

JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 06 Jun 2007 20:07

Yes, 180 Hrs/ Yr. Varies from type to type- older MiG-21s still go by the sortie role...300 sorties / yr...at half an hour each, thats 150 hrs/ Yr.

saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

Postby saptarishi » 06 Jun 2007 23:10

Ultra hornet


While debate rages over the hallmarks and advantages of fifth-generation fighters, Boeing is preparing to deliver the next generation of its long-running F/A-18. The F/A-18E/F Block II+ Super Hornet is the culmination of a fundamental upgrade of the multi-role fighter and the foundation for future capability expansion. Next-generation Super Hornet deliveries to the US Navy will begin later this year when the first aircraft from production Lot 30 rolls off the St Louis, Missouri assembly line. "Lot 30 is the launch point for Block II+," says Kory Mathews, director of F/A-18 programme integration. Today's F/A-18E/F Super Hornet was developed from the original F/A-18 Hornet in two stages: first an airframe and engine upgrade that scaled the fighter up by 25% to increase range, payload and growth capacity then a multi-phase avionics update that introduced advanced sensors. Lot 30 is the first time the structural upgrade that produced the F/A-18E/F comes together with the full suite of advanced avionics, and is the jumping-off point for the Capability Flightplan - a roadmap of enhancements planned to be developed and fielded over the next decade. Robust roadmap "We have a robust, well-defined capability roadmap in four main areas: distributed targeting, net-centric operations/battlespace management, sensor integration and advanced weapons," says Mathews. The Flightplan covers fiscal years 2008-2014, and will be updated annually. "It is a living document," he says. "We can add, accelerate or eliminate capabilities." The launching point for the Capability Flightplan is the avionics architecture implemented incrementally since deliveries of the Block II Super Hornet began in 2005 with production Lot 26, and fully realised beginning with Lot 30. The architecture backbone is a fibre-optic data network and advanced mission computer (AMC). Block II+ uses the latest Type 3 AMC, produced by General Dynamics Information Systems, with two times the throughput and memory of the Type 2 computer in Block II Super Hornets. Plugged into this architecture are the new APG-79 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar AAS-46 advanced tactical forward-looking infrared (ATFLIR) pod digital sold-state recorder (DSSR) accurate navigation (ANAV) system and Link 16 multifunctional information distribution system (MIDS). "Beginning with Lot 30, every aircraft will have AESA," says Mathews. Until then, some F/A-18E/Fs are being delivered with the earlier mechanically scanned APG-73 radar. The US Navy plans to retrofit 135 APG-73-equipped Block II Super Hornets with APG-79, for an eventual total of 415 AESA-equipped aircraft. The Raytheon AESA brings the capability for simultaneous air-to-air and air-to-ground operation and, starting with Lot 30, two-seat F/A-18Fs will have the advanced crew station, which decouples the front and rear cockpits. "The front-seater can sanitise the airspace while the rear-seater conducts an air-to-ground campaign," says Mathews. Both crew members will have the joint helmet-mounted cueing system. Lot 30 also introduces the ANAV box, which replaces the F/A-18's CAINS inertial navigator and MAGR GPS receiver with a tightly integrated system that addresses obsolescence and provides "unprecedented air-to-ground accuracy", says Mathews. Another step in expanding the Super Hornet's precision attack capability has already been taken with fielding of the digital sold-state recorder. Replacing an analogue cockpit video recorder, the DSSR brings the capability to grab and store sensor images, and send them over existing communications links - either Link 16 or the ARC-210 digital radio. "On ingress, the crew can see ATFLIR streaming video in the cockpit, frame-grab a still image of the target and datalink it to the forward air controller, who looks at the image, annotates it with Blue Force positions and datalinks it back," Mathews says, cutting the time needed to "talk" the aircraft to the target to "low-digit minutes". With the Lot 30 aircraft as a starting point, the Flightplan lays out a roadmap for expanding the F/A-18E/F's precision-engagement and battle-management capabilities. Much of the focus is on air-to-ground operations, but the Super Hornet is to get an infrared search and track (IRST) sensor to increase air-to-air capability. Development of the IRST is funded beginning in FY2008, leading to fielding in 2012-13, says Mathews. A targeting, not imaging sensor, the IRST will be integrated with the radar to provide spectral diversity and the ability to engage passively air-to-air. Although it could be mounted internally, a podded sensor is more likely, he says. Under the Flightplan, the distributed targeting area involves the addition of an image exploitation processor and mass storage unit to allow sensor information such as synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) imagery to be manipulated rapidly. The first increment will build on the AESA and ATFLIR targeting capability by georegistering imagery to an onboard database to generate precise target co-ordinates. "This will bring precision targeting for weapons on board the aircraft and provide nearly range-independent, pixel-level accuracy in the cockpit," says Mathews. The next step will extend the capability to multiple and moving targets. A mode will be added to the AESA enabling interleaved SAR and ground moving-target indication, allowing the system to georegister moving targets and update their positions. "Combine that with a weapon datalink and you will be able to release a weapon on the initial co-ordinates and update it in flight as the target moves. We will be able to engage multiple movers, stand off, in all weathers," Mathews says, adding that the final part of the distributed targeting roadmap will add features such as automatic target cueing and aided target recognition to reduce crew workload. The net-centric operations area of the Flightplan focuses on augmenting the communications links on the aircraft. "More and more they will use the aircraft for non-traditional ISR [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] because of its state-of-the-art sensors, and it needs to communicate with anyone inside or outside the theatre," says Mathews. Wideband links Two new links are to be added to the aircraft. A wideband IP (internet protocol) link will provide a "bigger pipe" for streaming video and voice-over-IP using ad hoc networks, compared with the narrowband, pre-established Link 16 networks. The second link will be beyond-line-of-sight satellite communications. Development of the wideband IP link is scheduled to begin in FY2010, followed in FY2012 by the satcom system. The EA-18G Growler electronic-attack variant of the Super Hornet has receive-only satcom, but the new system will transmit and receive voice and data, says Mathews. The third area of the Flightplan, multi-sensor integration, will exploit capabilities inherent in the Block II+ Super Hornet by rolling out software upgrades that tie onboard sensors more tightly together and with offboard sensors. As well as the AESA and ATFLIR, onboard systems include the ALR-67(V)3 radar warning receiver, also made by Raytheon, and the BAE Systems ALQ-214 integrated defensive electronic countermeasures system (IDECM). The ALR-67(V) is a digital cued receiver, and under the Flightplan its capability will be enhanced to allow single-ship geolocation of emitters with enough accuracy to cue the radar for targeting, says Mathews. The capability for multi-ship geolocation using three F/A-18E/Fs, accurate enough for passive targeting, will also be introduced. Some of most powerful sensor-integration capabilities planned involve the AESA and exploit its ability to act as more than a radar. The first of these is planned to be electronic attack, which will involve using the nose-mounted array of solid-state transmit/receive modules as both a highly sensitive passive emitter locator and enormously powerful directional jammer. Mathews cautions that the AESA is limited to in-band electronic attack, and in its field of view and field of regard as both a receiver and jammer, but the system promises to be a powerful weapon against other X-band radars in aircraft and missiles. Multi-sensor integration will tie the AESA together with the ALR-67(V) receiver for cueing and the IDECM for jamming techniques generation. The final area of the Capability Flightplan covers expansion of the weapon types cleared for carriage on the Super Hornet. This begins in FY2008 with Boeing's SLAM-ER stand-off land-attack and Harpoon Block III anti-ship missiles. A later spiral will add the Small Diameter Bomb - probably the seeker-equipped Increment II version designed to attack moving targets, says Mathews. Although the capabilities outlined in the Flightplan will be developed and fielded over a decade or so, the US Navy plans to upgrade all of its Block II Super Hornets to the Block II+ standard. Block I aircraft will also receive upgrades, but will not be retrofitted to the same standard because they lack the new forward fuselage introduced with Block II and cannot accommodate the APG-79 AESA. The US Navy, meanwhile, is looking at increasing procurement of F/A-18E/Fs beyond its planned 460 aircraft to offset the delay in Joint Strike Fighter initial operational capability to 2015. The Flightplan is designed to ensure, whatever its generation, that the Super Hornet stays at the leading edge of OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY

http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2007/03/12/2407802.htm

saptarishi
BRFite
Posts: 269
Joined: 05 May 2007 01:20
Location: ghaziabad
Contact:

Postby saptarishi » 06 Jun 2007 23:25

Flying the F/A-18F Super Hornet

http://www.ausairpower.net/SuperBug.html

see the link for excellent pictures

SaiK
BRF Oldie
Posts: 36416
Joined: 29 Oct 2003 12:31
Location: NowHere

Postby SaiK » 06 Jun 2007 23:31

Phazotron AI 2007
not a problem.. thought the link itself was self explanatory.
Last edited by SaiK on 07 Jun 2007 00:47, edited 1 time in total.

Drevin
BRFite
Posts: 408
Joined: 21 Sep 2006 12:27

Postby Drevin » 08 Jun 2007 18:03

Nice article that explains how the thrust of the EJ200 will increase to 27-28klbf as a MLU feature. Also check out the sophisticated TVC nozzle being built by ITP, Spain also part of the MLU Tranche3 package.

Plz check the section titled "Future of the EJ200"

http://www.eurofighter-typhoon.co.uk/Eurofighter/engines.html

The EJ200 rocks. The MLU EJ200 will have approx. 18klbf dry thrust. :twisted:

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16817
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Postby NRao » 15 Jun 2007 06:48

Not quite from the list of ACs, however PAK FA

Sumeet
BRFite
Posts: 1533
Joined: 22 May 2002 11:31

Postby Sumeet » 18 Jun 2007 22:27

note how Northrop Grumann, the main AESA radar maker define generations of AESA radar.

http://www.es.northropgrumman.com/ASD/b ... t/AESA.pdf

1st gen --- Ultra reliable radar (1985)
2nd gen --- Advanced Tactical Fighter (1989)
3rd gen --- APG-77 (1996)
4th gen --- APG-80, APG-77(V)1, APG-81.

Expect thales stuff to be 3rd gen AESA or in between 3rd & 4th. Thales already has experience of AMSAR & DRAAMA 1 AESA. Right now they are going for DRAAMA 2 with GaAs and soon it will be DRAAMA 2 with GaN. They can catch up with NG radars if they get export customer for Rafale and both the french and importer are seriously interested in bridging the gap.

AESA's are being flight tested on Rafale & Typhoon. Of course EU doesn't have them operational on any fighter yet. But its not long before they get it. The gap isn't that huge.

UMS in France will make GaN modules available by 2010-12, check the link below.

http://ums.openkast.com/ums/corporate_i ... p_page.php

With GaN T/R module -->


* T/R Module power can potentially go up by 1 or 2 orders with wide bandgap GaN and SiC MMIC.

* An existing AESA's GaAs T/R modules can be replaced with GaN or SiC T/R modules having 10 times the power.

* Then you have either a 10 times improvement in search volume or a 78% increase in track range.


Source: Phased-Array and Radar Breakthroughs, Dr. Eli Brookner, Raytheon Co.

More benefits of GaN -->

* High engergy band gap of GaN will help disadvantages GaAs face in areas like high supply currents, medium power per mm gate length, termal expense to prevent hot spots.

* GaN transistors can operate at 8 to 10 times the power densities of GaAs.

* Use of higher bias voltages, and optimised thermal behaviour.

* Because of material's high impedance one can have smaller input/output matching networks and related losses on the amplifier chip.


Source: Current Status of Airborne Active Phased Array (AESA) Radar
Systems and Future Trends, Hans Hommel, Heinz-Peter Feldle
EADS Deutschland GmbH



Other advantages of GaN:

* Increased input power level capability.
* Reception amplifier can face high power electromagnetic aggression due to power handling capability of GaN.


Source: T/R- Modules Technological and Technical Trends for Phased Array Antennas, Yves Mancuso, Patrick Gremillet, Philippe Lacomme, Thales Airborne Systems.

Thales already had a working software[earlier AESA with american T/R module], but they were waiting for an all french AESA before they optimize it so that it gives best possible performance for an AESA radar.

and it doesn't ends there thales already has real time all digital AESA electronic attack capability demonstrated through it EA pod development programme. They can add it to RBE-2 AESA soon.

http://www.thalesgroup.com/all/pdf/AEA.pdf

They have a techniques generator that works for the EA pod and instead of using the pod's AESA antenna they can use RBE-2's AESA antenna to transmit ECM/EA. Only limit will be imposed by bandwidth of RBE-2's T/R module. Since UMS is an equal JV between EADS and Thales, expect GaN to be available for Typhoon team too.


RBE2 AESA, Thales Brochure

kit
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4044
Joined: 13 Jul 2006 18:16

Active Stealth

Postby kit » 18 Jun 2007 23:04

Is it possible for the aesa radar to protect the fighter using active radar cancellation techniques .. i am not referring to active jamming but something similar to noise cancellation techiques ? Read somewhere that the spectra aboard the Rafale is capable of doing something like this .. you analyse the incoming radar signal then cancel it .. hey presto .. you are now invisible ! (to radar that is!

SaiK
BRF Oldie
Posts: 36416
Joined: 29 Oct 2003 12:31
Location: NowHere

Postby SaiK » 19 Jun 2007 00:35

STEALTH RADAR SYSTEM SEES THROUGH TREES, WALLS -- UNDETECTED

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/noiserad.htm

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5342
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Postby Kartik » 19 Jun 2007 01:09

if the IRST is to be mounted on the F-18E/F's centerline fuel tank that would mean that the pilot will be hard pressed to jettison it during combat- and if the centerline tank restricts Gs during combat as it does on the MiG-29 (where the centerline tank could be used only till 3.5-4 G and had to be jettisoned for higher Gs) then it would be more of a hindrance. this just goes to show that the F-18 E/F's airframe has already come to the limits of avionics space..

JaiS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 2190
Joined: 01 Mar 2003 12:31
Location: JPEG-jingostan
Contact:

Postby JaiS » 20 Jun 2007 03:02

Rafale cockpit pic - Credits to Kovy

Image


Return to “Trash Can Archive”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 65 guests