International Aerospace Discussion

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Sanjay M
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 12 Jun 2008 09:55

12:21 EST, June 11, 2008

University of Florida professor designs plasma-propelled flying saucer

Flying saucers may soon be more fact than mere science fiction. University of Florida mechanical and aerospace engineering associate professor Subrata Roy has submitted a patent application for a circular, spinning aircraft design reminiscent of the spaceships seen in countless Hollywood films. Roy, however, calls his design a "wingless electromagnetic air vehicle," or WEAV.


One of the most revolutionary aspects of Roy's use of magnetohydrodynamics is that the vehicle will have no moving parts. The lack of traditional mechanical aircraft parts, such as propellers or jet engines, should provide tremendous reliability, Roy said. Such a design also will allow the WEAV to hover and take off vertically.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby abhischekcc » 12 Jun 2008 13:23

The report of the 'flying saucer' given by Sanjay M shows a principle used in Vimans of yore.

The description of the propulsion techniques is remniscent of what I read about the propulsion of vimans.

The plasma helps by making the vehicle float over the earth's magnetic sphere.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 12 Jun 2008 18:08

You know that's a very stereotypical thing to say, don't you?
People make fun of Indians for saying that kind of stuff.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby abhischekcc » 12 Jun 2008 20:45

Sanjay, I meant that seriously.

US universities have millions of old Hindu documents covering a vast variety of subjects - including weapons.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Jaeger » 13 Jun 2008 11:40

abhischekcc wrote:The report of the 'flying saucer' given by Sanjay M shows a principle used in Vimans of yore.

The description of the propulsion techniques is remniscent of what I read about the propulsion of vimans.

The plasma helps by making the vehicle float over the earth's magnetic sphere.



could you share with us what you've read about the propulsion of vimanas? and where? it would be great to read this...

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 13 Jun 2008 12:56

Krishna's chakra is also a levitated object and the spinning could be another electromagnetic
force acting on its rotational axis but other forces hold it in balance around the finger.

there was something similar in Predator-2 movie iirc. move it out of its holding field and it goes
batnuts wrecking the whole house.

while the greco-roman and scandinavian gods used basic direct LOS weapons like zeus thunderbolt
or mjoelnir the hammer wielded by Thor, we yindoos were already into standoff, sensor bused BVR weapons like chakras who chased manouvering target, cluster munitions (one 'arrow' splitting into 1000), napalm, flying machines, ..... Krishna and Indralok devas were fond of these smart weapons, even gentle Saraswati had a special liquid when sprayed from her swan flying machine would weaken the asuras running around below.

Shiva & Parsurama ofcourse preferred to get into CQB and do what they do best - tear everyone apart.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 13 Jun 2008 13:13

well this is not all laughing matter.

there was actually a text called the vaimanika shastra.
I read a book on ancient flying objects in India sometime back which had a lot of the details.
Some of it was certainly intriguing but overall it was inconclusive, to say the least !

will post excerpts in a couple of weeks hopefully, if you guys are interested.

P.S all this is frightfully OT here. we should continue in the india's contribution thread, IMO.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby PaulJI » 13 Jun 2008 14:40

abhischekcc wrote:Sanjay, I meant that seriously.

US universities have millions of old Hindu documents covering a vast variety of subjects - including weapons.


What invites mockery is discussing mythological weapons as if they were real. Discussing real weapons (e.g. trebuchets, ballistae, Greek Fire, & whatever equivalents there were in India, doubtless described in some of the documents you mention) is a perfectly respectable activity. I think Sanjay may have been suggesting that you'd strayed into the mythological side of the discussion, & were risking ridicule as a result.

BTW, Singha - nice post. Good point about the relative sophistication of LOS vs loitering smart munitions. :lol:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Bolasani » 13 Jun 2008 18:14

Singha wrote:there was something similar in Predator-2 movie iirc. move it out of its holding field and it goes
batnuts wrecking the whole house.


Are you sure you are this was in a predator movie. There is a similar scene in "Men in Black". Kay after catching it says something like "This little thing caused the 1975 new york blackout."

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby abhischekcc » 13 Jun 2008 18:26


Raju

Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Raju » 13 Jun 2008 22:23

abhishek, isn't all this loony conspiracy ? I thought that was my speciality.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 13 Jun 2008 22:26

yes it was a crappy predator-2 movie without the awesome original crew. it was set in a city. predbhai
ran around killing people with these magnetic chakras.

Raju

Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Raju » 13 Jun 2008 22:31

the quest for truth is simple. Once we find it everyhing will connect and fall into place.

vimanas are part of our suppressed history. If commons come to know it were true then they will ask a lot of questions. And hence the only info that is available is from alternative media.

same for many other things.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 14 Jun 2008 03:42

for heaven's sake guys take this to the nukkad or even the India's contribution thread !!

Please !Please !Please !

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 14 Jun 2008 10:01

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0806/de ... 17_big.jpg
wow !

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0806/Ph ... 9Jun08.jpg
and holy cow, snow queen at MARS!.. sounds like phoenix just landed over thin surface of sand/rock over a possible frozen lake/ocean!?!?
http://planetary.org/news/2008/0601_Hol ... ed_on.html
Another image that came into the University of Arizona Phoenix Science Operations Center late Friday night showed an even larger, white patch under another part of the lander, so substantial a patch that it had team members exclaiming “Holy Cow,” hence its name.

mmm....
“The thrusters have interacted with the surface and thrown soil aside revealing a bright hard layer that seems to parallel the surface. The majority opinion, although it is not unanimous, is that we have uncovered ice about four to six inches under the soil,” he said. “But this is an astounding picture.”

great! hopefully its ice and not some other frozen liquid.. interesting times ahead.
The final determination about what Snow Queen and Holy Cow are revealing "will come with the analysis of the material,” said Keller. “The patches we’re discussing we can’t reach, but we think this extend in all the directions so we’ll be able to dig and do the analysis.”

hope the patch is not the only icy [or whatever that is] area there.
The ice, he clarified, is like the ice we know and not the carbon dioxide (CO2) ice known to be present on Mars. “The temperatures are not right for CO2 ice,” he noted. “It’s way too cold and CO2 ice would evaporate quickly.”

cool for our Virgin CEO who is planning for MARS occupation.. he wants to heat up the planet within next 100 years., by microbial deployments.. CO2 means all it has to do is heat up those CO2s to warm up the planet.
“The TEGA team has come up with a workaround that uses a backup filament to the filament in the ion source they believe is bad and that is the workaround they will be implementing today."

That is a learning for ISRO as well for Chandrayan [if any landers are planned].. backups!!! backups!! wonder how they re-configure all this.. interesting!

BTW:
The TEGA team suffered a similar filament failure just before launch and though the instrument was diassembled, repaired, and cleaned before it was buttoned up for launch last year, the team now believes “contamination” is the culprit, Spencer said in today’s telecon press conference.

mmm.. and who said failures never repeat once fixed.. the fix is always for certain conditions.. they perhaps missed something or the error correction did not anticipate something entirely new. can't regress at MARS I guess.
Right now, added Keller, there is “a preference” for Snow Queen. “It’s close and we can look in detail and there we have the chance to see changes,” he said. “If it’s ice and it sublimes, then we have the chance to look at it and detect changes and this is I think very important so I think this is a clear priority.”

The Phoenix team is currently relying on Mars Odyssey for uplinking its commands to its charge, since MRO’s Electra UHF radio is still under investigation, according to Spencer, although the MRO communications system is being used to downlink data to the team.

“The flight team and the spacecraft continue to perform extremely well and we’re moving ahead with our plans," summed up Spencer today. "Things are going extremely well."

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Chandi Prasaad » 14 Jun 2008 13:34

See how Chinese handle Russia and compare that with Indian Gorshkov

The Sino-Russia Il-76 Row
by Andrei Chang
Hong Kong (UPI) Jun 12, 2008
For some time, military cooperation between China and Russia has been stalled over a failed deal involving China's import of Russian Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft. China claims that Russia violated the terms of an agreement involving the sale of 38 aircraft. But Russia says this claim is unfair.

Negotiations on the aircraft deal began seven years ago. By the time the contract was signed in 2005, China had agreed to purchase 30 Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft and eight Ilyushin Il-78 air-to-air refueling tankers at an extremely low price. According to a source in the Russian military industry, China initially offered only $18 million for each plane. The Russian side proposed $22 million, and eventually the two sides settled on a price tag of $20 million per aircraft.

Such a low price was unprecedented in the international transport aircraft market. By comparison, around the same time Jordan had contracted for a variant of the Ilyushin Il-76 at a price of about $50 million per aircraft.

For this reason, the deal was controversial from the outset. The discussions began in 2001, the contract was signed in 2005, but by 2008, not a single Ilyushin Il-76 transport had been delivered.

The aircraft were to be assembled from Russian parts at the Tashkent Aircraft Production Corp. in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, a former Soviet republic in Central Asia. Out of the 38 Ilyushin Il-76 transports contracted, 15 were already half finished. The other Ilyushin Il-76s were to be newly manufactured.

The Tashkent-based company was facing serious financial difficulties, however, and was unable to produce the aircraft according to schedule. This was made worse by the dramatic fluctuation in the value of the U.S. dollar and escalating inflation in Russia -- making the cost of producing the transport aircraft much higher than when the deal was originally signed.

According to the Russian side, the Chinese have been unreasonable in refusing to renegotiate the deal in light of changing circumstances.

The Russian source compared the situation with a similar one faced with India over a 2004 deal involving the refurbishing of the aging Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier for use by the Indian navy. The Russian side was able to hold frank discussions with the Indian side, the source said, and acknowledged that it had made errors in the initial assessment.

The task was to refit the old aircraft carrier, but after dismantling the vessel, Russian engineers realized that the project was practically equivalent to building a brand-new aircraft carrier.

"The Indian experts saw the same situation we did, and as a result the two sides could look at the issue with mutual understanding and find a satisfactory solution to the problem," the source explained.

But the Chinese have been less understanding and less accommodating in their negotiations with the Kremlin over the Ilyushin Il-76 deal, the Russians claim. The Chinese also insist they will not sign any major military procurement agreement with Russia until this problem is solved to their satisfaction.

Why China still needs Russian aircraft
Russian officials complain that the Chinese have not been understanding and accommodating in their negotiations with the Kremlin over the long-stalled Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft deal.

The Chinese insist they will not sign any major military procurement agreement with the Kremlin until this problem is solved to their satisfaction.

The Russians say they are still willing to carry out the agreement and complete the manufacture and delivery of the Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft to China. But considering the current reality in Russia and Uzbekistan, the manufacturer feels it is only fair to readjust the price.

A source from Ilyushin Finance told UPI recently that the Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft dispute with China has made some recent progress. That is, China is now aware of the reality in Russia and is willing to discuss the possibility of signing a new contract. The China side insists, however, that the specific models of the transport aircraft, production sites and prices all will have to be renegotiated.

The Chinese side also has asked to inspect the aircraft production plant before signing a new official agreement. A more feasible plan is that the Chinese side first will inspect the Ulyanovsk Aircraft Factory, which is now preparing for the production of a brand-new version of the Ilyushin Il-76, called the Il-476.


The Ilyushin Il-476 is equipped with a full numerical flight-control system, a glass cockpit and a new-generation PS-90 engine. China is somewhat familiar with the Ulyanovsk Aircraft Factory, which in the past has produced Tupolev Tu-204 passenger aircraft for China that proved quite satisfactory in quality.

The factory will need to upgrade its equipment to manufacture the Ilyushin Il-476, as currently only 20 percent of the necessary equipment is ready. Fortunately, money is not a problem at the moment. The Ilyushin Group has sufficient financial capability to organize the production.

Russia recently set up the state-owned United Aircraft Corp., made up of the Ilyushin Group, Sukhoi and MiG. The Tashkent Aircraft Production Corp. also has decided to join this group, with the final signing ceremony to take place within two months. Once the Tashkent company formally joins the state corporation, it may receive new funding and be able to resume its full production capability.

According to the Russian source, China already has initiated preliminary contact with the United Aircraft Corp. to discuss renegotiating the Ilyushin Il-76 transport aircraft deal, but the whole process will take some time. It is not clear when a new agreement would be signed.

The latest developments with regard to the Ilyushin Il-76 deal are exactly in keeping with this author's prediction -- that China would have no alternative to Russia to produce its military transport aircraft.

The question now is what impact China's recent creation of the J-11B -- an illegal copy of Russia's Sukhoi Su-27 air superiority fighter -- will have on its renegotiation of the Ilyushin Il-76 deal with the Russians.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby abhischekcc » 14 Jun 2008 14:28

Singha wrote:yes it was a crappy predator-2 movie without the awesome original crew. it was set in a city. predbhai
ran around killing people with these magnetic chakras.


P2 was set in LA with Danny Glover playing the harassed outer-space-wild-life hunter.

That movie was pretty decent.

AVP1 was crappy. And from what I have heard AVP2 did the unthinkable - it was worse than AVP1. I mean, how can people take two powerful brands like alien and predator and turn it something like 'The Bridges of Madison County'.

Last OT post

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 15 Jun 2008 20:11

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080615.html
phoenix starts digging!.. coolest moments.

wonder why wouldn't they send an analyzer to analyze air /atmosphere content.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 20 Jun 2008 16:20

Friday, June 20, 2008
Sharper Satellite Images

A new satellite could produce color images of objects half the size of those visible to its predecessors.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 21 Jun 2008 13:43

wow!!!

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0806/so ... nge_v3.jpg

sounds like the next mission could carrying a jet engined blower to seek to the ice (hopefully h20)

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 22 Jun 2008 02:48

Yes, all this news about water ice is just fabulous.

They say there's enough water on Mars, frozen in the icecaps and also underground, that if it were all melted it could cover the entire planetary surface in a layer a few meters deep.

I'm surprised that the Phoenix lander was designed with such clunky equipment. I'm not trying to insult the hard work of the fine people at NASA, but if experienced experts from private industry (eg. mining) had been able to design this thing, I think the equipment on that lander would have been much better.

That's why I feel India should send a balloon.

Btw, I can't resist posting some

marvelous new pics of Mars

which I came across. They really look great. Take note of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's picture of the Earth and Moon together in the same frame. It's just so cool to see Terra and Luna together, au naturel. That really looks incredible. I wonder what Earth continent it's showing - can anyone tell? Might be North and South America.
Last edited by Sanjay M on 22 Jun 2008 03:16, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby John Snow » 22 Jun 2008 03:00

Sanjay M wrote:
Friday, June 20, 2008
Sharper Satellite Images

A new satellite could produce color images of objects half the size of those visible to its predecessors.


small question boss do we want blower or just change the outlet to inlet so that it sucks,
remember the atmospheric pressure is only 1 % of the earth, there fore suction or jet may not be good idea, instead a mechanical recirculating ball and screw (hydraulic oil driven closed circuit sump to pump)
like on (CNC I like this CinC music factory) type mechanisim is better also note grabity is not much helpfull either its just 1/3 of earth.
So postive cranking up of the load is easier and better ( since its 1/3rd heavy maal, small hydraulic motor is good I am not suggesting pneumatic again because of rarity of hawa)

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 22 Jun 2008 03:07


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 22 Jun 2008 03:21

Here's a cool picture of a Rainbow on Mars, taken by the Opportunity rover:

Image

This is a result of water droplets in the air, just like here on Earth.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby krishnasr » 22 Jun 2008 03:44

Sanjay M wrote:Yes, all this news about water ice is just fabulous....I'm surprised that the Phoenix lander was designed with such clunky equipment. I'm not trying to insult the hard work of the fine people at NASA, but if experienced experts from private industry (eg. mining) had been able to design this thing, I think the equipment on that lander would have been much better.
..


I guess they partnered with Univ of Arizona for this puppy. You have to owe to the kids there.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby John Snow » 22 Jun 2008 08:12

I was only talking about scooping or sucking, no drilling. That is no going beyond loose soil or water /ice crystals.
The second device with heating tip is of no use as it melt the ice, unless it collects vapours and then again liquifies it.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Bolasani » 22 Jun 2008 13:27

Sanjay M wrote:Here's a cool picture of a Rainbow on Mars, taken by the Opportunity rover:

Image

This is a result of water droplets in the air, just like here on Earth.


Hi Sanjay,

Could you please share the source of this picture.

Regards
Bharat

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 23 Jun 2008 18:59

seems the father of stealth was a Ru physics guru, whose work was adapted by
northrop and lockheed engineers using their superior computers later. he is retired
and teaches in UCLA now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ya._Ufimtsev

Ru system truly had a genius for theoritical analysis of complex problems in sciences.

http://care.eng.uci.edu/ufimtsev.htm

at the age of 70+ he is still publishing papers and worked as principal engineer
in northrop :eek: enquoob was speaking of another even older aerospace prof
"roaming the hallways at a conf looking for new things to learn"...

we need to obtain ToT for that "system" more than SC blades or what not.
it works, and coupled with modern computational tools which is now available
will have a devastating impact on our weapons industry and science in general.

for another reason I checked the mit maths dept..seems to have a lot of east
euro/russian named students.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 23 Jun 2008 22:42

Another way is to invite these profs and students into our universities for projects.. that way, we have those exposures as well. Give them the importance in those areas where we would like to establish.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Lisa » 24 Jun 2008 15:02

Received in an e-mail


BAE shoots for the moon to deliver the Typhoon

Engineers worked out how to compensate for minute tidal and ground movements when building RAF's new fighter, reports Roland Gribben

The RAF is said to be over the moon with the Typhoon, one of the world's most advanced swing-role combat aircraft that costs the taxpayer the little matter of £ 63m apiece. Little wonder. BAE Systems engineers had to accommodate the moon in working out details of the final assembly programme for the RAF's front-line fighter more than a decade ago.

Geological surveys covering the final assembly unit at BAE's Warton factory near Preston, Lancashire, showed that the earth would be moving fractionally - just one or two millimetres - as the final parts for the twin engine jet packed with delicate electronic gadgetry were moved into place. It was all down to the moon. The gravitational pull of the moon meant that the tidal flow of the nearby River Ribble ever so gently disturbed the gravel under the Warton assembly hangar, potentially jeopardising the performance and efficiency of the Mach 2 jet because of the failure to align key components correctly.

advertisementThe moon still plays with the tides around Warton and the earth continues to move, but BAE engineers and executives now breathe a regular sigh of relief and the RAF is said to be delighted with the behaviour of the Typhoon and its operational efficiency. It's all down to imagination, innovation and engineering ingenuity. BAE engineers came up with a brilliant solution to cope with the moon and ground movement and meet the demanding technical specifications of the final assembly phase. Two huge "floating'' concrete rafts on the hangar floor hold the key.

The rafts, 18m long and 3m thick, hold the aircraft and all the measuring equipment. Two sophisticated laser trackers and nine computer-automated jacks control movement, cancelling out the effects of the moon and tides, thus ensuring that the final alignment more than meets the demands laid down by the designers. Steve Throup, one of the small group of engineers involved in rising to the moon challenge, recalls: "We created a facility that was world class and is still recognised as world class. Engineering is all about challenges. You meet them with innovation and experience.''

The challenge was met back in 1997 after the go-ahead to build Typhoon - then called the Eurofighter - but BAE is only now releasing details of the work involved in ensuring the Typhoon was not grounded by the moon. Rising costs and political infighting, coupled with long delays, meant that the Typhoon was already surrounded by controversy before the Warton engineers got to grips with geology and the Ribble tides. The Typhoon was no ordinary combat aircraft either, capable of flying at 33,000ft at twice the speed of sound with computerised flight-control systems providing what is described as "full carefree handling''.

Fly-by-wire controls, autopilots and pilot interceptors have been installed to reduce pilot workload while low-cost maintenance and on-board testing of systems means the Typhoon is cheaper to run than the Tornado and other aircraft types it is replacing. Four nations have co-operated in its development - Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain - and 620 have been ordered; 232 for RAF squadrons and Saudi Arabia lined up as the biggest export customer.

The Typhoon package - moon included - presented BAE and its contractors with a considerable headache in ensuring Warton was turned into a state-of-the-art site for the final assembly and flight testing for the aircraft. Throup says: "The Typhoon requires an extremely high degree of accuracy in marrying up the components. There has to be absolute alignment for aerodynamic purposes and for the handling characteristics of the aircraft. This highlighted the geological fact that at Warton the ground moves.

"When you're trying to build machine tools and bringing together three or four elements in the airframe to an extremely high level of accuracy any movement becomes significant. "The ground might be moving only a quarter of a millimetre over 10m, but that's significant. When you have production processes taking place over a number of bays and have to take the tidal flows into account, then that's another significant factor to consider.

"A lot of innovation went into that hangar. We were told by the machine tool manufacturer that he had to guarantee his tools to a particular accuracy. He told us we had to guarantee the foundations to another particular level of accuracy. The fact that the ground moves as well is just another challenge from an engineering point of view.'' The engineering teams started off with 22 options and narrowed them down to "half a dozen realistic options''.

There was no "trial and error'', insists Throup. "It's a matter of iteration. You start of with a requirement driven by aircraft tolerances. You look at the solution, and that solution has to be based on some good numbers.

"We spent two and a half years on the final assembly hangar. We got the design solution in place and spent the final year installing the floating foundations. The foundation moves about a 10th of a millimetre and it needed a laser alignment system to ensure we got them in place. "You can imagine the disruption in digging a big hole in the production facility. But we had major components from the UK, Germany, Spain and Italy for the final assembly and had to ensure we got the alignment right and use very high accuracy electric motors to give you the straightest possible airframe.''

The upshot was that the BAE engineers were able to produce a significant improvement in the Typhoon tolerances. "By ensuring the airframe is more accurately aligned you achieve more performance from the same amount of thrust and with less drag. So you're going faster and you achieve that performance for less fuel burn,'' says Throup.

The assembly accuracy means the pilot ends up "saving'' fuel. It may be only 60 litres, but the technology employed on the Typhoon has been adapted for the F-35 Lightning II, the Joint Strike Fighter being developed by Lockheed Martin and BAE. Throup says: "The Typhoon hangar is a 'must see' for all the Lockheed engineers."

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 25 Jun 2008 03:57


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby PaulJI » 25 Jun 2008 17:21

Singha wrote:seems the father of stealth was a Ru physics guru, whose work was adapted by northrop and lockheed engineers using their superior computers later. he is retired and teaches in UCLA now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Ya._Ufimtsev
....


'"Everyone makes a secret of it, but Maxwell's equations have been around for more than a hundred years," says Dr Peter Brecher, vice president for technology management at EADS Military Aircraft.' - referring to the Lampyridae project.

Ufimtsev built on the refinements of Maxwells work by Arnold Sommerfeld (1868-1951). What Ufimtsev did was provide a methodology for estimating total radar reflectivity of an object, from Maxwells & Sommerfelds equations. His work was one step (though a major one) in many leading to low RCS aircraft. Not really "the father of stealth".

BTW, in addition to dissipating reflections, RAM is used extensively, & that originated in German during WW2, with research continuing in the UK & USA after the war.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby vina » 25 Jun 2008 23:05

A red letter day for Aviation History in India. According to NDTV, Dhruv bags first export order for $51m for 7 choppers from Ecuador!!

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby ranganathan » 25 Jun 2008 23:11


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 26 Jun 2008 10:09


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Jaeger » 26 Jun 2008 12:17

ranganathan wrote:They secured a couple of order from peru.

http://www.domain-b.com/aero/aero_mfg/2 ... lance.html

Link to ecuadorean deal.
http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/st ... 0080054460


So is it confirmed that we have 2 deals of 2 and 7 choppers respectively?

Why I ask is that neither of the reports refers to the other deal - each only talks about Peru & Ecuador respectively, and knowing our DDM's scope for muddle-headedness, I wouldn't put a goof-up beyond them. I really, really hope it's BOTH the deals - is there any other report about this with both mentioned?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 26 Jun 2008 20:11

Airbus Military's A400M is Finally Here

EADS rolls out fully painted Airbus Military A400M
Flight International

Image
Image
Image

Larger Sized Pics are Here



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby soutikghosh » 26 Jun 2008 23:02



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