Quick Clot Kits For Jawans - 1st Round Donations Delivered!!

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skher
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Quick Clot Kits For Jawans - 1st Round Donations Delivered!!

Postby skher » 29 Mar 2009 13:33

Jump to viewtopic.php?p=775822#p775822 for the announcement


gauravsurati wrote:Why this thread?

During recent counter insurgency operation against heavily armed terrorists from TSP India lost 8 brave souls in intense fighting environment. Later it was realised that less number of lives could have lost if soldiers bleeding could have been stopped immediately using a product namely 'Quick Clot' and then evacuated.

From Hindustan Times

SOLDIERS INVOLVED in counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir are bleeding to death for want of life-saving kits to treat battle field injuries.

The army has failed to equip tens of thousands of troops with an adequate number of frontline haemorrhage control kits to stop excessive bleeding from combat injuries.

Official documents show that the Udhampur-based Northern Command, the nerve centre of the army’s counter-insurgency operations, has ordered just 850 pouches of a granular haemo static substance called QuikClot with proven clotting ability, in the last three years.

The army had no budgetary provision even for the small number of kits bought. These were procured out of the Army Commander’s special financial powers. The price of QuikClot works out to Rs 3,640 per unit.It is a standard issue item for the US Marine Corps. American soldiers serving in Afghanistan and Iraq carry it as their preferred haemostatic agent.

“The army has failed to meet the urgent requirement of lifesaving kits demanded by Rashtriya Rifles (RR) units.

“It is an effective non-surgical method to stop bleeding that cannot be controlled by ordinary gauze or the Rakshak bandages used by us. Every team that goes into an operation must carry it. We have saved many lives and many more could be saved if supplies improve,” said an army doctor posted in Kashmir.



This thread is a humble initiative by BRFites to gather funds, procure QuickClots and deliver it to Rastriya Rifles in J&K. Offcourse, this has to be done by Army top brass and babus but due to their lethargic view towards lives of jawans, BRFites and jingos has taken this initiative into their own hands.

This is a collaborative project and what we need is a teamwork and resources from fellow BRFites and jingos especially from Delhi.

Here is the Indian Distributor found by SunilUpa saar.

SAGAR FOSSIL FUEL TECHNOLOGIES PVT. LTD.

257-A(1st Floor), Hauz Rani Market,
Opp. Max Devki Hospital,
Malviya Nagar,
New Delhi-110017, India
Tel: 91-11-26675536
Fax: 91-11-26675537
Email: quikclot@yahoo.co.in



Hindustan Times:Too few life-saving kits for soldiers in J&K


SOLDIERS INVOLVED in counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir are bleeding to death for want of life-saving kits to treat battle field injuries.

The army has failed to equip tens of thousands of troops with an adequate number of frontline haemorrhage control kits to stop excessive bleeding from combat injuries.

Official documents show that the Udhampur-based Northern Command, the nerve centre of the army’s counter-insurgency operations, has ordered just 850 pouches of a granular haemo static substance called QuikClot with proven clotting ability, in the last three years.

The army had no budgetary provision even for the small number of kits bought. These were procured out of the Army Commander’s special financial powers. The price of QuikClot works out to Rs 3,640 per unit.

It is a standard issue item for the US Marine Corps. American soldiers serving in Afghanistan and Iraq carry it as their preferred haemostatic agent.

“The army has failed to meet the urgent requirement of lifesaving kits demanded by Rashtriya Rifles (RR) units.

Haemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death in combat,” said an officer from an RR unit, not authorised to speak to the media.

The Rashtriya Rifles forms the backbone of the army’s anti-insurgency operations. At any given time, close to one lakh soldiers are directly engaged in counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir, army sources said. The kits procured by the army are hardly enough for them.

A senior officer in the Army headquarters said that these kits had been provided to regimental medical officers and nursing assistants who accompanied soldiers. But officers in Kashmir said this was only a makeshift arrangement.

“The medics can’t be with you all the time. Soldiers have to be self sufficient,” said an officer.

Commanding officers realise they need to source haemostatic kits on their own to give soldiers the cutting edge of military medicine.

Many Rashtriya Rifles units have begun diverting regimental funds, collected from profits made from canteen sales, to enable soldiers to rapidly treat multiple wound sites and various wound types with a single packet of material.

The kit gives precious evacuation time to wounded soldiers before they can be treated at a hospital. The army has admitted that there is no substitute for QuikClot because of its exceptional haemorrhage-control features.

“We regularly send jawans to New Delhi to buy the kits from the only distributor in India. However, due to paucity of funds, we barely order two or three kits at a time.

Ideally a battalion should hold , a stock of at least 100 kits at any given time,” said another Rashtriya Rifles officer.

Over the last two years, Rashtriya Rifles units have purchased around 1,500 kits on their own.

Army fatalities have averaged around 100 a year for the past several years.

“It is an effective non-surgical method to stop bleeding that cannot be controlled by ordinary gauze or the Rakshak bandages used by us.

Every team that goes into an operation must carry it. We have saved many lives and many more could be saved if supplies improve,” said an army doctor posted in Kashmir.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby p_saggu » 30 Mar 2009 02:17

Surgical Staplers: These come in circular and linear forms. They are most commonly used to staple intestines / stomach together in a jiffy when normally suturing it using sutures would have taken an hour. They can also reach in hard to reach areas and have revolutionized abdominal surgery because of the speed and good results that they offer.
Mostly they deploy titanium clips / staples that remain inside forever. The use of Titanium is important because it is biocompatible - does not encite a tissue reaction AND it is MRI friendly - remember for an MRI to take place, no magnetizing material should be present in and around the body.
There are also Skin staplers, which will staple a skin wound in a jiffy, they really save a lot of time. These are mostly made out of steel and will need to be removed about 8 - 10 days later with a simple staple remover.

Surgical clips: Again titanium clips, mostly used during surgery to clip bleeding vessels during surgery. They are in the form of a V, and the vessel in caught in between and the staple is squeezed to close the spurting vessel.

Dermal Adhesives: You apply on the edges of a wound (it has a nozzle like Feviquick) and then bring the two skin edges together. The adhesive sticks to adhesive across the wound and the wound closes.

IMHO, for the battlefield, the most important things will be QuickClot and the Skin staplers to allow the nursing orderlies and doctors to quickly manage a large number of superficial injuries (Flesh Wounds) very rapidly.

Please note that, in the field, Quick clot is only meant for the most common flesh wounds, and the injured person then has to wash the area with water, pour quickclot and cover it up with a clean surgical dressing which will add some amount of pressure to the area - a bandage etc until he reaches a field MI room.
In this youtube video, it is seen clotting the bleeding from a severed Femoral Artery - now this is massive bleeding that will kill within 5 minutes if not controlled. But to be able to pour this into a small bullet entry wound in sufficient amount and for it to reach the actual site of bleeding (It has to reach the bleeding vessel itself to be effective) on the field will be difficult, unless the wound is open right upto the bleeding vessel.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kn63UeF577Q

Wikipedia - Limitations of Quickclot:
In order to be effective, QuikClot must be applied to the source of the bleeding, the torn blood vessel itself. This is often accessible in an open laceration, but may be deeply buried and inaccessible in case of a puncture or gunshot wound. Also, foreign material or accumulated blood may have to be washed out to provide access to the bleeding vessel. The majority of deaths from exsanguination (blood loss) come from internal injuries, such as the laceration or perforation of the liver, spleen, or major arteries, which can only be controlled and treated by surgical techniques, therefore QuikClot is only useful in a situation where a person has serious external injuries that cannot easily be controlled by direct pressure, elevation, or a tourniquet.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Gaurav_S » 30 Mar 2009 06:07

Baljeet wrote:
Raj Malhotra wrote:Even with prior information, if we loose 8 men then they are one too many. No dis-respect to soldiers but i wonder additional resources and equipment would have helped matters?

Raj
IA losses more men to excessive bleeding. As mentioned before, we don't have any field kits to stop the bleeding and by the time a wounded warrior is given medical care its too late. we as a nation lack support infrastrucutre. What I am failing to understand is, if we are sending a platoon-company for operation, how come our officers don't have some helos on ready to launched within minutes to evac the wounded warrior. We can customize helos with thermal imaging, IR, and advanced radars that will provide better info to our ground troops. These helos flying 1000ft above ground can provide fire and recon support.


This is too sad to know. The soldier whose life could be saved cannot be saved due to lack of field kits that merely cost 3000Rs. This is just contrary to US Marine in Afghanistan where they have set up state of art operation theatre with every possible thing on earth and hardly some one dies once safely trasnported to the facility. They are also well trained for afghanistan like scenario in their training facilities in desert somewhere in California. like IA soldiers in COIN scenarios.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby gusidhu » 30 Mar 2009 07:43

Samay wrote:
Many Rashtriya Rifles units have begun diverting regimental funds, collected from profits made from canteen sales, to enable soldiers to rapidly treat multiple wound sites and various wound types with a single packet of material.

The kit gives precious evacuation time to wounded soldiers before they can be treated at a hospital. The army has admitted that there is no substitute for QuikClot because of its exceptional haemorrhage-control features.

“We regularly send jawans to New Delhi to buy the kits from the only distributor in India. However, due to paucity of funds, we barely order two or three kits at a time.

oh what a gross out, :(
really it feels that IA is fighting on its own with enemies and political-ignorance of defence forces!!
what an apathy :(




Hi Folks,
I have been a lurker for sometime now but I couldn't resist this posting today. I am sick of Indian gov't/babu BS towards the armed forces. Being an retired officers son, I am just plain sick of soldiers giving their lives for us but not having necessary life saving equipment or weapons...

I personally would like to help out the soldiers in RR. How can I send them required QuikClot from Delhi.
I don't want to contribute to PM relief fund or any similar fund. I want to buy as many "kits" as I can and will arrange for funds from everyone I know.

Regards,
Sidhu

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby kittoo » 30 Mar 2009 08:53

gusidhu wrote:Hi Folks,
I have been a lurker for sometime now but I couldn't resist this posting today. I am sick of Indian gov't/babu BS towards the armed forces. Being an retired officers son, I am just plain sick of soldiers giving their lives for us but not having necessary life saving equipment or weapons...

I personally would like to help out the soldiers in RR. How can I send them required QuikClot from Delhi.
I don't want to contribute to PM relief fund or any similar fund. I want to buy as many "kits" as I can and will arrange for funds from everyone I know.

Regards,
Sidhu


It would be nice indeed if we could help the army directly rather than through PM relief fund or similar. If anyone has any idea how to do it, please post.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby k prasad » 30 Mar 2009 11:50

gusidhu wrote:Hi Folks,
I have been a lurker for sometime now but I couldn't resist this posting today. I am sick of Indian gov't/babu BS towards the armed forces. Being an retired officers son, I am just plain sick of soldiers giving their lives for us but not having necessary life saving equipment or weapons...

I personally would like to help out the soldiers in RR. How can I send them required QuikClot from Delhi.
I don't want to contribute to PM relief fund or any similar fund. I want to buy as many "kits" as I can and will arrange for funds from everyone I know.

Regards,
Sidhu


Sidhu,

I salute your zeal for our jawans- we really need more people like you.

The best way, from what I've seen is to directly get in touch with the commanders - don't go to the generals; brigadiers, colonels and down are good - they are the highest level that are in touch with the men on the ground. Someone (Ray sir or Kapil) here, who knows the service people may be able to help you out with details.. Once one gets in touch with them, they are usually extremely helpful, and would be more than willing to help you send them over the stuff.

Just to give an eg, we had collected about 4 lakhs worth of medicine and clothing for a natural disaster (I think it was the tsunami), and had wanted to send it to the worst affected areas - speaking to the AF guys was the best thing we did - not only did they agree to airlift it to Nicobar, but they also sent a 1 tonner to collect the stuff.. the best part was that they told us exactly what was in short supply - so by the second batch, we tossed out most of the clothes, and instead, sent in large supplies of Diarrhea meds, water purifying tablets, IVs and ORS... it was a real help. Those are the best guys to contact - they have eyes on the ground, and are happy to help.

AWWA may also have some contacts, but that should probably be the next resort.

Good luck sir.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby RayC » 30 Mar 2009 12:14

Sidhu,

Since you are in Delhi, you could contact the Medical Directorate and inform them of your intention.

Or maybe the AG's Branch or the Infantry Directorate.

I am sure they will be delighted at your noble gesture.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Mandeep » 30 Mar 2009 12:30

I could put Mr Sidhu directly in touch with some COs of inf/RR bns.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby shiv » 30 Mar 2009 12:35

p_saggu wrote:The more important point is:
Is the Indian Army training its young field doctors specifically in the now revolutionized battlefield emergency management techniques? Are the field units equipped - no cost spared - to protect the soldier's lives.
There is a lot of difference between a moderately equipped and a very highly equipped and trained team of doctors and nursing orderlies.



I think IA doctors are good and capable and they have all they need. I meet them regularly at local meetings/conferences. The problem may not be doctors - but perhaps we do not yet have Yamriki Ishtyle Casevac a la Vietnam.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby shiv » 30 Mar 2009 12:56

RayC wrote:Shiv,

Can you tell us about the Surgical Staple, Surgical Clip, dermal adhesive etc and their use?


RayC - I think PSaggu has written the details. None of these is useful in the hands of anyone but a surgeon. Staples are for joining edges of skin or intestine, clips to stop bleeding provided you know where to find the blood vessel and clip it safely. Dermal adhesives are mostly to get skin together.

The single most effective first aid for a bleeding wound is to pack the bleeding area (** see footnote) with gauze, or a shirt or whatever cloth is handy preferably sterile, or else physically clean. If there is a hole in the belly or chest pouring on the Quikclot will not help but it will cause local pain. After packing never ever look at the wound again to see if it has stopped bleeding (as long as there is no oozing of blood around the pack indicating continued bleeding and an inefficient pack.) Let some surgeon do that in the right setting.

If there is a hole in the chest that is hissing and bubbling with blood as air goes in and out the immediate treatment is to insert what is known as an intercostal tube. A trained paramedic could do that and then seal off the bubbling hole with gauze packing.

Oxygen is always of help and sucking out blood, mucus and dirt in the mouth aids in breathing.

Putting a suitably large needle (cannula) in a vein and rushing in intravenous fluid helps to keep the heart pumping as blood is lost.

An injection of Morphine or Pethidine will reduce pain and calm the injured person and helps with treatment

A thigh, leg, neck or arm wound that is bleeding will respond well to Quikclot and may save a life.

I am hoping to see the development of artificial blood - which will be a real boon.

Evacuate quickly!

PS Footnote **
I have personal experience of packing some of the largest blood vessels in the body to stop torrential bleeding after serious accidents. This gives time to evacuate and arrange for blood replacement. Almost invariably - the bleeding either stops or has slowed to a trickle by the time the patient gets into the operating theater - making it easier for the surgeon.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby RayC » 30 Mar 2009 13:06

Shiv,

Thanks.

I will pass it on to my boys!

Even if they can't do all what you have said, at least they will not look helplessly on but would at least have the knowledge to know what is happening and can radio the MAP as also the Fd Amb.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby p_saggu » 30 Mar 2009 21:09

There is one thing I want to add here.

Every medical college has a few Mobile operation theatres mounted on 4x4 Trucks donated by WHO lying about - usually not functional. These were all given in the 60s or 70s. I have seen the insides of one. :shock: All gleaming and really clean and reasonably equipped OT in there.

Why shift casualties to far away MH's. Field hospitals are also not always nearby. Why not take the Operation theatre along with a Trauma Surgeon, an Anaesthesiologist, and the operating team to within a few kilometers of the encounter site? This is sure to make a difference in survivability of the few who are tottering on the edge. There will always be those who can't be salvaged, and there will be those who's lives can be saved or who can be given a better quality of life if early medical attention is provided?

Shiv-ji,
By properly trained trauma surgeons, I mean a surgeon who will without hesitation open up the chest or the cranium, just as easily as he would open up the abdomen. This skill needs to be specially imparted and acquired. A lot of surgery graduates in India have never seen the insides of the thorax in their surgical training, never evacuated an EDH. This needs special attention as a part of the curriculum by the AMC.
One person I was talking to who had exposure to the American OT's and systems at a field hospital was :eek: at the difference in abilities of the team not to mention the setup they had. We nowhere spend near what they do - we can't, but we can do so many things at our end that can make a real difference.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Baljeet » 30 Mar 2009 22:12

Shiv/Surya
It is sad.
I am just teetring on the point, where I may go to Army HQ and do a dharna, or start throwing Sadey Andey, tamater at them. Maybe they will wake up. These men who get killed they are not just number but someone's brother, husband, friend, father, uncle. What the hell is Army doing, can't they take into account these tactics to get upper hand against these "sooar ki aulaad". Either senior officers are so jaded they have lost all enthusiasm to fight and win or they are just doing bare minimum to keep that paycheck rolling for few more years till they retire and get a plum post somewhere else.

Either way, I don't think it is acceptable to any BRFite.

JMT...

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby gusidhu » 30 Mar 2009 22:12

Mandeep wrote:I could put Mr Sidhu directly in touch with some COs of inf/RR bns.


Mandeep,

please mail me contact info at: tsidhu at hotmail.com

Regards,
Sidhu

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby gusidhu » 30 Mar 2009 22:14

RayC wrote:Sidhu,

Since you are in Delhi, you could contact the Medical Directorate and inform them of your intention.

Or maybe the AG's Branch or the Infantry Directorate.

I am sure they will be delighted at your noble gesture.


Ray,

If you have contact info, pls mail at: tsidhu at hotmail.com

Also as discussed on the forum 100 kits per unit is adequate. But how RR units are there in J&K?

Thanks,
Sidhu

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby RayC » 30 Mar 2009 22:24

TS,

Email sent.

Contact the officer concerned and mention my name, state your desire and he shall help you.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sunilUpa » 30 Mar 2009 22:31

Mr.Sidhu,
Thank you for taking the initiative. If acceptable to you, I would like to make some monetary contribution. I am in masaland, so can send money by paypal.


Sunil

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sivabala » 30 Mar 2009 23:38

I wish DRDO reverse engineer this quick clot rather than spending more time on how to make idlies and vadas.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby kittoo » 31 Mar 2009 00:07

sunilUpa wrote:Mr.Sidhu,
Thank you for taking the initiative. If acceptable to you, I would like to make some monetary contribution. I am in masaland, so can send money by paypal.


Sunil


And I could send with DD/Check if you agree (or if SBI guys do work quick, through internet from my account). It wont be much probably but I'll do as much as I can. Do you agree? If you agree, send me details at kittoo4202004@gmail.com

Thanks.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Prem Kumar » 31 Mar 2009 00:19

Dear Sidhu,

If its fine by you, I'd like to contribute as well. Been a lurker for a while - more so after 26/11. I live in the States - so can help only monetarily. Let me know.

Thanks

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby RayC » 31 Mar 2009 21:58

p_saggu wrote:Now if this discourse in BRF on the last page has not set alarm bells ringing at army headquarters already - what with civilians and people from overseas 'collecting' funds to supply some article to an army unit.

Not allowed at all. The Officers commanding such unit will be in trouble already I tell you.

How did this ever leak out? It has potential security implications.

Heads will roll and things will go back to being the same - not I hope.


I wonder if there is any security implications.

One can give it to the unit directly, but it is always better to give it to a central agency like the AHQ so that those who are urgently in need can be given the consignment or distribute it to those in dire need.

If individuals start giving items and the AHQ is approached, it will shame many, including those who work out the Defence Budget in their air-conditioned comfort using English as a weapon of bureaucratic supremacy (civil servants of MOD) and of war (those in uniform who should care!) that what they could not give, concerned citizens and NRIs are voluntarily coming forward to give using their own personal finances (in this time of economic meltdown and job loss) since they care!

Thank you all for the sentiment. I am proud of you noble Indians!

You all make it worthwhile to lay down our lives for the country!

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sohamn » 31 Mar 2009 23:12

sunilUpa wrote:^^Can BR initiate a drive to collect fund and have Sindhu or some one else in Delhi buy the kit for IA? We can use 'Donate to BR' facility to collect funds (paypal) and Ray Saheb, Mandeep can facilitate the actual handing over. Will be a nice gesture, if BF admin agree and they don't have any issues with Tax/Forex etc.

Meanwhile..

2 Militants, Soldier Killed in Kashmir Gunfights

Srinagar, March 30: Two militants and an Indian soldier were killed in separate gunfights in Kashmir on Monday.

A police spokesman said that the Indian army and policemen on specific information about the presence of militants laid siege around the Moshwara village in Kellar in South Kashmir on Monday morning. "While the soldiers were conducting combing and search operations, they came under a volume of fire from the militants. The fire was returned by the soldiers, triggering an encounter. In the ensuing gunfight, which lasted for four hours, two militants were killed," he said.

The identity of the slain militants and the outfit to which they owe allegiance could not be known.

The police spokesman said that an Indian army soldier, who was critically injured in a gunfight with militants at the Kamla forests in South Kashmir a few days back, has succumbed to his injuries. He identified the dead soldier as Rumpum Goji.

Fayaz Wani reports on life in Srinagar, Kashmir.


If there is a drive to collect money in BR inorder to collect KITs I will be more than happy to donate. Please let me know if such a drive is happening, and whom to donate the amount.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Mandeep » 01 Apr 2009 02:15

Donating equipment, clothing, facilities, food etc directly to an Army unit isn't a crime. Anyone can do it. In the past I've arranged the donation of among other things solar lanterns to units commanded by my friends. The only condition I laid down was that 75% of the lanterns were for the use of troops (in their bunkers, barracks, langars) and the rest for officers, offices, messes etc.

Somehow I found the method of direct donation to units much more satisfying than approaching a disinterested bureaucrat (uniformed or otherwise).in Delhi.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Lalmohan » 01 Apr 2009 14:04

the blood clot kit issue raises an important question for me. How does the army manage 'innovation'? How does it scan what is available and what might be adapted for use? Is it all down to DRDO? Are army guys sent out and about to look for things/go to conferences, etc?

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Tanaji » 01 Apr 2009 14:06

I humbly suggest that the mods

  • Make a separate thread on the donation of QuickClot kits
  • Make it a sticky
  • Include all relevant details on what is being bought, whom to contact for sending money etc (need not be real names, at least a valid email address that when contacted would give real details )
  • Should include modes of payment especially for overseas contributors

The above will facilitate a larger response. One other suggestion is keeping the others updated as to how many kits were actually bought, and were delivered.

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Procurement efforts for clot kits

Postby suryag » 07 Apr 2009 15:43

Hi are there any updates on procurement efforts for clot kits.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Prem Kumar » 08 Apr 2009 00:33

Seconding Suryag's note: any further news on the clot kits? Can the Admins create the separate thread that was talked about earlier? We shouldn't lose the momentum on this fund collection - strike the iron when it is hot.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Raj Malhotra » 08 Apr 2009 18:36

Pls note that it is always possible the the medicine news is a plant, the med may be overhyped product which is being sold for 100 times its cost price.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sunilUpa » 08 Apr 2009 18:54

ASPuar and others, please accept my apologies, due to workload haven't been able to post on BRF.

Now that we have ASPuar volunteering to do the actual work in NewDelhi, we need to find a way to send money to him. Any ideas? Does Paypal work in India?


Can we turn this in to an organised fund raising effort? Should we set a target for the funds? I think we should. What are the tax implications (to ASpuar)?

Could some one experienced in these matters help?

Admin, can we open a thread for this?

Sunil

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby ASPuar » 08 Apr 2009 23:08

Everyone hold your horses. I have volunteered to help. I havent volunteered to do everything on the ground, because most likely I will not be able to, given work and time constraints. Ill definitely need an assist, and it must be a collaborative project.

Some things we need to know first:


1. What is the product?

2. Who sells it?

3. Where is the seller to be found?

4. How much does it cost, and can an ordinary citizen buy it?

5. Who will we send it to, once we have it?

6. How will we send it?

7. Who do we liaise with at AHQ, DGAFMS, Corps, etc?

8. How will we manage the money, etc?

Ill try and find the answers to some of these questions. Meanwhile, if anyone knows any of the answers, please post away. If you wish to contact me by email, I think Brig Ray and PVS Jagan Mohan have my email add.

Regds,

ASP

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 05:52

Admins, give us a green to open new thread so this questions can be answered and this thread doesnt gets derailed.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sunilUpa » 09 Apr 2009 06:17

ASPuar wrote:Everyone hold your horses. I have volunteered to help. I havent volunteered to do everything on the ground, because most likely I will not be able to, given work and time constraints. Ill definitely need an assist, and it must be a collaborative project.


oops sorry. Let's try to organize ourself and work out the logistics.

Some things we need to know first:


1. What is the product?


QuikClot

2. Who sells it?


Z-Medica Corporation USA

3. Where is the seller to be found?


The news report which triggered this endeavor indiated that the sole distributor for the product is in New Delhi. I have written to Z-Medica asking for the distributors contact details. Will post as soon as I get it.


4. How much does it cost, and can an ordinary citizen buy it?


The news report indicated Rs3000. Yes, ordinary citizen can buy it. There are many versions of QuikClot, even for OTC sale.
5. Who will we send it to, once we have it?


Rai Saheb had provided name of a contact to Sidhu. May be he can provide it to you too. Or better you and Sidhu can co-ordinate the efforts.

6. How will we send it?


I am not sure, depending on the exact physical location of Ray Saheb's contact, you guys may post it or physically deliver it. Though I believe personal delivery as a representative of BR would have major impact.

7. Who do we liaise with at AHQ, DGAFMS, Corps, etc?


Ray saheb and/or Kapil /other adminullahs can throw some light on this.

8. How will we manage the money, etc?


I can send you my contribution either through paypal or some other means. It may be better to collect the funds in USA and send in one lot. Another option is to have the money wired directly to the distributor. Ideas please!

Sunil

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby shiv » 09 Apr 2009 06:21

gauravsurati wrote:Admins, give us a green to open new thread so this questions can be answered and this thread doesnt gets derailed.


You don't need admin sanction for this.

Only admin benevolence after it is started.. :mrgreen: :((

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 06:26

1. What is the product?


QuikClotSunil[/quote]

Sunil saar, better we go through all the versions of QuickClot available. Also the prices will vary. So first we need to figure out which would be the best suitable and feasible for us to send.

Quick Clot emergency dressing
Qucik Clot Combat gauze
Quick Clot
Quick Clot Advanced Clotting Sponge (ACS)
Quick Clot ACS+

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 06:39

I am working on opening of new thread.

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Re: Indian Army Discussion

Postby sunilUpa » 09 Apr 2009 06:42

Here is the Indian Distributor.

SAGAR FOSSIL FUEL TECHNOLOGIES PVT. LTD.

257-A(1st Floor), Hauz Rani Market,
Opp. Max Devki Hospital,
Malviya Nagar,
New Delhi-110017, India
Tel: 91-11-26675536
Fax: 91-11-26675537
Email: quikclot@yahoo.co.in

Gurusaraswati, I think the version IA needs is ACS or ACS+.
Now - I am not sure whether this grade is available for sale to ordinary citizens. If not available, then we need to take help of Ray saheb.

Now is there a easier way to copy all these posts in to a new thread other than copying and pasting each post?

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Buying Quick Clot for Indian Army - A humble initiative

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 06:58

Why this thread?

During recent counter insurgency operation against heavily armed terrorists from TSP India lost 8 brave souls in intense fighting environment. Later it was realised that less number of lives could have lost if soldiers bleeding could have been stopped immediately using a product namely 'Quick Clot' and then evacuated.

From Hindustan Times

SOLDIERS INVOLVED in counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir are bleeding to death for want of life-saving kits to treat battle field injuries.

The army has failed to equip tens of thousands of troops with an adequate number of frontline haemorrhage control kits to stop excessive bleeding from combat injuries.

Official documents show that the Udhampur-based Northern Command, the nerve centre of the army’s counter-insurgency operations, has ordered just 850 pouches of a granular haemo static substance called QuikClot with proven clotting ability, in the last three years.

The army had no budgetary provision even for the small number of kits bought. These were procured out of the Army Commander’s special financial powers. The price of QuikClot works out to Rs 3,640 per unit.It is a standard issue item for the US Marine Corps. American soldiers serving in Afghanistan and Iraq carry it as their preferred haemostatic agent.

“The army has failed to meet the urgent requirement of lifesaving kits demanded by Rashtriya Rifles (RR) units.

“It is an effective non-surgical method to stop bleeding that cannot be controlled by ordinary gauze or the Rakshak bandages used by us. Every team that goes into an operation must carry it. We have saved many lives and many more could be saved if supplies improve,” said an army doctor posted in Kashmir.



This thread is a humble initiative by BRFites to gather funds, procure QuickClots and deliver it to Rastriya Rifles in J&K. Offcourse, this has to be done by Army top brass and babus but due to their lethargic view towards lives of jawans, BRFites and jingos has taken this initiative into their own hands.

This is a collaborative project and what we need is a teamwork and resources from fellow BRFites and jingos especially from Delhi.

Here is the Indian Distributor found by SunilUpa saar.

SAGAR FOSSIL FUEL TECHNOLOGIES PVT. LTD.

257-A(1st Floor), Hauz Rani Market,
Opp. Max Devki Hospital,
Malviya Nagar,
New Delhi-110017, India
Tel: 91-11-26675536
Fax: 91-11-26675537
Email: quikclot@yahoo.co.in

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Re: Buying Quick Clot for Indian Army - A humble initiative

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 07:02

Ray saar, ASPuar, SunilUpa, gusidhu, Mandeep can help and do the needful.

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Re: Buying Quick Clot Kits For Our Jawans - A Humble Proposal

Postby shiv » 09 Apr 2009 09:09

Could someone please check one of these kits to find out

1) The shelf life/expiry date
2) Whether any special transport/storage requirements exist

I do not have a clue about this.

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Re: Buying Quick Clot Kits For Our Jawans - A Humble Proposal

Postby Gaurav_S » 09 Apr 2009 09:31

QuikClot ACS™

QuikClot ACS™ (Advanced Clotting Sponge), a formulation and delivery system subsequent to the original QuikClot®, consists of beads of QuikClot® contained in a porous surgical fabric. The sponge is packed into the wound and allows the activated beads to come into direct contact with the bleeding. It is extensively used by all branches of the U.S. military, by Homeland Security and first responders.

This product has features that improve its ease of use in certain scenarios. For example:
It can be directly applied to high-pressure bleeding wounds.
It can be applied from any angle.
It will not blow around in a windy environment.
It is simple to remove when the victim has been moved to the hospital setting.

QuikClot ACS™ comes packaged with two 1.75-ounce sponges (50g) in four-ply packaging. It is also available in a Z-Medica TraumaPak™, along with a pressure bandage and high volume gauze.

QuikClot ACS+™

Cool Formulation - New for the Military, Homeland Security & First Responders

QuikClot ACS+™ is the latest Z-Medica product. QuikClot ACS+™ is offered in a delivery system similar to the original QuikClot ACS™ and allows the same ease of application and removal. As a result of intensive research and development, the formulation of QuikClot ACS+™ has been re-engineered to stay cooler on contact. It has a greatly reduced exothermic reaction, with maximum temperatures in vivo typically at 105 degrees F. This cooler formulation was developed in conjunction with the U.S. Marines, with applications beyond the military.

When dealing with large, severe injuries on the battlefield or here at home, a few seconds can mean the difference between losing a limb – or losing a life. When time is critical, just rip open a packet of QuikClot ACS+™, pack the self-contained sponge into the wound and the bleeding stops rapidly. The sponge can be packed to conform to the shape of the wound and is easily removed in the hospital setting.

Each package of QuikClot ACS+™ contains one 3.5-ounce (100g) hemostatic sponge. It is also available in a Z-Medica TraumaPak™, along with a pressure bandage and high volume gauze.


An unopened pack of QuikClot® has a shelf life of three years. The only storage direction is not to leave a pack of QuikClot® in direct sunlight for extended periods of time. QuikClot® can also be stored very high and low temperatures (below freezing).


Once the package has been opened, the QuikClot® is no longer sterile and should be used immediately.


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