INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

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Yagnasri
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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Yagnasri » 25 Sep 2014 15:25

Where are other boats. No news on the second one.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby jamwal » 25 Sep 2014 15:38

Why are so many posters changing their handles ?

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby sattili » 25 Sep 2014 15:41

^^^^^
May be because job market picked up in India and lot of them have new mail ids.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Yagnasri » 25 Sep 2014 17:07

jamwal wrote:Why are so many posters changing their handles ?


I changed it because it is too close my name. Of course I have changed jobs more than once in between.
Further this is the name I wanted to give to my son but wife selected her fathers name. :D

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby ravip » 25 Sep 2014 18:18

Yagnasri wrote:
jamwal wrote:Why are so many posters changing their handles ?


I changed it because it is too close my name. Of course I have changed jobs more than once in between.
Further this is the name I wanted to give to my son but wife selected her fathers name. :D


OT
One great thing abt naming children's after there grandparents is you can take revenge against them by scolding the child in front of them....

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby dinesh_kimar » 25 Sep 2014 19:29

[/quote] His comparison of Kilos and Arihant and a theory that Arihant is just an Extended Kilo seems to be a motivated rant...what do you guys think?[/quote]

The Navy may have requested use of avbl kit , like USHUS Sonars and Type 71 torpedo / Klub capable. The obvious solution was Kilo type arrangement in front end of boat, where these items are stored. Sutton has good eye for certain details, and he says it as he sees it.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby member_26622 » 25 Sep 2014 20:43

^ converting a Kilo class submarine in to a Nuclear sub is a major-major achievement! Joking- Can we do same for the other 10 boats.

Least bothered by this 'copied this and that' analysis. Eagerly awaiting news on the follow on beast? Want to see momentum building up.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby member_28782 » 28 Sep 2014 12:48

Interesting discussion on reddit about US vs Russia submarine tech. More at http://np.reddit.com/r/WarshipPorn/comm ... text=10000


"This is a multi-faceted and complicated question to answer, so I'll try to answer to the best of my ability.
Acoustic Stealth:
The Russians have historically been lagging behind the US in this aspect, but they achieved acoustic parity with the US in the mid-1980s with the Akula class SSN. In 1995, the only Akula II, K-157 Vepr', was launched and found to be quieter than the American Improved Los Angeles SSNs being produced at the time. Their latest submarines, the Severodvinsk and Borei classes are probably roughly as quiet as our Virginia class. However, both countries have quieted their submarines to such a degree that the detection range is on the order of a mile if both submarines at at low speed, which is almost point-blank range. Thus, acoustic stealth has reached the point of diminishing returns and isn't as important as it used to be. So US=Russia
Non-Acoustic Stealth:
This is probably the most contentious claim I'm going to make here, but I assure you it's true. In the late 1960s, the Soviets developed an optical device that could measure the turbulence created by the passage of a submarine. This device was mounted to a Victor class SSN and used to trail an American SSBN near Guam for several hours with only intermittent sonar contact (they had to tell it was an American boomer, after all). The improved SOKS device mounted on the Improved Victor IIIs, Akulas, Sierras and later Soviet SSNs measured many other parameters like temperature, conductivity, radioactivity and turbulence. SOKS was used to trail the newest American SSNs and SSBNs (Los Angeles and Ohio classes) almost completely non-acoustically.
The Soviets also developed a space-based strategic ASW system to track American submarines. There were several technologies at play. The most widely used were optical and radar sensors that scanned the ocean for scars produced by the passage of a submerged submarine. There were also lasers that could measure the turbulence of the water remotely. Thermal emissions were tracked as well as night-time bioluminescence made by frightened plankton, jellyfish and ctenophores when the submarine disturbed them. By the end of the Cold War, the Soviets were into their third generation of ASW satellite and the detection of American submarines from space was routine. Progress was underway to sync the satellites up to ICBM batteries that could destroy US SSBNs in time of war. Although the Russians had their budget slashed after 1991, R&D on submarines and ASW has continued at Soviet-level funding.
The reason this is a problem for US submarines is two-fold. First, US submarines create a lot of turbulence. The shape of their sails and control surfaces creates a lot of vortices, which are a large component of the turbulence that the Russians can detect. Russian submarines are much more streamlined and special care has been taken to eliminate all vortices (that's why the Boreis' sails look so weird). New Russian submarines also have grates that thoroughly mix the hot water coming from their powerplants into the cool ocean water, reducing their thermal signature. The second problem for the US is that most in the submarine community regard non-acoustic ASW as a myth. The CIA was aware of it during the Cold War, but the submarine community in general is in denial about the whole thing. US<<Russia
Diving Depth:
The Soviets have always been ahead on this one, due to more advanced metallurgy. Their steel-hulled Akulas can dive to 600 meters, while the Virginias can probably manage 400 meters. US<Russia
Armament:
Russian submarines, especially Severodvinsk, have many more weapons (and of greater variety) than US submarines. Severodvinsk has 30 torpedoes and up to 32 missiles, compared with 24-27 torpedoes and up to 12 missiles for the Virginias. US<Russia
Survivability:
Russian submarines have double-hulls, which makes them more damage resistant and able to float after one compartment and its surrounding ballast tanks are flooded. US<Russia
Sonar:
Active sonar is roughly the same for both, but the US has historically had better passive sonar, though the gap is likely closing. US>Russia
Safety:
The Russians don't have reactor safety issues anymore, but it's hard to beat the United State's perfect record in reactor safety. The Russians have also had issues with fires and chemical spills. However, Russian submarines are more robust and have escape chambers, which makes them safer for the crew if something goes wrong. US≥Russia
Crew Quality:
The US is better, no question. The US submarine force's men are superbly trained in contrast to the 2-year conscripts the Russian Navy has to use for their enlisted men. US>Russia
Design and Hydrodynamics:
Russia is superior because of their innovation in design and advanced knowledge of hydrodynamics. American submarines are very conventional in comparison. Also, their reactors are much more power-dense (and no, it's not because they are liquid metal. They're all PWRs) US<Russia
Cost and Maintenance:
Building stuff in Russia is simply cheaper. The quality is less, of course, but not by as much as you might think. The Russians really stepped up their game in the mid-80s. A typical Russian submarine costs about half what an American submarine costs. Maintenance is more expensive for the Russians because their submarines are double-hulled. US=Russia
Which is better? It's hard to say. On paper, Russian submarines are far superior. But I think in a war, the crews of American submarines could level the playing field. I honestly hope we never find out who is better."

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Austin » 28 Sep 2014 15:48

There is a comparison chart made by Naval Guru Norman Polmar who has written extensively on US and Russian Submarine have met their designer and have insight into the subject.

Here is a link to comparision chart I found on the link

https://i.imgur.com/7Tm6LGF.jpg

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Philip » 29 Sep 2014 06:00

Tx Raj and Austin.Excellent material to show those less knowledgeable about the Russian/Soviet advances and capabiliities in sub warfare vs US capabilities.The links should be X-posted on the IN td. too.


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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby member_28108 » 29 Sep 2014 13:48

Knowing that we need a larger hull to equip ICBM's what were the engineering challenges to design the submarine with a larger diameter hull in the first place? Wouldn't it be true that we can load smaller missiles in a bigger tube but not vice versa? Is the design limited by the nuclear reactor ouput or could we have had a larger hull and a higher output reactor?

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Karthik S » 02 Nov 2014 08:24

Are the follow up subs going to be twice the size of Arihant as mentioned in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arihant_fo ... _submarine ?

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Singha » 02 Nov 2014 10:23

imo the Kilo class is misleading. being entirely double hull it has a higher displacement and outside size than U209 but its interior space will be same or even smaller than U209. it gets some addl reserve buoyancy due to double hull but the world has moved to single hulls enmasse and even Sverodbinsk and Borei.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Vipul » 03 Nov 2014 02:17

Indigenous n-sub's sea trials by year-end.

In a major boost to indigenisation of defence manufacturing, India's first nuclear-powered and nuclear-armed submarine INS Arihant will head out for sea trials by the year-end.

"INS Arihant will be ready for sea trials by the end of this year," an official aware of the developments relating to the 6,000-tonne submarine told IANS, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Once the trials are through and the submarine enters service, India will not only complete its nuclear triad of delivering nuclear weapons from land, sea and air, but also join an elite club of six nations that operate nuclear submarines carrying ballistic missiles. The US, Russia, France, Britain and China are the other nations with this capability.

The INS Arihant's miniaturised nuclear reactor, built with Russian help, had gone critical last year and the vessel has been going through a series of harbour trials since then at Visakhapatnam, where it is being built.

The submarine has also been going through the power-up cycle of its nuclear reactor and has now achieved a nearly 100 percent power level, the official said.

"Its reactor had gone critical last year. We are now close to attaining 100 percent its power," the official said, adding: "The nuclear reaction is highly controlled. It is something similar to nuclear power plants, but extra caution is needed. The reactor is now functioning perfectly well," the official said.

Once the submarine attains 100 percent power, it will head out to sea for its final trials, which will include the firing of the indigenous Bo5 missile that has a 700-km range and can carry a one tonne nuclear warhead. INS Arihant can carry 12 such missiles.

The vessel, the lead ship of the Arihant-class submarines, was launched in 2009. Its design is based on the Russian Akula-1 class submarines and its 83MW pressurised heavy water reactor has been built with significant Russian assistance.

While its 100-member crew has been trained by Russian specialists, Indian scientists at Mumbai's Bhabha Atomic Research Centre have received significant expertise in reducing the size of the reactor to help it fit into the 10 metre diameter hull of the submarine.

The Indian Navy currently operates the INS Chakra nuclear-powered submarine leased for 10 years from Russia in 2012.

Nuclear submarines stay out at sea for longer periods than diesel-electric powered boats and can also remain under water for longer durations. Conventional submarines have to surface at regular intervals for re-charging their batteries, making them vulnerable to detection.

Two other vessels of the Arihant class are also believed to be under construction at Visakhapatnam's state-owned Hindustan Shipyard Limited.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby sivab » 03 Nov 2014 08:51

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/na ... 559039.ece

Navies of friendly countries keen on Indian sonars
Y. Mallikarjun

India is looking to export indigenously developed hull-mounted sonars and negotiations are at an advanced stage with the navies of three to four friendly nations.


SONAR (an acronym for Sound Navigation and Ranging) is used to detect underwater targets. Like radar, used to detect long-range aerial and other targets, sonars have applications in underwater surveillance, communication and marine navigation.

Three units of these sonars have been exported to Myanmar. Officials from Bharat Electronics Limited and the Naval Physical and Oceanographic Laboratory visited the neighbouring country and installed them a fortnight ago. BEL produced the sonars while the Kochi-based NPOL, a naval lab of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), designed and developed them. BEL had signed the Rs.150-crore contract for the three sonars with Myanmar in January 2013. Director-General of DRDO (Naval Systems and Materials) Bhujanga Rao told The Hindu that there was a demand from other nations too. Naval officials from three to four countries came to India and held discussions. Mentioning different sonars developed for the Navy, he said that a versatile, new-generation system USHUS has been installed on India’s first indigenous nuclear-powered submarine, Arihant. It has a higher range and can withstand high static pressure of water. Observing that it was superior to Russian equivalents and comparable to the best in the world, he said that sonars on all Russian-class submarines being operated by the Indian Navy would be replaced with USHUS.

Another advanced hull-mounted sonar HUMSA-NG (new generation) was also developed and the Navy had placed orders for its installation on different platforms such as destroyers, frigates and corvettes, Dr. Rao said.

A sonar for detecting intruders like divers had been developed for installation at harbour entry points and to protect offshore installations. It will be ready for deployment in a year. Similarly, ship-towed array sonar technology that could detect targets up to 100 km was ready for user-evaluation trials. ABHAY, a compact sonar for fitting on warships of smaller size or shallow watercraft, was currently undergoing technical trials on board INS Ajay, Dr. Rao said.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 03 Nov 2014 17:17

I was under the impression that the reactor on board the Arihant was Indian made and designed, based partly on a land prototype. But that fitting it in the submarine was achieved with some assistance from the Russians. Now, this above article is stating that the reactor itself was made with Russian help. If so, what is the percentage of Indian to non-Indian components, design etc.

Could someone point me to an article which shows what precisely are the Indian inputs into the Arihant? Perhaps on BR itself from 2009 when the sub was launched, or an independent article. Thanks!

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Hobbes » 04 Nov 2014 06:59

You will see as many differing and conflicting reports on the subject as there are desi dork reporters. Ignore them. I'd recommend reading Dr. Kakodkar's interview from around 3 years ago for the canonical version.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby A Sharma » 04 Nov 2014 07:45

Interview from 2009
Russians helped with INS Arihant's heart: Kakodkar

Q: Was this completely made in India?

A: Yes.

Q: Designed, fabricated and executed in India?

A: Yes, that's right, by Indian industries.

Q: And by Indian scientists?

A: Yes

Q: So this is not a Russian design?

A: It is an Indian design.

Q: Indian design, made in India, by Indians?

A: Yes, that's right.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 04 Nov 2014 08:17

^
Nice. The slight area of confusion for the lay or casual reader is whether the reactor that is inside the Arihant presently was designed and fabricated entirely by Indians. Because in this interview, what he is really referring to is the land based reactor in Kalpakkam. There is little doubt that is Indian. But is the reactor running in the Arihant based on the Kalpakkam land reactor, or only partly based on it, and partly also Russian? I suppose from the interview, one could conclude the Arihant reactor is also Indian, but the Russians consulted on it when the Indians ran into any difficulty.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby shaun » 04 Nov 2014 08:20

If there is some kind of consultation with ruskis while designing the reactor , that too can be considered and escalated as significant ruski help. Ruskis being the supplier of N subs to India , it can not be denied that cooperation for N sub tech does exist at all levels . Just how much the cooperation is can only be known when Arihat gets operational.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby shaun » 04 Nov 2014 08:26

Varoon Shekhar wrote:^
Nice. The slight area of confusion for the lay or casual reader is whether the reactor that is inside the Arihant presently was designed and fabricated entirely by Indians. Because in this interview, what he is really referring to is the land based reactor in Kalpakkam. There is little doubt that is Indian. But is the reactor running in the Arihant based on the Kalpakkam land reactor, or only partly based on it, and partly also Russian? I suppose from the interview, one could conclude the Arihant reactor is also Indian, but the Russians consulted on it when the Indians ran into any difficulty.

if you have read the article properly, Mr Anil Kakodkar have said that " we have a compact propulsion reactor which has been tested at Kalpakkam for the last three years and this is an exact prototype of what has been installed in INS Arihant which was launched soon " , i guess you should have no doubt on that !!

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 04 Nov 2014 08:45

http://www.frontline.in/static/html/fl2 ... 702500.htm

Thanks, and in this article by T.S.S from Frontline I just dug up, they go into it more, if anything, and stress the Indian character of the on-board reactor. Good stuff!

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Philip » 04 Nov 2014 12:00

200 Russians were reportedly present at the official launch and Dr.MMS praised the vital contribution from Russia.Open source info will never be able to quantify or qualify what the % and breadth of collaboration was,but it would be prudebt to say that without the Russian assistance,we would've taken at least another decade to get to where we are now.Supplying an Akula-2 to train the crews is another major contribution and step in our mastering N-sub tech and ops.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby P Chitkara » 04 Nov 2014 16:14

I concur with Phillip. What one can deduce is, we ran into some major issue(s) with our design and the Russians helped us resolve them without which we would've spent much more time in getting reactor fit in the sub.

Very fact that MMS publicly acknowledged the help means those issue(s) was/were blockers, stalling the progress significantly.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby SaiK » 04 Nov 2014 17:58

AK still holds us by the same logic for A5 maals (2-50kt) -> 200kt. DRDO is in advanced stages of MIRVs now.

However I like these statements, it should be V&Ved by a team. they can keep the numbers secret, but validate the designs per requirements are correct.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby sum » 02 Dec 2014 07:26

Work on second n­uclear sub reactor begins

As the first indigenous nuclear submarine Arihant is getting ready for sea voyage, work has begun inside a closely guarded naval dockyard in Visakhapatnam for the “assembly” of another nuclear reactor to propel the second N-powered submarine.

“The assembling of the second reactor began a few months ago at Visakhapatnam and materials are being collected to make the third one,” sources familiar with the project told Deccan Herald. India plans to make three N-powered submarines with second strike capability in a secret project.

The pressure vessel for the second nuclear submarine is being manufactured by the Heavy Engineering Corporation Ltd, Ranchi. There is, however, no official word on the second N-submarine.

Arihant is ready for sea trial as it has received approval from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) Safety Council. Since strategic projects are outside the purview of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, it is the BARC Safety Council that gives regulatory approvals.

“Arihant’s 85 MW light water reactor that runs on enriched Uranium fuel is ready. The reactor has so far operated only 30-40 per cent of its capacity because it is at shore. It will function on full power when it goes to the high seas. The Navy is now making preparations for the sea trial, which involves making other arrangements,” sources said.

In April, when Navy chief Admiral R K Dhowan visited the Eastern Naval Command at Visakhapatnam he said Arihant was in the final phase of its harbour trials and would shortly be put to sea. Since then eight months have passed without a word on the Arihant from the Navy.


The boat is to be fitted with B05 (K-15) submarine launched ballistic missile, which was tested successfully from an under-water pontoon off Visakhapatnam in January 2013, showcasing the missile’s ability to break waters.

Meanwhile, nuclear scientists have readied the second core of Arihant that attained criticality – commencement of the nuclear chain reaction signifying energy production – on October 11, 2013 at a facility known as P4 inside BARC.

The new core could be used in Arihant after 7-8 years of service or may be used in the second submarine, if the reactor has the same capacity, sources said, without disclosing the power output of the second reactor, which is being assembled
.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Philip » 02 Dec 2014 14:47

One looks forward to more positive news when Pres.Putin visits,sealing the deal for the second Akula and more N-sub/sub/naval cooperation apart from other key JVs. We should concentrate upon building ur fleet of SSBNs,at least 5,asap,while getting our SSGNs from Russia in the interim.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby JTull » 02 Dec 2014 15:18

Instead of more power, it is more important is to make the leap to lifetime reactor rather than the one that requires significant downtime every 7-8 years. It involves 'taking the expended core out of the reactor and putting in a new core with fresh nuclear fuel' (Link). USN takes 2-3 years, so in newbie India's case we can expect the downtime to be much longer. IN won't have that many Arihant class subs in next 8 years to afford to lose big chunk of the fleet to refuelling.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby RKumar » 02 Dec 2014 15:26

Philip wrote:One looks forward to more positive news when Pres.Putin visits,sealing the deal for the second Akula and more N-sub/sub/naval cooperation apart from other key JVs. We should concentrate upon building ur fleet of SSBNs,at least 5,asap,while getting our SSGNs from Russia in the interim.


I think second Akula linked with consultancy for upgraded power house and PAK-FA are more realistic expecting anything more then that will be too far fetched.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Philip » 02 Dec 2014 18:39

Yes,the lifetime reactor capability would not necessitate any radical refit/refuelling botheration. However,if we are to build a worthy SSBN,the sub must carry at least 12 ICBMs of at least 8000km range with MIRVs. 5000km is insufficient if we want to hide our subs in the remote expanses of the IOR of Pacific in dealing with China.This would mean a larger sub and larger reactor. Either the K-series of missiles have a much greater range than advertised,or the first 3 ATVs will have limited strat. capability and will require a second series of larger SSBNs to succeed them.

This may be the strategy,using the first ATVs as SSGNs later on,just as US Ohio SSBNs were converted into SSGNs,as they could carry 12 750+km missiles for land attack.

Meanwhile some news about the OZ sub ambitions.

http://online.wsj.com/articles/japan-ga ... 1417503055
Japan Gains Edge in Australia Submarine Deal
Treasurer Joe Hockey Says Australia Won’t Hold a Competitive Tender for New Fleet
A Japan Maritime Self-Defense Forces diesel-electric Soryu submarine is seen in this undated handout photo. REUTERS
By ROB TAYLOR
Dec. 2, 2014 1:50 a.m. ET

SYDNEY—Australia said it wouldn’t hold a competitive tender for a 25 billion Australian dollar (US$21 billion) fleet of new conventional submarines, fueling speculation one of the Asia-Pacific’s biggest defense contracts will likely go to Japan.

In an Australian radio interview on Tuesday, Treasurer Joe Hockey said the country was seeking a submarine that was already operating—as opposed to the theoretical designs of some European manufacturers and new proposals from the government’s own naval shipyard, ASC, based in South Australia state.

Asked whether the submarine contract might be put to a free-to-all competitive tender, Mr. Hockey said such a process would likely take too long. “We need to make decisions now,” he said. “We don’t have time to go through a speculation process. We don’t have time for people to suggest they can build something that hasn’t been built.”

Mr. Hockey’s spokeswoman later said a more qualified tender, open to a handful of preselected manufacturers and thus quicker to complete, hadn’t been ruled out—leaving open the door to a number of German, French and Swedish firms that have already put forward proposals.

A major defense blueprint to be published in the first half of next year that will set forth Australia’s security priorities may affect the type of tender the government eventually adopts, but the urgency expressed by Mr. Hockey would right now seem to favor the Japanese, who have the advantage of proposing submarines with a proven operational capability.

Since the middle of the year, there have been rumors Canberra is leaning toward buying as many as 12 submarines from Japan in what would be Tokyo’s largest weapons sale since World War II. Mr. Hockey’s remarks make clear Australia is prepared to sidestep calls from within the government, and among a number of European submarine builders, for a competitive process.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, center, with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Barack Obama during the Group of 20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, last month. ENLARGE
Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, center, with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Barack Obama during the Group of 20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, last month. BLOOMBERG NEWS
The government is looking to replace six home-built Collins-class submarines with a new fleet twice that size, as it looks to ward off heightened regional security threats and protect a network of gas pipelines critical to the resource-rich country’s prosperity. The first of the aging Collins fleet—long plagued by reliability problems—is due to be retired in about 12 years.

Submarines are at the heart of a new arms race in Asia, as countries seek to hedge against Beijing’s recent assertiveness over territorial claims in the East and South China seas, and in the Indian Ocean. Australia has lately been deepening security ties with Japan, whose bid for the lucrative submarine contract appears to have gained traction following Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ’s visit to Canberra in July.

German submarine manufacturer ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, France’s DCNS and Sweden’s SAAB Kockums are lobbying Prime Minister Tony Abbott ’s government for a chance to participate in a tender.

TKMS has proposed a bigger version of its Type 214 submarine—known as the Type 216, optimized for use in Australia’s vast ocean territories, but it hasn’t yet been built. DCNS has proposed a new conventionally powered version of its Barracuda nuclear-powered attack vessel. The French company last month opened an office in Canberra hoping to improve its chances of winning the contract.

Ever since Mr. Abe’s visit to sign a bilateral security agreement here, speculation has been building that Australia will buy Japan’s 4,200-ton Soryu, or Blue Dragon. Still, the Australian prime minister is under considerable pressure from within his own conservative government to build the new boats in Australia using foreign design-and-technical assistance. That path would likely favor the Germans over the Japanese, due to the country’s experience in setting up overseas production lines in Israel and elsewhere.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby dinesha » 05 Dec 2014 21:05

This was published in Yesterday's TOI
As per this Graphics 6-SSN plus 3 SSBNs funded by PMO
Image

Accompanied report by Rajat Pandit: http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Arti ... 2014017027

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Singha » 05 Dec 2014 22:13

sorely missing from that list are more P28 ships and the MCM ships. we need these more than we need the P15B

K Mehta
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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby K Mehta » 10 Dec 2014 17:30

Data point: 4 arihant class vessels being made.

L&T's Hazira facility after all fabricated the hull of the INS Arihant and the other three boats in its class

From here: geek at large blog

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby arun » 13 Dec 2014 17:21

Welcome News about the Arihant.

Sandeep Unnithan writing in India Today informs that Arihant will commence sea trials with a surfaced sortie on Monday December 15th.

Indigenous nuclear powered submarine INS Arihant to head out for sea trials

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby srin » 13 Dec 2014 18:09

How very obliging of Navy and IT to broadcast this. Now everybody will be trying to get its acoustic signature.

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby shiv » 13 Dec 2014 18:18

srin wrote:How very obliging of Navy and IT to broadcast this. Now everybody will be trying to get its acoustic signature.

This is precisely the time to fiddle with the acoustic signature in various ways and let everyone listen

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby Austin » 13 Dec 2014 18:28

srin wrote:How very obliging of Navy and IT to broadcast this. Now everybody will be trying to get its acoustic signature.


Good Luck to any one trying to play smart they would be greeted by IN ASW assets :lol:

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby ravip » 13 Dec 2014 18:53

And still some believe it's d first sortie....

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Re: INS Arihant (ATV) News and Discussion -2

Postby dinesha » 13 Dec 2014 20:03

^^^From the above article
The navy plans a fleet of five SSBNs, all of them capable of firing nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles from under the sea. Two more Arihant class submairnes are being fabricated at the SBC in Vizag and are likely to be inducted over the next five years.

India currently operates one nuclear submarine, the INS Chakra (the ex Russian sub 'Nerpa') taken on a ten-year lease from Russia in 2012. One of the items on the agenda of recent summit-level talks between Russian President Putin and Prime Minister Narendra Modi is believed to have been the lease of a second SSN, the unfinished 'Iribis', left unfinished after the breakup of the Soviet Union.


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