Indian Space Program Discussion

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Vipul
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Vipul » 16 Mar 2012 21:00

Isro gets Rs 125 cr for Mars mission, eyes Nov 2013 launch.

After the moon mission, Isro's plans for Mars exploration got a shot in the arm with the government allocating the ambitious programme Rs 125 crore in the Union Budget announced today.The budget documents state that the space agency plans to launch a Mars Orbiter as early as November next year with a 25 kg scientific payload.

Isro got a Rs 2,283 crore hike in allocation in the Union Budget, presented by Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, over the 2011-12 revised estimates of Rs 4,432 crore.

The Mars mission, which comprises putting a spacecraft in the Red Planet's orbit to study its atmosphere, could be launched in November 2013 by Isro's warhorse rocket -- the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle.

The space agency had identified three launch windows -- one each in 2013, 2016 and 2018.Top Isro officials were earlier targeting launch opportunities in 2016 and 2018, but the budget papers show that the plans have been advanced.
"We are yet to finalise the scientific experiments for the Mars Mission," a Isro official said.

Besides the Mars Orbiter Mission, Isro's Human Spaceflight programme has got Rs 60.46 crore in the budget.

The agency's ambitious plan to put in place a regional navigation satellite system for the Indian subcontinent, on the lines of the US-operated Global Positioning System, has been allocated Rs 170 crore in the budget.

The Chandrayaan-II mission, planned for launch in 2014-15, has been allocated Rs 82.50 crore. This amount also includes some allocation for Chandrayaan-I mission

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Arunkumar » 19 Mar 2012 21:11

^^^^
A payload of 25 kg to mars and assuming commonality with chandrayaan's Indian payload the most likely candidates for the mission might be
1.) Terrain Mapping Camera (6.3 kg.)
2.) Hyper Spectral Imager (2.5 kg)
3.) Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI) (11.37 kg).
Probably can accomodate a pair of magnetometer also.

chandrayaan payload

After the yinghuo-1 setback wonder when the chinese are trying to get back to mars.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Jayram » 20 Mar 2012 04:10

Varoon Shekhar wrote:^^^
Nice to hear about the RISAT-1 launch coming up.It's eagery awaited! Not to be nitpicking, but wasn't this supposed to be launced around March 15th? A good side note is that RISAT-2 is confirmed to be an Indian satellite with an Israeli made SAR. A couple of reports tended to suggest that the entire satellite was Israeli.

Not quite right as per the link
In earlier satellites, one major component, the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was imported, but in Risat-1 that has also been developed in India.

So looks like we are past that barrier also.. But jingoes might need more confirmation before celebrating this acheivement..

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Prem Kumar » 20 Mar 2012 05:01

merlin wrote:Wonder what the huge weight difference between RISAT-2 and RISAT-1 is only due to SAR antenna or something else (a jingo would hope for extra fuel for maneuvers to increase revisit time).


There was a discussion on this a couple of pages ago. Not sure why the weight (& consequently power requirements) of RISAT 1 is 6 times that of RISAT 2. Another poster had mentioned that it might be due to the fact that RISAT 1 is a Phased Array radar. It might also be that the Israeli SAR technology is much more advanced than ours. I dont know for sure.

Standard revisit times of RISAT 1 and 2 are identical - unless you are talking about an "on-demand" revisit by expending onboard fuel for an emergency visit

I was also curious about the article mentioning

In earlier satellites, one major component, the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was imported, but in Risat-1 that has also been developed in India.


There has been only RISAT 2 prior to this. Unless there has been some secret payloads to test out SAR from space.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Bade » 20 Mar 2012 09:21

^^^ Chandrayaan had a SAR from the US. Isn't it ironical that the US still has no SAR payload in the public domain, despite its usefulness in disaster management. It uses non-US data sources for such purpose.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby ranjithnath » 20 Mar 2012 10:14

while we are on the topic of mars mission , a small problem to ponder over
what would be the theoretical minimum velocity increment for a two impulse transfer from earth to mars about the sun??

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby merlin » 20 Mar 2012 12:43

Prem Kumar wrote:Standard revisit times of RISAT 1 and 2 are identical - unless you are talking about an "on-demand" revisit by expending onboard fuel for an emergency visit


Yes exactly that. Some of the increased weight should be for more fuel for on-demand shortened revisit times when really, really required.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20617 » 20 Mar 2012 14:38

Vipul wrote:Isro gets Rs 125 cr for Mars mission, eyes Nov 2013 launch.

After the moon mission, Isro's plans for Mars exploration got a shot in the arm with the government allocating the ambitious programme Rs 125 crore in the Union Budget announced today.The budget documents state that the space agency plans to launch a Mars Orbiter as early as November next year with a 25 kg scientific payload.

Isro got a Rs 2,283 crore hike in allocation in the Union Budget, presented by Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, over the 2011-12 revised estimates of Rs 4,432 crore.

The Mars mission, which comprises putting a spacecraft in the Red Planet's orbit to study its atmosphere, could be launched in November 2013 by Isro's warhorse rocket -- the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle.

The space agency had identified three launch windows -- one each in 2013, 2016 and 2018.Top Isro officials were earlier targeting launch opportunities in 2016 and 2018, but the budget papers show that the plans have been advanced.
"We are yet to finalise the scientific experiments for the Mars Mission," a Isro official said.

Besides the Mars Orbiter Mission, Isro's Human Spaceflight programme has got Rs 60.46 crore in the budget.

The agency's ambitious plan to put in place a regional navigation satellite system for the Indian subcontinent, on the lines of the US-operated Global Positioning System, has been allocated Rs 170 crore in the budget.

The Chandrayaan-II mission, planned for launch in 2014-15, has been allocated Rs 82.50 crore. This amount also includes some allocation for Chandrayaan-I mission


I don’t agree with this allocation.

Why do we need to spend Rs 125 crore on Mars Orbiter Mission when we can give that amount to speed up our regional navigation satellite system for the Indian subcontinent, on the lines of the US-operated Global Positioning System.

Imagine what our scientists can achieve with the total budget of Rs 295 crore (Rs 170 crore + Rs 125 crore). We must focus first on building our satellite system for our security. We need to be independent of GPS as well as Glosnass as fast as possible. I don’t really see any purpose of sending a rocket to Mars which we can ill afford.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SSSalvi » 20 Mar 2012 17:01

^^^

Last 3/4 years our satellite programs appear to be more oriented towards trying to get clappings from the gallery rather than the real utility to national requirements. Man to moon, Mars probe ( when is our man to Mars planned? ).

ISRO nowadays thinks that the space programs are for show more than utility.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Reddy » 20 Mar 2012 17:36

SSSalvi wrote:^^^

Last 3/4 years our satellite programs appear to be more oriented towards trying to get clappings from the gallery rather than the real utility to national requirements. Man to moon, Mars probe ( when is our man to Mars planned? ).

ISRO nowadays thinks that the space programs are for show more than utility.

Why should'nt ISRO aspire to send a probe to Mars or Moon?
All work and no play makes Ramu a dull person.

On the other hand, if they don't… and if i live for another 50 years, i can foresee people complaining, why din't India plan for Mars trip few decades back and missed the golder opportunity etc.

When i get time, i participate in a programme that teaches school children in villages science and stuff. You should see when i told them that india sent a probe to the moon. It makes them so proud and confident that they can do something. If you have been following Macaulay education and stuff on BR you know what i mean and the importance of it. Frankly, i am happy that my tax is being put to good use by ISRO by inspring next generation. For the past few decades they have done silent work and it is time to show path to next generation and set bigger and more amibitous targets.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby keshavchandra » 20 Mar 2012 19:17

IIT Kanpur makes prototype of lunar robot for ISRO
Link
Moving a step ahead in a nationally relevant space project, the IIT Kanpur has developed a prototype of a lunar robot for ISRO mission to the moon. The project, which was started in 2010 has a larger objective to send a mobile robot to the moon for performing experiments and developing maps of the lunar terrain.

There were fundamentally two components which had to be completed by IITK, Dr Ashish Dutta, Associate Professor of mechanical engineering said. This included the structured light based 3D map generation of lunar terrain that is being carried out by Dr. K.S. Venkatesh, Associate Professor of Electrical engineering.

“As there is no ready made map of the lunar surface, the focus is to use structured light to generate a map of the lunar terrain after landing. Based on the map the robot is expected to move from one point to another for experiments,” Dr Dutta told HT.

The second component is kinematics and path planning. After the map is generated the robot has to move to a desired location. As the lunar terrain consists of dust, rocks etc the robot has to choose the safest path to travel by.

The focus of this part is to analyse all the possible feasible paths and then choose the best path in terms of safety and least energy consumption, he said, Underlining the major challenges confronted he said the lunar terrain consists of rocks, ash and craters.

Planning motion in such an environment is extremely difficult, as there is no scope of mistakes.

Besides the gravity on the moon is 1/6 that of earth and hence the design has to consider this sub gravity conditions.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20617 » 20 Mar 2012 19:37

Reddy wrote:
Why should'nt ISRO aspire to send a probe to Mars or Moon?
All work and no play makes Ramu a dull person.

On the other hand, if they don't… and if i live for another 50 years, i can foresee people complaining, why din't India plan for Mars trip few decades back and missed the golder opportunity etc.

When i get time, i participate in a programme that teaches school children in villages science and stuff. You should see when i told them that india sent a probe to the moon. It makes them so proud and confident that they can do something. If you have been following Macaulay education and stuff on BR you know what i mean and the importance of it. Frankly, i am happy that my tax is being put to good use by ISRO by inspring next generation. For the past few decades they have done silent work and it is time to show path to next generation and set bigger and more amibitous targets.


Reddyji

What you consider as ‘put to good use’ is in my opinion sheer waste of money.

Money does not grow on trees.

We are a poor nation.

We have to prioritise.

What is more important – having our own satellite system or sending a rocket to Mars?

USA, Russia and China (very soon) have their own satellite system. We also need our own satellite system for security reasons. We must aim for independence.

One can also argue that we can have so many schools and/or hospitals built from this amount. So it boils down to prioritisation.

We don’t really need to send a rocket to Mars to get inspired. There are thousands of other ways to get inspired. How about getting a few gold medals at Olympics?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby akashganga » 20 Mar 2012 21:59

Shankaraa wrote:
Vipul wrote:Isro gets Rs 125 cr for Mars mission, eyes Nov 2013 launch.

After the moon mission, Isro's plans for Mars exploration got a shot in the arm with the government allocating the ambitious programme Rs 125 crore in the Union Budget announced today.The budget documents state that the space agency plans to launch a Mars Orbiter as early as November next year with a 25 kg scientific payload.

Isro got a Rs 2,283 crore hike in allocation in the Union Budget, presented by Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, over the 2011-12 revised estimates of Rs 4,432 crore.

The Mars mission, which comprises putting a spacecraft in the Red Planet's orbit to study its atmosphere, could be launched in November 2013 by Isro's warhorse rocket -- the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle.

The space agency had identified three launch windows -- one each in 2013, 2016 and 2018.Top Isro officials were earlier targeting launch opportunities in 2016 and 2018, but the budget papers show that the plans have been advanced.
"We are yet to finalise the scientific experiments for the Mars Mission," a Isro official said.

Besides the Mars Orbiter Mission, Isro's Human Spaceflight programme has got Rs 60.46 crore in the budget.

The agency's ambitious plan to put in place a regional navigation satellite system for the Indian subcontinent, on the lines of the US-operated Global Positioning System, has been allocated Rs 170 crore in the budget.

The Chandrayaan-II mission, planned for launch in 2014-15, has been allocated Rs 82.50 crore. This amount also includes some allocation for Chandrayaan-I mission


I don’t agree with this allocation.

Why do we need to spend Rs 125 crore on Mars Orbiter Mission when we can give that amount to speed up our regional navigation satellite system for the Indian subcontinent, on the lines of the US-operated Global Positioning System.

Imagine what our scientists can achieve with the total budget of Rs 295 crore (Rs 170 crore + Rs 125 crore). We must focus first on building our satellite system for our security. We need to be independent of GPS as well as Glosnass as fast as possible. I don’t really see any purpose of sending a rocket to Mars which we can ill afford.

India should do the Mars Mission. It will be a technologically challenging. The entire world will watch and appreciate. The money allocated for this is comparatively small. I hope ISRO goes ahead with this in 2013.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby abhishek-nayak » 20 Mar 2012 22:16

Shankaraa wrote:
Reddyji

What you consider as ‘put to good use’ is in my opinion sheer waste of money.
Money does not grow on trees.
We are a poor nation.
We have to prioritise.
What is more important – having our own satellite system or sending a rocket to Mars?
USA, Russia and China (very soon) have their own satellite system. We also need our own satellite system for security reasons. We must aim for independence.
One can also argue that we can have so many schools and/or hospitals built from this amount. So it boils down to prioritisation.
We don’t really need to send a rocket to Mars to get inspired. There are thousands of other ways to get inspired. How about getting a few gold medals at Olympics?


Mate, you are highly wrong here.125 crores is not a big money.As far as i know india can very well afford a mars mission as well as Navigational system.Mars mission will help in maturing our space program and more and more youngsters will be encouraged to join ISRO rather dreaming of migrating to USA and working for NASA.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Bade » 20 Mar 2012 22:31

Rs 125 crores will get you just 25 super luxurious villas in and around Bangalore. Peanuts I say. ISRO needs to do more robotic missions on planetary exploration.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 20 Mar 2012 23:57

Mars mission sounds good, and doable. But first, ISRO needs to get the GSLV Mark 2 up and running. It's been almost 2 years since the last flight. Then the GSLV Mark 3, which seems to have some encouraging news around it. Also, the RISAT-1, Astrosat, SRE-2 and Insat-3D are way behind schedule, going by what was projected about them many years ago.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Bade » 21 Mar 2012 01:28

One needs to decouple in our thoughts between successes and failures of launching rockets and payload missions. Both are done by different sets of skilled people. We need to retain and also nurture talent where people who plan payload missions and execute them also have enough things to do while the rocket engineers fix their issues.

I am surprised why Astrosat is so way behind schedule. SRE-2 maybe has to do with timing and funding for a manned mission, for which PSLV/GSLV success or readiness counts more.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Paul » 21 Mar 2012 01:48

Just wait till the Brit tabloid press gets to know this! No more peanuts to Pranabda!!! ye hear.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby suryag » 21 Mar 2012 04:00

It is surprising that India which is so impoverished is spending money on a mission to MARS. Indian politicians seem to be totally oblivious of the hardship that they common man is undergoing. Rather than spending XX crores on MArs mission they should try and focus on building toilets and improve sanitation. Exploration of mars and others should be left for advanced nations like UK, Spain, Italy and Portugal. No wonder you have more cellphones than toilets in India.... this will be the gist of the next Uklistan article.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby lakshmikanth » 21 Mar 2012 04:59

^^^ There is an untold small print to the above and that is
"We would rather dump all our wealth in the sea, rather than give it to you filthy brown monsters".

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby abhishek-nayak » 21 Mar 2012 09:43

suryag wrote:It is surprising that India which is so impoverished is spending money on a mission to MARS. Indian politicians seem to be totally oblivious of the hardship that they common man is undergoing. Rather than spending XX crores on MArs mission they should try and focus on building toilets and improve sanitation. Exploration of mars and others should be left for advanced nations like UK, Spain, Italy and Portugal. No wonder you have more cellphones than toilets in India.... this will be the gist of the next Uklistan article.


they would certainly not mind if Greece sends a mars probe but if India does then it is a big problem.I see racial angle to this issue

They don't mind that UK which has 400% external debt building a super-carrier but if india builds a medium size A/c then there is a problem.

They don't mind USA and UK spending 600 and 60 billion respectively on military but they have a problem if india spends 1.8% of it's GDP on defense.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby gakakkad » 21 Mar 2012 09:53

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Mars mission sounds good, and doable. But first, ISRO needs to get the GSLV Mark 2 up and running. It's been almost 2 years since the last flight. Then the GSLV Mark 3, which seems to have some encouraging news around it. Also, the RISAT-1, Astrosat, SRE-2 and Insat-3D are way behind schedule, going by what was projected about them many years ago.


AFAIK PSLV would suffice for the mars mission..Atlas centaur was used for viking..The team of people for each of this would be different..so one is not compromised by the other. All GSLV variants are going to be tested by the end of this year.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 21 Mar 2012 10:47

"AFAIK PSLV would suffice for the mars mission..Atlas centaur was used for viking..The team of people for each of this would be different..so one is not compromised by the other. All GSLV variants are going to be tested by the end of this year."

Thanks, good news. I was not making any connection between the success of the GSLV mark 2 and a possible Mars mission. Just wondering and hoping that a long delayed vehicle would fly successfully before the recently announced mission. It is good that there are different teams involved in all these projects. Shows the depth of the organisation, in a way.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby merlin » 21 Mar 2012 12:52

gakakkad wrote:All GSLV variants are going to be tested by the end of this year.


Hopefully that will happen but at this point I'm skeptical.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Hersh » 21 Mar 2012 14:17

Regarding Mars mission:
1] Its an important aspect since one never knows what all minerals we might find on Mars.
2] We end up developing technologies which have applications in varied fields....for example who says that the precision launching required for Moon mission wouldnt have impact on the accuracy of our Missile delivery systems.
3] Another advantage you get is that by being in the first-to-reach club you become part of all policy making ....an analogue is...had India tested a nuclear device in 60s it may not have faced nuclear apartheid imposed on in it by NPT.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20617 » 21 Mar 2012 16:42

<del>

when your post vanishes without a trace, take the hint.
Last edited by Rahul M on 21 Mar 2012 18:29, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: user warned.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Kailash » 21 Mar 2012 18:50

gakakkad wrote:AFAIK PSLV would suffice for the mars mission..Atlas centaur was used for viking..The team of people for each of this would be different..so one is not compromised by the other. All GSLV variants are going to be tested by the end of this year.


Aiming for 2013 for Mars, it is understandable that
-neither is GSLV going to be ready and tested fully
-nor will there be so many experiments designed and ready

But for comparing the sheer cost/kg of payload lifted, and quantity/quality of data that would be collected, would be sensible to wait for a later date (GSLV + More payload/experiments) than launching a limited payload now?

*Obviously, I am ignoring the time difference to put together a GSLV vs PSLV and the difference in reliability of the two LVs. Also assuming new experiments and improved instrumentation would be ready for say, a 2016/2018 timeframe.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby KrishG » 21 Mar 2012 23:13

Kailash wrote:Aiming for 2013 for Mars, it is understandable that
-neither is GSLV going to be ready and tested fully
-nor will there be so many experiments designed and ready

But for comparing the sheer cost/kg of payload lifted, and quantity/quality of data that would be collected, would be sensible to wait for a later date (GSLV + More payload/experiments) than launching a limited payload now?

*Obviously, I am ignoring the time difference to put together a GSLV vs PSLV and the difference in reliability of the two LVs. Also assuming new experiments and improved instrumentation would be ready for say, a 2016/2018 timeframe.


2013 is not a realistic date for the mission. It will take no less than 3 years for earth orbiting satellites itself from sanctioning to the actual completion of fabrication and testing (assuming things go on schedule). So, it's unrealistic for 2013 launch date.

The only situation where this 2013 date would be somewhat possible is if our orbiter is similar in specifications to Yinghuo-1 (small, basic, secondary payload of another country's Mars mission). AFAIK no Mars mission is due in 2013 for our small orbiter to piggyback.

So, realistically the planning and specification phase of the mission will itself run into 2013. 2015-2016 will be when it'll be launched (if everything goes according to plan). By that time we will have the Mk-III available. As far as I am concerned, this the most likely scenario.

gakakkad wrote:AFAIK PSLV would suffice for the mars mission..Atlas centaur was used for viking..The team of people for each of this would be different..so one is not compromised by the other. All GSLV variants are going to be tested by the end of this year.


Image

The capacity of PSLV for Martian mission is largely limited. With an orbiter weighting just 200 kgs about only 20%-30% (normally even less) of its capacity will be available for scientific instruments. The Mk-III is what ISRO will be looking at for this mission.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby keshavchandra » 27 Mar 2012 10:45

ISRO to launch Indonesian satellite
The IinuSat, weighing about 30 kilogrammes, is being made by students of six universities in Indonesia and the technical experts have already arrived at the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) in Thiruvananthapuram for its integration with the launch vehicle.

The ISRO would be paid a fee of 100,000 Euros for the launch, said Son Kuswadi, Education Attache in the Indonesian Embassy in India. The launch is scheduled in early 2013, he revealed.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Austin » 27 Mar 2012 22:28


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Neshant » 28 Mar 2012 05:29

I was reading about the Beagle 2 (unsuccessful) mission to Mars. More specifically, the payload it carried. Might be worth working with them to implement some of the payload pacakages on future Indian missions to Mars :

Beagle 2 had a robotic arm known as the Payload Adjustable Workbench (PAW), designed to be extended after landing. The PAW contained a pair of stereo cameras, a microscope (with a 6 micrometre resolution), a Mössbauer spectrometer, an X-ray spectrometer, a drill for collecting rock samples and a spotlamp. Rock samples were to be passed by the PAW into a mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph in the body of the lander - the GAP (Gas Analysis Package), to measure the relative proportions of different isotopes of carbon. Since carbon is thought to be the basis of all life, these readings could have revealed whether the samples contained the remnants of living organisms.

In addition, Beagle 2 was equipped with a small "mole" (Planetary Undersurface Tool, or PLUTO), to be deployed by the arm. PLUTO had a compressed spring mechanism designed to enable it to move across the surface at a rate of 20 mm per second and to burrow into the ground and collect a subsurface sample in a cavity in its tip. The mole was attached to the lander by a power cable which could be used as a winch to bring the sample back to the lander.

The lander had the shape of a shallow bowl with a diameter of 1m and a depth of 0.25 m. The cover of the lander was hinged and folded open to reveal the interior of the craft which holds a UHF antenna, the 0.75 m long robot arm, and the scientific equipment. The main body also contained the battery, telecommunications, electronics, and central processor, heaters, and additional payload items (radiation and oxidation sensors). The lid itself further unfolded to expose four disk-shaped solar arrays. The lander package had a mass of 69 kg at launch but the actual lander would have been only 33.2 kg at touchdown.

The ground segment itself was derived from the European Space Agency software kernel known as SCOS2000. In keeping with the low cost theme of the mission, the control software was the first of its type deployed on a laptop.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby MN Kumar » 30 Mar 2012 12:44

Couple of days back there was a news snippet in one the Telugu daily that a GSLV Mk3 mockup has been moved to the launch pad. Apparently to test the different launch mechanisms. There was also a small picture of the mockup on the launchpad. Couldnt find the same in their online version.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 30 Mar 2012 19:16

^^^

Excuse the ignorance, but what relation would a mock-up have to the 'real deal'. Would some of the components be the same, or is a mock up just a structure with the same shape to simulate certain conditions?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Vipul » 03 Apr 2012 00:26

ISRO prepares to keep date with 'lucky' 20 April for RISAT-1 launch.

Following its delayed launch apparently due to ISRO row, India's indigenously designed and developed all-weather satellite with the unique day and night imaging capability may be launched on 20 April, a "lucky" day for the space agency.

As preparations for the blast-off from India's spaceport of Sriharikota, get under way, ISRO is looking forward to 20 April to keep its date with the launch.

RISAT-1, a Radar Imaging Satellite which can take images of the earth during day as also at night under even cloudy conditions, is the first of its kind developed by India and is already at the spaceport after being transported from Bangalore.

India had launched RISAT-2, which was acquired from Israel at $110 million, on 20 April, 2009, and Resourcesat-2 mission took place on the same day last year. Both proved to be extremely successful ventures.

According to an ISRO official who spoke to PTI in Bangalore, 20 April was a lucky day for ISRO. The statement should not come as a surprise given the back-to-back failures of GSLV -- one with Russian engine and another with homegrown one.

The 1850 kg RISAT-1, is slated for launch by ISRO's workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C19 (XL)) into a 536 km orbit.

The spacecraft's launch, the country's first microwave remote sensing satellite, was delayed by at least a couple of months following the ISRO row, the fallout of the punitive action against four former space scientists for their role in the Antrix-Devas deal, that delayed the preparations.

RISAT-2 with all weather capability and ability to penetrate through clouds was realised in association with Israel Aerospace Industries. It is primarily a spy satellite, and is being used exclusively for Defence applications, to keep a sharp eye on the borders and the country's neighbourhood.

According to an ISRO official quoted by PTI the RISAT-2 satellite could focus sharply on metallic objects.

He added, the RISAT-1 would be useful for monitoring of agriculture and water resources management, among other applications, adding that the satellite would not be used for defence applications as RISAT-2 was already doing the job.

kmkraoind
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby kmkraoind » 03 Apr 2012 18:39

ISRO signs Rs 100-crore deal to launch French satellite - Firstpost

“Under this agreement, an advanced Remote Sensing satellite — SPOT-6 —weighing nearly 800 kg, built by ASTRIUM SAS, will be launched on-board ISRO’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, during the second half of 2012″, ISRO said.

Pranav
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Pranav » 04 Apr 2012 07:35

Vipul wrote:According to an ISRO official quoted by PTI the RISAT-2 satellite could focus sharply on metallic objects.

He added, the RISAT-1 would be useful for monitoring of agriculture and water resources management, among other applications, adding that the satellite would not be used for defence applications as RISAT-2 was already doing the job.


So RISAT-1 cannot "focus sharply on metallic objects"?

I guess it's unlikely that the specs for both the satellites would be in public domain.


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby koti » 05 Apr 2012 21:24

Can anyone ID the SLVs?
Link

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby disha » 05 Apr 2012 21:53

koti wrote:Can anyone ID the SLVs?
Link


From left to right (nearest to furthest): PSLV, GSLV Mk-II, GSLV Mk-III. PSLV appears to have 6 strapons.

Apparao
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Apparao » 06 Apr 2012 22:56

MN Kumar wrote:Couple of days back there was a news snippet in one the Telugu daily that a GSLV Mk3 mockup has been moved to the launch pad. Apparently to test the different launch mechanisms. There was also a small picture of the mockup on the launchpad. Couldnt find the same in their online version.


http://www.shar.gov.in/sdsc/fplan

Liquid Stage of GSLV Mk-III known as L110. It is a 110 Tons Propellant (UH25 and N2O4) stage. The test is planned in a full scale mode at Launch pad. It is scheduled during 2nd week of April to 10th of May 2012.


Probably they meant this??


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