Indian Space Program Discussion

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Don » 25 Nov 2012 20:55

http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Fai ... s_999.html

Failure Of India's Big Rocket Project Is Symbolic Of Deep Structural Problems
by Sumantra Maitra
New Delhi, India (SPX) Nov 25, 2012



The ongoing "Asia Pivot" by United States is rapidly changing the regional dynamics of the Indo - Pacific region, and nowhere is it more visible than the sphere of cooperation in defence and space research.

Recently Canadian and Australian defence co-operation and ties with India reached unprecedented highs, a chain of event termed as the "Rise of the Anglosphere" by historian Walter Russell Mead.

However, the successive failure of Indian GSLV missions, combined with India's stubborn secrecy and fierce independence in the space sector is giving rise to doubts about the scope of further future co-operations.

Although the failure of this signature launching vehicle is attributed to technical glitches, it is highly symbolic of the greater lack of clarity, purpose and direction in the Indian space program.

The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) was originally intended to be India's signature launching vehicle, eventually to launch India's INSAT type satellites, and reduce dependence on foreign rockets.

In the early nineties, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, India was forced to develop independent launching vehicles. India originally tried to buy the technology to build a cryogenic upper stage from Russia, but was denied, under pressure from United States and other Western countries.

With the development of indigenous Cryogenic engine, India became the sixth country in the World to posses the technology, which could be potentially used for civilian and military purposes.

Indian GSLV generally uses L40 liquid strap on boosters and old Soviet KVD 1 upper stage. But even though Indian military and ballistic missile programs were successful, as recently evident with the successful launch of Agni V ICBM, its civilian rocket and space program were mediocre at best.

The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), a launcher vehicle used previously to launch civilian satellites was used as a model of GSLV programs, but it was not successful. Multiple versions of GSLV were launched in the last decade, with more than half of them failing due to technical difficulties. A brief stint of success in 2003- 04 was followed by successive failures.

The vehicle failed to reach orbit, lost control of liquid fuel booster, veered of designated trajectory and had to be destroyed over the Bay of Bengal, or failed to deliver payload in the last four missions. With an unprecedented failure rate, GSLV is gradually on its way to be the costliest misadventure of Indian strategic and space sector. The eighth launch is scheduled in 2013.

The causes of these failures are minor, according to the official bureaucratic rhetoric, and were attributed to minor technical malfunctions. There was no clear response to queries as to why five out of seven launches have resulted in total or partial failure.

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is also secretive and tightlipped about capability and weight of the satellites and why India is still unsuccessful in launching communication satellites more than 3000 KG, 36 Transponder class, whereas the nearby competitors like Japan and China, not to mention USA, Russia and European Space Agency have already moved on to triple that size.

There is no clarity and accountability when it comes to tax payer's money spent on space research, and no heads roll even when there are repeated failures. The lack of purpose is also evident as India lacks fixed and dedicated plan in the Space sector.

In an interview earlier this year, Dr. K, Radhakrishnan, chairman of ISRO, stated that India's main concern and thrust is in the area of applications and not manned space flights and space stations, unlike Russia, US or China. India with its massive population and democratic set up needs more communication satellite to cater to domestic needs, unlike China which is heavily centralized and controlled.

However that argument and logic falls flat as India is already planning for its second lunar mission in early 2014, Chandrayaan 2, and possibly a manned space mission by 2017.

In January 2011, the U.S. officially removed export controls on several subsidiaries of India's Defense Research and Development Organization and the ISRO. It was a clear signal that the United States would like to chart a new future of space co-operation with India.

American think tank Heritage Foundation also published a report around same time, calling for enhanced space and missile defence co-operation between India, Australia and United States, including satellite defence and interceptors, theatre based missile defence and most importantly future co-operation and joint space programs. However there seems to be lukewarm response and enthusiasm from the Indian side.

India's notorious reliance on Russian hardware is also a major hindrance when it comes to further cooperation with the West. Only with the benefit of hindsight would we be able to determine the trajectory of India's space co-operation with the West, or whether it takes any specific direction, but at this present point of time, it is safe to assume, that without any clear plan, or white paper, India's current space prospects are quite grim, and will continue in the chaotic and headless way for the near foreseeable future.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 25 Nov 2012 22:27

Don wrote:http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Fai ... s_999.html

Quote:
Failure Of India's Big Rocket Project Is Symbolic Of Deep Structural Problems
by Sumantra Maitra
New Delhi, India (SPX) Nov 25, 2012


+1 ....always good to critically review things and try to fix problems and come out with flying colors rather than put everything under the carpet.
Action/Success speaks much much louder than words/announcement
Eagerly awaiting for some REAL success...

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23370 » 25 Nov 2012 22:34

When ISRO/DRDO are under sanction they always come out with results that scare the chaddis of the so called anglo-sphere and chinese. All this just seems to be a part of US pivot to Asia. I would prefer India to remain strategically independent of both US and Russia. China is a c-grade power and both US and Russia are aware of it. No reason for India to fight their war.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 25 Nov 2012 22:52

Bheeshma wrote:China is a c-grade power


Sir , with due respect, with my limited knowledge, China has a cryo engine , man in space, preperation for a space station and still it is considered a c - grade power (i am just keeping focus on the space tech and i am not concerned about the source of their technology), where do we stand. From my understanding since 1989, they are not receiving any tech officially from any other country.
Would request a more objective and realistic assessment and I would be the happiest when tech developed by ISRO/DRDO start scaring othes :) .

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20292 » 25 Nov 2012 23:11

^^^

Well. well well. I am sure we think of ourselves, as dhimmified peace loving Indians. But take a look at what we have in our arsenal in general, and I will beg to differ that we dont scare anybody.

We scare plenty of people, including the Chinese. Lets work on scaring them more!

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20292 » 25 Nov 2012 23:13

Don wrote:http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Failure_Of_IndiaS_Big_Rocket_Project_Is_Symbolic_Of_Deep_Structural_Problems_999.html

Failure Of India's Big Rocket Project Is Symbolic Of Deep Structural Problems
by Sumantra Maitra
New Delhi, India (SPX) Nov 25, 2012



The ongoing "Asia Pivot" by United States is rapidly changing the regional dynamics of the Indo - Pacific region, and nowhere is it more visible than the sphere of cooperation in defence and space research.

Recently Canadian and Australian defence co-operation and ties with India reached unprecedented highs, a chain of event termed as the "Rise of the Anglosphere" by historian Walter Russell Mead.

However, the successive failure of Indian GSLV missions, combined with India's stubborn secrecy and fierce independence in the space sector is giving rise to doubts about the scope of further future co-operations.

Although the failure of this signature launching vehicle is attributed to technical glitches, it is highly symbolic of the greater lack of clarity, purpose and direction in the Indian space program.

The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) was originally intended to be India's signature launching vehicle, eventually to launch India's INSAT type satellites, and reduce dependence on foreign rockets.

In the early nineties, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, India was forced to develop independent launching vehicles. India originally tried to buy the technology to build a cryogenic upper stage from Russia, but was denied, under pressure from United States and other Western countries.

With the development of indigenous Cryogenic engine, India became the sixth country in the World to posses the technology, which could be potentially used for civilian and military purposes.

Indian GSLV generally uses L40 liquid strap on boosters and old Soviet KVD 1 upper stage. But even though Indian military and ballistic missile programs were successful, as recently evident with the successful launch of Agni V ICBM, its civilian rocket and space program were mediocre at best.

The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), a launcher vehicle used previously to launch civilian satellites was used as a model of GSLV programs, but it was not successful. Multiple versions of GSLV were launched in the last decade, with more than half of them failing due to technical difficulties. A brief stint of success in 2003- 04 was followed by successive failures.

The vehicle failed to reach orbit, lost control of liquid fuel booster, veered of designated trajectory and had to be destroyed over the Bay of Bengal, or failed to deliver payload in the last four missions. With an unprecedented failure rate, GSLV is gradually on its way to be the costliest misadventure of Indian strategic and space sector. The eighth launch is scheduled in 2013.

The causes of these failures are minor, according to the official bureaucratic rhetoric, and were attributed to minor technical malfunctions. There was no clear response to queries as to why five out of seven launches have resulted in total or partial failure.

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is also secretive and tightlipped about capability and weight of the satellites and why India is still unsuccessful in launching communication satellites more than 3000 KG, 36 Transponder class, whereas the nearby competitors like Japan and China, not to mention USA, Russia and European Space Agency have already moved on to triple that size.

There is no clarity and accountability when it comes to tax payer's money spent on space research, and no heads roll even when there are repeated failures. The lack of purpose is also evident as India lacks fixed and dedicated plan in the Space sector.

In an interview earlier this year, Dr. K, Radhakrishnan, chairman of ISRO, stated that India's main concern and thrust is in the area of applications and not manned space flights and space stations, unlike Russia, US or China. India with its massive population and democratic set up needs more communication satellite to cater to domestic needs, unlike China which is heavily centralized and controlled.

However that argument and logic falls flat as India is already planning for its second lunar mission in early 2014, Chandrayaan 2, and possibly a manned space mission by 2017.

In January 2011, the U.S. officially removed export controls on several subsidiaries of India's Defense Research and Development Organization and the ISRO. It was a clear signal that the United States would like to chart a new future of space co-operation with India.

American think tank Heritage Foundation also published a report around same time, calling for enhanced space and missile defence co-operation between India, Australia and United States, including satellite defence and interceptors, theatre based missile defence and most importantly future co-operation and joint space programs. However there seems to be lukewarm response and enthusiasm from the Indian side.

India's notorious reliance on Russian hardware is also a major hindrance when it comes to further cooperation with the West. Only with the benefit of hindsight would we be able to determine the trajectory of India's space co-operation with the West, or whether it takes any specific direction, but at this present point of time, it is safe to assume, that without any clear plan, or white paper, India's current space prospects are quite grim, and will continue in the chaotic and headless way for the near foreseeable future.


Shite article by Mr Maitra...sounds very poorly written to meet an overnight deadline.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 25 Nov 2012 23:17

mahadevbhu wrote:Lets work on scaring them more!


+1 ....
yes this is what i meant , we need to do more :) , a lot more

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby kit » 26 Nov 2012 00:41

Even though a lot of entities including ISRO came out of the sanctions list., nothing much has changed at the ground level !

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 26 Nov 2012 07:32

ISRO eyes a 6-tonne Ka band satellite - Madhumitha, The Hindu
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) plans to foray into the powerful and high-throughput world of ‘K{-a}’band satellites by importing a six-tonne satellite, building one itself, or both.

It is looking at packing in 100 beams in a ‘next generation’ satellite compared to its regular 40, a senior ISRO associate and satellite expert said. It is testing the market to find a seller who could make it in the next 2 to 3 years as also be a partner in building such an indigenous satellite. It could take ISRO at least five years to work on it from scratch.

ISRO has assembled all its communications and Earth observation satellites in-house for some decades now. “We are trying out a different and twin-pronged approach here,” he said.

ISRO Satellite Centre or ISAC, the satellite assembly centre in Bangalore, earlier this month invited expressions of interest from global satellite manufacturers ‘for design, development, fabrication and operationalisation’ of a 6-tonne K{-a}-band spacecraft. It would weigh almost double the size of the biggest that ISRO has produced so far.

Experts say the K{-a}band will allow higher and faster data transmission on the Internet by at least two or three times what ISRO satellites now offer; and that it will suit VSAT operators who support this traffic.

“K{-a}band is the future, the world is moving towards it and if we don’t get in now, we will be left behind,” the scientist told The Hindu . “We have started building a six-tonne satellite at ISRO facilities, but it will take time.

In 2010, ISRO sent up GSAT-4 with a K{-a}band transponder. However, its homegrown GSLV launcher failed. The next one, GSAT-11, is at least two years away.

The same year, it also built a K{-a}-band satellite, called HYLAS-1 (or Highly Advanced Satellite) for a fee for British operator Avanti in a tie-up with Europe’s Astrium.

A K{-a}band transponder can accommodate far more users more efficiently than ISRO’s older Ku band satellites, one of them said. However, a disadvantage was ‘rain fade’ or disturbed transmission during rain.

The latest exercise comes at a time when ISRO is desperately augmenting its satellite capacity by leasing foreign satellites partially or fully.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 26 Nov 2012 10:25

"Shite article by Mr Maitra...sounds very poorly written to meet an overnight deadline."

No appreciation for the efforts of ISRO, just negative comparisons with other countries. Instead of praising the building of a 3400 kg satellite, he has to compare the satellite with much heavier ones launched by countries that have been in the industry longer or have different requirements or less/no sanctions, or all of these. A 3400kg sat is something to be praised, particularly if it is the heaviest and/or more sophisticated comsat launched by India, regardless of what other countries have done.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Yogi_G » 26 Nov 2012 12:48

That article by Maitra almost castigates India for its "notorious" reliance on Russian hardware. Fact is even the US is reliant on Russian hardware now (Soyuz) :-)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby AbhiJ » 26 Nov 2012 19:40

Yogi_G wrote:That article by Maitra almost castigates India for its "notorious" reliance on Russian hardware. Fact is even the US is reliant on Russian hardware now (Soyuz) :-)


RD 180

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Katare » 26 Nov 2012 21:54

It seems like the fortunes/misfortunes of DRDO and ISRO have flipped in last 2 years!

DRDO well Run/delivered projects/products-
Aakash got Rs 25K corer order
Arjun kicked $hit outta T90
BMD close to completion (The cutting edge stuff!)
Agni 4 and 5, Prahar, K5/K15, Shaurya
Dhruv is going full speed, LCH and LUH doing good
PINAKA is being churned out by thousands
Brahmos is being tested and delivered by truck loads
ATV is unveiled and ready for sea trials
Lakshya and Nishan inducted, Rustom and many other on development
At least a dozen+ Radars- Indra, Rajendra, Rohni, Revati, Ashlesha, Bahiravi, BFSR (S & M), WLR
EW/ELIIT/COMiNT package - Sangraha, FCS etc
Navel sensors a- HUMSA, Ajanta, APSOH, NAGAN, Panchendriya


ISRO's got only

Chandrayan mission
2 Failed GSLV missions that were the most important focus for it is a big bummer
Scandal related to previous chairman


DRDO major projects still lingering-LCA, Kaveri, MMR
Nag
Astra
IJT/Sitara
IAC
ATV (may be not)
Not a big list compared to well managed/delivered projects.......
What did I miss? Only major (Rs 1000K Corer projects)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Brando » 26 Nov 2012 22:08

Failure Of India's Big Rocket Project Is Symbolic Of Deep Structural Problems
by Sumantra Maitra
New Delhi, India (SPX) Nov 25, 2012


Regardless of the semi-educated analysis, there is some truth in the article. The needless secrecy of ISRO for example, the lack of a clearly defined goals by the organization; which was set up to use space to improve the lives of millions of poor in India but is now concentrating on Mars/Moon missions etc and trying to compete with Chinese in glory/high profile missions without getting its basics straight. The failure to focus on building capabilities in launch vehicles while still flogging the PSLV horse and celebrating even minor successes as great achievements? If the South Koreans can make use of the RD-170 technology and collaborate closely with the Russians , why can't ISRO find partners to help it out if it lacks the ability ?? why is ISRO still mucking about with UDMH hypergolic propellents when all of the world's top space agencies are moving to more efficient and lighter cryogenic propellents ?? And why is it that in 2012 India still has to "lease" satellites from foreign companies to meet domestic needs if ISRO has been doing its job ??

So while ISRO is a capable organization, it is like a rudderless ship adrift at sea led by charlatans trying to gain celebrity instead of doing their jobs. That's why we have ISRO chairman asking the government for funding a "manned" mission and Mars missions while we still have to buy passage with the ESA for our heavier satellites and Indians have to lease bandwidth on foreign satellites to meet our needs.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 26 Nov 2012 22:18

"ISRO's got only

Chandrayan mission
2 Failed GSLV missions that were the most important focus for it is a big bummer
Scandal related to previous chairman"

The GSLV has been a disappointment, for certain. But let's give credit to ISRO for its successful satellites and the PSLV launcher, even though the latter is now routine. Oceansat-2, Megatropiques and most of all RISAT-1, were major successes, and deserving of praise. RISAT-1 is the most sophisticated satellite developed in India, and very few countries have the technology/capability.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Shrinivasan » 01 Dec 2012 02:05

Brando wrote:
Failure Of India's Big Rocket Project Is Symbolic Of Deep Structural Problems
by Sumantra Maitra
New Delhi, India (SPX) Nov 25, 2012
And why is it that in 2012 India still has to "lease" satellites from foreign companies to meet domestic needs if ISRO has been doing its job ??.

how many other countries has this huge requirement for transponders as India? our craze with television sucks up transponders like crazy.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Vivek K » 01 Dec 2012 08:37

A lot of research in India seems to be done to milk the taxpayer. Projects like the IJT, the SARAS and perhaps even the AMCA are good examples of this. Modus Operandi - make a good brochure, run CFD analysis a couple of times and attract a few hundred crores from GOI for 10 years and then declare failure.

Corruption has become so deeply rooted in us that in theface of current challenges, we live in the "San chalta hai" attitude. The belief even here in some fanboys that their Mother Russia will make India a great power is simply another form of this deep rooted corruption.

Instead of common sense buys like the Qatari Mirages or the Hungarian Mig-29s, we are throwing money at costly fixes that will not appear for a long time while enemies fly cheap alternatives.

ISRO is showing no signs of recovering from the GSLV failures. We need the GSLV to come good.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Singha » 01 Dec 2012 09:25

ISRO I feel missed a product transition in the shift to heavy satellites. now we are lagging in that tech and desperately need foreign help to get domestic production going on such sats.

imo they should focus on a few things, but surely the current budget needs to be increased to chinese levels. you can be sure the Cheen is throwing a lot more money at this.
- GSLV fix it whatever it takes - rope in Rus help like was done for ATV.
- heavy comm sats
- military comms, sigint, oceansat and IMINT sats - rope in israeli help if needed

production rates need to increase, all points to lack of money and some lack of focus.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_20067 » 01 Dec 2012 09:28

Vivek K wrote:A lot of research in India seems to be done to milk the taxpayer. Projects like the IJT, the SARAS and perhaps even the AMCA are good examples of this. Modus Operandi - make a good brochure, run CFD analysis a couple of times and attract a few hundred crores from GOI for 10 years and then declare failure.

Corruption has become so deeply rooted in us that in theface of current challenges, we live in the "San chalta hai" attitude. The belief even here in some fanboys that their Mother Russia will make India a great power is simply another form of this deep rooted corruption.

Instead of common sense buys like the Qatari Mirages or the Hungarian Mig-29s, we are throwing money at costly fixes that will not appear for a long time while enemies fly cheap alternatives.

ISRO is showing no signs of recovering from the GSLV failures. We need the GSLV to come good.


You are stealing words of lot of people....

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby kit » 01 Dec 2012 11:06

The default style of indian reporting is criticism. Dont know why they dont stick to factual and well researched information.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Bade » 01 Dec 2012 18:12

Looking up to ISRO for military hardware and operational needs is like waiting for NASA to help out the military infra. It ain't gonna happen.

People who are willing to work on military bread and butter solutions are not the types who are willing to take huge pay cuts to work for ISRO or NASA type orgs on cutting edge stuff. What India lacks are Lockheed type military projects heavy companies, who feed on the trained but unhappy low paid ISRO engineers and scientists, who are willing to work on less challenging intellectually and in a less free environment for a larger pay.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SaiK » 01 Dec 2012 19:29

Is satellite docking a difficult technology to master? if we can, then we can
1. extend the life of existing satellites, by perhaps dispatching smaller payload from modified missile systems to orbit -> dock... package should be able to dock, reprogram, or add battery or memory/processor/any LRU.
2. multiple launches is possible and any satellite can gain weight, features and functions added up.

now these may not be cost effective, but may be so depending on mission objectives.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 01 Dec 2012 22:00

kit wrote:The default style of indian reporting is criticism. Dont know why they dont stick to factual and well researched information.


Fact of the matter is
1. ISRO is very good in launching rockets with 1.5 tonne to 1.8 tonne capacity to LEO / SSO
2. ISRO is alright in making satellites upto 3 tonne capacity for communication and also for remote sensing

3. ISRO does not seem to have advanced tech to make efficient rocket system. Its rocket engine's needs to be more efficient
4. To make to the next level of space exploration it needs cryo / semi-cryo engine. This is more critical since India does not have the luxury to buy engines from Russia / any country at least overtly
5. ISRO is better for the time being compared to countries like Brazil / S. Korea in space tech (this is great), but far , far behind China and ESA and i am not counting the Russian / USA

These are facts from open source and does not require much research and we have to live with it and with the huge delays that nowerdays seems to be happening with all there missions i am not sure were it is heading [ 2011 - 3 launches , 2012 - 2 launches only ].
And honestly I don;t understand why we count a .75kg or a 1 kg satellite as part of a space mission , are they really so important[ i am not aware of this thing at least , please correct me]

PS : People with much more knowledge in this regard at least please don;t suggest that space exploration tech are too complex and needs time to develop. If that is the case [ and i agree with it ] then my request to the scientists would be to at please stop announcing unrealistic timelines and create expectations only to later disappoint and focus more on the task at hand

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Bade » 02 Dec 2012 02:40

Regarding deadlines, even accomplished nations like USA have missed deadlines by a large margin. The satellite programs are more complex in their case and run multi billion dollar budgets, with number of payloads in each mission on a single platform approaching double digits at times.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SaiK » 02 Dec 2012 04:20

The good thing about USA is process corrections. There is absolutely nothing wrong in learning that.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby kit » 03 Dec 2012 07:29

A disruptive technology developed will change space travel and rocketry as we know

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ne-379609/

wasnt a similar program under development in india ??

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 Dec 2012 08:07

^^ Inflight Oxygen gathering and liquidation is basicly an Indian idea long put forward by Kalam not surprising the world has realised the effeciency of such an approach.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby NRao » 04 Dec 2012 14:08

kit wrote:A disruptive technology developed will change space travel and rocketry as we know

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ne-379609/

wasnt a similar program under development in india ??


Wiki wrote:AVATAR (Sanskrit: अवतार) (from "Aerobic Vehicle for Hypersonic Aerospace TrAnspoRtation") was a concept development effort for a single-stage reusable spaceplane capable of horizontal takeoff and landing, by India's Defense Research and Development Organization along with Indian Space Research Organization and other research institutions. The mission concept was for cheaper[citation needed] military and civilian satellite space launches.

The notional specification was for a payload weighing up to 1,000 kg to low earth orbit. It would be the cheapest way to deliver material to space at about US$67/kg.[not verified in body] Each craft was anticipated to withstand 100 launches.


Image
A scaled down version of AVATAR undergoing aero-elastic test.

The idea was to develop a hyperplane vehicle that can take off from conventional airfields, collect air in the atmosphere on the way up, liquefy it, separate oxygen and store it on board for subsequent flight beyond the atmosphere.


Image

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby vina » 04 Dec 2012 15:13

Austin wrote:^^ Inflight Oxygen gathering and liquidation is basicly an Indian idea long put forward by Kalam not surprising the world has realised the effeciency of such an approach.


Hmm. You haven't heard of Alan Bond .

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby kit » 06 Dec 2012 07:39

The AVATAR design was frozen ? That pic looks too simplistic.If i remember correctly the design had some patents.What is the current status of that project ??

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby arun » 09 Dec 2012 16:40

Times of India quoting Director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, P S Veeraraghavan, provides an update on the development of the indigenous cryogenic engine which is expected to power a GSLV Mk II launch in April 2013:

"We did a thorough analysis of the D3 flight and identified the reasons behind its failure," Veeraraghavan said. "The analysis called for a redesign of certain components in the cryogenic propulsion system and the same has now been addressed and is being put through multiple testing," he said.

"Most tests have been completed except for the high altitude test, which validates the mission of our cryogenic engine. We hope to complete this and launch the GSLV mission by April 2013," Veeraraghavan said.


From Here:

GSLV's next launch in April: Veeraraghavan

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby merlin » 09 Dec 2012 17:53

ISRO in full caution mode ala ADA. Another failed launch and their credibility will take a huge hit.

member_23694
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 09 Dec 2012 17:54

arun wrote:Times of India quoting Director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, P S Veeraraghavan, provides an update on the development of the indigenous cryogenic engine which is expected to power a GSLV Mk II launch in April 2013


at last some news :-o
desperate for its success, this is one tech which cannot afford another failure or delay

T - 4 months and counting :D

Any news on the GSLV Mark 3 test launch ?

member_23694
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 13 Dec 2012 22:33

ISRO planning 10 space missions in 2013

http://idrw.org/?p=16577

Only one GSLV mission in the whole year :evil: and no mention of GSLV MK 3 .. :((
Could anyone please provide a better news for ISRO's plan for 2013 ?

TSJones
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby TSJones » 14 Dec 2012 00:59

An outside view of the Indian space program:

http://spaceref.com/asia/india-races-ch ... urity.html

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby TSJones » 16 Dec 2012 04:30

Geez, no discussion? I thought that no mention of India's Mars mission was a major faux pas of the article. A Mars mission is a *big deal* for any country. I would have thought India should have got an honorable mention for this.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby disha » 16 Dec 2012 04:53

TSJones wrote:Geez, no discussion? ...


It is interesting to see that desis not indulging in rona-dhona on a two bit farticle is giving you lots of khujli.

Indian Space research and development is quite ahead and is more innovative (largest remote sensing constellation in world, first country to definitely find water on moon etc) and it does not have to genuflect for rah-rah gora attention. Particularly when all our rocket technologies has been stolen from the great US of A after Abdul Kalama's visit to US - right!

member_23651
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby member_23651 » 16 Dec 2012 12:30

I would love to see an international body on the scale of size as UN body, pooling money and resources on developing radical new technologies & managing launch for interplanetary missions. Eventually it may come, would be a win win situation for everyone. But India would still need to continue develop technologies, to avoid playing second fiddle to P 5 .

JE Menon
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby JE Menon » 16 Dec 2012 15:52

TSJ

I think there's nothing fundamentally wrong with the article as its mainly a fact list. They ascribe motivations which in my opinion are entirely misjudged but that happens a lot with American observers of India and that's not a bad thing necessarily for either the US or us. For now. But the US is getting to know us better and vice versa every day almost. Hence the mild exasperation and questions that boil down to "what do you guys REALLY want?" Or "what is your real strategic posture"? And the like. They don't believe us when we tell them all we want is peace and love and harmony in the world. Beatles too recent in the collective psyche I suppose. But that truly is what we want and will work for, though we know a lot of killing is a part of the harmonization part. Being non-veg in spirit we will leave that part to the euros the Chinese and you chaps, who seem more comfortable and capable in that sort of thing. You will be surprised at how close above is to reality. :)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby D Roy » 16 Dec 2012 16:54

mainly a fact list


It isn't even that.

It's a poorly pieced together list of numerous omissions and commissions.

No mention of RISAT-I, failure to note that the Mars mission is next year itself. Insinuations about Chandrayaan-I when it was obviously in the *right* orbit to have accomplished one of its primary mission objectives.

Other unsubstantiated points. It's pretty bad. And I don't have the time to do a 'nicer' critique, as it were.

It is not even a farticle. It's more like a turdicle.


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