Indian Naval Discussion

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Austin
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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Austin » 02 Jun 2010 11:47

SNaik wrote:Damit.
The boat is ready. The crew is ready. What the hell makes them to delay for half a year again... Somebody needs a security clearance to work on it or similar silly stuff...


No the Indian crew will train on the boat for 5 - 6 months and then it will touch Indian shores.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Singha » 02 Jun 2010 15:48

Navy chopper crashes into a river in AP, 4 injured
Updated on Wednesday, June 02, 2010, 14:29 IST

Visakhapatnam: A Chetak helicopter belonging to the Navy Wednesday crashed into a river near Anakapally town, about 50 kilometres from here, injuring the pilot and three others onboard.

According to initial reports, the pilot and three trainee pilots were injured, DIG Visakhapatnam range Swomya Mishra said.

The mishap occurred when the chopper touched a high tension wire while flying low near Sarada river bridge, the DIG said.

All the injured have been admitted to a local government hospital, he said.

PTI

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby venkyt » 02 Jun 2010 18:21

To all naval tech gurus here.

Why can't we design and develop a small, very fast boat with 'multiple rocket launcher' [like Pinka/Smerch modified for naval purpose, if required], and build that in numbers. I am just conceptualizing a platform, cheap and best, (i) to equal the numbers of Missile boats the Chinese have at present, of course with a difference - deadly punch and (ii) saturate a enemy flotilla nearing our shores. May be we can even try to 'containerize' them [rocket pack] too.
Please let me know how bad or how good is this concept.
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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Singha » 02 Jun 2010 18:37

being unguided , once the enemy sees all these rockets outbound they would change course and all that salvo would go waste.

there is a better soln if you want to containerize and arm everything in the water including the mumbai-goa ferry - its called 3M54 Klub :)

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby venkyt » 02 Jun 2010 18:44

Singha wrote:being unguided , once the enemy sees all these rockets outbound they would change course and all that salvo would go waste..........


how about radar guidance or any other possible guidance systems fitted in these pencils.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby SNaik » 02 Jun 2010 19:31

Austin wrote:
SNaik wrote:Damit.
The boat is ready. The crew is ready. What the hell makes them to delay for half a year again... Somebody needs a security clearance to work on it or similar silly stuff...


No the Indian crew will train on the boat for 5 - 6 months and then it will touch Indian shores.


Wasn't it reported that Indian crew has been trained in Russia since couple of years ago? Anyway, the first Chakra had quite a lot of Russian personnel along the Indian crew.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 02 Jun 2010 19:35

venkyt, a swarm of missile boats is of limited use for us, none of our adversaries have the capability to bring a large number of combatants near our shores and will not have that capability for decades to come.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby ramana » 02 Jun 2010 20:17

Right after 1971, KS and Md. Ayoob wrote a book, "Liberation War" in which they had this very concept. It didn't get traction for it was a brown water navy instead of the blue water navy that is needed. Its more like a last ditch effort like kamikaze squadrons. Sort of arming yourself with slingshots when the enemy has cavalry.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Austin » 03 Jun 2010 07:14

SNaik wrote:Wasn't it reported that Indian crew has been trained in Russia since couple of years ago? Anyway, the first Chakra had quite a lot of Russian personnel along the Indian crew.


A lot of these were disguised for ATV training , The Chakra will have indian crew by june and after training will be reaching Indian shores by November , probably to coincide with December Navy Day event.

Did the old Chakra had a Zampolit on board ?

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby SNaik » 04 Jun 2010 13:53

Austin wrote:
A lot of these were disguised for ATV training , The Chakra will have indian crew by june and after training will be reaching Indian shores by November , probably to coincide with December Navy Day event.

Did the old Chakra had a Zampolit on board ?


AFAIK the situation is similar to first MiG-29Ks. They were handed over to India several months before they physically arrived in India. Same goes for the boat.

Can't say about zampolit, but she definitely had her Soviet Navy Captain Terenov and some of the BCh-5 personnel (that's Mech Dept, including reactor) on board.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby kit » 04 Jun 2010 18:19

Must Have for Indian Coastal Security

http://www.janes.com/events/exhibitions ... sona.shtml

http://www.janes.com/news/defence/jdw/j ... _1_n.shtml

"Scuba training is relatively cheap and easily accessible. Even a single terrorist equipped with a limpet mine or IED [improvised explosive device] could wreak havoc, with huge financial, environmental and/or political consequences

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby maz » 06 Jun 2010 21:43

Guys, any idea as to what the ESM system on the 1241RE's mast may be called? These craft were fitted with an Ajanta P? ESM until this baby showed up. Click the link below to see picture.
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NAVY/Galleries/News/Events/Presidents+Day+at+Sea/viraat01+081.jpg.html

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Nikhil T » 07 Jun 2010 07:56

Good to see Navy awarded the contract to Pipavav which has no experience with Naval contracts but is the top private sector shipyard.
Pipavav Shipyard bags Rs 2,600-cr Navy deal for 5 - 2000-tonne OPV

AHMEDABAD: Pipavav Shipyard, the country’s largest ship-building facility in the private sector, has bagged a Rs 2,600-crore contract to build offshore patrol vessels for the Indian Navy. The shipyard located in Gujarat will be constructing about five such vessels, each with a displacement of about 2,000 tonne. With the Navy order in its kitty, the company’s order books have swelled to over Rs 7,000 crore.

“We have been declared as the lowest bidder by the ministry of defence (MoD) for contract to build off-shore patrol vessels (OPVs) for the Navy. This will be our maiden foray into building ships for the defence sector,” said Nikhil Gandhi, group chairman, SKIL Infrastructure, the original promoters of Pipavav Shipyard (PSL), a BSE-listed company.

“These vessels will be fitted with a 76 mm gun. They will be about 110 meters in length, will have a displacement of about 2,000 tonne and will have a maximum speed of 20 knots,” Mr Gandhi told ET on Friday.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby akimalik » 07 Jun 2010 09:00

maz wrote:Guys, any idea as to what the ESM system on the 1241RE's mast may be called? These craft were fitted with an Ajanta P? ESM until this baby showed up. Click the link below to see picture.
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NAVY/Galleries/News/Events/Presidents+Day+at+Sea/viraat01+081.jpg.html


Hey, can anyone by any chance tell me where to get the same image of K40 but without the watermark?
my dad is Ex-K22 and I would love to present him with this pic .... brings back fond memories :-).
Thanks (and sincere apologies if this is OT).

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby arun » 07 Jun 2010 13:11

Nikhil T wrote:Good to see Navy awarded the contract to Pipavav which has no experience with Naval contracts but is the top private sector shipyard.

Pipavav Shipyard bags Rs 2,600-cr Navy deal for 5 - 2000-tonne OPV


Indeed it is good to see a private sector yard like Pipavav Shipyard winning an Indian Navy order for five Offshore Patrol Vessels. Private sector shipyard L&T was also reportedly in the fray along with usual suspect :wink: Goa Shipyard

This class of vessels seems to be distinct from the Goa Shipyard built Saryu Class NOPV that is currently being built for the Navy. The class of OPV that will be built by Pipavav Shipyard seems to be 5 meters longer but has a displacement that is 200 Tonnes less and is 5 Knots slower. Going by a Janes article released during/after IMDS in June / July 2009, the Pipavav Shipyard has tied up with Russia’s Severnoye Design Bureau for the executing the contract:

Russia's Severnoye teams with Pipavav to compete for Indian NOPV

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Ankit Desai » 07 Jun 2010 20:06

Navy planning to procure four AEW&C planes

We are planning to procure four carrier-based AEW&C aircraft to carry out airborne surveillance, detection and tracking of airborne and surface contacts and control air interceptions and air strikes,"
Navy officials told PTI here.

Using AEW&C aircraft on aircraft carriers will help in expanding the area under surveillance near the area of their deployment,
they added.

Ankit

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Gagan » 07 Jun 2010 21:21

I am trying to make models of the IN subs.
Does any one have schematics for the Kilo class and the U-209 class subs similar to these for the scorpene?

Image

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Raman » 07 Jun 2010 22:09

A Sharma posted this piece of news on the INS Arihant thread.

From MOD Annual report 2010

Quote:
Seabed Arrays : These are off-board sonars, deployed on the seabed, meant for continuous monitoring of strategic locations. Sea trials were carried out during March - April 2009. All the objectives of the project have been achieved. The system was proved against submarine target. The project was completed in 2009.


That is fantastic news. Soon, we will have the Desi version of SOSUS arrays deployed.

N00bs endlessly debate about missile ranges while gurus know that the biggest problem in long range engagement is acquisition, identification and targeting, not shooting. The navy's investment in seabed and towed array sonars, along with UAVs and data linking will make it a very very formidable force indeed.

The only thing I don't grok is the relatively pidly size of our maritime patrol aircraft fleet compared to the area of interest. :(( Jingos are never satisfied.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Anujan » 07 Jun 2010 23:09

While poking around on the internets, I found an excellent 450 page PDF document

"Blueprint To Bluewater, THE INDIAN NAVY 1951 – 65 by Rear Admiral Satyindra Singh" hosted in the Indian Navy site: http://indiannavy.nic.in/bptobw.pdf

Sorry if everyone is already aware of this.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby putnanja » 07 Jun 2010 23:28

Indian Navy To Order 500 Sub Escape Sets

The Indian Navy is nearly ready to order 500 Submarine Escape Sets (SES), designed and developed by the Defense Research and Development Organization’s Defense Bioengineering and Electro-medical Laboratory (DEBEL).

The Navy cleared SES in March 2008 after a series of rigorous trials.

Kolkatta-based Bengal Waterproof Ltd (BWL) will produce the sets under transfer of technology (ToT) from DRDO. Bangalore-based DEBEL has issued a proprietary certificate to BWL to manufacture the sets.

...
...
SES user trails were successfully completed at INS Satavahana in Visakhapatnam, and the Navy is said to have expressed its “complete satisfaction.”

“The SES is a crucial life-support system for submariners. So far, the Russian-made SESs were being used by us. SES acts between life and death and there’s a set procedure to even use it,” an Indian Navy source said. “We keep doing tests in swimming pools and other naval facilities which can simulate conditions to test the effectiveness of the suit. The average shelf life of a hydro suit is 3-4 years, after which it needs to be replaced, while the breathing apparatus has a longer life.”

...


Image courtesty Http://Tarmak007.blogspot.com


Image

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby ramana » 08 Jun 2010 00:53

Isnt that called diving suit?

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Neshant » 08 Jun 2010 04:46

i think its pressurized so their lungs don't pop .

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby NRao » 08 Jun 2010 06:59

Raman wrote:A Sharma posted this piece of news on the INS Arihant thread.

From MOD Annual report 2010

Quote:
Seabed Arrays : These are off-board sonars, deployed on the seabed, meant for continuous monitoring of strategic locations. Sea trials were carried out during March - April 2009. All the objectives of the project have been achieved. The system was proved against submarine target. The project was completed in 2009.


That is fantastic news. Soon, we will have the Desi version of SOSUS arrays deployed.

The only thing I don't grok is the relatively pidly size of our maritime patrol aircraft fleet compared to the area of interest. :(( Jingos are never satisfied.


+1. Cosign.

Great news. Hopefully will have a nice big DB to go along with it too.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby sathyaC » 08 Jun 2010 08:39

Navy planning to procure four AEW&C planes
http://www.ptinews.com/news/698336_Navy ... W-C-planes
New Delhi, June 7 (PTI) Looking to strengthen its surveillance capabilities and control over the maritime zone, Indian Navy is planning to procure four aircraft carrier-based Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) planes.

"We are planning to procure four carrier-based AEW&C aircraft to carry out airborne surveillance, detection and tracking of airborne and surface contacts and control air interceptions and air strikes," Navy officials told PTI here.

At present, the Navy operates the carrier-borne Kamov-31, which were procured from Russia for early warning roles.

Using AEW&C aircraft on aircraft carriers will help in expanding the area under surveillance near the area of their deployment, they added.

"The control over the area would also be increased as the AEW&C aircraft can detect enemy fighter and maritime patrol aircraft and direct the fighter planes attached with it towards them and take them out," officials said.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby David Maturana » 08 Jun 2010 21:44

hello

any news about the tests of the indian club-s ASM ??

I read some reports that talk about the failure of some tests of this missile

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Kanson » 08 Jun 2010 22:21

Marten wrote:Noob kweschun. Please indulge me.
What is India's role in the IUSS project? Found an intriguing reference on the Department of Ocean Development Website.

Is this a different IUSS with similar objectives?

4.9 National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT)
Mission-4: Marine Instrumentation
* Development of Echosounder / Acoustic Sub-bottom Profiler with tow fish for IUSS Project.
* Development of 2-16 kHz Acoustic Sub-bottom projector / hydrophone array for IUSS Project.
* Development of 2-16 kHz Magnetostrictive projectors for IUSS Project.


Development of Integrated Underwater Survey System (IUSS)

The proposed state-of-the-art IUSS comprises a sub-bottom profiler, side scan sonar and single frequency echo sounder. The processing software for controlling the electronics and communicating with interfacing devices is being developed. The user requirements have been obtained from various organisations and the action plan is ready. The system design for the echosounder is in progress using HP Vee software on VXI platform.

http://moes.gov.in/ayr98-99/ar_nt114.htm
http://moes.gov.in/welcome.html

It can have military application too. Specs looks similar to Nagan towed array.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby David Maturana » 09 Jun 2010 02:32

MKA wrote:hello

any news about the tests of the indian club-s ASM ??

I read some reports that talk about the failure of some tests of this missile

:?: :?:
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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Austin » 09 Jun 2010 08:53

MKA wrote:
MKA wrote:hello

any news about the tests of the indian club-s ASM ??

I read some reports that talk about the failure of some tests of this missile

:?: :?:


Failures with sub launched Klub have been rectified and it works well now.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Austin » 09 Jun 2010 08:56

Severodvinsk shipbuilders upgrade diesel sub for India

Fifth diesel electric submarine of Indian Navy is being modernized at Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center in Severodvinsk. The corresponding contract has been signed in Delhi, said Nadezhda Scherbinina, director of the shipyard's press service.

"Contract on upgrading INS Sindurakshak is for the first time signed without intermediary of Rosoboronexport", noted the shipyard's official. "Zvezdochka shipyard enjoys the right of independent foreign economic activity given by the President of the Russian Federation", she said. Modernization of Project 877EKM submarine INS Sindurakshak (stands for Sea Giant) will take 2-2.5 years. "The sub is planned to be delivered to Severodvinsk late June", said Scherbinina.

Being specialized in overhaul and utilization of nuclear-powered submarines, Zvezdochka shipyard has upgraded four Indian diesel electric submarines. The shipyard also continues repair and modernization of similar submarine INS Sindukirti in her basing site Vishakhapatnam, India.

All these submarines are Russian-made Project 887EKM (Kilo class) developed by Rubin design bureau, St. Petersburg. They are designed for antisubmarine and antiship warfare; defense of naval bases, coastal and sea lines of communication; reconnaissance and patrol operations. Such submarines have displacement of 2,300 tons; length of 72.6 meters; submerged speed of 19 knots (about 35 kph); test depth of 300 meters; crew of 52; endurance of 45 days. Armament includes six 533-mm torpedo tubes. In the course of modernization subs are equipped with advanced Russian Club-S cruise missile system with firing range of about 200 km, Indian sonars and radio communication systems.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby sathyaC » 09 Jun 2010 10:25

Army and navy plan to set up a marine brigade
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story ... igade.html
The navy and army have sent a proposal to the government seeking permission to transport a 5,000-strong armed infantry and special forces troops, tanks and weapons - an independent brigade group (IBG) - on foreign shores for active operations. This capability has both been controversial and strategically provocative.

It has been learnt that after years of consultations, the army and navy have finally started seeing eye to eye on the modalities required to incrementally build up the capability to deliver a full brigade- strength contingent of troops - including two special forces units - with arms, ammunition, vehicles and weapons outside the Indian mainland.

"The need to move forces is in keeping with the expanded security focus on India's island territories and the ability to deliver forces expeditiously for humanitarian relief operations," navy spokesperson Commander PVS Satish said.

While the financial implications of such a capability are being worked out, they will involve integrated expenditure on larger amphibious assault vessels, equipment and joint training.

The army has an IBG, the 340 Independent Infantry Brigade under Jodhpur- based 12 Corps, for amphibious assault operations.

It re-raised the 91 Infantry Brigade early last year for amphibious warfare.

But the navy currently only has the capacity to transport a little less than two battalions on expeditionary missions. The move now is to crank up that capacity more than twice over for a full IBG. Former navy chief Admiral Arun Prakash said it was absolutely essential that the navy built up the capacity to transport a brigade- sized group across the seas. "We have 1,200 island territories. We have energy investments worth thousands of crores far from our shores. We have huge diaspora in the Middle East. If there was a Kargil-like situation on any of our island territories, we would need adequate boots on the ground for combat. There are also other liabilities such as piracy and potential hostage situations.

Being able to transport a couple of battalions isn't nearly enough," he said.

Sources said the process to obtain approval from the government began under the previous navy chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta, currently India's high commissioner to New Zealand.

The case is said to have been taken up afresh in February this year by the chiefs of staff committee for consideration by the defence minister.

While formal approval is yet to come, the government has indicated it is in principle inclined to approve the proposal.

The capability received a cursory mention in an official technology roadmap document published by the defence ministry last month.

Vice Admiral (retd) Madanjit Singh, navy's former western commander, said: "It is a major capability that the navy is looking at and will necessarily be a joint effort in consultation with the army. Such a capability is useful for operations, humanitarian relief and rescue operations." The Centre and South Block have always been wary about discussing expeditionary capabilities, considering the implications of such operations and India's carefully nurtured image of a country with no belligerent ambitions.

While the establishment has always guised amphibious capabilities as an imperative for more efficient humanitarian relief operations, there have been several recent signs that assault and combat are very much part of the plan.

On April 14, a detachment of Indian soldiers conducted a landmark joint amphibious assault exercise with US Marines off the coast of San Diego on board the US Navy's landing vessel, USS New Orleans . In February last year - five months after the South Block formalised India's first joint amphibious warfare doctrine - the three forces conducted the biggest joint landing operation of troops (a battalion of the 91 Infantry Brigade re-raised in 2009 as an amphibious brigade) on Gujarat's Madhavpur beach after departing the navy base at Karwar, south of Goa.

Leaving little to the imagination, the South Block had announced then that the exercise proved that the forces could conduct "swift and intense conflict during military operations". Apart from being in the market for four- six more large amphibious landing ships to augment the American-built INS Jalashwa inducted almost three years ago, there are other items on order that indicate the desired amphibious assault readiness.

The most recent was the army's expression of interest in procuring up to 4,000 amphibious assault rifles for the infantry.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 09 Jun 2010 17:57

French Naval Ship Tonnerre at kochi, India Its Mistral Class. Looks like more of a Car carrier. You can see men standing vs the size of the ship.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Philip » 09 Jun 2010 18:42

What is really required is the setting up of a nascent Marine Corps for the country.With so much of island territory to defend and also mutual defence agreemeents with close friends like the Maldives,Mauritius and other possible security ties with the Seychelles and our traditional ties with other Afro-Asian nations,our huge population of expats in the Gulf and Missile East,an Indian Marine Corps for the future is a must.One must remember the attempted coup in the Maldives,the IPKF in Sri Lanka,the current pirate attacks in the Arabian Sea/Indian Ocean,which can only be eradicated if the land bases and ports of the pirate fleets are destroyed.The size of such a force is debatable though.In my opinion,a force of not less than 3 divisions,should be available,along with several units of special forces.Initially it should be part of the IA,while the IN takes care of all logistics with the required naval warships to transport and resupply such a force.These forces can also be used anywhere in the Indian landmass in a crisis to support the IA in any theatre.Their presence however will serve as a deterrent against any other hiostile littoral power.The Marine Corps should have a few flat top multi-role amphibious ships which can also operate Harrier type VSTOL aircraft for ground attack/support.While India has no doctrine of expeditionary forces for power projection globally like the US or NATO,the capability of coming to the assistance of a friendly country with whom India has a security treaty or mutual arrangement is absolute.The Marine Corps should also be able to conduct simultaneous amphibious operations in both the Bay of Bengal and the Indian ocean or African seas,hence the need for at least 3 divisions.We must remember and not forget the speed of the Japanese push into Malaya during WW2 and naval forays into the IOR.i

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby David Maturana » 09 Jun 2010 19:54

Failures with sub launched Klub have been rectified and it works well now.


have you any informations about the origin of this failures ???

did you have any links talking about this problem ??

thank you

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Rony » 10 Jun 2010 02:12

Walter Ladwig on Indian Navy's emerging role in Asia-Pacific

India Sets Sail for Leadership

Later this week, a flotilla of Indian warships will complete a month-long deployment to the Pacific that included visits to Australia, Indonesia, Singapore and Vietnam. Such an event may be surprising to some, because India is rarely considered a major Asia-Pacific power. However, over the past 18 years New Delhi has made a concerted effort to direct its foreign, economic and military policies eastward. If the country stays on this course, it could become an important force for regional economic and security stability.

India's eastward focus began in the economic sphere in 1991 with attempts to link its own liberalizing economy to the dynamic "tigers" of Southeast Asia. This process has been slow and sometimes halting. But two decades on, India is set to ink a free trade agreement with the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations that will link 1.6 billion people with a combined GDP of $1.5 trillion by 2012.

These economic linkages are leading to military cooperation with countries such as Singapore, Vietnam and Indonesia. Those governments see India as, in the words of Singaporean Minister-Mentor Lee Kuan Yew, "a useful balance to China's heft." This is all the more important as the Obama administration appears to be paying less attention to Asia even as China is increasingly asserting itself. India already possesses the world's fifth-largest navy and Asia's only operational aircraft carrier. Having introduced its first indigenously constructed nuclear submarine last year, the navy is in the process of acquiring a number of new diesel-electric submarines and surface vessels, as well as three aircraft carriers that will house the most advanced maritime strike aircraft in the region.

New naval facilities constructed in India's eastern island chains, roughly 500 miles from the mouth of the Straits of Malacca, will facilitate its power projection into the Pacific. The navy has been conducting joint exercises with other Southeast Asian countries for years. These drills run the gamut from annual training with the Singaporean navy on antisubmarine warfare and advanced naval combat to the maneuvers with both Indonesia and Thailand emphasizing coordinated antipiracy exercises in the Straits of Malacca.

Now India is extending its influence beyond Southeast Asia. Shared concerns over the Beijing-Islamabad-Pyongyang nuclear proliferation axis led to a "long-term cooperative partnership for peace and prosperity" with South Korea, which includes a free-trade pact, bilateral security cooperation and agreements on joint defense production.

More significant is India's strategic partnership with Japan, founded on a shared desire to see a peaceful multipolar Asia based on democratic values. The two countries will sign a free-trade agreement later this year and have already institutionalized defense cooperation, high-level military exchanges and joint naval exercises in both the Indian Ocean and the Sea of Japan.

And although Australia's ties with India have cooled somewhat under sinophile Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, a 2009 strategic partnership between the two nations pledges "policy coordination on regional affairs in the Asia region," which is a diplomatic euphemism for shared concerns over China's growing power.

India's increasing role in the Asia-Pacific has been firmly supported by the region's premier naval power, the United States. Since 2001, the U.S. and India have conducted over 40 joint military exercises, including one of the largest multilateral naval exercises ever held in the region, Malabar 2007, which featured three aircraft carriers, 28 surface vessels, 150 aircraft and over 20,000 personnel from India, the U.S., Japan, Australia and Singapore. A 10-year Indo-U.S. defence pact signed in June 2005 deepened intelligence-sharing, military technology transfers, missile-defense collaboration and arms sales.

The question for New Delhi will be how best to leverage this progress for additional security and improved relations throughout the region. Although India's "Look East" policy has clearly met with success, there are many in India who still fail to acknowledge the vital role it is poised to play in Asia. The ability of countries in the region to partner effectively with India would be enhanced significantly were New Delhi to define more concretely its vision for the country's broader role in Asia.

India's partners also will need to learn how to work with the rising regional power. It will be critical to understand that India is not seeking to be a junior partner in an anti-China coalition, but is pursuing its own interests as an emerging power. Heartache will result if policy makers, especially in the U.S., attempt to force India into a familiar mold such as the U.S.-Britain "special relationship." Instead, Washington should champion India's robust participation in key regional economic and political institutions such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation group and the Asean Regional Forum.

The Obama administration to date has placed a higher priority on strengthening its ties with Beijing than on pursuing the closer relationship with New Delhi initiated during the Bush administration. That may be changing. President Obama himself recently said, the U.S.-India relationship is the "indispensable partnership of the 21st century." Now it's time to partner more effectively with India in practice.

Mr. Ladwig is a doctoral candidate in international relations at Merton College, Oxford.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby SNaik » 11 Jun 2010 02:17

First MiG landed on Vikram :mrgreen:
tests of arrestor gear, handling and parking equipment starting.
Image

Kartik
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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Kartik » 11 Jun 2010 05:07

sad to see the state of the first and original MiG-29K prototype..its airframe dates back to the late 1980s but it was a darn good looking fighter, possibly better looking than the new MiG-29K/KUB unified family with their twin-seat MiG-29M2 derived front fuselage.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby negi » 11 Jun 2010 18:52

^ I agree , but it still looks better than those Mac'D fed F solah block 70's and above.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Singha » 12 Jun 2010 08:31

hard landing :) but using jf17 bandar plug n play techniques, should still be in the air tomorrow!

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 12 Jun 2010 18:44

Navy Creating a New Base for Nuke Submarines
Navy Creating a New Base for Nuke Submarines
Suman Sharma / DNA
Saturday, June 12, 2010
0:06

The Navy is coming up with a Secret Base on the East Coast, under the Code Name Project Varsha, to berth its Upcoming Fleet of Nuclear Submarines.

India’s first indigenous nuclear-powered submarine, INS Arihant, under project Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV), was launched for trials last year at the Visakhapatnam-based ship building centre (SBC). Arihant is still undergoing its criticality certification at the SBC.

The Navy has Plans to build Five More such Nuclear-Powered Submarines at SBC. The defence ministry also took over the Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL) in Visakhapatnam last year from the ministry of shipping, so that it could use HSL’s facilities and infrastructure to build the submarines.

The new base, Project Varsha, will have special features to ensure safety of the submarines and the personnel onboard for maintenance. According to a source, the government would be taking the help of some other countries for the huge project as it required special fitments and attachments made of special material.

Located about 200 kilometres around Visakhapatnam at an Undisclosed Location, the Base would be on the lines of the Chinese nuclear submarine base in Hainan island, the source said. The base will have accommodation and other facilities for the officers and men posted onboard.

The base would accommodate other submarines and ships if required, the source said, as a lot of vessels due for induction in the near future were facing space constraint.

Refusing to disclose the cost of the project and whether there would be any special facility for missiles, a source said, “Not sure when it would be ready. It might take time as it’s a special project and meant mainly for nuclear submarines.”
Last edited by Juggi G on 12 Jun 2010 18:54, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Indian Naval Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 12 Jun 2010 18:48

Indian Navy Planning to Procure 4 Planes for Airborne Surveillance
The Navy wants the aircraft to be capable of Catapult Assisted Take Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) technique for the launch and recovery of aircraft.

Navy is in the Process of Finalising the Design on the Second Indigenous Aircraft Carrier, which is likely to be Similar to the American Aircraft Carriers, which use the CATOBAR technique for launch and recovery of aircraft.


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