Indian Army: News & Discussion

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chetak
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 07 Apr 2010 19:33

Former Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor and his equally distinguished friends continue their unending search for high moral standards.

Outstanding!! :evil:

" former Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor also became a member in 2007 and they all will be allotted a house "



http://ibnlive.in.com/news/prime-defenc ... ml?from=tn


Prime defence land grabbed in Mumbai

Prachi Jatania, CNN-IBN
Posted on Apr 07, 2010 at 14:34

Mumbai: After Sukna, now comes allegations that a prime land here that belonged to the defence ministry, is being handed over to a housing society.

Several Armys generals along with bureaucrats, have houses in the multi-storey in South Mumbai's prime property in Colaba. The 27-storey building is located near the Colaba defence station with over 3800 square metres.

Allegations that the Maharashtra government's Revenue department gave permission to a private housing society to construct a high-rise here on a land that essentially belongs to the defence ministry. The Revenue department notice makes it clear that in 2003, the land was alloted to Adarsh Society with a rider that promoters get an NoC from the Defence ministry.

A year later in July 2004, the revenue officials did a sudden U-turn. The documents accessed by CNN IBN show the revenue department suddenly realises that this land is not a defence land. The society members are using the piece of paper to show no irregularities took place.

Brigadier MP Wanchu (retd) argues: "This was never defence land. The letter shows it was an error from State government." The then Revenue Minister Shivajirao Patil Nilangekar also claims that since no one objected, the land was given to the society.

The Adarsh Society, formed in 1994, had 71 members in all. Retired top Army officials, state bureaucrats all became a part of the society with a fee of Rs 50,000 each.

Former Army Chief Gen N C Vij, former GoC of Maharashtra and Gujarat area Maj Gen TK Kaul, Lt Gen G S Sihota, former Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor also became a member in 2007 and they all will be allotted a house. Nationalist Congress Party Member of Parliament Shriniwas Patil, a close aide of Sharad Pawar and son of former BMC chief Jairaj Phatak, MPCC spokesperson Kanhaiyalal Gidwani and former Vice Admiral Madanjit Singh will also be allotted houses in the society.

The society claims it has necessary clearances. But questions are being raised as to how a residential building with permission for 30 storeys came up near Navy Nagar, essentially a cantonment. And why the Army chose to maintain a stoic silence. Did the presence of top Army officials and bureaucrats in this society ensure that all NOCs came without a hitch, what is the exact status of the land and more importantly, has the revenue department and Army got together and colluded to give away prime property to a private society at throw away prices?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby rohitvats » 07 Apr 2010 20:58

somnath wrote:<SNIP>conscious effort to reduce the "burden" on the military for most of these extraeneous tasks - CRPF replacing the Army in Kashmiri cities.......<SNIP>


You do push the envelope to prove your point of view - CRPF replacing Army in Valley is an example of lessening the 'burden' on IA? What about the small fact that IA was there in first place and ensured that the cities were sanitized to the level that CPO can take over the job? and what about the latest call to induct the IA in anti-maoist operations?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Surya » 07 Apr 2010 21:22

chetak - what asurprise :)


somnath - seriously - time and time again you over extend yourself??

This was not the army's task in the first place but since no one else could handle it they had to do it. and did it for years.

In fact it
was the CRPF that was replaced by BSF replaced by Army as the insurgency worsened and it is just rightly reverting itself.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Katare » 07 Apr 2010 22:42

Why do you say it was not army's job? I thought fighting Naxals is not army's job but fighting foreign terrorists entering India in Border States is legitimate job for army? Fighting separatist forces to maintain territorial integrity of India is army's job isn't it?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 07 Apr 2010 23:25

Katare wrote:Why do you say it was not army's job? I thought fighting Naxals is not army's job but fighting foreign terrorists entering India in Border States is legitimate job for army? Fighting separatist forces to maintain territorial integrity of India is army's job isn't it?



The states want full control over law and order. It is after all a state subject and a jealously guarded one at that.

The Indian Armed forces were never meant for policing duties. No mai ke lal can misuse them. Let the states get their respective acts together jointly and severally as the situation demands.

Let not some moron, however high ranking he may be in the home ministry make a mistake about civilian control over the Army.
The IAF chief for the first time in history, has publicly come out against the Home minister's ideas of using air power against our own citizens. Do not dismiss such statements lightly or the country will pay a very heavy price. We are not pakis.

Local governments and rancid politicians, especially like the ones in jharkand and some other states are in open collusion with the maoists. Elections are won on their support like it happened in Andhra.

Suddenly some political jokers want the Army in??

The minute the Indian Armed Forces get drawn into a law and order situation they will lose all the respect that they ever had and the politicians and rabid NGOs will have a field day. This will be the beginning of the politicization of the Army because it will get placed under the local command of some stupid IPS or IAS babu bootlicking some politician. Remember what happened to the central forces in lalgarh? with pan chewing CPM politicians wanting to give orders?

Will any state govt ever pass a state specific Armed forces special powers act to safe guard the Army? why not?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby negi » 07 Apr 2010 23:26

I think it is useless to split hair and debate as to whether it is IA's job or not . If CRPF , BSF or other paramilitary forces are unable to get things under control someone capable has to do it .Now one can understand IA's discomfort with engaging extremists within the Indian borders specially in populated areas but if such hard and fast rules around IA's involvement need to be set then the onus of empowering the paramilitary to take on such rogue elements is on the GOI , basically a distress call for IA help only indicates there is something seriously wrong with our internal security apparatus.
Last edited by negi on 07 Apr 2010 23:35, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 07 Apr 2010 23:33

Surya wrote:chetak - what a surprise :)



Surya ji,

A spade is a spade is a spade.

Always call it like it is.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 07 Apr 2010 23:38

negi wrote:I think it is useless to split hair and debate as to whether it is IA's job or not . If CRPF , BSF or other paramilitary forces are unable to get things in control someone capable has to do it .Now one can understand IA's discomfort with engaging extremists within the Indian borders specially in populated areas but if such hard and fast rules around IA's involvement need to be set then the onus of empowering the paramilitary to take on such rogue elements is on the GOI basically the distress call for IA help only indicates something seriously wrong with our internal security apparatus.



The Army can depute senior and junior officers, NCOs as well as provide training. They may even lead CPO jawans for a short while during which the officers of the CPOs can be brought up to speed.

Thus far and no further. No Army soldiers for policing duties.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby pmund » 07 Apr 2010 23:53

Chetak, hear hear!!!!! The Maoist problem is a creation of bad politics and even worse governance. Politicians use and disown Maoists according to their convinience. Elections were won in Jharkhand and Andhra on Maoist support, now they want the rebels out. No one in these badlands trusts anyone. The governments dont trust their own police, police don't trust CRPF and CRPF doesn't trust police. Politicians should never ever force the army into this highly politicised war zone. Our soldiers cannot be used as pawns in a dirty internal political game. The consequences will be terrible.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 08 Apr 2010 00:04

pmund wrote:Chetak, hear hear!!!!! The Maoist problem is a creation of bad politics and even worse governance. Politicians use and disown Maoists according to their convinience. Elections were won in Jharkhand and Andhra on Maoist support, now they want the rebels out. No one in these badlands trusts anyone. The governments dont trust their own police, police don't trust CRPF and CRPF doesn't trust police. Politicians should never ever force the army into this highly politicised war zone. Our soldiers cannot be used as pawns in a dirty internal political game. The consequences will be terrible.


The IA has already faced such a situation in srilanka with the various Indian intelligence agencies playing their own little games and rogering the IA in the bargain.

They will not forget such a lesson in a hurry.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Katare » 08 Apr 2010 01:32

chetak wrote:
Katare wrote:Why do you say it was not army's job? I thought fighting Naxals is not army's job but fighting foreign terrorists entering India in Border States is legitimate job for army? Fighting separatist forces to maintain territorial integrity of India is army's job isn't it?



The states want full control over law and order. It is after all a state subject and a jealously guarded one at that.

The Indian Armed forces were never meant for policing duties. No mai ke lal can misuse them. Let the states get their respective acts together jointly and severally as the situation demands.

Let not some moron, however high ranking he may be in the home ministry make a mistake about civilian control over the Army.
The IAF chief for the first time in history, has publicly come out against the Home minister's ideas of using air power against our own citizens. Do not dismiss such statements lightly or the country will pay a very heavy price. We are not pakis.

Local governments and rancid politicians, especially like the ones in jharkand and some other states are in open collusion with the maoists. Elections are won on their support like it happened in Andhra.

Suddenly some political jokers want the Army in??

The minute the Indian Armed Forces get drawn into a law and order situation they will lose all the respect that they ever had and the politicians and rabid NGOs will have a field day. This will be the beginning of the politicization of the Army because it will get placed under the local command of some stupid IPS or IAS babu bootlicking some politician. Remember what happened to the central forces in lalgarh? with pan chewing CPM politicians wanting to give orders?

Will any state govt ever pass a state specific Armed forces special powers act to safe guard the Army? why not?


Fighting foreign/domestic terrorists, separatists and low intensity war imposed on India from outside is not law and order problem to be handled by Indian Police. Indian Police is designed/sized, equipped and trained for dealing with everyday criminals, thief and crooks not well organized armies of terrorists.

Who determines what the duties of Indian Armed forces are? If you go by IA doctrine it has whole chapter on fighting low intensity insurgency like in Kashmir. Armed forces are guarantor of territorial integrity of India from any threat.

The Indian Army Doctrine
Chapter 5 - Operations Other Than War 67
Section 14 : Low Intensity Conflict Operations and 68
Counter-Insurgency Operations
Section 15 : Non-Combat Operations 77
Section 16 : United Nations Peacekeeping Missions 81


Why did you bring in Naxals in your emotional reply? My question to Surya was about army fighting in J&K against pak sponsored terrorism?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Surya » 08 Apr 2010 02:14

katare

Note its first task.
ideally the army restricts itself to wars and borders. Insurgencies generally are better handled by police and CPO - armies do not want to end up in this mess.

of course the army as a last resort will step in and did. The complaint is this has happened again and again - The state seems to go through this learning process again and again.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby anjan » 08 Apr 2010 03:58

ASPuar wrote:City chiefs of police, for example, chief of NYPD or Chicago PD, or San Francisco PD, or LAPD, are ranked in Code 7, along with full colonels, and US Consuls in foreign lands. In India, of course, police chiefs of our cities are comparing themselves to Army Commanders in status.


This is what I've been trying to explain. All things considered though I don't hold much against the police. They're being played too but they aren't utter dopes at playing politics unlike the armed forces. The levers of control and the blame for the mess rests squarely with the IAS.

somnath wrote:Anjan, if you look at insurgencies across the country, the reasons are political, not due to lack of civic governance..So in Kashmir, the problem would have been there even if we were governing with Swiss efficiency! about the rest, there is a conscious effort to reduce the "burden" on the military for most of these extraeneous tasks - CRPF replacing the Army in Kashmiri cities, NDMA for disaster management (and natural disasters call for Army deployment all over the world, nothing unique bout India)...So "Army called out for every damn thing" is a grossly wrong impression..


Insurgencies don't exist in vacuums. Yes they tend to falter without external funds and arms but at the core there are valid reasons. Sometimes the reasons are so abused by vested interests that they can't be recognized but they exist nonetheless. This was true of J&K and the NE. As the most recent example this is also true of the naxal problem as well. Absolute lack of civic governance and an utter inability of the state to protect its citizens is how it started. Go peek at the naxal threads. Once again there is a call to induct the army and the air force. This when a decently led state administration(AP) has clearly proved itself up to the task of resolving it themselves.

When there is a civil disturbance, it's the army doing "flag marches". When kids fall into wells, it's the army that does the rescuing. The Army even finds itself building schools and clinics in disturbed areas. There was an element of hyperbole to that statement but it is far from being a "grossly wrong impression". "Aid to civil authority" is fine and good. It's part of the Army's job. It just shouldn't have to be done all the time.

This is however a seperate discussion. Let's not sideline the actual issue. The question is one of people of vastly differing experience levels and selection processes being equated by the government to the detriment of the forces. And your stand that this shouldn't affect morale, recruitment or performance.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby skher » 08 Apr 2010 04:41

IMVVHO, IA/IAF cannot fight Naxals simply because they lack the kind of resources and intelligence assets.

NE/J&K officers often complain abt intel quality; so when the push comes to shove R&AW and IB continue to copy-paste while jawans/SOG do the dirty work on their own.

The three articles below imvvho give a good perspective about the challenges facing IA:-

With regards to our army hopefully not fighting Naxals I found the following
wiki useful:-


The final PAVN triumph was aided by numerous weaknesses and failures in South Vietnamese forces and leadership.
Thieu's "hold everywhere" strategy in the months before the Northern offensive stretched ARVN forces too thinly and withered away any central reserve. Ongoing corruption and incompetence dogged and demoralized the ARVN rank and file. For example, rampant inflation wiped out the inadequate wages of troops that already had little medical care available. In a society where regular full-time soldiers and their dependents made up about 20% of the population, this amounted to widespread impoverishment of important segments of South Vietnamese society. Desertion rates after the American pullout approached 25% of total force strength, reductions that were not made up when the end came. Of the total 1,000,000 men theoretically mobilized for defence (including about half a million militia), only about 10% were direct combat troops{{Is SSC still a great idea, when so many CPOs are there?}}.


If IA loses a single battle in an ambush, Naxals will proclaim the revolution as being valid and then follow Mao and Stalin.Of course,they shall not succeed but then nobody can stop a Alexander Perensky idolizer or a Ngapoi Ngawang Jigme follower.

The second piece is an editorial by former vice chief Lt.Gen. Oberoi:-


The situation reminds this writer of the battlefield message sent by a General to his Emperor: “Am surrounded both sides. My centre cannot hold. Situation excellent. I shall attack.” Will the new Army Chief, who had cut his professional teeth in a proud and valorous regiment, replicate this by being proactive? The citizens, who have a great affection for the army, do expect it from him.

..

The military also needs to modify the concept of being apolitical. The army’s long standing stance of keeping a distance from the leaders of political parties other than those of the party in power needs to be modified. In a parliamentary system like ours, policy is formulated by all parliamentarians despite differences of the opposition. After all, the Parliament Standing Committee on Defence and similar other committees are all-party bodies. Consequently, though remaining apolitical, the army needs to apprise and discuss its concerns with the political leadership across the board. This would not reduce the apolitical nature of the army, about which it is justifiably so proud.


In South Asia, this institutionalized effort has not yielded any benefit,with many cases ending in nightmares.

However, cross recruitment between retired/retiring Foreign,Police and Army officers did yield results in the past.


Finally, a conclusive analysis posted on Broadsword regarding Officer Shortage:-

Today, as the new chief implicitly accepts, the army has become a personality cult where officers either conform to the inclinations of the boss or get weeded out. Originality and eccentricity, those priceless attributes of a successful military leader, have been rendered extinct by a dull, humourless routine that is set --- Congress Party fashion --- by what the boss thinks his boss wants.

..

Blocking any radical change is thetribal ethos of the Indian Army. An officer belongs first to his regiment or battalion; only after that is he an Indian Army officer. An army chief’s first duty is towards the regiment and battalion that nurtured him; reforming the army conflicts with the role of regimental patriarch.

..

Today, 63 years after independence, the military has no promotion manual; policy exists only in a constantly revised torrent of letters from the Military Secretary’s branch.

..

the institution of the COAS would be greatly strengthened by transparency and the absence of discretion in promotions and postings. It would also free army chiefs from accusations of prejudice; a lever that MoD officials --- and in one well-known case, a defence minister --- have successfully employed to demand favours for their own candidates.




Hence, imho IA already faces an internal three front war with threat of more police duties applied as a stick -

.Politicization :- Creating a bureaucratic approach to all things, thus a machine eveready for any order without thinking.

.DRDOification :- All projects and threats to security rushed to IA/IAF at first go, the forces reciprocate by thrusting all minute equipment needs onto research labs without investigation.

.RSVPs for VIPs only - The forces esp. police/CPOs must respond to costume changes needed by netalog - "Wherever,Whenever".
CPM the corrupt thugs must be better than Naxals as liberation of Lalgarh must be made to prove.

Similarly, our inept JK state govt. needs votes hence IA/BSF/CRPF/AFSPA must move out pronto and the Centre be shown as liberator by inaugurating dams (under heavy security cover) without JK contributing a single paisa.


Thus far, Armed Forces have stubbornly not yielded."One Rank,One Pension" is made to sound like "Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" - this perception must go.

Regarding promotions, if chiefs are not given the duty, then two routes seem plausible:- a tri-service officer below flag rank is given this duty with chiefs consulted (the officer is a political appointee) or a judges like collegium is formed comprising of retired and serving officers who nominate their successors and select vice chiefs (TSPA seems headed here).

Both scenarios are not very welcoming in thought.

Captains select their team.Period.

JMT

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Yayavar » 08 Apr 2010 04:43

chetak wrote:..
But questions are being raised as to how a residential building with permission for 30 storeys came up near Navy Nagar, essentially a cantonment. And why the Army chose to maintain a stoic silence...


So this building will overlook cantonment area....one can imagine what malicious nay misguided, youth can do in such a situation.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Katare » 08 Apr 2010 05:40

Surya wrote:katare

Note its first task.
ideally the army restricts itself to wars and borders. Insurgencies generally are better handled by police and CPO - armies do not want to end up in this mess.

of course the army as a last resort will step in and did. The complaint is this has happened again and again - The state seems to go through this learning process again and again.


Fully agree!

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby somnath » 08 Apr 2010 07:22

[quote="Surya"]somnath - seriously - time and time again you over extend yourself??

This was not the army's task in the first place but since no one else could handle it they had to do it. and did it for years.

In fact it
was the CRPF that was replaced by BSF replaced by Army as the insurgency worsened and it is just rightly reverting itself.
chetak - what asurprise :)
quote]

Dont want to belabour over this point (was discussed in detail many moons back - but rationality takes a back seat to emotionalism in these discussions, so will keep it short)...

It is the Army's mandate to protect the integrity of the country from "military" threats...Today, the prime source of threats to most countries is in the so-called "sub conventional" domain...In J&K, when did the Army have to get involved in a big way? From about 1990/91 - and that was the time when PAkistan really turned on its jihadi project there...If its not the Army, who should be countering the threat? While the J&K issue is complex, and there are multiple reasons why things have come to this pass, the primary reason is a political issue between India and Pakistan (people who think governance is the primary issue should think why people in Bihar do not rise in revolt, or Orissa for that matter)...And Pak is carrying out its political objectives through "other" (quasi Klauswitzian) means....It is not a "low grade" threat, it is a sophisiticated insurgency campaign directed (at least in parts) by those very people who successfully executed the Afghan campaign against USSR..

FAced with such a scenario, is it surprising (or unfair) that the nation calls upon the Army (the military force that is the best trained, best equipped and best funded by FAR) to counter it?

When the primary source of threat to the nation state is sub conventional in nature, how can the state's primary military force say that "my job is to fight conventional wars only"??

Other nations faced with similar, but far less virulent insurgencies, have also called upon their Army (UK in NI, Thailand, Phillippines to counter their respective muslim insurgencies, Israel day-in-and-day-out, the list is long)..

Having said that however, history shows that CI campaigns are best fought by a local police force - Punjab is a prime example of that..Therefore, the Indian state too is trying to implement it as an axiom to the extent feasible...Hence, police/CRPF is gradually replacing the Army in Kashmiri cities, and no one (barring PC at times, mostly in allegorical terms!) talks about using the Army against Naxals...

Ditto for disaster rescue - Whether the Chinese earthqauke last year, or the earthquake in PoK, or Katrina, or Haiti recently, or Chile - nation states mobilise their armies for rescue - why? Because the armies are the largest source of trained, disciplined manpower available in large numbers, and equipped with some of the vital equipment (earthmoving eqpmnt, boats, aircraft the works)....India does it too - the Army does a great job and we are proud of its performance...But why should it be "oh the civvies are all worthless and we need to pull their chestnuts out of the fire"???

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Surya » 08 Apr 2010 07:35

Err what you said in 20 paras has been mentioned by me and Katare in 4 lines.

Thats not the issue which we are pointing out to you.

The issue is you placing the case of CRPF replacing the Army as if the CRPF was helping out!!!!

What we are pointing out is that it was the other way.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby somnath » 08 Apr 2010 07:56

Surya wrote:The issue is you placing the case of CRPF replacing the Army as if the CRPF was helping out!!!!


When did I say anyone was "helping" anyone else out?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby anjan » 08 Apr 2010 12:12

somnath wrote:It is the Army's mandate to protect the integrity of the country from "military" threats...Today, the prime source of threats to most countries is in the so-called "sub conventional" domain...


There are two nuclear armed countries sitting on the east, west and north of the country. One of which is an irredentist power that likes to go on "lesson teaching" expeditions every few years. Do these threats appear sub-conventional to you? Water in the Himalayas is going to be a major flash point in the future as both India and China seek to quench their respective thirsts. Maybe we can convince them to leave their shiny aircraft and tanks at home because we only do "sub-conventional"

In J&K, when did the Army have to get involved in a big way? From about 1990/91 - and that was the time when PAkistan really turned on its jihadi project there...If its not the Army, who should be countering the threat? While the J&K issue is complex, and there are multiple reasons why things have come to this pass, the primary reason is a political issue between India and Pakistan (people who think governance is the primary issue should think why people in Bihar do not rise in revolt, or Orissa for that matter)...And Pak is carrying out its political objectives through "other" (quasi Klauswitzian) means....It is not a "low grade" threat, it is a sophisiticated insurgency campaign directed (at least in parts) by those very people who successfully executed the Afghan campaign against USSR..



I take it this was directed at me. May I suggest you read up on what set off the insurgency? Why did a valley that was largely peaceful for 4 decades turn violent? Given the state of our governance, I wouldn't be too surprised if the only reason too many other states didn't go that way was the supply or lack thereof of arms and training. On the whole given that we have a running insurgency in J&K and the NE and now most of the eastern part of the country the question is rather strange.

FAced with such a scenario, is it surprising (or unfair) that the nation calls upon the Army (the military force that is the best trained, best equipped and best funded by FAR) to counter it?

When the primary source of threat to the nation state is sub conventional in nature, how can the state's primary military force say that "my job is to fight conventional wars only"??


The CRPF is a quarter of a million strong (set to raise to 400k). What is this force supposed to do in your opinion?

I don't know if the CRPF are ill-trained and ill-equipped to handle insurgencies. I don't know enough to pass judgement. At any rate you seem to think so. Otherwise why bring in the Army? If this is so then do you not see these failures as an indictment of the administration? So essentially the army needs to be used because, in a break from what appears to be an otherwise proud GoI tradition, they can actually do their jobs competently. You were I believe speaking of pulling chestnuts of the fire.

Mind you I said nothing about bloody 'civilians'. I speak of our babus specifically and the police to an extent. You're attacking a straw man.

Other nations faced with similar, but far less virulent insurgencies, have also called upon their Army (UK in NI, Thailand, Phillippines to counter their respective muslim insurgencies, Israel day-in-and-day-out, the list is long)..


One of the key conclusions in studies of the 2006 Lebanon War was that the Israeli Army's war fighting capability had been blunted by the constant occupation duties. This was attributed to their failure against a largely light infantry force. What happens if we have to go up against the Chinese? Losing to them won't just be loss of face like it was for the Israelis.

Also have you ceased defending your position re the relative rank parity issue?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby ASPuar » 08 Apr 2010 12:54

Hear, hear!

To say that the threat of the day is X, while ignoring the threat of the future, is like putting your head in the sand, ostrich style. For Indias army to get embroiled in internal policing, especially at a time when we have two dangerous, and adventurist neighbours, is a mistake. And for it to do so when a GIGANTIC paramilitary force has been raised for this very purpose, is ridiculous.

The men under arms in the CRPF have been raised and trained with the express purpose of dealing with internal security threats. Lets let them get on with it, and please stop this constant whine of "The army should do it!" for everything that happens. What will the CRPF do then? Sit on the sidelines and twiddle its thumbs?

The officers and Jawans recruited to the army, and the officers and Jawans recruited for the CRPF come from the same country, and the same population base. If the infantry officers and jawans of the army can perform to a higher standard, it is a credit to the army leadership, and training, and a reflection also on the training and standards within the Police led CRPF.

If the anti-naxal fighting was to be given over to the army, then the CRPF manpower should also be placed under army control, so that the force, can be moulded into a fighting machine capable of doing the job, by the Army leadership.

Only in this way can we give effect to the mandate of the CRPF, which is to deal with internal security.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby rohitvats » 08 Apr 2010 13:27

From Orbat.com (http://orbat.com/):

India approves two more divisions The first two are raised and are in Eastern Command, though of course it will take two years at least for them to shake down. Now the Indian press reports that two more divisions have been approved, starting with a divisional HQ, some division troops and a brigade each, and then built up. These two will go to Ladakh. The Army has requested even more divisions.(This confirms the assertion posted earlier that these two divisions are in addition to two raised earlier for North East. Also, based on the information in the new reports(that these formation will be dual tasked against TSPA), self was of the opinion that these two new divisions will be part of the Northern Command. The same is confirmed by this article. As part of Northern Command, these two formations can be dual tasked for LAC or LOC. What remains to be seen is whether these are raised as Command Reserves, part of existing Corps or new Corps HQ. If they are raised as part of new Corps HQ-not dedicated to any specific sector like 14 Corps, we might see the first Mountain Strike Corps.This raising will have another beneficial effect - AHQ will not have to draw troops from other sectors to bolster Northern Command AOR in case of shooting match with TSPA)


India previously had ten divisions dedicated to the China front, though at least two more could be quickly inducted. (This needs a bit of correction - with 8 Mountain Division deployed along LOC in Kargil after 1999, there are 9 Mountain Divisions available in addition to one infantry division. Of these, 7 Mountain Divisions and 1 Infantry Division are part of Corps which will be in action against the PLA. 2 Mountain Divisions are reserve divisions - will be deployed in case of tempratures warming up)


Now India has not only added four new divisions, a strike corps has been reoriented to counter any China thrust through Nepal. Which is a polite way of saying India now has an option to attack south Tibet through Nepal. That makes a 40% increase in dedicated forces, and a doubling of contingency forces. India can now deploy 18 divisions against Tibet.( For number of divisions to reach 18, the Strike Corps will have to pitch in with 4 additional divisions - this means divisions will be added to the nominated Strike Corps HQ. For example, 1 Corps has 4th Infantry Division - 3 more will have to be added to it from other sectors)


But wait - as the Count says, there's more. Since the first two divisions have gone to the Northeast, China would face 9 and not seven divisions without Eastern Command calling for reinforcements. (33 Corps/4 Corps/ 3 Corps - each with three divisions)


Further, by 2015 India is likely to at least three more divisions against China.(It will be interesting to see how these are deployed - we might very well see the birth of Mountain Strike Corps with these)
Last edited by rohitvats on 08 Apr 2010 17:36, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby sugriva » 08 Apr 2010 13:39

ASPuar wrote:If the anti-naxal fighting was to be given over to the army, then the CRPF manpower should also be placed under army control, so that the force, can be moulded into a fighting machine capable of doing the job, by the Army leadership.


It is nobody's case that the Army should have to shoulder the responsibility of internal security when a 400,000 strong force of CRPF is present to do the job. If required more battalions of CRPF should be raised for the purpose. However it is also the case that the CRPF is a police organization and by no yardstick of logic can it be argued that it should be placed under the control of the Army which is a military organization. It can however be argued that since the CRPF is facing Naxalites, a guerrilla army, with allegedly good company and battalion level command structures, it, or atleast the part of it that is fighting the Naxalities, shall have to evolve into a Light Infantry/Rashtriya Rifles kind of organization with dedicated command structures and battalion/brigade/division level assets. Dedicated forces and officers are needed for this purpose. The ranks can continue to be recruited the way they are today. The officers need to be dedicated to the CRPF only and should be recruited from the pool of SI's that enter as the first level leaders. IPS officers, who are on one day, doing bandh bandobast and riot control duties, cannot, on the next day, be expected to fight like Infantry Major Generals. This unfortunately is the situation today. We require military style leadership for an organization that is fighting an enemy, the Naxalites, that are in effect an illegal military operating from our soil. As a first step a new CPO should be formed that takes manpower from the CRPF and that is tasked purely as an internal security force. This will be on the lines of the Soviet MVD troops and have a light infantry orientation. The SSC officers of the Army, on their leaving the army, should be offered permanent commission in this force, if they choose to join it. To start with, an Infantry officer with experience in CI ops should be made the commanding officer of this force. He should leave the army and join as an officer of this force. Question now is, will the army be willing to stand the creation of a well trained, well armed light infantry force of around 250,000-300,000 strength that is not under its operational control.
Last edited by sugriva on 08 Apr 2010 14:00, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Sanku » 08 Apr 2010 14:00

^^^^

Correct!! The real issue is fairly poor IPS organization, which is tasked with everything from a Bandobast to a Light infantry role.

The IPS could itself have a dedicated wing, which is sent to Military schools and is responsible for the useful stuff, those wishing to continue in the profitable parts of IPS by running around politicos will give this a wide berth. Thus only really good people will get there.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 08 Apr 2010 14:11

sugriva wrote: The SSC officers of the Army, on their leaving the army, should be offered permanent commission in this force, if they choose to join it. To start with, an Infantry officer with experience in CI ops should be made the commanding officer of this force. He should leave the army and join as an officer of this force. Question now is, will the army be willing to stand the creation of a well trained, well armed light infantry force of around 250,000-300,000 strength that is not under its operational control.


Also, will the army sanction a recruitment program that depleted its already severely understrength officer corps.
Last edited by Viv S on 08 Apr 2010 14:11, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby ASPuar » 08 Apr 2010 14:11

:?: Central Police Forces already number well above the 1 Million mark, so where is the question of Army tolerating or not tolerating the formation of such forces?

There is no harm in serving army officers giving direction to the force, for a specified mandate. After all, there is precedent, as the Assam Rifles functions (and functions very well!) under the command of a Director General from the army, serving on deputation with the Home Ministry. And the BSF, ITBP, and SSB are also under army control in border areas, which arrangement works perfectly well.

I would suggest a bifurcation of the CRPF, into two wings. One for internal security, headed by a DG from the Army, because armed violence requires a militarized response. And one for Law and Order support, headed by a DG from the IPS, because law and order problems should not be quelled with excess force.

This would give better results than the behemoth being created right now. Pure control by IPS officers (who are also outsiders to the force), and moreover, are unacquainted with IS duties against a heavily armed enemy, seems to be inadequate in the situation currently obtaining, as can be seen by the recent disaster.

In this way, we can give our boys better training, and a fighting chance
Last edited by ASPuar on 08 Apr 2010 14:15, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 08 Apr 2010 14:15

However it is also the case that the CRPF is a police organization and by no yardstick of logic can it be argued that it should be placed under the control of the Army which is a military organization.
that's not correct, most countries have a regulation by which all police and paramilitary forces come under the overall control of the armed forces in case of war.

in J&K it was certainly a localised war and that begs the question why the same principle shouldn't have been applied.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby rohitvats » 08 Apr 2010 14:26

sugriva wrote:It is nobody's case that the Army should have to shoulder the responsibility of internal security when a 400,000 strong force of CRPF is present to do the job. If required more battalions of CRPF should be raised for the purpose. However it is also the case that the CRPF is a police organization and by no yardstick of logic can it be argued that it should be placed under the control of the Army which is a military organization. It can however be argued that since the CRPF is facing Naxalites, a guerrilla army, with allegedly good company and battalion level command structures, it, or atleast the part of it that is fighting the Naxalities, shall have to evolve into a Light Infantry/Rashtriya Rifles kind of organization with dedicated command structures and battalion/brigade/division level assets. Dedicated forces and officers are needed for this purpose. The ranks can continue to be recruited the way they are today. The officers need to be dedicated to the CRPF only and should be recruited from the pool of SI's that enter as the first level leaders. ..............


Excellent post and most relevant arguments...only if some one in MHA thought like this...(I'll let go of the IA tolerating raising of dedicated Light Infantry for IS duties bit... :P )

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby sumshyam » 08 Apr 2010 18:04


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby skher » 08 Apr 2010 18:56

ASPuar wrote:
There is no harm in serving army officers giving direction to the force, for a specified mandate. After all, there is precedent, as the Assam Rifles functions (and functions very well!) under the command of a Director General from the army, serving on deputation with the Home Ministry. And the BSF, ITBP, and SSB are also under army control in border areas, which arrangement works perfectly well.

I would suggest a bifurcation of the CRPF, into two wings. One for internal security, headed by a DG from the Army, because armed violence requires a militarized response. And one for Law and Order support, headed by a DG from the IPS, because law and order problems should not be quelled with excess force.



Sir, if I understand correctly, the above bifurcation would replicate the Special Action Group (SAG) and the Special Ranger Group (SRG) model nationally while ensuring the NSG remains a group of crack commando teams placed at select airports.

Will the IPS headed Ranger Force also be in charge of assorted non-combat duties during an operation like perimeter defence,paramedical/sapper support,media blackout etc. and relief/reconstruction/investigation post operation?

Else only the army will have the resources to perform such duties.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby anjan » 09 Apr 2010 00:09

sugriva wrote: The SSC officers of the Army, on their leaving the army, should be offered permanent commission in this force, if they choose to join it.


This used to be true for at least the police earlier. As I understand it, the IPS was not happy with the fact that such officers would carry over their seniority and this was eventually stopped. I think the Army revived a similar proposal for both the IPS and IAS sometime back but it went nowhere under opposition.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 09 Apr 2010 01:04

From Shiv Aroor's blog ...

Former Army Chief Wanted To Resign, Govt Pre-empted

Recently retired Chief of the Indian Army, General Deepak Kapoor, wanted to put in his papers in the second half of January this year, more than two months before he was due to retire on March 31, according to top official sources. They reveal that General Deepak Kapoor wanted to resign from service when he received unprecedented written "advice" from his boss, Defence Minister AK Antony, to alter an earlier decision to slap his Military Secretary Lt Gen Avadhesh Prakash with administrative action. Forced to bow to the "advice" -- many in the Army wonder if he had a choice -- sources say the Chief was willing to throw in the towel and retire early.
...
...
The sequence of events, as top sources now re-tell it, is significant. In the wake of the Sukna episode becoming a full-blown controversy, General Kapoor had taken a call, well within his rights as Chief, to ignore recommendations from his successor, that one of the accused, the Military Secretary, be sacked. Instead, Gen Kapoor recommended that the officer undergo administrative action. Sources say in the first of two meetings in the second-half of January with the Defence Minister, General Kapoor defended his decision, but was asked verbally to give it a re-think. Sources reveal that after he returned for a second meeting with his recommendation unchanged, Antony then issued written "advice" that Lt Gen Avadhesh Prakash undergo disciplinary proceedings. It was at this point, Gen Kapoor's aides now reveal, that he wanted out.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby sum » 10 Apr 2010 10:16

Two Army Majors honoured with Kirti Chakra

Major Amit Oscar Fernandes won the second highest gallantry medal for his raw courage, extreme determination and timely action in saving the lives of his comrades, while eliminating three hardcore terrorists in Baramulla on November 16, 2008.

He had, during a search and destroy operation, spotted the movement of terrorists only when they were close to him due to poor visibility and rough terrain.

But the Army officer from 7 Maratha Light Infantry brought down effective fire on the terrorists killing two of them. The third terrorist charged at him, but Fernandes caught the weapon, snatched it and shot the former dead.

Major Suresh Suri had displayed conspicuous act of bravery, comradeship and exemplary leadership and ultimately sacrificed his life after evacuating his injured comrade, despite injuries suffered during a gunfight with terrorists in Jammu and Kashmir on September 22 last year. suri's wife Pallavi received the Kirti Chakra conferred on her husband posthumously. He was part of an inner cordon and along with three other ranks entered a house to search for the hideout of terrorists. On the second floor of the house, he found the hideout and in an effort to nab the terrorists scaled the roof, but came under heavy fire.

Despite getting injured, Suri retaliated with fire and lobbed a grenade, killing a terrorist and injuring another. When other members of his team got injured, the Kumaon Regiment officer, who was serving with 13 Rastriya Rifles, ensured their safe evacuation before succumbing to injuries.

Among the 23 awardees of Shaurya Chakra, the third highest peace time gallantry medal, were Border Roads Organisation's Excavating Machinery Operator Satish Kumar, who had cleared a landslide without caring for his own life on a road considered the lifeline of Bhutan in August 2008.

IAF's Sqn Ldr Harkirat Singh, a fighter pilot, too won the Shaurya Chakra for successfully handling an emergency while flying the MiG-21 Bison jets during a practice interception sortie in September 2008.

Singh was flying at a 4-km altitude when his engine failed, but the officer displayed exemplary courage and landed the aircraft safety during night conditions, exhibiting his piloting skills.

Ten of the 23 Shaurya Chakra awardees were conferred the medal posthumously and they were Lance Naik Sujit Babu V, Sergeant Mustafa Ali, BRO personnel Pritam Chand and Piar Chand, Rifleman Mohammed Abdul Amieen Bhat, Lt Satbir Singh, Naik Manoj Singh, Havaldar Vipan Thakur, Havaldar Thangjalet and Naval commando Chandra Shekhar.

Ali, an IAF flight engineer, had been killed after the helicopter he was in came under Maoist fire while transporting Election Commission officials and ballot boxes after polling in the Chhattisgarh Assembly Elections in November 2008.

The helicopter pilot, Sqn Ldr T K Chaudhri too won the Shaurya Chakra for piloting the chopper to safety in Jagadalpur despite coming under fire from the ultras and consequent damage to the aircraft's rotor blades, fuel tank and tail boom.Patil also presented Param Vishist Seva Medals, the highest medal for distinguished service to 15 senior officers, including South Western Army Commander Lt Gen C K S Sabu, Western Naval Commander Vice Admiral Sanjeev Bhasin, IAF Training Command Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Air Marshal V R Iyer, IAF Maintenance Command Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief P V Athawale and Armed Forces Medical Services Director General Lt Gen N K Parmar.

Uttam Yuddh Seva Medal was conferred on Lt Gen Rabindran Krishna Swamy and Lt Gen Bikram Singh for their service in the Jammu and Kashmir based
16 Corps and 15 Corps respectively. These apart, the President also conferred a Bar to Ati Vishist Seva Medal and 26 Ati Vishisht Seva Medals on senior officers.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby shukla » 11 Apr 2010 10:55

[quote="sum"]Two Army Majors honoured with Kirti Chakra


These are amazing stories of pure bravery!! Hats off...

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 11 Apr 2010 13:57

X-post

rohitvats wrote:
Rahul M wrote:Austin, could you kindly list IN's aggregate sea-lift capability for us, including civilian assets that might be used ?

rohit, could you help us identify IA's amphib units, if there are any that train for that role regularly, and what their wartime role might be ? in IA thread ?

TIA.


There is one Infantry Brigade tasked for amphib. role and one more was to come up in Trivandrum...I don't remember the numbers...let me check.


BMP's were deployed by sea in the last amphib exercises on the west coast, would those be a part of the amphib bde you refer to or from outside units ?
ideally an amphib formation will be of a self-contained combined arms type isn't it ? and IN's amphibs do have the ability to carry tanks.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby atreya » 11 Apr 2010 13:58

shukla wrote:
sum wrote:Two Army Majors honoured with Kirti Chakra


These are amazing stories of pure bravery!! Hats off...


Where can I read the citations of ALL the awardees? Newspapers mention only 2 or 3 citations.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Anantz » 11 Apr 2010 17:06

Rahul M wrote:
rohit, could you help us identify IA's amphib units, if there are any that train for that role regularly?

There is one Infantry Brigade tasked for amphib. role and one more was to come up in Trivandrum...I don't remember the numbers...let me check


The brigade was mentioned as 91 Infantry Brigade based at Trivandum.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby pmund » 11 Apr 2010 17:22

ATT ATREYA, here is the full list of awardees and citations. Hail the bravehearts of the nation.

ASHOK CHAKRA
IC 59066N MAJOR MOHIT SHARMA (POSTHUMOUS)
1ST BATTALION THE PARACHUTE REGIMENT (SPECIAL FORCES)

IC 59066N Maj Mohit Sharma was commissioned into First Battalion of the Parachute Regiment (Special Forces) on December 30, 1999. During his initial probation period, he got injured and was posted back to his parent unit on medical grounds where he served for three years. Thereafter was posted to 38 Rashtriya Rifles Battalion and due to his exemplary services in combating terrorism during OP RAKSHAK he was awarded the Chief of Army Staff Commendation Card. After serving in the unit for 21 months he again volunteered for probation with the First Battalion The Parachute Regt (Special Forces) and displaying unparalleled motivation he successfully cleared probation. He was awarded with Sena Medal (gallantry) for his daring covert operation in 2005.

On 21 Mar 2009 while tracking an infiltrating terrorist group he and his men came under heavy volume of fire. Unmindful of his safety he rescued two of his comrades to cover under overwhelming effective fire, killed two terrorists and in the process sustained multiple gunshot wounds. Grievously wounded sensing grave danger to his commandos he charged on the terrorists and killed two more at close range. The brave officer succumbed to his injuries and made the supreme sacrifice in the finest traditions of the paltan and the country.

SS-40576A MAJOR D SREERAM KUMAR
39 ASSAM RIFLES

SS-40576A Major D Sreeram Kumar was born on 11 Jan 1981 at Jhansi in Uttar Pradesh. He passed his matric and intermediate exam from Sainik School Amaravati Nagar, Tamil Nadu in 1996 and 1998 respectively. He was commissioned into 90 Medium Regiment (Artillery) on 20 Mar 2004 and was promoted to the Rank of Major on 24 Aug 2008.

Major D Sreeram Kumar is presently serving with 39 Assam Rifles since Mar 2007 in Arunachal Pradesh (OP ORCHID) and from 07 Dec 2007 in Manipur (OP HIFAZAT). With his consummate leadership and ingenuity he has created an effective and vibrant intelligence network, delivering hard blows to the activities of the terrorists and making it extremely difficult for them to operate in the battalion area of responsibility.

Due to his efforts there has been a palpable decrease in insurgency activities in the unit area of responsibility which has bought succor to the people and ensured their safety. The officer has personally participated in number of operations, leading from the front and has eliminated 12 terrorists, apprehended 23 terrorists and recovered 12 weapons since induction of the Battalion in Manipur (OP HIFAZAT) in Dec 2007. Largely due to his efforts and earnestness the unit in 2008, has achieved numerous operational successes in Manipur (OP HIFAZAT).

KIRTI CHAKRA
IC-59630X MAJOR AMIT OSCAR FERNANDES
SEVENTH BATTALION THE MARATHA LIGHT INFANTRY

IC-59630X Major Amit Oscar Fernandes was commissioned into the 7TH MARATHA LIGHT INFANTRY on 13 May 2000. The officer is presently posted with the battalion which is deployed in Counter Insurgency Operational Area in Jammu and Kashmir since 07 Sep 2006.

He has served with 27 RASHTRIYA RIFLE (MARATHA LIGHT INFANTRY) from 23 Aug 2002 to 18 Aug 2002 deployed in Counter Insurgency Operational in Jammu and Kashmir and thereafter with Commando Wing, Junior Leader Wing, The Infantry School, Belgaum as a Instructor from 19 Sep 2004 to 06 Sep 2006.

On 16 Nov 2008, an input received at 1650 hrs indicated likely presence of terrorists in general area Beli Baihk, District-Baramulla. A well planned search and destroy operation was directed towards general area Beli Baihk at 1700 hrs. Terrorists moving towards Lachhipura was spotted by the search party under Major Amit Oscar Fernandes at 2045 hrs only at extremely close range due to poor visibility and good cover. The contact with terrorists was established and intense fire fight ensured. In the fire fight two terrorists were killed. The third terrorists closed in and fired on Maj Amit Oscar Fernandes. The officer caught the barrel of terrorists weapon and deflected the fire away from himself and his party. The terrorist bit his thumb to release the weapon. Maj Amit Oscar Fernandes overpowered the terrorist, snatched his weapon and shot him dead. Major Fernandes by his raw courage, extreme determination and timely action saved the lives of his comrades while eliminating three hard core terrorists.

IC-61379L MAJOR DEEPAK TEWARI
Corps of EME

IC-61379L Major Deepak Tewari was commissioned into Corps of EME on 08 Dec 2001. He completed his attachment period with 8 Bihar from 08 Dec 2001 to 07 Dec 2002 and was then posted to 7002 EME Battalion from 08 Dec 2002 to 03 Jun 2005. Major Deepak Tewari was posted to 14 Rashtriya Rifles (Garhwal Rifle) on 29 Jun 2008 after completion of his Engineering Degree at MCEME Secunderabad.

On 27 November 2008, he received specific information from the Brigade HQ, regarding presence of five terrorists in one of the houses of Shokbaba. He rapidly moved in pitch dark night, thus surprising the terrorists with the speed of movement. At 0015 hrs while closing in on to the target, the officer heard the militants coming out of the house towards them. On seeing troops, terrorists opened heavy volume of fire. The officer, despite the barrage of fire, displaying nerves of steel and quick reflexes retaliated and chased four terrorists who jumped behind a rock, lobbed a grenade and resumed firing at the officer. In the face of terrorist fire, displaying dogged determination, the officer moved forward with lightning speed, leap frogging behind boulders, encircled the terrorists and in a daring act of bravery, single handedly eliminated three terrorists in extremely close range gun battle of approximately three meters and critically injuring the fourth. The brave officer then provided personal leadership to the team which resulted in elimination of five hardcore Lashkar-e-Toiba terrorists.

9113063K PARATROOPER SHABIR AHMAD MALIK (POSTHUMOUS)
1ST PARA SPECIAL FORCES

No. 9113063K Paratrooper Shabir Ahmad Malik joined the army on 15 Mar 2007 in J&K Light Infantry. An alumnus of the prestigious Sainik School Manasbal, he was a fierce patriot since childhood and thus volunteered for Special Forces. Out of two hundred odd probationers he got selected to become part of the elite First Para (SF) on 15 Mar 2008.

As a young paratrooper, he proved to be a very motivated and hardworking soul. Always ready to volunteer for any task not considering the risks involved. He volunteered as a scout to lead his troops in operations.

On 21 Mar 2009, his troop was tracking an infiltrating column of terrorists when leading as a scout he observed suspicious movement and alerted his commando buddy. An overwhelming volume of fire from three directions by the terrorists resulted in the injury of his buddy. Undaunted the young paratrooper crawled under overwhelming effective fire and rescued his comrade to cover and further charging on the terrorists killed two at close quarters in hand to hand combat. During this act of bravery he sustained severe gunshot wounds but refusing to be evacuated he kept motivating and directing his troop mates. The brave paratrooper finally succumbed to his injuries but not before he had eliminated two hardcore terrorists and helped in successful evacuation of his buddy. This act of valour and selfless sacrifice has made him a youth icon in Kashmir valley.

2994546Y NAIK RISHIKESH GURJAR
10 RASHTRIYA RIFLES (RAJPUT)

2994546Y Naik Rishikesh Gurjar 10 Rashtriya Rifles (Rajput) was born on July 10, 1978 at village Nisura, Dist Sawaimathopur, Rajasthan. He did his schooling in his village and studied upto class 8th. The individual got enrolled into the Rajput Regiment on October 28, 1995 and after successful completion of basic training from Rajput Regimental Centre, Fatehgarh, he joined 3 Rajput in mid-1997. During his service career, he has participated in Operation Vijay at Kargil from June 1999 to Sep 99 in operation in Operation Parakram / Rakshak at Bandipura (J&K) from December 2002 to August 2005 and in operation Rakshak at Doda from October 2007 till date.

Presently as an NCO incharge of Ghatak Platoon of 10 Rashtriya Rifles, he has been part of various operations during, which include arrest of two overground workers with Rs. 1,90,000/-, one Terrorist of LeT ‘Tanzeem’ apprehended with Chinese Grenade and surrender of two terrorists of LeT ‘Tanzeems’.


SHAURYA CHAKRA

1. GS-173875N Satish Kumar, BRO, Operator Excavating Machinery Grade–II (cleared a landslide at great risk to his own life)

2. 26696 Sqn Ldr Harkirat Singh (landed a stricken MiG at night)

3. IC-64795 Maj Ankur Garg

4. IC-62248 Maj Saurabh Dutt Kholia

5. 15330627 Lance Naik Sujith Babu V (Posthumous)

6. IC-57104 Maj Dinesh Singh Parmar

7. IC-63089 Maj Subramaniam Anand

8. 25871 Sqn Ldr Tarun Kumar Chaudhry (Piloted away a stricken chopper after Maoists shot at it and killed an airman in Jagdalpur)

9. 776951 Sgt Mustafa Ali (Posthumous) (Shot dead by Naxalite as his IAF chopper was taking off in Jagdalpur)

10. GS-171792-K Operator Excavating Machinery Pritam Chand (Posthumous)

11. GS-173772-P Driver Mechanical Transport Grade – II Piar Chand (Posthumous)

12. 9107449 Rifleman Mohd Abdul Amieen Bhat (Posthumous)

13. IC-70145 Lt Satbir Singh (Posthumous)

14. 13625790 Naik Manoj Singh (Posthumous)

15. 2795178 Sepoy Hanmant Mahadeo Yevale

16. 13622147 Hav Vipan Thakur (Posthumous)

17. SS-39651 Maj Ajay Singh

18. JC-74651 Naib Subedar Ganesh Nath

19. IC-61038 Maj Harmeet Singh Samra

20. G/114735 Hav Thangjalet (Posthumous)

21. IC-59470 Maj Manoj Aruparayil Pothen

22. 4478544 Lance Naik Davinder Singh

23. IC-63580 Capt Mudassar Iqbal

24. IC-69343 Capt Anoop Pandey

25. 120351-A POWTR CD III Chandra Sekhar (Posthumous)

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS

PARAM VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-24198 Lt Gen Chanroth Kunnumal Suchindra Sabu

2. 01248-K Vice Admiral Sanjeev Bhasin

3. 12939 Air Marshal Venkatraman Ramamurthy Iyer

4. 13472 Air Marshal Pramod Vasant Athawale

5. MR-03364 Lt Gen Naresh Kumar Parmar

6. IC-24219 Lt Gen Ajay Kumar Singh Chandele

7. IC-25053 Lt Gen Dalip Bhardwaj

8. IC-25064 Lt Gen Shreedharan Shyam Kumar

9. IC-25126 Lt Gen Rajinder Singh Sujlana

10. IC-24706 Lt Gen Kammula Ramachandra Rao

11. IC-25213 Lt Gen Mukesh Sabharwal

12. IC-25469 Lt Gen Karan Singh Yadava

13. IC-23689 Lt Gen (Retd) Narinder Singh Brar

14. IC-29915 Lt Gen (Retd) Vinod Chopra

15. 12833 Air Marshal (Retd) Keshava Murthy Rama Sundara

UTTAM YUDH SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-25538 Lt Gen Rabindran Krishna Swamy

2. IC-25816 Lt Gen Bikram Singh

BAR TO ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

3. IC-25457 Lt Gen Vijay Kumar Ahluwalia

ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-24654 Lt Gen Tejinder Singh

2. IC-27146 Lt Gen Uma Shankar Prasad Sinha

3. IC-25141 Lt Gen Deepak Raj

4. IC-25442 Lt Gen Swatantarta Nand Handa

5. IC-25056 Lt Gen Inderjit Singh

6. IC-25815 Lt Gen Gurdeep Singh

7. IC-27325 Lt Gen Rajesh Kochhar

8. V-00330 Lt Gen Jai Krishan Srivastava

9. 02373-T Vice Admiral Paras Nath

10. 01701-R Vice Admiral Pradip Kumar Chatterjee

11. 01773-D Vice Admiral Anurag Gopalan Thapliyal

12. 13606 Air Marshal Simhakutty Varthaman

13. IC-25280 Maj Gen Ashok Vasudeo Taskar

14. IC-30052 Maj Gen Brijinder Singh Daulta

15. IC-30076 Maj Gen Sathish Chandra Nair

16. IC-30137 Maj Gen Sukhraj Pal Kochhar

17. IC-30389 Maj Gen Sanjiv Chachra

18. IC-30571 Maj Gen Rajeev Datt

19. IC-33450 Maj Gen Darshan Lal Chowdhary

20. IC-30687 Maj Gen Sanjiv Langer

21. 01660-Y Rear Adm Chander Shekhar Patham

22. 13508 Air Vice Marshal Dinesh Mukundan

23. 14446 Air Vice Marshal Anil Kumar Behl

24. 15327 Air Vice Marshal Ajit Shankarrao Bhonsle

25. 13487 Air Vice Marshal Salem Sunder Ram Gunashekar

26. 15220 Air Cmde Kulwant Singh Gill

shukla
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby shukla » 11 Apr 2010 18:01

Army practices response to NBC disasters

The Indian Army’s Northern Command Saturday concluded a two-day exercise aimed at practicing its response to nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) disasters, an official said.
On first day of the exercise, held in Himachal Pradesh’s Dharmashala area, Friday, deliberations were held on the situations which would be encountered and “the response of the civil administration as the first responder and that of the army as the second responder,” army spokesman Major K.S. Rathi said in a release here.

“On the second day (Saturday), troops carried out their drills for mitigation of the said disasters,” the spokesman said, but gave no further details. According to the spokesman, the exercise “benefited the army in streamlining their drills and procedures, thereby ensuring effective response to any such disaster.” “It also re-emphasised the requirement of coordination and understanding between various branches of the army and the civil administration to face any disasters.”

atreya
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby atreya » 11 Apr 2010 18:39

Thanks a lot pmund ji. I love reading the citations of awardees. It fills me with pride and passion. R.I.P posthumous awardees! You martyrdom will inspire others to no end!


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