Indian Army: News & Discussion

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Nihat » 28 Sep 2010 11:35


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Suresh S » 28 Sep 2010 11:47

Because of this one man, major somnath sharma ( not to diminish the sacrifice of his comrades )we still have the best part of kashmir , the valley. A man sadly most ordinary indians have not heard of but he remains one of my great heroes. Is my assessment correct , any comments ?

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 28 Sep 2010 14:17

India, Japan Set to Boost Military Ties
The Tribune, Chandigarh, India

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Pratyush » 28 Sep 2010 14:45

There is a breif bio of Savitri Khanolkar in the book Param Vir by Ian Cardozo (SP), truly a remarkable woman.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 28 Sep 2010 16:24

tsarkar wrote:Actually, an amphibious attack on Karachi followed by physical occupation is a good idea.

Pakistani doctrine is that when it is unable to withstand an Indian conventional strike, it will use nuclear weapons against that strike formation.

Close proximity to Pakistan’s most economically valuable infrastructure & segment of population will negate this option and restrict their responses. They cannot use full firepower because of collateral damage to infrastructure and populace – that they know they cannot easily replace.


All urban and even suburban areas should be avoided completely. With respect to Karachi; the local populace is well armed (and therefore a headache for the Pakistani state) and probably hard to subdue, the local garrison and AF bases are large, and landing areas for the amphibious force will be limited.

The problem with landing a brigade sized force is that its too small to effectively hold the area (Karachi is massive in terms of both area and population) and too large to be a viable raiding force. In addition extricating the brigade will again be a major challenge.

IMO the next war should see at the very least a division sized force being airlifted to the closest valley to Sost in Gilgit with an aim to cut off the highway to Xinjiang (Khunjerab Pass) and then move north along the road towards the passes into Afghanistan. Coupled of course with simultaneous ground offensives into Skardu. Since the area is disputed (thank you Pakistan!), the chances of the war going nuclear are relatively lower (though still not negligible). The area is mountainous and the offensive will be slow, but if decisive air superiority as well as a constant airlift of troops and supplies to forward bases can be maintained (it was far harder in 1948), India could separate Pakistan and China by 6000 kms while establishing a corridor into Afghanistan, and via Afghanistan and Tajikistan to Central Asia.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Singha » 28 Sep 2010 16:34

local support would be essential though for recon and food etc. would the shias of NA perceive a better deal with India than China-Pak combine?
or would ummah brotherhood cement the shia-sunni divide?


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby ManuT » 28 Sep 2010 18:11

Raja Bose wrote:
tsarkar wrote:On foreign women marrying Indian Servicemen and settling in India, I completely forgot to mention Savitri Khanolkar, who later designed the Param Vir Chakra. Such were the examples set that we fail to follow today.


To add to the above: Major Somnath Sharma the first recipient of the PVC (posthumous) was her son-in-law.


Former COAS, Gen V. N. Sharma was the brother of Maj Somnath Sharma.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Suresh S » 28 Sep 2010 20:29

i wanted to share a interesting theory i have as to how indra,s weapon vajra is part of our param vir chakra devised by savitri khanolkar. savitri,s mother was russian and in russian methology Indra is the god of rain and lightening and is known by ordinary folks. my guess is that this intelligent woman associated the two cultures and came up with this symbol.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Lalmohan » 28 Sep 2010 20:37

vajra is the divine thunderbolt in indian mythology, no need to import russian theories onlee!

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby ParGha » 28 Sep 2010 20:38

snahata wrote:i wanted to share a interesting theory i have as to how indra,s weapon vajra is part of our param vir chakra devised by savitri khanolkar. savitri,s mother was russian and in russian methology Indra is the god of rain and lightening and is known by ordinary folks. my guess is that this intelligent woman associated the two cultures and came up with this symbol.

Indra's vajra was devised from the thigh bones of the Sage Dadachi - symbolic of the good sacrificing itself to battle evil (in this case the demon Vritra). It has been officially documented in case of the PVC. No need to theorize on it.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby tsarkar » 28 Sep 2010 21:14

Snahata, not really correct.

Savitribai Khanolkar was associated with the Ramakrishna monastic order established by Swami Vivekananda. She studied at Ramakrishna Vedanta Ashrama, Darjeeling as did Sister Nivedita, another spiritual lady.

The Vajra represents the selfless sacrifice of Rishi Dadhichi, and is representative of the ultimate sacrifice possible by a human towards larger benefit of mankind. The Ramakrishna order occasionally uses the Vajra motif to inspire selfless sacrifice in service of mankind.

Books written by Sister Nivedita have the Vajra motif on the back cover. Ramakrishna Ashrama Nagpur temple has the Vajra motif at its gate.

The Vajra motif used by Ramakrishna Order and also depicted in the Param Vir Chakra is the Tibetan Vajra. Vajra is called Dorje in Tibet and Bhutan. Tibetan Buddhism is practiced at Darjeeling where the Ramakrishna Vedanta Ashrama is located and Savitribai Khanolkar studied.

When she had to design the Param Vir Chakra, she used the motif she knew represented ultimate sacrifice – the vajra made of Dadhichi’s bones. The Tibetan Vajra, coincidence or providence, is quite asthetic and apt for a medal. The design is simple, apolitical, universal and spiritual without any religious connotations.

The explanation I have made here is briefly touched here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savitri_Khanolkar in Lt. Gen Harbaksh Singh’s verbatim description of her, who himself gave stellar leadership to the Army in 1965.

Many internet article incorrectly describe Shivaji’s sword is also inscribed on the Param Vir Chakra. That is untrue. The inscription is only the Tibetan Vajra.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Param_veer_chakra.gif
http://www.google.co.in/search?hl=en&q= ... =&gs_rfai=

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Suresh S » 28 Sep 2010 23:38

dhanoyobad dada. You are right and i am aware of this story.I am only saying in russian culture also indra is associated with good deeds and since all of us are influenced by our mothers it could have had some effect on her pshyche, the name of indra i mean.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 30 Sep 2010 20:53

Botswana, India to Hold Joint Military Exercise from October 3rd to 9th

A 15-member delegation of the Botswana Defence Force (BDF) will be in India from Oct 2 to participate in a joint logistics exercise with the Indian Army. The BDF delegation, led by their Chief of Staff Logistic Brigadier George Modirwa Tlhalerws, will travel to Dehradun for the Oct 3-9 exercise.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 01 Oct 2010 14:43


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby sum » 02 Oct 2010 10:53

India’s bid to counter ‘assertive’ China

India is preparing grounds, literally, to take battle tanks, radars and more troops closer to the border with China in an apparent bid to counter an “assertive” neighbour.

This would be done, first by upgrading the high-altitude Nyoma air-field in Ladakah – within 23 km of the line of actual control – for supporting fighter and heavy-lift operations and later making a hard landing strip at Daulat Beg Oldie – 10 km from the border – enabling touch down of heavy troop carriers.

“We plan to expand Nyoma base. The proposal has been forwarded to the defence ministry,” said NAK Browne, commander-in-chief of the Western Air Command.

Defence Minister A K Antony who expressed concerns at Beijing’s increasing “military assertiveness” last month visited Nyoma in June. Troop-carriers AN-32 landed in Nyoma for the first time more than a year ago.

Asked whether expansion of the base, located at an altitude of 13,300 ft, means undertaking fighter operations at Nyoma, Browne said: “Expansion means we should be able to operate each and every type of platforms including the fighters.”

Old fighters
While old generation fighters like the MiG may not be able to operate at high altitude with low air pressure, new generation Su-30 were “specifically designed to operate at such an elevation,” the commander-in-chief said.

Since the current runway at Nyoma and DBO are made out of compactified rubble, there are limitations in operations. But with a hard strip the new C130 J and the upcoming C-17, which the IAF is buying from the USA would be able to touch down at Nyoma.

This means if the need arise C-17 – world’s heaviest transport plane with 75 tonne capacity – could be used to ferry tanks and heavy artillery tantalisingly close to the border.

India’s main battle tanks, Russian origin T-90 and T-72, are in the 40 tonnes category. While T-90 weighs about 46.5 tonnes, T-72 is slightly lighter with 41.5 tonnes. Both should not pose any problem to C-17.
....
But it would take awhile before Nyoma can support fighter and heavy-lift operations.
“We will take 3-4 years to make it fully functional because at an altitude of 13,000 ft, only 7 to 8 months in a year are available for construction.

“Cement does not dry in winters and besides the hard surface we have to make parking, refuelling and safety facilities, ” Browne said.

However, operationalising DBO at 16,000 ft altitude would be a different ballgame.
Though the IAF plans a hard strip at DBO too in the long run, fighters may not be able to operate there and transport planes may have to operate at only half of their capacity, said an IAF official.

While tanks are ruled out, radars and more troops can be carried to DBO at the base of the Karakoram pass. With Nyoma, DBO and ****** in operation, the IAF is not activating Chusul, the fourth advanced landing ground in the region.


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 02 Oct 2010 10:58

Five Indian Army T-90 Regiments to Receive Presidential Standards Honor Five T-90 armoured regiments of the Indian Army will receive the Presidential Standards, a rare honor, on October 19. President Pratibha Patil will present the Colors, a first for armored regiments, at a parade to be held in Babina in Uttar..

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 04 Oct 2010 13:13

Elbit Systems wins $56 million Tank Upgrade Contract from Asian customer

Am trying to catch hold of people in Elbit. Hope to get some confirmation soon.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Nirmal » 04 Oct 2010 21:49


This link does not seem to work any more. Can you point to another link or post the article in full as a last resort.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Gaur » 04 Oct 2010 21:51

^^
That is odd. The link is working fine for me.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 05 Oct 2010 04:07

Nirmal, here it goes

This is the real original Url, Click It, do tell if it works for you or not

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... nst%20IEDs

Posting it in Full
Indian MEG Effort Trains Against IEDs
Sep 30, 2010

By Anantha Krishnan M.
BENGALURU, India

The Madras Engineer Group (MEG) of the Indian army is gearing up in the fight against improvised explosive devices (IEDs), especially radio-controlled IEDs.

The MEG, which is also known as the Madras Sappers, has crafted a blueprint that is supposed to help boost preparedness for asymmetric warfare, as well as for upgrading equipment.

“Training a scholar warrior of [the] 21st century will be now our priority,” says Maj. Gen. Brajesh Kumar of army headquarters.

He says the MEG is committed to be more effective in meeting the needs of today’s warfighting environment. “As the combat engineering support [arm] of the Indian army, we have a huge role to play,” he says. “Be it the conventional war or the asymmetric one, we have realized that the innovation in training using cutting-edge technology can outsmart the enemy.”

Brig. Gen. Gurdip Singh, MEG commandant, tells AVIATION WEEK that as part of the army headquarters’ Project Kshamata information technology (IT) initiative with Microsoft, many army personnel are being trained in improving their IT and English skills. “Microsoft gives exposure to our master trainers in various skill sets, and they in turn train our men. The Sappers are known for their strong interpersonal bonding abilities, and we would want to turn this to the advantage of [the] army. This program is a huge confidence booster to our forces,” the commander says.

MEG’s ability to innovate made headlines recently for the use of eco-friendly improvised firing targets at its ranges. “Out-of-the-box thinking is the key and the Indian army has always backed MEG’s new initiatives, which is an eye-opener for many,” Gurdip says.

MEG Photo : Defense PRO, Bangalore.

Image

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 06 Oct 2010 18:35

Indra 2010 - Indian, Russian Armies to Conduct Anti-Terror Military Exercises

Indian and Russian Armies to conduct anti-terrorism exercise ''Indra-2010''. This will be held in Chaubattia in Uttarakhand between October 15 and 24, Defence Ministry officials revealed in New Delhi. The battalion-level exercise will comprise of infantry troops from both the armies who would work out insurgency and terrorism situations and plan and execute an operation to counter these, particularly in a mountainous terrain, they said.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby putnanja » 06 Oct 2010 22:17

Pvt sector to develop Rs 10,000 cr army communications network

In a giant first step towards bringing India’s reputed IT industry into defence production, the Indian Army has approached six private sector IT majors for developing a high-tech communications backbone network for the Indian Army.

The army’s communications chief, Lt Gen P Mohapatra, revealed today that the army had sent out security-classified “Expressions of Interest”, or EoI, for developing a Tactical Communications System (TCS), which will provide a robust, snoop-proof, mobile, cellular network for the Indian Army’s voice and data communications during battle.

The EoI, which Business Standard has reviewed, has gone out to at least five private companies: Tata Power (Strategic Electronics Division); HCL Infosystems; Wipro Technologies; Rolta India; and L&T. Another potential candidate, Tech Mahindra, was ruled out as it did not qualify as an Indian company because of a foreign holding component higher than 26%.

In addition, three public sector undertakings --- Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL); Electronics Corporation of India Ltd (ECIL); and ITI Ltd --- have also received the EoI.
...
...
In a bold departure from its earlier practice of selecting the lowest bidder, the MoD has indicated that indigenisation and technological quality of the product would be considered in choosing a Development Agency. The EoI states, “The contribution of the Indian industry in acquiring and developing Technologies in critical areas shall be a key criterion in assessment of various proposals (sic).”
...
...
The TCS project is India’s second project under the “Make” procedure, after the Future Infantry Combat Vehicle (FICV) development project (Business Standard, 9th Aug 10, Indian industry at landmark defence tender). But MoD sources, pointing out the significance of the TCS, say, “The FICV is just a stand-alone armoured vehicle. In contrast, the TCS is a network-centric backbone that connects crucial systems in the electronic battlefield; it connects the sensors, the shooters, the decision systems and the command hierarchy. It is the backbone for everything.”
...

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Nirmal » 07 Oct 2010 13:00

Juggi G wrote:Nirmal, here it goes

This is the real original Url, Click It, do tell if it works for you or not

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/ ... nst%20IEDs

Posting it in Full
Indian MEG Effort Trains Against IEDs
Sep 30, 2010

By Anantha Krishnan M.
BENGALURU, India

The Madras Engineer Group (MEG) of the Indian army is gearing up in the fight against improvised explosive devices (IEDs), especially radio-controlled IEDs.

The MEG, which is also known as the Madras Sappers, has crafted a blueprint that is supposed to help boost preparedness for asymmetric warfare, as well as for upgrading equipment.

“Training a scholar warrior of [the] 21st century will be now our priority,” says Maj. Gen. Brajesh Kumar of army headquarters.

He says the MEG is committed to be more effective in meeting the needs of today’s warfighting environment. “As the combat engineering support [arm] of the Indian army, we have a huge role to play,” he says. “Be it the conventional war or the asymmetric one, we have realized that the innovation in training using cutting-edge technology can outsmart the enemy.”

Brig. Gen. Gurdip Singh, MEG commandant, tells AVIATION WEEK that as part of the army headquarters’ Project Kshamata information technology (IT) initiative with Microsoft, many army personnel are being trained in improving their IT and English skills. “Microsoft gives exposure to our master trainers in various skill sets, and they in turn train our men. The Sappers are known for their strong interpersonal bonding abilities, and we would want to turn this to the advantage of [the] army. This program is a huge confidence booster to our forces,” the commander says.

MEG’s ability to innovate made headlines recently for the use of eco-friendly improvised firing targets at its ranges. “Out-of-the-box thinking is the key and the Indian army has always backed MEG’s new initiatives, which is an eye-opener for many,” Gurdip says.

MEG Photo : Defense PRO, Bangalore.

Image

Thanks a lot Juggi_G. The Link works though unnecessary in view of Full posting. Thanks nevertheless.


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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby pgbhat » 10 Oct 2010 20:38

Did not see this posted.

The ‘Cold Start and Stop’ strategy ---- Ali Ahmed
The underside of the idea is that the Pakistanis would be able to face off with the IBGs using only their defensive forces. Their strategic reserves would not require to be committed. This way they would be able to preserve the strategic reserves from attrition by land based firepower and air action. Thus, with its ‘centre of gravity’ in the form of the strategic reserves intact, Pakistan would not require to concede anything, making war termination at this stage difficult. This may then entail launch of strike corps, morphing the option from ‘Cold Start and Stop’ to the next higher one of ‘Cold Start and Continue’.

The end game of the Cold Start and Stop strategy can be visualised along two directions. The first is to stay on till a negotiated end is reached, using the captured territory as a bargaining chip. This may not be possible since captured territory does not make sense in today’s world order. Pakistan may simply ‘wait out’ India.

This recommendation is in keeping with an insight of the late General Sundarji, that war between nuclear powers requires having an exit policy permissive of a ‘face saving’ exit for the other side and an ‘honourable’ end to the war.2 A Cold Start and Stop strategy, informed by politico-diplomatic exit policy, may prove a saleable option.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 10 Oct 2010 23:45

http://expressbuzz.com/biography/Thinking-of-Indian-soldier/213880.html

Spare a thought for Indian soldier
Vir Sanghvi
10 Oct 2010

I was watching British television news last week. A big story concerned the death of a Lieutenant Colonel in Afghanistan. Apparently, some British soldiers carry video cameras
strapped to their headgear and so the shooting of the officer was recorded on videotape. It made for gruesome viewing.

The story was about the lack of facilities that led to his death. The Colonel commanded a small detachment of men who came under fire from the Taliban. When the attack began, they tried to radio for help but found that they could not get a signal in the covered space they were taking refuge in. So, the Colonel went out to try and get a signal. This made him an easy target for the Taliban who shot him. The bullet entered his shoulder and severed an artery.

His horrified troops then radioed the base and asked for a helicopter to pick up the Colonel and to take him to hospital. According to the TV channel, it took 40 minutes for the despatch of the helicopter to be approved once the message had reached. The helicopter took some time to reach the Colonel and overall, it was over an hour before he was placed in the helicopter to be taken to hospital. Though doctors did their best, he died three hours later.

It was a horrific story made more poignant by the demands for an enquiry from the Colonel’s mother. Why hadn’t the radios worked properly? Why had it taken so long to approve a helicopter?

The defence ministry was asked to respond by the TV channel. That response made the point that a) the radios were working fine, which cannot be right because no soldier would risk his life and expose himself to hostile fire trying to get a signal out in the open if he could simply use the radio from his secure, sheltered spot and b) even if the helicopter had reached earlier, the Colonel would still have died. The Taliban bullet had severed a key artery and death was inevitable.

That response was clearly unsatisfactory. At the time that the base delayed sending the helicopter nobody knew how serious the Colonel’s injuries were or whether his life could have been saved by rushing him to hospital. It was not as though some officer said, “Oh, he is going to die anyway,” and therefore decided to dilly-dally over sending a chopper.

That same day, Prime Minister David Cameron was asked to comment on the incident. Cameron made all the right noises, but essentially his response was that British forces in Afghanistan did not have enough helicopters or helicopter pilots. However, the Colonel had died when Labour was in power. Now that the Conservatives had taken office, the British army had been given the choppers and pilots it needed.

It would seem to me that the army behaved scandalously. But that is not my concern this Sunday. What struck me while watching that report was how seriously the British took the death of a single officer in war time. Months after the event, it was the lead story on the news and the Prime Minister was being asked to explain the circumstances of the tragic death.

Contrast the British example with the way in which we respond to the deaths of our soldiers — both army and para-military — even though we know that they have given their lives so that we can be safe and secure.

First of all, we would have no video-recording because nobody bothers to give our soldiers cameras.

Secondly, no soldier would believe that he was entitled to get a chopper to come and pick him up from the battlefield once he had been shot. We simply don’t extend that sort of facility to our troops.

Thirdly, the circumstances of the death would never be made public. The video-footage would never get out. We would never hear about how long it took for a rescue to be organised.

Fourthly, we in the media would never dare question the Prime Minister about the death of an individual soldier. We would act as though the PM was too important a man to bother with the death of a single officer. And finally, the reason why none of this would happen is because at some basic level, we simply do not care enough for the lives of our fighting men.

Consider the news items we come across every day. Soldiers are killed trying to do a job they have no business to attempt, imposing the law of the state in some insurgency-ridden part of India. Soldiers die in pointless clashes — during peace time!— on the border with Pakistan. Soldiers are ambushed by Naxalites and killed by the dozen.

Go through the newspapers for the last year and try and add up how many lives have been lost. Now, we are so brutalised by the constant litany of deaths that they no longer necessarily make page one. The killings are buried in some small item on some inside page. And yet, much of what we are as a nation is due to the sacrifices of our troops. It is easy for you and me to sit at home and criticise the way in which the CRPF is battling the Naxalites. But it is not so easy for the sons, daughters and widows of the hundreds of men who have died in this battle to bother with armchair criticism. Poorly-led, inadequately armed, insufficiently trained and bereft of accurate intelligence, our soldiers are sent off to their deaths. And when they fail to come back, only their families weep. The rest of us do not even notice.

The difference between India and a Western country is that we still have people willing to die for us. In the West, citizens are no longer willing to risk their lives in warfare. As long as battles are conducted with missiles and drones, the population is content to watch the spectacle on television. But once lives begin to be lost, the public turns against the war and demands an immediate pull-out.

Consider the US and Vietnam. Until the body count became high, Lyndon Johnson was a popular President. But as more and more soldiers began to die, he was vilified, the war lost public support and the US’s priority became to look for a way to get out. So it was with Tony Blair. History will remember him as one of Britain’s more successful prime ministers. But within his own country, he is treated as a villain or a ‘war criminal’ even, because he risked British lives in Iraq. And now, Barack Obama’s principal priority is to pull troops out of Afghanistan even though the consequence of a US withdrawal would be a certain return to the pre-2001 situation.

No Western nation could live with the casualties we suffer each week in the battle against the Maoists. By now, public resolve would have crumbled and there would be calls for some kind of deal to avoid further bloodshed. And no Western nation would have had the stomach for something like Kargil, where each hill was recaptured after close-proximity combat and many officers lost their lives.

The reason we know that we can fight challenges to our sovereignty and to the rule of law is because we are sure that we can count on our armed forces. Time after time we ask them to risk their lives for us. And they never ever let India down.

So, spare a thought, this Sunday, for the Indian soldier. We never give him the facilities that are his due.

And we never greet his death with the respect or concern it deserves.

But all of us recognise that one reason why we are still a free and sovereign nation is because he is willing to die so that we can live.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby anchal » 11 Oct 2010 00:14

Nice article. for quite some time Vir is talking sense. dunno what prompted the change? at the same time; some are gone case going by Burqua aunty's flirtatious interview with Mush the lier and murderer

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby chetak » 11 Oct 2010 00:59

anchal wrote:Nice article. for quite some time Vir is talking sense. dunno what prompted the change? at the same time; some are gone case going by Burqua aunty's flirtatious interview with Mush the lier and murderer


vir is suffering from temporary food poisoning from all the free food he has reviewed as a foodie journo.

A leopard cannot change it's spots.

He will soon be back to his nasty ways again.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 11 Oct 2010 01:56

chetak wrote:
anchal wrote:Nice article. for quite some time Vir is talking sense. dunno what prompted the change? at the same time; some are gone case going by Burqua aunty's flirtatious interview with Mush the lier and murderer


vir is suffering from temporary food poisoning from all the free food he has reviewed as a foodie journo.

A leopard cannot change it's spots.

He will soon be back to his nasty ways again.


He's always been respectful of the security forces and a hardliner with respect to Pakistan.

He's a pro-Congress, anti-RSS/VHP/SS secularist but then that's hardly a crime.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Avik » 11 Oct 2010 03:47

Indian Army's performance at the Commonwealth Games:

Indian Armymen have done a proud to India by winning five gold medals, two silver medals and three bronze medals in the Common Wealth Games (CWG) 2010 . Winners are:Subedar Vijay Kumar-won two gold medals in shooting, Naib Subedar Imran Hasan Khan –won a gold medal in shooting, Hawaldar Gurpreet Singh –won a gold
medal in shooting, Hawaldar K. Ravi Kumar –won a gold medal in weight lifting, Naib Subedar Manoj Kumar- won a silver medal in wrestling, Hawaldar Suken Dey – won a silver medal in weight lifting (56 kg weight category) and Hawaldar V.S. Rao - won a bronze medal in weightlifting (56 kg weight category).


anchal
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby anchal » 11 Oct 2010 13:08

I just love the way General speaks - confident and to the point.

Asked about reports suggesting that Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin has been visiting terror camps along the LoC with Pakistan Army and ISI officials, the Army chief said, "Salahuddin is on the other side. We are not worried with whom he goes around. If he tries to infiltrate, he would also be dealt in the same way his accomplices are."


Must have hurt turd's echandee. The pig has been squealing for quite sometime now!
http://news.rediff.com/slide-show/2010/oct/11/slide-show-1-army-will-deal-with-salahuddin-when-he-infiltrates.htm

Juggi G
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 13 Oct 2010 10:35

Self - Deleted
Last edited by Juggi G on 13 Oct 2010 12:48, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 13 Oct 2010 11:19

India to Enhance Military Cooperation, Conduct Joint Trainings with Vietnam

As a part India's Look East Policy, Defence Minister AK Antony said that New Delhi will provide support to Vietnam to enhance and upgrade the capabilities of its three services in general and its Navy in particular. Antony announced India's help at the bilateral meetings with the top Vietnamese leadership including President Nguyen Minh Triet, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and Defence Minister General Phung Quang Thanh.

"India will help Vietnam in its capacity building for repair and maintenance of its platforms. The Armies of the two countries will also cooperate in areas like IT and English Training of Vietnamese Army personnel," Antony said on Tuesday. He further said that both the armies will also have a joint training in mountain and jungle warfare in India next year, and offered assistance to Vietnamese Forces in UN Peacekeeping operations, in which India has vast experience.

Antony announced these measures to expand defence cooperation with Vietnam after successful conclusion of the first ASEAN Plus Eight Defence Ministers' Meeting in Hanoi. The Vietnamese Defence Minister thanked India for its valuable contribution to make the ASEAN Defence Ministers' Meeting a great success.

SriSri
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby SriSri » 13 Oct 2010 11:19

@JuggiG, Sorry but that is not funny. :-/

Gaur
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Gaur » 13 Oct 2010 12:23

Juggi G,
You find that funny? Well, I have much to say regarding that but I think it will be wasted on you.

Juggi G
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Re: Indian Army: News & Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 13 Oct 2010 12:51

Sorry Guys ! A Thousand Apologies for Offending the Sensibilities

I have self-deleted the post




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