Indian Space Program Discussion

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vavinash
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby vavinash » 16 Oct 2008 05:18

Gerard, nothing new in the article. Chinese have better launch capability for now but their satellite tech sucks. Its no wonder IRS series of sats is used world wide for earth imaging. With Cartosat2/2a and soon 2b ISRO is leagues ahead of them. Even in comm sats INSAT series are far more reliable. ISRO just needs the GSLV MK-III and RLV out soon.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby prao » 16 Oct 2008 20:38

Quite simply, this turd knows which side of his bread is buttered. He's protecting his source of income.


Nope. Margolis doesn't need the money. He is the heir to and owner of the Jamieson Vitamin company. His motivations are more basic.


Indeed that seems to be true though it is neither mentioned on his website nor (based on a quick look) on the Jamieson company corporate website and he seems to be a full time journalist.

His motivations ARE probably more basic as you say. The Pukis are probably satisfying those "basic" motivations. :wink:

EOD

Prao

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby A Sharma » 16 Oct 2008 21:36

India formulating strategy to face space-based warfare: Raju

India is formulating a strategy to defend itself against any warfare using space-based assets and all three services were taking adequate steps to make use of them, Union Minister of State for Defence M M Pallam Raju said here today.

Responding to questions at a press conference, Raju said usage of space-based assets for warfare is something India has expressed its reservation against.

"Yet we are conscious that space-based assets may be used against us in warfare. So all the three services (Army, Navy and Air Force) are taking adequate measures to see how we can make use of space-based assets to adequately defend us".

"...We have to see how they (Indian Space Research Organisation) can use space-based assets for defending a nation and that's what we are actually thinking. We are formulating a strategy on that", the Minister said.

Raju rejected suggestions by some analysts who see India's moon mission, Chandrayaan-1, slated next week, as part of a space race between New Delhi and Beijing.

"We are constantly challenging ourselves as a nation. It's a race against ourselves and not a race against anybody", Raju said, adding that the mission showcases and reinforces India's capabilities in the space sector.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Avinash R » 17 Oct 2008 17:28

Moon mission to boost PSLV orders
http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14779144
Friday, 17 October , 2008, 13:20

Chennai: The launch of India's lunar spacecraft Chandrayaan on Oct 22 will not immediately result in big satellite launch orders for Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), but will improve its expertise in the area where India specialises - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicles (PSLV).

PSLVs carry lightweight research satellites, not the heavy communication or weather satellites that orbit the earth above the equator. In the area of these rockets, called Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicles (GSLV), India has a long way to go before it can attract commercial luggage.

“World over the lunar or other planetary missions are in exploratory research stage. Estimating the commercial fallout of India's moon mission is too early to discuss. People have to go a long way to exploit the potential,” K.R. Sridhara Murthi, executive director, Antrix Corporation Limited told IANS.

The Rs 940 crore turnover Antrix (profit Rs 160 crore) is the commercial arm of ISRO.

“Even the pictures taken by the Chandrayaan spacecraft will not be of much commercial value. But they will have scientific value. The one advantage that India has is that we are in the game in an early stage,” Murthi said.

Adding that the main driver is future potential and strategic capability, he said: “The positive spinoff is the development of technological capability in making high energy instruments, miniaturised components, robotics and others that will be in useful in the long run.”

While PSLV is used for placing lighter satellites in polar orbit and at times in geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) if the payload is around 1,100 kg, GSLV is for putting heavier satellites of around two tonnes in GTO.

Only research institutes and universities would want to send small satellites on PSLVs and they are widely dispersed across the globe, making it difficult to make a concerted marketing pitch, remarked Murthi.

India will be considered seriously in the global satellite launch arena only when its GSLV Mark III comes into play with a capacity to carry over three tonnes, he added.

ISRO's current strategy relating to its rockets is to maximise the carrying capacity utilisation by pitching for light weight luggage as co-passenger for its own satellite - the main luggage.

“India has not invested in capacity creation to wait for payload. Our investment is for our use and at the same time cash on the available opportunity,” Murthi said.

The bulk of the commercial launches around the world are for communication satellites that weigh over three tonnes, a segment dominated by Europe, the US, Russia and China.

The major launch vehicles in the world are Delta, Pegasus, Shuttle, Atlas, Ariane, Soyuz, Proton, Titan and the new Long March that belongs to China.

The rocket freight rate is calculated on cost per kilogramme per kilometre carried basis.

ISRO has used PSLV to launch 16 third party satellites till now.

The heaviest is the 500 kg Italian satellite Agile in 2004 followed by the Israeli satellite TecSAR that weighed 300 kg.

Presently ISRO has received three or four payload commitments from third parties for PSLV, said Murthi.

According to him the overall launch industry is stagnating in the last couple of years.

“There is no big growth. No big satellite systems are coming into the market.”

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby renukb » 18 Oct 2008 09:21

India's pie in the sky
Bibhu Ranjan Mishra & Praveen Bose / New Delhi October 18, 2008, 0:11 IST

On Wednesday, India will enter the annals of lunar history with its bid to land a mission on the moon.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/ ... ono=337665

At dawn on October 22, a thousand staid scientists, all with alphabet soups of academic qualifications, will be braced to break out the bubbly. India’s first moon mission, Chandrayaan-1

(C-1) is scheduled to launch about 10 minutes after sunrise from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, on the little peninsula of Sriharikota, India’s spaceport on the Bay of Bengal.

Chandrayaan is the latest validation of India’s space programme which had its origins in 1963 when Vikram Sara-bhai laid the foundation for what has become one of the greatest success stories of India.

While India has put satellites galore into space, ISRO’s experience is thus far limited to operating assets at a distance of about 40,000 km. A moon mission is a whole new ball-game. It involves managing complex equipment at a distance of 400,000 km — enough to cause over a second’s lag each way in the radio signals that control those systems.

The sylvan green of Sriharikota with its vast acres of mangrove swamps and its winter arrivals of flamingos and other migratory birds is a charming, if apparently incongruous, setting for a high-tech space centre. However, although the 1,000-odd scientists and technicians camped there claim their surroundings help them relax, the location was chosen for hard-headed, practical reasons.

There is always an element of uncertainty in a rocket launch. If it fails here, it will land in the sea. In case of deviations from the proposed path or other malfunctions, the launch vehicle can be blown up. “Once the vehicle lifts off, nothing can be done. We won’t simply destroy because of a marginal deviation or malfunction. We destroy it only when there is a chance of it causing catastrophic damage,” says

V Krishnamurthy, general manager (safety) of the mission.

However, C-I is unlikely to fail — at launch at least. The PSLV is tried and tested, it has put 12 payloads into space. The objective of C-1 is to put a 1.5 metre cube into orbit, about 100 km above the lunar surface, for two years. Various experiments will be run and data of all sorts acquired. The unmanned, 11-payload mission also incorporates a moon impact probe that will crash into the moon itself and drop a tricolour on the surface, staking India’s claims to the moon.

The making of C-1 has involved very complex systems integration. The mission head of the project, M Annadurai, has had his fingers crossed since July 21 when the integration of the launch vehicle started. His team is “charged-up”. “People from the lowest to the top level are working round the clock with great excitement. All of them are self-motivated and don’t need to be set a target. We have not seen this kind of team spirit with any other project in the past,” says M C Dathan, director, Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR.

At a distance of 384,000 km, the moon is the most visited celestial body. A few dozen manned and unmanned missions have been undertaken by Russia (then the USSR), USA, China and Japan. Russia and the US have landed robotic spacecraft on the moon; the US has landed astronauts as well. But no man has walked on the moon for over 30 years.

In May 1999, Atal Behari Vajpayee evaded the question of a possible moon mission while he was watching the launch of PSLV-C2. He took refuge in poetry, saying, “When man reached the moon, he did not find anything beautiful there.” ISRO did eventually get clearance for the missions and, at Vajpayee’s behest, it was named Chandrayaan. The numeric “1” suggests that it is the first of several missions and indeed C-2 is already in the pipeline.

C-1 is an exercise in developing technical expertise for ISRO as well as in global scientific cooperation. It carries six payloads and experiments devised and contributed by UK, Germany, Sweden, Bulgaria and the US (two payloads), apart from five designed by Indian scientists. If all work, it will send back enough data to generate 3-D maps, check for the presence of water and other chemicals and minerals, assess background radiation levels, measure the (tenuous) lunar atmosphere, study solar wind interaction, et cetera.

It will acquire unprecedented amounts of data and answer many questions about the evolution of earth’s mysterious satellite. “In spite of several missions to the moon, the origin of the moon is not fully understood. The theory that the moon originated due to a catastrophic collision of the earth with a Mars-sized body over 3 billion years ago is unproven. In this context, the data collection about the lunar surface and its chemical composition by C-1 may provide us insights into its origin,” says

G Madhavan Nair, chairman, ISRO. With luck, it will also throw up more questions that later missions can attempt to answer.

“The present unmanned mission from India is unique. Most moon missions so far have tried to unravel one side of the moon. We are now concentrating on the polar orbit, and wish to prepare a three-dimensional atlas which is unique and will help in mapping the topography,” says V K Srivastava, a senior scientist working with the project.

The moon impact probe aims at providing ISRO with technologies for future soft landings including possibly manned missions. Another target is to investigate the abundance of Helium-3, which is vital for fusion energy generation experiments. He-3 is very rare on earth and supposedly present in much larger quantities on the moon. While it may not be cost-effective in energy terms to mine it, its presence would spark new interest in lunar resources. “The moon has 2-3 million tonnes of Helium-3. This would be enough to produce energy for us on earth for about 8,000 years,” says U R Rao, former director of ISRO.

For ISRO, which runs a large and ambitious communication and remote sensing satellites programme, C-1 is a crucial mission. While ISRO chairman

K Kasturirangan had been lobbying since 1999, it was in November 2003, after G Madhavan Nair took over, that the project gained approval. Work started about four years ago. The C-1 spacecraft has been built using the indigenous capabilities of ISRO Satellite Centre in Bangalore with contributions from the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, ISRO Inertial Systems Unit, Thiruvananthapuram, Space Application Centre (SAC), Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad and Laboratory for Electro-optic Systems, Bangalore. As mentioned, the 1,380 kg spacecraft to be launched with the polar satellite launch vehicle (PSLV) carries 11 scientific experiments.

Around November 8, when the satellite is in a polar orbit about 100 km above the moon’s surface, the moon impact probe will be ejected to hit the lunar surface. It will take a series of “close-ups” as it crashes and the instrumentation will transmit that data back. Other payloads will execute their functions over two years on the solar-powered satellite. The telemetry and data relay will be managed at the Deep Space Network Station in Byalalu near Bangalore.

The satellite has a mass of 550 kg (the weight on the moon is one-sixth that on earth due to lower gravity, but mass remains the same). “When it is in the moon orbit, our satellite will be about 550 kg, despite carrying 11 payloads on board. This is satisfactory,” says Srivastava. (Famously, astronauts eat caviar because it has the highest calorie to weight ratio, and weight is key to space missions.) Chandrayaan-1 will be launched using a PSLV variant. PSLV-C11 consists of four stages along with six strap-on rockets.

It is very cost-effective, with a price-tag of less than Rs 400 crore. A space shuttle mission from NASA, which only goes to 40,000 km (and comes back) costs about five times as much. The project cost of Rs 386 crore includes Rs 100 crore towards the cost of the launch vehicle, another Rs 100 crore for the Deep Space Network, which controls the mission, and Rs 185 crore for satellite and operations. “Actually, the moon mission’s cost of less than Rs 400 crore is just 10 per cent of the annual budget of ISRO. The money we have invested on DSN will help us with all future planetary missions including Chandrayaan-II,” a spokesperson for ISRO says.

ISRO, like any other public sector organisation, has to work under tight constraints. Insiders say it was really tough for the space research agency to accomplish the project on schedule within the given budget. ISRO outsourced non-core work to private vendors to minimise costs and speed up schedules. The major hurdle was post-Pokhran II sanctions that prevented technology transfer. As a result, the Indian payloads were developed indigenously. The failure of Insat 4C in July 2006 also slowed things down. Thankfully, all that is in the past.

ISRO and the Indian scientific establishment have a lot riding on C-1. It would make India a serious player in outer space and make it easier to attract and retain high quality scientists and engineers. The moon could eventually serve as a launch-pad for missions to other planets such as Mars. India would definitely like a seat in that game. The countdown begins on Wednesday.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Nitesh » 18 Oct 2008 10:29

Moon mission to boost PSLV orders
Friday, 17 October , 2008, 13:20
Last Updated: Friday, 17 October , 2008, 13:25

http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14779144

{Admin Note: Duplicate news body removed. Pls check the thread to ensure it is not already posted.
Thanks -Arun_S Admin hat on}

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Rony » 19 Oct 2008 01:28

'We Can Easily Catch Up With China' : Chairman of ISRO and the Space Commission on the moon mission and more
How do you handle criticism from a section of the people that a poor nation like India shouldn't be wasting money on projects like Chandrayaan?

We have faced this question in the early phase of the programme. We are convinced that we are doing more service to the society than the money spent on the programme. But to doubly assure ourselves, we asked a school of economics in Chennai a couple of years back to make an assessment. The report they submitted was really mind-boggling. They found that what we have given back to the society in terms of products and services is something like one and half times more than the cumulative investment made on the entire space programme. Leave alone the infrastructure, the technology, the human resources and the various laboratories we have developed, if we add all that it is certainly more than five times spent on the programme.

How do you compare India with China?

Compared to China we are better off in many areas. For example our communication satellites are world class. Chinese still depend on some foreign companies to supply some components. On launchers, we have very advanced capability. As far as manned-mission is concerned we are lagging behind, but that was a conscious decision on our part. Since it involves a lot of funds, in the initial phase of the moon programme we have not given thrust to that area. But given the funds and necessary approvals we can easily catch up with our neighbour in this area.

When will India put a man on moon?

We have a dream to put a man on moon with our own vehicle system by 2015.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Rony » 19 Oct 2008 01:33

Space You Can Use : India may now be the world leader in deploying satellites that assist practical work on the ground

Nobody would mistake India for a leader in outer space. Many Indians are hopeful that the launch this week of the Chandrayaan I spacecraft, which will orbit the moon in search of water, will mark a turning point for the nation's space program. The Indian mission will carry instruments for the U.S. and European space agencies in addition to its own Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). Judging from local media coverage, Indians are following the mission almost as closely as the gyrations of the stock markets.

The Indian space program is already far ahead in one respect: its use of space technologies to solve the everyday problems of ordinary people on the ground. For more than 20 years, India has been quietly investing hundreds of millions of dollars in its earth-sciences program with an eye toward helping farmers with their crops, fishermen with their catches and rescue workers with management of floods and other disasters. "India is leading the way in the approach towards the rationale for earth observation," says Stephen Briggs, the head of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Earth Observation Science and Applications Department.

Measured by the number and sophistication of their satellites, America and Europe may be ahead of India. But with an annual budget of about $1 billion—less than a tenth of NASA's—ISRO covers a lot of ground. It has built and launched 46 satellites, which provide data for at least nine Indian government ministries. Its 11 national communications satellites are the largest network in Asia, and its seven remote sensing satellites map objects on Earth at a resolution of less than a meter. These form the backbone of a series of practical initiatives that, according to a Madras School of Economics study, have generated a $2 return for every $1 spent. "We have clearly shown that we can give back to the country much more than is invested in the space program," says ISRO chairman Madhavan Nair.

The satellite network is the fruit of an effort begun in 1982 to connect India's remote—and often roadless—regions to radio, TV and telephone networks. By 2002, ISRO had expanded satellite TV and radio coverage to nearly 90 percent of the country, up from 25 percent.

India's investment in Earth observation satellites over the years comes to only about $500 million per satellite, about a tenth of the cost of its Western counterparts. After introducing a satellite service to locate potential fish zones and broadcasting the sites over All India Radio, ISRO helped coastal fishermen double the size of their catch. For the government's Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission, begun in 1986, satellites have improved the success rate of government well-drilling projects by 50 to 80 percent, saving $100 million to $175 million. Meteorological satellites have improved the government's ability to predict the all-important Indian monsoon, which can influence India's gross domestic product by 2 to 5 percent.

Next, ISRO plans to roll out satellite-enabled services to hundreds of millions of farmers in India's remote villages. In partnership with NGOs and government bodies, it has helped to set up about 400 Village Resource Centers so far. Each provides connections to dozens of villages for Internet-based services such as access to commodities pricing information, agricultural advice from crop experts and land records. ISRO's remote-sensing data will also help village councils develop watersheds and irrigation projects, establish accurate land records and plan new roads connecting their villages with civilization as cheaply and efficiently as possible. One ISRO partner—the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation—has used satellites to conduct 78,000 training programs for more than 300,000 farmers in 550 villages, teaching them about farming practices like drip-and-sprinkle irrigation, health-care awareness programs for diseases like malaria and tuberculosis, and information about how to access government services. Using satellites to guide reclamation of 2 million hectares of saline and alkaline wastelands is expected to generate income of more than $500 million a year.

The United States and Europe may have beaten ISRO to the moon, but India's vision might just show the way for mankind's next giant leap.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby sanjaykumar » 19 Oct 2008 04:28

We have a dream to put a man on moon with our own vehicle system by 2015

:?:

2025?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby vavinash » 19 Oct 2008 05:21

2015 was for man in space if IRC.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rakall » 20 Oct 2008 10:48

Last night there was a report on NDTV by Vishnu & Pallav on Chandrayaan & India's future space plans icnluding the manned mission.. It was a tremendous report.. Great piece of work, but a case of bad telecast timing -- was telecast at midnight; I was only able to watch it 'by chance'.

VISHNU - can you please post the timings, if there is a repeat telecast.. Or upload the video for the jingos.

Some salient points of the report:

1. All the details of Chandrayaan; which nowadays every channel is repeating..

2. The report carried some visulas of the design drawings that ISRO prepared for the manned mission; One could see the design of the vehicle as planned for the manned mission, the design of how the "crew vehicle/Orbitor vehicle" is mounted on top of the launch vehicle..

3. There was a brief visual of a scaled-down version of the re-entry vehicle -- thermocouple mounting going on the heatshield tiles, before the hypersonic windtunnel test; A brief visual of the re-entry vehicle in actual wind-tunnel test being subjected to hypersonic flow..

4. Then came a HUGE BONUS.. the SilicaPhenolic heat shield tile - which is 2cm thick was tested by NDTV science editor Pallav.. What they did was -- heat the silica phenolic tile with the flame from a oxyacetylene torch on one side.. that is a temp of 1400-1500deg on one side of the 2cm thick tile.. Pallav was able to touch the otherside of the tile very comfortably with bare hands.. The demonstration of the tile was simple "Sooooooooooooperrr".!!

It was a nice report.. NDTV reporters were able to get deep access and managed to telecast some diamond pieces of info, just sliding across the screen for fractions of seconds each.. Absolutely wonderful.. Dr.KasturiRangan remarked that in 7-8years the manned mission should be ready to takeoff (ofcourse, if the funding pipeline from GoI remains free flowing).

if there is a repeat telecast -- it is a report everyone must see (Esp. Arun)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Rahul M » 20 Oct 2008 22:58

anyone has that image of a nose cone being carried on a bicycle ?
TIA.

btw, arun ji, it would be a very nice addition to the BR space page.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Arun_S » 20 Oct 2008 23:02

Rahul M wrote:anyone has that image of a nose cone being carried on a bicycle ?
TIA.

btw, arun ji, it would be a very nice addition to the BR space page.

I have that photo and more. I need help moving the Space and Missile pages to CMS software, that make updating the web pages much easier.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rsingh » 21 Oct 2008 01:30

Image
Image
Image


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Rahul M » 21 Oct 2008 11:39

rsingh ji, thanks a lot ! you made my day !

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rsingh » 21 Oct 2008 18:15

Ooh I just googled. Humble, intelligent and visionary founding fathers of ISRO are to be thanked. There is an very good article on this in Newsweek.Please do not miss it.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Arunkumar » 21 Oct 2008 21:28

Astronaut training center to come up in bangalore.

http://www.saharasamay.com/samayhtml/ar ... sid=106669

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby sanjaychoudhry » 22 Oct 2008 00:26

India to build new launch-pad, astronaut training centre

India plans to build a new satellite launch pad and a major training facility for astronauts as it proposed to undertake a manned space mission by 2015.

"It (the cost of setting up the launch pad) is around Rs 600 crore. A major national facility (for training astronauts) will be established here (Bangalore),Indian Space research Organisation Chairman G Madhavan Nair told PTI.

It would be the third launch pad in the Sriharikota spaceport on the east-coast in Andhra Pradesh, some 100 kms north of Chennai.

Nair said the manned mission has been approved by the Space Commission, and a formal government nod is expected in the next few months.

The Technologically-challenging manned mission (human space flight) envisages development of a fully autonomous manned space vehicle to carry crew (two members) to low earth orbit and their safe return to earth, development of critical/new technologies for crew module, service module, launch escape system, establishment of long-term facilities and identifying detailed elements required for undertaking the venture.

"Basically, technology elements required for development of habitable module is the top-most priority", Nair, also Secretary in the Department of Space, said.

"Technology elements required for improving the reliability of launch systems have been identified.Crew escape and mission management system has to be in place," he said.

In 2006, ISRO said the preliminary estimated cost for the manned space mission was Rs 10,000 crore spread over a period of eight years.


http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/00 ... 211431.htm

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SriniY » 22 Oct 2008 01:12

When ISRO says they are constructing a new launch pad, do they mean they are constructing the huge vehicle on which the rocket is assembled and the corresponding vehicle assembly building or are they building a new place from where the actual launch takes place.


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 22 Oct 2008 06:37


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 22 Oct 2008 06:40


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Santosh » 22 Oct 2008 07:10

What instruments were carried on board the Chinese Chang'e 1 lunar mission? Disha seemed to suggest in the other thread that the chinese launch was mainly for H&D purposes. Any references? SSridhar's article above does not mention anything. TIA

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SaiK » 22 Oct 2008 07:15

I want Indian lander and not russkier lander for chandrayan-2.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby vavinash » 22 Oct 2008 07:15

It certainly had a camera. maye be a cybershot was carried on the chang-e :mrgreen: :rotfl:

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Bade » 22 Oct 2008 07:27

It does not matter what Change carried or did not; if the rest of the world cannot see it or share the data. It remains a dud. :mrgreen:

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rgsrini » 22 Oct 2008 07:34

SaiK wrote:I want Indian lander and not russkier lander for chandrayan-2.

I agree. Why would we want to go through all the difficulty of carrying a payload to the moon and land a Russian stuff to roam on it, unless Russia contracts/pays ISRO to do it. I hope better sense prevail amongst the scientific and political community.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 22 Oct 2008 07:44

Santosh wrote:What instruments were carried on board the Chinese Chang'e 1 lunar mission?


Chang’e 1 carries a total of eight primary instruments to photograph and map the lunar surface, probe its depth, study the regolith’s chemical composition, and analyze the space environment around the Moon.

According to the mission description, Chang’1 carries two basic imagers.

A CCD stereo camera will produce three-dimensional images of the lunar surface by compiling three separate, two-dimensional views of each target area. Meanwhile, the probe’s interferometer spectrometer imager is expected to overlay optical measurements with spectra to depict the regional distribution of resources and materials, Luan added.

Chang’e 1 will also carry a laser altimeter to take precise elevation measurements of the lunar surface, as well as gamma/X-ray spectrometers to hunt out and measure the amount of up to 14 elements – among them iron, potassium, uranium and titanium – according to Luan’s description.

A microwave detector will bounce signals down to the Moon’s surface, operating on four different frequencies to determine the lunar regolith’s depth, while a high-energy solar particle detector and low-energy ion instrument – Chang’e 1’s space environment monitor system – measures the solar wind environment, according to the CNSA mission description.

A payload data management system rounds out Chang’e 1’s instrument package. Also riding to the Moon aboard the lunar probe are some 30 songs, among them Chinese folk songs and “The East is Red” – China’s national anthem – Xinhua reported in November.


Has there been any news of how have these performed ? No.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby sanjaykumar » 22 Oct 2008 08:14

Chang'e means good in Panjabi :rotfl:

Ujjal
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Ujjal » 22 Oct 2008 08:18



Vipul
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Vipul » 22 Oct 2008 17:58

Next Mission: Sending Indian to space - ISRO.

India's first unmanned moon mission, Chandrayan-1 is a success and history has been written on October 22. Amidst joy and pride, the Indian Space Research Organisation is already looking forward to the year 2015 when it plans on having India's first manned space flight.

ISRO Chairman Madhavan Nair, who was beaming with pride, told a crowded press conference three hours after the launch of Chandrayan-1 that they were planning on sending two humans into space (low earth orbit).At present, they are devising a capsule to ensure that this project is a success.

This is a bit challenging, Nair said, adding that ISRO had already prepared a project report and hoped that this mission became a reality by 2015.The ISRO chairman further added a new facility will be set up to undertake the manned mission.
Apart from a training centre in Bangalore, a new launch pad in Shriharikota will also be set up, he added.

The space agency will use the GSLV to undertake the manned space flight, Nair said, adding that the rocket required design modification and that the tolerable failure rate should be 1 out of 100.He said the natural next destination would be to mars and added that the GSLV was capable of carrying a spacecraft to Mars [Images]. ISRO is expected to undertake the mission to Mars by 2012.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Vipul » 22 Oct 2008 18:04

Arun_S wrote:
Rahul M wrote:anyone has that image of a nose cone being carried on a bicycle ?
TIA.

btw, arun ji, it would be a very nice addition to the BR space page.

I have that photo and more. I need help moving the Space and Missile pages to CMS software, that make updating the web pages much easier.


Photo of Carts carrying rocket material in the early days.

To greater glory from such humble beginings, Please archive /upload it.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby manoba » 22 Oct 2008 18:30

rgsrini wrote:
SaiK wrote:I want Indian lander and not russkier lander for chandrayan-2.

I agree. Why would we want to go through all the difficulty of carrying a payload to the moon and land a Russian stuff to roam on it, unless Russia contracts/pays ISRO to do it. I hope better sense prevail amongst the scientific and political community.


Why can't they send two rovers then? One from the Russkies and second from, say the IIT-Kanpur student's project. We all know the ISRO guys are good at cramming loads of things in one single box, pack and deliver it to Chandamama's door step.

Hope the ISRO guys are reading BRF :mrgreen:

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SaiK » 22 Oct 2008 19:14

landers take more space and weight.. has a larger mission objective.. especially thinking off serving a billion people on bharat maata for complete energy independence. Also, see in the coming years about psy-ops and anti-India strategies for such aspirations..jealousy!.. and since, no one has a reactor that is driven by h3 yet. what would happen to angrezi ego if barc were to be the first!? (pls. remember the news about India's breakthrough in tritium and ->H3 in a year)


the content here is wrong:-
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/news ... wsid=10371

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby nevin » 23 Oct 2008 08:28

a basic silly doubt:

hows the rocket positioned on the launchpad? there are stabilizing attachments, but is the whole rocket sitting on the rocket engine nozzles ( i dont think so ), if not, then hows it done?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 23 Oct 2008 10:07

ISRO can put an Indian into space before 2015

“It is a complex and challenging task,” but the Indian Space Research Organisation can put an Indian astronaut into space before 2015, ISRO Chairman G. Madhavan Nair said on Wednesday.

He told a press conference at Sriharikota that the ISRO had prepared a project report on sending an Indian into space. The Space Commission approved the ISRO’s proposal. “We are awaiting the government clearance.”

The ISRO could design a module carrying two persons into space. An astronaut corps had to be trained. India’s manned mission to space would cost Rs.12,000 crore.

Asked whether he expected international cooperation in this venture, Mr. Nair said the ISRO would like to be self-reliant. “We do not have any proposal for cooperation with other countries but we are not averse to it.”

Planning a mission to send an Indian spacecraft to the Mars had started, he said. The ISRO’s Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) could take a spacecraft to that planet.

“The technical capability exists and mission planning has started. We are looking at proposals from the scientific community [to carry instruments on board the spacecraft to the Mars]. As soon as we get them, we fill finalise them and plan our mission to the Mars.”

A technology demonstrator of the Indian reusable launch vehicle would be flight-tested in two years, Mr. Nair said.

S. Ramakrishnan, Director (Projects), Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, said mission studies on sending an Indian spacecraft to the Mars were being done.

Our Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle can take a 250-kg spacecraft to the Mars. The GSLV-mark III can put a one-tonne spacecraft in orbit around the Mars.”

M. Annadurai, Project Director, Chandrayaan-1, said Chandrayaan-2 would fructify by 2012 or 2013, and it would drop a lander/rover on the Moon. Russia would provide the rover for it. The rover would come out of the lander. The rover would go about and pick up lunar soil samples. “While Chandrayaan-1 is a remote-sensing mission for locating chemicals and minerals in the lunar soil, Chandrayaan-2 will do in situ analysis of lunar soil, chemicals, helium 3, etc.”

Asked when the country could send an Indian to the Moon, Mr. Annadurai said, “In 20 years, a manned mission is possible, if called for.”

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby disha » 23 Oct 2008 10:46

nevin wrote:a basic silly doubt:

hows the rocket positioned on the launchpad? there are stabilizing attachments, but is the whole rocket sitting on the rocket engine nozzles ( i dont think so ), if not, then hows it done?


That way it will create a problem and blow apart the rocket itself with a big blast.

There are several ways, one way is via frangible nuts and bolts. On sufficient thrust, the "computer" sends a signal to explosively break them.

I would imagine that the rocket itself is bolted to the launch tower and there is gap below the launch pad to divert the exhaust gases away ...

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Shankar » 23 Oct 2008 15:57

When ISRO says they are constructing a new launch pad, do they mean they are constructing the huge vehicle on which the rocket is assembled and the corresponding vehicle assembly building or are they building a new place from where the actual launch takes place.


it means simply a full new stand alone launch station the basic concrete launch pad ,the vehicle assembly building ,the propellant storage ,the launch centre ,the personnel everything


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