Indian Space Program Discussion

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hnair
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby hnair » 23 Oct 2008 23:20

nevin wrote:a basic silly doubt:

hows the rocket positioned on the launchpad? there are stabilizing attachments, but is the whole rocket sitting on the rocket engine nozzles ( i dont think so ), if not, then hows it done?


Nevin, I think there is a load bearing skirt around the base of the propellant section (ribbed section). The nozzle is isolated from any such stress and is allowed to vent to the plume buckets through those openings in the pedestal. If the rocket was sitting on the nozzle, the explosive power of the ignition added with the prevention of plume venting will cause some crazy stuff to happen :)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby nevin » 24 Oct 2008 09:32

thanks disha, h_nair for the replies - i hav always wondered how they get the stuff done. its some pretty heavy weight,no? 300+tonnes i think.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 24 Oct 2008 13:05

GAGAN to be the most sophisticated navigation system in the world

By 2011, India will have arguably the most sophisticated satellite-based air navigation system in the world that will bring immense benefits to both civilian and military aircraft, experts said.

Raytheon Company of the US is currently leading a team of companies to deliver a comprehensive solution for a global satellite navigation system to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Airports Authority of India.

The $196 mn or Rs.7.74 bn Global Positioning Satellite-Aided Geosynchronous Augmented Navigation system or GAGAN, to be implemented from the end of this year or early next year, will provide India with the most accurate, flexible and efficient air navigation system ever deployed.

"India had asked for the most sophisticated navigation system - even more sophisticated than what we have implemented in the US and Japan and we have shown that we are ready to deliver that," Raytheon's director of business development and strategic planning Fred A. Treyz III told media.

Treyz was here as part of Raytheon's delegation to the first civil aviation air show in India, the India Aviation 2008 held here Oct 15-18, 2008.

The GAGAN design is based on the experience that Raytheon gained while implementing the only certified space-based navigation augmentation systems in the world in the US and Japan.

The Wide Area Augmentation System, designed and developed by Raytheon and now being used in the US, was certified and commissioned by the Federal Aviation Administration of the US in July 2003.

The MTSAT Satellite Augmentation System also designed and developed by Raytheon was certified and commissioned by the Japanese Civil Aviation Bureau in September 2007.

The European Union is currently implementing the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) but this system is yet to be certified.

No other nation or group of nations is deploying such sophisticated air navigation systems.

The other members of the Raytheon-led technology team are Accord Software and Systems Pvt. Ltd. of Bangalore, Elcome Technologies Pvt. Ltd. of Gurgaon and Naverus Inc. of Kent, Washington.

Accord Software is providing Global Positioning System (GPS)-based user receiver prototype development optimized for the equatorial region, Elcome is providing logistical and on-site support and Naverus is providing performance-based navigation route design, procedure flight validation and other related services.

The project will provide straight-line fuel-efficient routes and precision approach landings, thereby reducing fuel burn substantially. It will also enable multiple approach capability.

GAGAN will also make it possible to provide coverage of oceanic areas, which is not possible by terrestrial systems; improve airport and airspace access in all weather conditions; enhance reliability and reduce delays; provide uniform and accurate navigation performance over the entire airspace; provide fuel efficient air corridors and provide CAT-I approach without ground element support.

Broadly, the project would result in fuel savings/efficiency for airlines and enable higher air traffic within the limited airspace.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby vishwakarmaa » 24 Oct 2008 23:08

SSridhar wrote:GAGAN to be the most sophisticated navigation system in the world

By 2011, India will have arguably the most sophisticated satellite-based air navigation system in the world that will bring immense benefits to both civilian and military aircraft, experts said.

Raytheon Company of the US is currently leading a team of companies to deliver a comprehensive solution for a global satellite navigation system to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Airports Authority of India.


Indian leaders couldn't find enough mathematicians, Graph theory experts and software, hardware experts in 1.1 Billion population(best minds of whose work for West) to design the system by our own.

A pity and shameful situation.

I would say, what I just said is wrong. We do have such people who can implement but our leaders lack confidence in our own capabilities. And when they do, they often put wrong people(management) to lead it so, efforts fail.

I have just one thing to say - "Reservations" or compromise on "merits" always pays back dearly. Even a single sub-standard person in the loop screws the plot.


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 25 Oct 2008 11:10


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 25 Oct 2008 11:14

http://www.janes.com/news/security/jdw/ ... _1_n.shtml

The [US] is frankly not so well loved around the world that people want to co-operate with us on things just because we're nice guys; they want to co-operate with the best

Isn't India a bit different than the 'rest of the world' when it comes to Uncle Sam :lol:


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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby sum » 26 Oct 2008 10:34

Another report on the astronaut training center coming in Devanahalli:
Link
Astronaut Training Centre at Devanahalli
DH News Service, Bangalore:


Another scientific institution will soon adorn the city. The Indian Astronaut Training Centre will be set up at Devanahalli near the Bengaluru International Airport.

Briefing mediapersons on Saturday, G Madhavan Nair, Chairman, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said, “At present about 40 acres has been allotted for the training centre and the State government has agreed to give another 100 acres for the purpose. This centre is part of the Eleventh Five Year Plan and Rs 1,000 crore has been earmarked for it. The Astronaut Training Centre will be completed by 2011-12”.

Chandrayaan-2

The preparations for the second unmanned lunar mission is already on and Chandrayaan-2, a joint venture of Russia and India features a lander and a rover. Explaining the details, M Annadurai, Project Director, Chandrayaan-1 said, “The project report of Chandrayaan-2 has been submitted for approval and is in the conceptual stage. The spacecraft will weigh 350 tonnes and is expected to be completed in a time frame of four years. The budget allocated for the spacecraft is Rs 425 crore and will be launched from Sriharikota’s Satish Dhawan Space Centre.” Indicating the present trend, Annadurai, said, “the launch of the lunar mission has triggered opportunities for young scientists. Most scientists from other space agencies have enquired about research opportunities here at ISRO.

This has become a trend in a small way and a ‘reverse brain drain’ phenomenon has set in where scientists from other nations have begun seeking opportunities with Indian organisations.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 26 Oct 2008 11:20

India Gains on China in Asia's Space Race

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ ... 08,00.html

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 26 Oct 2008 11:28

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/JJ16Ad02.html

Not only is India's prowess in the EOSAT realm attracting considerable attention, but India has already undertaken ambitious satellite-based distance education and telemedicine projects covering vast rural areas. India is the first country to launch the dedicated distance learning satellites known as EDUSAT, and is demonstrating that it can be an effective integrator of terrestrial networks and satellite infrastructures after working its way through a somewhat painful learning curve.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rsingh » 26 Oct 2008 11:48



You mean Antriksh Yatris

From Time
China had stolen a march in 2003 by becoming only the third nation to fly a man into space (after the U.S. and the old Soviet Union), but when, ten days from now, Chandrayaan-I drops a probe bearing India's flag onto the moon, India will become only the fourth country to plant its colors on the lunar landscape — after the Americans, the Russians, and Japan.


I thought Chini managed to throw empty noodle carton on moon. Wow that is the news.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 26 Oct 2008 15:33

Is Antriksh Yatri the official name for Indian astronaut ? I thought M Nair was still consulting his Sanskrit scholars.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 26 Oct 2008 18:15

Deep Space Networks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Space_Network

Each complex consists of at least four deep space terminals equipped with ultra-sensitive receiving systems and large parabolic-dish antennas. There are:

* One 34-meter (111-ft) diameter High Efficiency antenna.
* One or more 34-meter Beam Waveguide antennas (three at the Goldstone Complex, two at the Robledo de Chavela complex (near Madrid), and one at the Canberra Complex).
* One 26-meter (85 ft) antenna.
* One 70-meter (230 ft) antenna.

Indian Deep Space Network

The Network consist of a fully steerable 18m and a 32m DSN antenna which improves the visibility duration when compared with the existing ISRO Telemetry Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC). The established Indian Deep Space Network is a state of art system with its base band system adhering to Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standards thus facilitating cross-support among the Telemetry Tracking Command (TTC) agencies.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby kit » 27 Oct 2008 07:38

Away from the moon !

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008 ... super.html

Google's Super Satellite Captures First Image

While the GeoEye-1 will provide imagery to the NGA at the maximum resolution of 43 cm, Google will only receive images at a 50-cm resolution because of a government restriction

India better do some catching up here .. or everyone will start googling !

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby ajit » 28 Oct 2008 09:04

Wonkish jingos frequenting this forum may find these presentations interesting.

CHALLENGES IN CRYOGENIC DEVELOPMENT PRESENT & THE FUTURE
by NK GUPTA - Project Director, C25 LPSC-ISRO, Trivandrum.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/NKGupta.pdf

ROLE OF CRYOGENICS IN INDIAN SPACE PROGRAM
by L. MUTHU - Chief General Manager, LPSC,ISRO, Mahendragiri.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/Lmuthu.pdf/LMF.pdf

FACILITY FOR HEAT TRANSFER MEASUREMENT FOR SATELLITE PROGRAMME
by P. P. GUPTA - THERMAL SYSTEMS GROUP, ISRO SATELLITE CENTRE, BANGALORE.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/Ppg ... ents-1.pdf

More at http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/iccevents.html

Apologies if posted earlier...

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Arunkumar » 28 Oct 2008 15:13

ajit wrote:Wonkish jingos frequenting this forum may find these presentations interesting.

CHALLENGES IN CRYOGENIC DEVELOPMENT PRESENT & THE FUTURE
by NK GUPTA - Project Director, C25 LPSC-ISRO, Trivandrum.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/NKGupta.pdf

ROLE OF CRYOGENICS IN INDIAN SPACE PROGRAM
by L. MUTHU - Chief General Manager, LPSC,ISRO, Mahendragiri.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/Lmuthu.pdf/LMF.pdf

FACILITY FOR HEAT TRANSFER MEASUREMENT FOR SATELLITE PROGRAMME
by P. P. GUPTA - THERMAL SYSTEMS GROUP, ISRO SATELLITE CENTRE, BANGALORE.
http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/Ppg ... ents-1.pdf

More at http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/iccevents.html

Apologies if posted earlier...



Thanks for the presentations. Was a interesting read.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby JaiS » 31 Oct 2008 01:56

The W2M satellite “spreads its wings” at the Kourou Spaceport

Developed by a European-Indian alliance of EADS Astrium and ANTRIX (the commercial arm of ISRO – the Indian Space Research Organisation), W2M will have a span of 15.7 meters when its solar panels are fully extended in orbit.

Based on the ISRO I-3K satellite bus, W2M will have a liftoff mass of 3,460 kg. and will provide TV and radio broadcasting services.

Image

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby rahulm » 31 Oct 2008 07:19

In http://www.iuac.ernet.in/iccwebsite/Lmuthu.pdf/LMF.pdf

I noted that the Isp of the GSLV MkII Cryonegic Upper Stage (CUS) is 460 whereas for the GSLV MkIII C25 stage is lower at 445.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Raj » 01 Nov 2008 23:33

Not sure if this has been posted before, but I just came across the following power point presentation.
ihy2007.org/presentations/ILWS/ISRO_Update.ppt

Small Satellites for Earth's Near Space Environment (SENSE) (2010):

SENSE is a twin satellite mission to probe the electromagnetic environment of the earth's near space region. The mission proposes to launch two small satellites at low earth orbit one with high inclination and the other at lower inclination for space weather related studies. The SENSE mission aims to unravel the roles played by major large-scale drivers in determining the state of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere system and the weather of the near space environment at low latitudes.

Solar Coronagraph-ADITYA (2012):

It is proposed to fly a space-borne coronagraph "ADITYA" in visible and near IR bands to study the coronal mass ejection and consequently crucial physical parameters for space weather such as the coronal magnetic field structures, velocity fields and their variability in the inner corona etc.

The definition team reports for both these missions are under preparation.


YOUTHSAT:

A collaborative effort between India and Russia, with the following three payloads/ experiments:

SOLRAD (Russia): To measure temporal and spectral parameters of solar flare X-rays and gamma rays as well as of charge particle (electrons and protons) fluxes, which are sensitive to solar flare activity.
RaBIT (India): Radio beacon for Ionospheric Tomography: For two-dimensional mapping of ionospheric structures- both top and bottom side along the satellite path.
Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager (Visible) (India): For the altitude profile of neutral and ionized species of the upper atmosphere.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby SSridhar » 04 Nov 2008 22:18

'Bhuvan' - India's Google Earth
ISRO will soon launch 'Bhuvan', which will provide online maps based on Geographical Information System (GIS) in line of Google Earth, ISRO chairman, G Madhavan Nair said here on Tuesday.

"ISRO is planning to launch 'Bhuvan'. It is equivalent to the Google Earth, but is going to be much more precise," said Nair, who was here to attend the inaugural function of the 28th INCA International Congress on Collaborative Mapping and Space Technology.

"It will provide the latest information on our natural resources. We are going to provide very accurate maps of the region with the latest picture. This will be more beneficial for the people of the country," he said.

"The service likely to commence in the coming six months, will be available to the people in appropriate manner. This will provide valuable and updated information to the people," Nair said.

"The software and infrastructure necessary for the service is being established," he said. "Though most of the information will be online, but precision data will be given to selected users only," Nair said.

The ISRO chairman said with this service they will have mapping of the entire earth, both in terms of the upper land surface and the exotic minerals down below. Nair also delivered the Todar Mul Memorial lecture on the occasion and briefed the participants about the Indian space programme and its application in day-to-day life.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Gagan » 05 Nov 2008 01:12

Hey everyone,
The PSLV launched Chandrayaan that weighs 1380 Kgs into GTO. That's 1.3 tonnes.
This is coming close to the GSLV capabilities now.

Is it possible to have a PSLV-XXL to throw 2+ tonnes (or more) into GTO?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby vavinash » 05 Nov 2008 01:47

There is no PSLV-XXL but PSLV-HP which should be able to put 1.5~1.6 tonne into GTO. That is still not near GSLV's capabilities (2.5~3.00 tonnes). Once GSLV MK-III comes online India will have light/med and heavy launcher capability in PSLV/GSLV-II/GSLV-III.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion - 23 April 2008

Postby Gerard » 05 Nov 2008 03:26

4-5 tons to GTO still lags behind beasts like the Arianne V ECA.

The proposed Unified Modular Launch Vehicle with semi-cryo and cryo stages may be the true workhorse in the coming decades.

Semi-cryogenic Engine / Stage Deveopment - Developing a higher thrust semi-cryogenic core stage for the unified modular launch vehicle. (Project not yet approved)

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2008 09:30

An interesting tidbit

The Hindu dated Nov. 6, 1958

The Indian Astronautical Society, Mysore, announced in a press note on November 5 that a two-step rocket designed and developed by two of its members was successfully launched on November 3. The rocket, developed under project experiment of the Society, was the third to be launched. The test rocket launched consisted of two steps, each with a separate propulsion unit.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Kakarat » 06 Nov 2008 12:38

ISRO develops new satellite

BANGALORE: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has developed a new satellite
that could take images through the clouds, enabling space-based application in such scenarios to manage cyclones, floods and agriculture related activities.

India's current earth-observation satellites are working in visible and infrared bands, which means they can take pictures only when its cloud-free.

"Often, during cyclones and floods the entire sky will be clouded. To see through the cloud, the new Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT) will be important. In fact, we have got a tie-up with Canadian space agency...we are now using their satellite images to assess floods and other problems," ISRO Chairman G Madhavan Nair said.

"Once our satellite (RISAT) is put into orbit, we will be able to use this for all purposes. And that will also help us in assessing the agriculture during monsoon season - how much sowing has been done and how much harvesting," Nair, who is also Secretary of Department of Space said here.

According to ISRO officials, RISAT mission would have a C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) payload, operating in a multi-polarisation and multi-resolution mode.

SAR, an active sensor, operated in the microwave range of electromagnetic spectrum, provides the target parameters such as dielectric constant, roughness and geometry. With its unique capability for day-night imaging and in all weather conditions, including fog and haze, provides information on soil moisture.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby narayana » 06 Nov 2008 14:19

According to ISRO officials, RISAT mission would have a C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) payload, operating in a multi-polarisation and multi-resolution mode.


Great News in less then a years time after launching Israeli tecSAR we are ready with our own SAR :) :D

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Vipul » 06 Nov 2008 21:10

Any news on when the next launch is scheduled?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SaiK » 06 Nov 2008 22:33

what is the best SAR resolution out there? can we use this for dual use?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Anujan » 06 Nov 2008 22:35

narayana wrote:
According to ISRO officials, RISAT mission would have a C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) payload, operating in a multi-polarisation and multi-resolution mode.


Great News in less then a years time after launching Israeli tecSAR we are ready with our own SAR :) :D


ISRO's SAR testbed.

Image

SaiK wrote:what is the best SAR resolution out there? can we use this for dual use?

Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT)
Considering that the major crop (Khariff) season is largely covered with clouds, thus debilitating data acquisition from electro-optical cameras on board IRS satellites, a Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT) has been taken up for development. The satellite equipped with a capability of imaging under day and night as well as cloudy conditions will become an important complementary system to the band of electro-optical sensors launched hitherto. The satellite will involve the development of a multi-mode, multi polarisation, agile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) operating in C-band and providing 3-50 metre spatial resolution. Various modes of operations such as ScanSAR, strip and spot will provide images with coarse, fine and high spatial resolutions. RISAT will also involve the development of related algorithms and data products to serve the user community in many applications of relevance to the country.

With RISAT, the important applications like Khariff crop inventory, disaster management support – especially flood studies – will get a boost.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SwamyG » 06 Nov 2008 22:44

Potentially it could be used for military and snooping needs as well, right?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Arun_S » 06 Nov 2008 23:11

narayana wrote:
According to ISRO officials, RISAT mission would have a C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) payload, operating in a multi-polarisation and multi-resolution mode.


Great News in less then a years time after launching Israeli tecSAR we are ready with our own SAR :) :D

The above statement is ambiguous in its intent, depending on one's perspective.

RISAT mission was announced and part of the launch schedule for many many years and one can see technical publications in international conferences by ISRO on RISAT over last many years. Much before TecSAR was even thought to be launched by PSLV-core alone. There is absolutely no correaltion between India providing commercial launch service fro tecSAR and India's own RISAT with respect to any tecSAR technology leaching to heathen and backward Indians.

India is no slimy Chinese who actively steal (copy) at every possible opportunity. In South-East Asia (I..e in Indo-China), there is a popular belief that Chinese script, language and ethics is built on Chinese children learning to copy and emulate from earliest days of childhood.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby skher » 07 Nov 2008 03:15

Do we have a shuttle carrier or AVaTaR carrier aeroplane in mind for the manned missions (space/moon)....something that could take the spacecraft to 90,000 feet [Two Stage To Orbit plan] ?

If yes,that's just great!!
We'd hit two birds with one stone by having a heavy multi-role strategic lift airplane being developed at the same time with a revolutionary space vehicle.It'd be disappointing and uncharacteristically ISRO if chose to outsource the plane.

If no,does that mean AVaTaR will fly horizontally like a normal aeroplane on earth and then fire up its ramjets when in space?

Considering that well funded NASA et al were unable to make this viable,what timeframe are we looking for AVATAR/shuttle carrier?

P.S.:Much water has passed since these questions were asked on the thread,the answers or action plans could be different (or so I hope with childlike glee).

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby wasu » 08 Nov 2008 09:02

Moon dust & hard business

http://businesstoday.digitaltoday.in/in ... 2&Itemid=1

......

Even before Chandrayaan’s launch, while India and the world were worrying over the global financial meltdown, Antrix had crossed a milestone unnoticed and unheralded. It delivered a communications satellite, the W2M, to the Paris-based Eutelstat, a leading telecom operator, on October 18.

Although the W2M satellite—unlike the home-grown Chandrayaan-1—was conceived and built in association with EADS Astrium, the European satellite major, it was the first complete commercial satellite built by ISRO for a foreign client. Antrix is tight-lipped about the size of the deal or its share, but insiders said the contract was worth about Rs 350 crore, or close to Chandrayaan’s cost.

As the W2M was shipped, K.R. Sridhara Murthi, Antrix’s Managing Director, had told Business Today: “Today is a great day for us. For the first time, India has shipped a commercial satellite for export.”

The outside world had little clue about W2M, but Antrix does not mind. It is now putting together another satellite, Hylas, for a UKbased client, even as ISRO works on Chandrayaan-2. “Work on Chandrayaan-2 will start soon… It will contain an orbiter, a lander to soft-land in the moon and a rover to pick up samples and analyse them,” says Nair, adding: “Mars is our next challenge.”

On the edge
ISRO’s edge so far has been its ability to offer the cheapest platform for launching “light” satellites, even as it faces tough competition from global players in all its segments—satellite building and launching, and offering transponders on its satellites.

“We are not operating in isolation. We have adopted the cooperate-and-compete approach... that is how we have to do business and survive,’’ says Murthi. Antrix is not ready to spell out its rates vis-a-vis those of the competition, but Murthi says: “We can be 30 per cent cheaper if we can have an end-to-end value addition—from design to delivery of service.” And that has not happened yet.

Antrix is not the only one reaping gains. India’s private sector has latched on to the subcontracts from the space programme. The domestic industry, apart from meeting 30-35 per cent of ISRO’s orders for components and services, also gets orders from Antrix worth 20-30 per cent of its annual revenue, which is expected to be Rs 940crore in 2008-09. For example, the Rs 100-crore deep-space network built by the public sector Electronics Corporation of India (ECIL) on Bangalore’s outskirts, had components built by many others, including private sector Indian companies.

Apart from majors like ECIL or Godrej, ISRO’s activities have helped scores of medium-scale industries like Avasarala Technologies in Bangalore and Astra Microwave Products and MTAR, both in Hyderabad. “Over the last two years, we have got orders worth Rs 25 crore each from ISRO, and I think the orders are only going to rise in the coming years,” says B. Malla Reddy, MD & CEO of the listed Astra, which supplies transmit/ receive (TR) modules for remote sensing satellites, automatic weather stations and C-band and Ku-band receivers.

Avasarala, which supplies heat pipes for payload structural panels, is moving up the value chain. “We are thinking of migrating into total assembly of structural panels,” says T.T. Mani, MD & CEO of Avasarala, which hopes to end the year with revenues of Rs 200 crore, up Rs 48 crore over last year’s figure.

Growth trajectory
Antrix reported revenues of Rs 940 crore and a profit after tax of Rs 168 crore in 2007-08, an increase of 41 per cent and 60 per cent, respectively, on the corresponding figures for the previous year. “Antrix is an amazing success story. It was started with equity of just Rs 1 crore in 1994, and you can see where it is now,” says S.V. Ranganath, Special Secretary (Finance), in the Department of Space.

U. Sankar, author of The Economics of India’s Space Programme, notes that ISRO’s market opportunities lie in, among others, the launch of small satellites in polar orbits. “Its unit launch cost is lower because of its learning-bydoing approach, lower cost of technical manpower and lower risk,” says the honorary professor at the Madras School of Economics.

S.R. Kulkarni, Professor of Astronomy & Planetary Sciences at Caltech, says the future of the space business and space science is quite bright. “India need not travel the same path as the pioneers or the new entrants, but can blaze a distinct trail by building on her strengths,”’ he says. (see next page) As for Chandrayaan itself, the possibilities for commercial gains are quite distant. “Right now, it will be premature to talk of the commercial spin-offs from Chandrayaan-1. But at a later stage we will think of possible launch opportunities for any private initiatives for moon probes and lunar missions. Like, for instance, small satellites, which will be launched either through private enterprises or through space agencies,’’ says Murthi.
Last edited by Rahul M on 08 Nov 2008 09:04, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: edited link format. no need to to use the "url" code, it screws up the "automatically parse URLs" option AND messes up the page format.

SSridhar
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 08 Nov 2008 21:03

Posting in the right thread. .

Singha wrote:from ISRO website, the specs of RISAT look inferior in res and band is C-band.

The satellite will involve the development of a multi-mode, multi polarisation, agile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) operating in C-band and providing 3-50 metre spatial resolution. Various modes of operations such as ScanSAR, strip and spot will provide images with coarse, fine and high spatial resolutions. RISAT will also involve the development of related algorithms and data products to serve the user community in many applications of relevance to the country.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 08 Nov 2008 21:04

Singha wrote:would the new RISAT be useful in mapping out military targets through cloud cover?

it is noteworthy the germans already have a 5 sat SAR-LUPE constellation up there
with 50cm-1m res.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAR_Lupe

SAR-Lupe's "high-resolution" images can be acquired day or night through all weather conditions. The first satellite was launched from Plesetsk on 19 December 2006, about a year after the intended launch date; four more satellites were launched at roughly six-month intervals, and the entire system achieved full operational readiness on 22 July 2008.[2]

The five satellites operate in three 500-kilometre orbits in planes roughly sixty degrees apart. They use an X-band radar with a three-metre dish, providing a resolution of about 50 centimetres over a frame size of 5.5km on a side ('spotlight mode', in which the satellite rotates to keep the dish pointed at a single target) or about one metre over a frame size of 8km x 60km ('stripmap mode', in which the satellite maintains a fixed orientation over the earth and the radar image is formed simply by the satellite's motion along its orbit). Response time for imaging of a given area is ten hours or less. Thales Alenia Space provided the core of the Synthetic Aperture Radar sensors

Rahul M
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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 08 Nov 2008 22:21

guys, HELP WANTED !
anyone has a graphic showing the stage separation of a rocket as it injects the sat ? the kind we see regularly in magazines like frontline when sats are launched.

not the one in BR page http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/SPACE/Images/fliprof.jpg
but a 3d one in colour that I remember having seen a number of times.
TIA.

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby p_saggu » 08 Nov 2008 22:28

The W2M satellite arrived in French Guyana in this colorful container

Image

The W2M satellite payload for Arianespace’s upcoming Ariane 5 mission touched down today in French Guiana, arriving in a brightly-colored shipping container that underscores the Indian origins of its spacecraft bus. :D

The W2M satellite is unloaded from an An-124 cargo jetliner at Cayenne’s Rochambeau International Airport in French Guiana. Its protective shipping container carries the colors of India’s flag: deep saffron at the top, white in the middle and dark green at the bottom. The flag’s central symbol – representing a wheel of law – is replaced on the shipping container with a view of the Earth, which is circled by an orbiting telecommunications satellite.


At 3460 Kgs is this the heaviest satellite that ISRO's ever built?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby Raj » 09 Nov 2008 00:16

wasu wrote:Moon dust & hard business

http://businesstoday.digitaltoday.in/in ... 2&Itemid=1

......



From Wasu's above link
As for the GSLV Mark III, ISRO officials say that three important ground tests will be conducted some time next year and the first launch will happen by 2010 end or early 2011.

ISRO is also working on a re-usable launch vehicle. Re-use of the various stages of PSLV and GSLV will reduce launch costs dramatically. “The re-usable launch vehicle is still in a concept stage. Over the next two years, we will need to do demonstration projects… and expect one to be ready to use in 2020 or so,” Nair says.



If India hopes to put an Indian in space by 2015, then India needs a man rated heavy lift launcher of putting about 7500 kg into space.

If India hopes to put an Indian on Moon and safely bring back to earth by 2020 then we need Rockets with similar capability of Saturn V.
The US Saturn V(moon rocket) had a capability to lift about 118,000 kgs into LEO and 47,000 kgs into lunar vicinity.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_V
Unless our launcher capability increases immensely, I do not know how India can put Indian on the moon.

Is Nair talking about Avatar?

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Re: Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby vavinash » 09 Nov 2008 00:54

Manned mission will use GLSV-II not III. It will most likely put 1-2 cosmonauts in space not an entire platoon.


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