International Aerospace Discussion

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shiv
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby shiv » 28 Jun 2009 20:36




Thanks

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v326/adityam/Paris/Le Bourget/?action=view&current=paris_small045.jpg

Great picture of the F-35's power plant

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby PratikDas » 28 Jun 2009 22:57


Doesn't the gap between the intake blades look rather narrow? Or is it some sort of a movable shutter?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 29 Jun 2009 08:17


Drevin
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Drevin » 30 Jun 2009 17:24

swiss plane that flies 100% on solar energy :!: night and day :!:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-10274838-76.html?tag=newsCategoryArea.4

Any military applications for this folks :?:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 30 Jun 2009 18:03

Drevin wrote:swiss plane that flies 100% on solar energy :!: night and day :!:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-10274838-76.html?tag=newsCategoryArea.4

Any military applications for this folks :?:


There is one that is built by Rutan IIRC - that is actually multiple solar planes that join up (all by themselves) - fold at these joints to maximize exposure to the sun (so at sunrise/sunset, they form a V/W).

Never need to come down supposedly.

Proposing them as UAVs.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Arun_S » 30 Jun 2009 21:46

Good that India bailed out of this while China sunk in $$$ into it.

Galileo : EU satnav project ill-conceived: auditors court

by Staff Writers
Brussels (AFP) June 29, 2009
The EU's much delayed satellite navigation network project Galileo has been ill-prepared and badly managed, the European Court of Auditors charged Monday.

"The programme lacked a strong strategic sponsor and supervisor: the (European) Commission did not proactively direct the programme, leaving it without a helmsman," the auditors' court opined after carrying out an audit of the ill-starred project.

As well as the commission -- the EU's executive arm -- the 27 member states came into criticism for promoting their own industries first and foremost.

"Owing to their different programme expectations, member states intervened in the interest of their national industries and held up decisions. The compromises made led to implementation problems, delays and, in the end, to cost overruns," the official auditors declared.

The 30-satellite network is meant to challenge the dominance of the US-built Global Positioning System (GPS), which is widely used in navigation devices in vehicles and ships. The EU aims to have it up in space by 2013.

The EU has struggled to secure financing for the project's budget, originally 3.4 billion euros (5.4-billion dollars) -- and has had to release unused funds from the bloc's massive agricultural budget.

The audit examined the factors in the failure of the concession process and for delays and cost overruns of technological development.

It concluded that the original public-private partnership plan was "inadequately prepared and conceived" not to mention "unrealistic".

The Galileo Joint Undertaking -- a body set up in 2003 and scrapped in 2006 -- was given the task of supervising Galileo's technological development activities but "was seriously constrained by governance issues, an incomplete budget, delays and the industrial organisation of the development and validation phase," the report said.

If the Galileo project is to succeed, the European Commission "must considerably strengthen its management of the programmes," the Court of Auditors said.

"Finally, should the EU resolve to engage in other large infrastructure programmes, the commission must ensure it has access to the appropriate management tools," it added.

The report makes grim reading for the European Commission not least because the Galileo programme was the first of its kind.

"We acknowledge that there were delays and cost overruns," a European Commission spokesman said.

"In hindsight things could always be done better... but we are happy to accept the recommendations of the court in order to be able to get on with the project," he added.

While unable to quantify the cost or time overruns, he said the first operational satellites should be launched next year.

The auditors' report said that the stalling of negotiations with private sector companies in 2007 means "technological development has been set back five years".

While test satellites have been launched none of Galileo's 30 operational satellites have been put in space yet.


The project was the first close collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the commission on such a large space programme, the first industrial programme to be managed at European level and the first time the commission was to participate in a public private partnership scheme.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 01 Jul 2009 01:53

Israel and Kazakhstan sign space technology deal
According to the agreement, Kazakhstan will purchase satellites and surveillance technology from Israel.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 01 Jul 2009 01:57

A post-launch examination of the Unha-2
By David Wright and Theodore A. Postol
* The launch vehicle North Korea tested on April 5, the Unha-2, represents a significant advance over North Korea's previous launchers.
* In particular, it would have the capability to reach the continental United States with a payload of 1 ton or more if Pyongyang modified it for use as a ballistic missile.
* However, if key Unha-2's components were acquired from Russia and elsewhere, North Korea's domestic missile development program may be much more limited than commonly assumed.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Shameek » 01 Jul 2009 20:55

What supersonic liiks like

F-22 raptor during exercise Northern Edge 2009. Interesting phenomenon.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 02 Jul 2009 03:24

Ariane launches giant satellite
The world's biggest commercial telecommunications satellite has been put into orbit by an Ariane 5 rocket. The TerreStar-1 satellite - which weighs just under seven tonnes - will provide next-generation mobile voice, video and data services to North America.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 02 Jul 2009 06:05

shameekg wrote:What supersonic liiks like

F-22 raptor during exercise Northern Edge 2009. Interesting phenomenon.


[youtube]_0hlJm6EbSw&NR=1[/youtube]



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby p_saggu » 02 Jul 2009 23:54

Is this phenomenon similar to the Agni-3 image launch with the air puff? Or did the Agni-3 just vent some gas just as it launched from the vent near the nose cone?
Image
The Apollo 11 Saturn V lifted off with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., on July 16, 1969, from Kennedy Space Center, en route to the first moon landing. A vapor cone seen in the image is thought to be related to the breaking of the sound barrier, in a phenomenon called a PrandtlñGlauert singularity. Credit: NASA

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby mandrake » 03 Jul 2009 00:03

p_saggu wrote:Is this phenomenon similar to the Agni-3 image launch with the air puff? Or did the Agni-3 just vent some gas just as it launched from the vent near the nose cone?


different imho

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 03 Jul 2009 05:01

comment from the ayatollah blog
There seems to be this “Lego” philosophy in vogue these days; where it is assumed that rocket stages across different families of designs are interchangeble blocks to be stacked and unstacked as fancy will take. I believe history suggest this not to be the case and rocket science not quite yet so trivial. I find the diameter of the Unha-2 second stage to be intriguing but I find the conclusion that because it’s roughly ~1.5m and thus must be the SS-N-6 to be an extreme case of dicto simpliciter.


And if it is 1m and solid fueled, it must be a Scout!

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Juggi G » 04 Jul 2009 14:39


Austin
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 04 Jul 2009 20:01

Manned Prototype of Mig UCAV ( image via Matej )
Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 04 Jul 2009 20:04

p_saggu wrote:Is this phenomenon similar to the Agni-3 image launch with the air puff? Or did the Agni-3 just vent some gas just as it launched from the vent near the nose cone?


Cloud near the RV was due to venting of nozzle from RV which carries liquid engine/HAM.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Paul » 05 Jul 2009 00:41

singha, wrt your comment on the bouncing bombs....the royal navy used this to extend range in the 19th century.

I just finished watching "The Dambusters", story of the 617 sqdn who used bouncing bombs to breach the great dams on the ruhr. A very well made movie...shows how the dogged determination of a scientsist (Barnes Wallis) took a hare brained idea to fruition. I had read about Barnes wallis and the 617 sqdn's exploits in the book section of the reader's digest in 1982.

A must see for all aviation lovers. This movie IMO is more tightly scripted than other similar movies like "30 seconds over tokyo" or "Sink the Bismarck".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnes_Wallis

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Sanjay M » 05 Jul 2009 02:32




Quickly, let us call Spielberg, so that he can announce the storyline for his next Indiana Jones movie!


Gerard
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 07 Jul 2009 04:24


Samay
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Samay » 08 Jul 2009 23:48

Dont know if posted earlier
Unkil's effort to kill LCH of drdo

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Anujan » 10 Jul 2009 08:23

High-Priced Fighter Jet Has Major Shortcomings
The United States' premier fighter jet, the Lockheed Martin F-22, has recently required more than 30 hours of maintenance for every hour in the skies

The aircraft's radar-absorbing metallic skin is the principal cause of its maintenance troubles, with unexpected shortcomings -- such as vulnerability to rain and other abrasion

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Samay » 10 Jul 2009 17:12

Anujan wrote:
High-Priced Fighter Jet Has Major Shortcomings
The United States' premier fighter jet, the Lockheed Martin F-22, has recently required more than 30 hours of maintenance for every hour in the skies

The aircraft's radar-absorbing metallic skin is the principal cause of its maintenance troubles, with unexpected shortcomings -- such as vulnerability to rain and other abrasion

It seems as if they are finding excuses to limit the nos,.
Wonder how much maintenance pakfa will require if it is of same league.
It will be interesting to find how many f22s usaf will decide so as to ensure battle readiness , . This 1:30 ratio will make things very difficult for them in war.
or may be this report is a spoof.!!!!

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 11 Jul 2009 02:14


Gerard
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 12 Jul 2009 18:31

Military mega-lasers are too hot to handle
HIGH-ENERGY laser weapons have been hailed as the future of anti-missile defence, but they may be further from being battle-ready than military chiefs hoped.

In recent tests, several prototypes have suffered serious damage to their optics at intensities well below the expected levels of tolerance. "Optical damage has been quietly alarming upper management in most major programmes," Sean Ross of the US Air Force Research Laboratory in New Mexico told a meeting of the Directed Energy Professional Society in Newton, Massachusetts, last week. There are also big problems managing the waste heat generated by high-intensity beams.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 13 Jul 2009 14:44


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Vinito » 13 Jul 2009 14:50



isnt this the german discovery during the end of WW2 that led to US research into blended wing body design....?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Gerard » 13 Jul 2009 17:38

Chicago Rules
Have you noticed the strangely heavy outbreak of bad F-22 news recently? The timing is convenient for F-22 foes; they face a do-or-die Senate vote this week, so any negativity is welcome. The bad news started Thursday, when USMC Gen. James Cartwright, JCS vice chairman, told a Senate panel about a new Joint Staff-led study—heretofore unknown—validating DOD's plan for 187 F-22s (not 243, USAF's requirement). Next came a punch from US theater commanders; as General Cartwright told it, they didn't want more F-22s as much as they wanted more EW versions of the Navy F/A-18. On Friday came a tiresome Washington Post gut job, titled, "Premier US Fighter Jet Has Major Shortcomings" (more on which below.) Among the story’s sources: "confidential Pentagon test results," "Pentagon officials," "internal [Pentagon] documents," "The Defense Department," "a Defense Department critic of the plane," "other skeptics inside the Pentagon," "Pentagon audits," "two Defense officials with access to internal reports." Hmmm. Do you think DOD might have planted this story? Others have watched this spectacle and drawn their own conclusions.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 13 Jul 2009 23:20

Austin wrote:9K317 Buk M1/M2


In this picture it shows five air carfts on the launcher. Wonder if it means 5 ACs has been brought down by it. Perhaps targets?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby p_saggu » 14 Jul 2009 03:45

Image


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Philip » 15 Jul 2009 14:27

Oooh! Doesn't Hitler's bomber make you drool. It is so modern even today and the "Batwing" tail detail is the cat's whiskers!

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 15 Jul 2009 20:45


Arun_S
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Arun_S » 16 Jul 2009 04:35

Russian Angara launcher morph as S.Korean SLV.

People will recall Angara was to compete w/PSLV


2 stage launcher.
The heafty russian (Angara) booster is 140 tonne and the Korean kick stage atop that is just 1000 Kg, and that puts 100Kg payload in LEO.

http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/kslv.htm
Orbital launch vehicle. Country: Korea South. Status: Development.

South Korean launch vehicle family. Originally they were to be of completely indigenous design; but in 2005 it was now announced that they would use the (in-development, unflown) Russian Angara booster module as the basis. The program, like that of the Angara, was subject to continuous funding shortages and schedule delays.

Manufacturer: KARI . Version:

KSLV-I. Status: In development. Manufacturer's Designation: Korea Space Launch Vehicle-I.

In 2005 it was announced that the KSLV-I would not fly until 2007. It was now a completely different vehicle, consisting of a first stage derived from the Russian Angara launch vehicle, and a solid propellant second stage of South Korean manufacture.

It had been decided to develop a first stage in collaboration with Russia, based on the still-in-development Angara launcher. This would be an order-of-magnitude larger than the original KSLV-I design. The first test of this vehicle, still designated KSLV-I, was moved to 2007 and would consist of a launch of the first stage with a South Korean solid rocket motor kick stage to place the small 100-kg satellite into orbit.

KARI oversaw basic system design, ystem management of the launch vehicle, and basic design of the ground equipment. International cooperation plans called for joint development of the launch vehicle and interface design for the 100 kg Science Satellite 2.

LEO Payload: 100 kg (220 lb). to: 300 km Orbit. at: 38.00 degrees. Liftoff Thrust: 1,910.000 kN (429,380 lbf). Total Mass: 140,000 kg (300,000 lb). Core Diameter: 3.90 m (12.70 ft). Total Length: 30.00 m (98.00 ft).

* Stage1: 1 x Angara UM. Gross Mass: 140,000 kg (300,000 lb). Empty Mass: 10,000 kg (22,000 lb). Motor: 1 x RD-191. Thrust (vac): 2,094.700 kN (470,907 lbf). Isp: 338 sec. Burn time: 300 sec. Length: 25.00 m (82.00 ft). Diameter: 2.90 m (9.50 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene.

* Stage2: 1 x KSR-1. Gross Mass: 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). Empty Mass: 100 kg (220 lb). Thrust (vac): 86.200 kN (19,379 lbf). Isp: 250 sec. Burn time: 25 sec. Length: 4.70 m (15.40 ft). Diameter: 0.42 m (1.37 ft). Propellants: Solid.


Note that S.Korea does not consider N.Korean launch of spacecraft as legitimate while its own program is divinely kosher. :rotfl:

South Korea to launch its own space rocket this month

Seoul (AFP) July 14, 2009
South Korea will this month launch a satellite using its own rocket as part of a drive to join Asia's space race, officials said Tuesday.

An experimental satellite weighing 100 kilograms (220 pounds) will be launched into a low earth orbit on July 30 from the Naro Space Centre in Goheung, 475 kilometres (300 miles) south of Seoul.

"It will mark the first time that South Korea will launch a satellite from its own territory, using its own launch vehicle," Park Jeong-Joo, director of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute, told journalists.

Only nine other countries have their own launch vehicles.

The launch will come around four months after Seoul's rival North Korea in April fired a long-range rocket for what it called a satellite launch.

Other nations said no satellite was detected in orbit and the exercise was a disguised test of a long-range Taepodong missile.

The United Nations Security Council condemned the launch and tightened sanctions, prompting Pyongyang to quit a nuclear disarmament deal and to stage its second atomic test.

Park said that launch was a covert missile test. "We can't put the North's rocket launch on a parallel with ours, which is purely for scientific and peaceful purposes," he said.

South Korea, under a pact with the United States, is restricted to possessing military missiles with a maximum range of 300 km.

The two-stage rocket was developed at a cost of some 500 billion won (388 million dollars) through cooperation with Russia, which jointly built its first stage, Park said.

"We experienced a lot of difficulties in securing technology cooperation from developed countries," Park said without elaborating.

"Russia turned out to be the most cooperative and willing partner in transferring technology and it has highly developed space technology," he added.

South Korea has already launched 10 satellites using overseas launch sites and Park admitted this was a cheaper option.

"However, if a country has to rely on foreign countries for the most fundamental space transportation systems, it would be at a big disadvantage in terms of technology protection and security," he said.

The 33-metre-high rocket is scheduled to lift off between 4:40 pm and 6:37 pm on July 30, weather permitting, and fly south near Japan's Okinawa islands.

Its nose fairing covering the satellite, and the first stage, should fall into waters off the Philippines 230 seconds after launch.

And 540 seconds after launch, the satellite should enter an elliptical orbit 300-1,500 km above the earth.

South Korea in November 2007 announced a plan to launch a lunar orbiter by 2020 and send a probe to the moon five years after that. It unveiled the project one month after China launched its first lunar orbiter and two months after Japan did.

In April last year Seoul sent its first astronaut into space -- aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 16 Jul 2009 09:52

not sure about this but the legendary Tsagi @ ramenskoye :twisted: seems to deal in both aero and hydrodynamics..potentially indicating it works on basic problems in both air and naval areas before ToT to the more product oriented shops like sukhoi or rubin.

http://www.tsagi.ru/eng/

these are the people who came up with the common template for the Mig29 and Su27+...

they probably still attract some of the best scientific talent internally from Russia.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 16 Jul 2009 09:55

NRao wrote:In this picture it shows five air carfts on the launcher. Wonder if it means 5 ACs has been brought down by it. Perhaps targets?


Perhaps simulated confirmed SAM kills in exercise

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Arunkumar » 16 Jul 2009 11:52

Singha wrote:http://www.tsagi.ru/eng/
these are the people who came up with the common template for the Mig29 and Su27+...

Can some gurus enlighten about the physics/aerodynamics behind the shape of the su27+/mig-29. To be more specific almost all double engined fighters have their engines 'inside' the fuselage while in case of the above two they appear to be 'hanging' from the body. Apart from giving a stunning look how does it help aerodynamically.?


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