Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby BijuShet » 06 Nov 2009 03:49

After Zardari's failure to proceed with the NRO bill it seems his job may be on the line.
Article in The News : Zardari violated Constitution: legal experts
Thursday, November 05, 2009 - By Usman Manzoor

ISLAMABAD: President Asif Ali Zardari will either have to step down as a director of Park Lane Estates (Pvt) Limited or resign as the head of the state because keeping both positions is a violation of the Constitution, say legal experts.
...
Senator S M Zafar said that if the president was holding the office of director of a company then the second half of Article 43(1) of the Constitution applies, which amounts to misconduct. He mentioned that the misconduct could only be rectified by the impeachment of the president.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Amber G. » 06 Nov 2009 03:59

News about shooting at Ft. Hood
Let us see how long before a Paki connection appears....

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby ramana » 06 Nov 2009 04:02

Amber G. wrote:News about shooting at Ft. Hood
Let us see how long before a Paki connection appears....


My thoughts too! the facility was processing/readiness center for troops onwards to Iraq and afghanistan per Lt Gen Cone, the commandant. So there will be a Paki connection only matter of time.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby ashkrishna » 06 Nov 2009 04:09

Amber G. wrote:News about shooting at Ft. Hood
Let us see how long before a Paki connection appears....


the name malik suggests sub-continental origin...but i may be wrong....

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Anujan » 06 Nov 2009 04:11

About the glorious Rahe-Na-Ijjat operation

http://forty2d.wordpress.com/2009/11/06 ... is-at-war/

the Army-waaley definitely knew who the Taliban were. They warned them in advance about the house-to-house search, and all of them escaped,” my friend said. “We also heard about the search, and hid all the weapons that we had.”....They took away all the gold and jewellery,” my friend said. “We hadn’t particularly hidden them; we’d just hidden our weapons. We never thought that the Army-waalahs were robbers of this calibre!”


“You see this Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) tent right outside the camp?” my friend at the Swabi camp asked us. “They stop all aid trucks and take everything. They sell off most of the things. The rest they distribute from their own camp, pretending that this aid is from the JI. Government aid is also being channeled through them. They think this will make us love the JI. Haha!”


the reason Karachi has been relatively peaceful up until now, despite constant attacks in Lahore, Islamabad and Peshawar, is that most of the major Taliban commanders are hiding here. ‘They know that Karachi is the only place for them to hide right now. If they attack Karachi, the only other place for them to go is in the sea,’

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby BijuShet » 06 Nov 2009 04:13

One of the shooters possibly identified as Major Malik Nadal Hasan.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby saip » 06 Nov 2009 05:28

Nidal Hasan

Grad School: Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences F. Edward Herbert School Of Medicine - Bethesda MD
Year Completed: 2003

Medical, Osteopathic, or Podiatric Post Grad School

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Cant find the paki connection. hey you will never know.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby shiv » 06 Nov 2009 06:57

ashkrishna wrote:Considering the current situation in pakiland, which future scenario will be strategically beneficial for us SDRE's?

1) A continued state of turmoil in pakistan with a stable equilibrium between the PA and the various species of dissidents it faces. i.e. more tactically brilliant victories for the PA and the occasional IED mubarak here and there.

2) A fragmented land of the pure i.e many lands of pure beebals , which gives a geographical legitimacy to existing tribal aspirations. ( this would be the outcome of a peel-e-banana strategy). Ofcourse, in this case you have a panjabistan with even more vehement anti-indianism sharing a long border with us.


I think only option 2 can possibly work in future.

India and Pakistan have many similarities. I believe Indians have (historically, less so nowadays) looked at cultural similarities while Pakistanis have tended to point out similarities between India and Pakistan in center-state relations.

Both India and Pakistan inherited parts of old India that consisted of many fragments with tribal and ethnic differences, a different history and regional pride. In both cases a "central government" was formed that sought to unify diverse parts.

The Indian route was to allow freedom for states to choose their on paths and elect their own leaders and within a broader framework where the center was primarily responsible for foreign policy and external security. If the people of a state chose an oddball path - it was not in the power of the Indian center to change that much but the constitution provided the framework for central governance in some cases. The states were allowed to have "state police forces" but the center managed to retain a loyal and disciplined armed forces.

Pakistan came into existence assuming that the Islam glue would bind everyone together and that the ethnic pride and history of the peripheries could be suppressed on the basis of Islamic pride. I think all the mussalmaaans who believed this were misled by the mussalmaan pride that is easier to hold on to when kafirs are in execss and you don;t have to deal with individual mussalmaan ethnic and culture issues. The British too helped to lead the Indian mussalmaan crowd up the garden path by putting them on a pedestal where white man praised the kaalu musslmaans for being fierce and "laayal" to Islam and made them believe that Islam was the only glue that human societies need. This was absolutely wrong and I think Arabs and others understand that. But Pakis have not figured it out.

The new Pakistan was beset by fission - Bengali, Sindhi and Mohajir. NWFP and FATA were not a problem then because they were left ungoverned. Pakis tried to "cover up" the internal fissures first by giving power to the Army and trying to channel national hate towards "Anti-Islamic" India. So while India remains hated, that fact has not helped Pakis to unite any more. They hate each other too.

India must befriend some ethnic identities in Pakistan and help them to govern themselves with dignity. Doing that on the Afghan side of the Durand line is a good idea - but that is a big threat to the Paki army and elite. The army and elite have now degenerated into a gang of criminals with wealth and power far faar more than any fictional James Bond or Superman villain.

But the fact remains that Indian "unity" is dependent on allowing individual identities to exist within a constitutional framework and not suppressing them for a single "core identity" like Pakistan sought to do using Islam as unifier and suppressor of other identities. That is a mistake India must not make.
Last edited by shiv on 06 Nov 2009 07:20, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Amber G. » 06 Nov 2009 07:19

Amber G. wrote:News about shooting at Ft. Hood
Let us see how long before a Paki connection appears....

Here is xpost from other thread:
Amber G. wrote:From Telegraph.uk
Nidal Malik Hasan 'said Muslims should rise up'
He was making outlandish comments condemning our foreign policy and claimed Muslims had the right to rise up and attack Americans," Col Lee told Fox News.
"He said Muslims should stand up and fight the aggressor and that we should not be in the war in the first place." He said that Maj Hasan said he was "happy" when a US soldier was killed in an attack on a military recruitment centre in Arkansas in June. An American convert to Islam was accused of the shootings.
Col Lee said that other officers had told him that Maj Hasan had said "maybe people should strap bombs on themselves and go to Time Square" in New York.
He said he was aware that the major had been subject to "name calling" during heated arguments with other officers.


Pakis are so predictable...!

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Satya_anveshi » 06 Nov 2009 07:47

Question is, Does that confirm that the Paki GHQ attack was planned and executed by the Americans that some of the Paki folks are compelled to respond in a similar manner?

If true and if that incident(GHQ attack) has p!ssed these guys so much, then god forbid, Americans are going to get screwed in Afghanistan while at the same time, Americans will find it tough to hand over any role to Taliban, who are just proxy for Pak Army.
Last edited by Satya_anveshi on 06 Nov 2009 08:44, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby chilarai » 06 Nov 2009 08:05

regarding the fragmentation of pakistan , I think that is the only somewhat good end result for India.
While Bangladesh is no friend, had it remained pakistan, it would have meant more headaches to us than currently.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Satya_anveshi » 06 Nov 2009 08:25

Wonder how Paki media is covering this story of US Fort Hood attack especially urdu news papers and in some remote corners of Pakistan (NWFP).

Last time around Taliban claimed the attack on the immigration check post, not sure whether they said anything about this one.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby sunilUpa » 06 Nov 2009 08:26

saip wrote:Nidal Hasan

Grad School: Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences F. Edward Herbert School Of Medicine - Bethesda MD
Year Completed: 2003

Medical, Osteopathic, or Podiatric Post Grad School

Last Updated 10/13/2009Psychiatry
WRAMC
Washington, DC USA
Year Residency Completed: 2007


Cant find the paki connection. hey you will never know.


He is of Jordanian origin.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 08:54

Pact with Pakistan: Nov, 1959
Replying to a question, he {Prime Minister Nehru} said that he could not say offhand the extent of the area in the Patharia forest that would be given by India to Pakistan.

From the book, 'The Bengal Borderland'
The most intense dispute occurred in a forest in Sylhet, the district of Assam that had been cut in two by the Boundary Commission. Western Sylhet joined Pakistan and Eastern Sylhet joined India. The new border ran straight through the Patharia forest in central Sylhet, and this would be a bone of contention for years to come. The forest had been under the administration of the Assam Forest Department. It formed the border between two thanas but had never been surveyed. Whether the border ran along the eastern boundary of the forest (as Pakistan claimed) had never been of much concern to anyone. Now it became an important international issue, not least because the area was thought to contain natural gas and oil. Clashes began to occur, forest guards were abducted and territorial claims were emphasized by constructing and destroying forestry outposts. . . . In 1948, it was put on the agenda of the Inter Dominion Conference at new delhi; the resulting Delhi Agreement proposed 'interim agreements' to defuse the tension and put it forward as one of the four border disputes to be adjudicated by the Bagge Tribunal {Algot Bagge, former member of the Supree Court of Sweden was Chairman and two High Court judges, Mr. C.Aiyar and Mr. Shahabuddin were appointed to the panel by India and Pakistan respectively} . . . and the Bagge Tribunal began its work in December 1949. In early 1950, the Tribunal decided that the Boundary Commission's zigzag line through the forest was the correct border. . . . The dispute dragged on and occassionally led to cross-border shootings. Further high-level meetings proved fruitless until a compromise was reached in 1959; since then the Patharia forest has been enshrined in the ninth amendment to the Constitution of India

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Vivek_A » 06 Nov 2009 10:55

Army brigadier, driver injured in Islamabad gun-attack

ISLAMABAD: Gunmen injured an army brigadier and his driver in Islamabad on Friday, as they opened fire on their vehicle, sources told DawnNews television.

Brigadier Sohail and his driver came under attack by unknown assailants in the I-8/4 sector of the capital, the television channel said.

SSP Islamabad Police Tahir Malik told DawnNews that both the brigadier and his driver have been shifted to a hospital and are now in stable condition.

‘We have collected a pistol from the site of the attack and are looking for further evidence,’ Malik said.

‘Unknown attackers were waiting for Brigadier Sohail to leave his house and opened fire at his vehicle as soon as it entered the main road,’ eye witnesses said.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby rkirankr » 06 Nov 2009 10:59

^^

What is this with only Brigadiers being attacked individually. No more no less. No karnal saabs, no jernails saabs hain. Why the obsession with Brigadiers for the purest of the pure?

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby sum » 06 Nov 2009 11:00

Wow....Brigadiers seem to be the latest endangered species in Pakland...

Hope they now cower in dark corners like they had wanted the SDRE to all this while.

Karma is truly a b@tch.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Vivek_A » 06 Nov 2009 11:02

TFT is out and Pakis are wet dreaming Kashmir again

RAPE wannabe

There is hope!

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has visited Indian-held Kashmir and talked of crafting an internal solution. Some of the steps outlined are heartening: withdrawal of 15,000 troops, soft changes to raise the quality of life of Kashmiris, and talks with militant groups who renounce violence.

His speech obviously points to the likelihood of resumption in the near future of the Pakistan-India dialogue. Indeed, if Prime Minister Singh’s message of internal normalisation in Indian-held Kashmir was to be combined with serious talks with Pakistan, the two sides could well clinch a deal.

We are told that Pakistan and India were very close to just this kind of a deal in 2007 but that the moment may have passed now and the opportunity lost. This is an incorrect assessment. The prognosis is not as bleak. Few realise that events surrounding the Kashmir dispute have been moving – for some time – in a manner that makes the situation ‘ripe’ for resolution.

The decade of the 1990s made both sides realise that the cost of the status quo was prohibitive. Neither side had managed to achieve an all-out victory or budged from its stance. Yet, both were bleeding profusely. Moreover, at the turn of the century, as India’s foreign policy began to reassert itself in the global arena, its global aspirations were being hurt by Pakistan’s constant pricking.

For Pakistan, the ‘internationalisation’ of the dispute had taken place but there was no indication that the world was willing to do more. Indeed, September 11 led to more pressure on Pakistan to reorient its focus westward, and subsequently inward.

In essence, both sides saw a clear benefit in moving to the table. A number of intellectual developments pushed the process along as well.

For one, there was a tremendous increase in the intellectual attention paid to Kashmir. The number of proposals forwarded for resolution during the decade of the 1990s was more than three times the number in the first four decades of the conflict. Moreover, the proposals had become much more nuanced and innovative; compromise, rather than maximalist gains, was the central feature of most suggestions. Those applying their mind to the problem were no longer international bodies, third parties, or the two states involved in the dispute. After the insurgency began, a majority of the proposals came from independent experts, think tanks, NGOs, and other non-state entities predisposed to thinking in less deterministic terms. It is ideas from these quarters that spurred innovative thinking and presented formulations that could provide both sides with adequate face-savers while benefiting the Kashmiris.

The period between 1989-2002 saw a growing convergence on the key pillars of any solution: the idea of ‘autonomy’ emerged as a clear favourite. Supplemental elements that saw strong support included the involvement of Kashmiris in any negotiations, soft borders on the LoC, and demilitarisation of Kashmir. It is these ideas from which General Musharraf’s formula emanated; it was not exactly an ‘innovation’ on his part, as many saw it.

Finally, the general framework for an agreement as outlined in these intellectual exercises (and brought out in the Musharraf formula) had found support not only in Islamabad and New Delhi but also among the dissidents in Kashmir. The Pakistan government had approached Kashmiri parties/groups that have always looked to Islamabad for support and mainstream ones had signed off on the general direction of progress.

All of the above factors still remain intact. This gives one much hope.

Literature on problem solving in conflict situations suggests that getting an agreeable formula is one of the two major components required to tip the balance in favour of a resolution. And in Kashmir’s case, common understanding on issues listed above has come about organically, after a prolonged period of intellectual debate. This itself implies sustainability. In fact, the reason the deal fell through last time was not due to a lack of understanding on what to do with Kashmir but the absence of the second component highlighted in problem solving debates, i.e. political will.

Even on that count, the two sides are better placed now. The Congress in India does not have to deal with intra-coalition challenges to the extent that it had last time round. Pakistan is over the Musharraf crisis and the government, unpopular as it is, is desperate to find any silver lining to present to its people. At a conceptual level, this is as close to ideal as a conflict resolution framework can get for this most intractable of disputes. The shared desirability of some sort of compromise, the essential prerequisite for ripeness of resolution, has surely set in.

Now is the time when leaders from the two countries need to stick their neck out and absorb the short-term political costs of pushing this through. Doing so will have a strong and positive effect on other contentious issues as well. This will more than reverse any near-term political fallout for governments on both sides.

Manmohan Singh’s speech has provided the opening for the two sides to take on this challenge one more time. India now needs to come back to the table and back its PM’s vision with action. Islamabad must reciprocate.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Gagan » 06 Nov 2009 11:03

rkirankr wrote:^^

What is this with only Brigadiers being attacked individually. No more no less. No karnal saabs, no jernails saabs hain. Why the obsession with Brigadiers for the purest of the pure?


My guess is two factors:
1. The Pak fauj Brigadier sahibs are the highest ranking officers who don't have the hi-fi security that Generals have.
2. The Pak fauji Brigadier sahibs of today were Major and Colonel sahibs a few years back when they were supping hookah with the purest of the pure talibs. They all know each other on a first name basis.
Now when backstabbing happens, the talibs retaliate against the ones who broke the promises made to them.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Umrao Das » 06 Nov 2009 11:03

Brigadeirs are the highest level (rung) who are in direct thick and thin of operations. Or perhaps when these brigaders were Vols and Lt Cols they did the Paki Karma which is now catching up?

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Vivek_A » 06 Nov 2009 11:05

TSPA's monica and TFT RAPE poohbah

It takes one to tango!

Ejaz Haider
The Pakistan Foreign Office has welcomed the speech by Singh and his comment that India wants to talk without preconditions. But the question is, and it's an important one, what are the two sides going to talk about and to what end?

Listing positives in India-Pakistan relations is usually an exercise either in starry-eyed idealism or misplaced optimism. Even so, let’s consider what analysts say are some positives.

India’s Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singh recently visited Indian-occupied Kashmir and offered an olive branch to Pakistan in continuation of what he is supposed to be wanting for a long time – i.e., peace with Pakistan. Reports also suggest he is prepared to talk to Pakistan without any pre-conditions. Following the decision to withdraw a division (some 15,000 troops), India has, according to some reports, begun “relocating” some elements of 39 Div from Rajouri and Poonch districts in what a military spokesperson said was a move “as per the periodical review of security situation”.

In addition, Singh listed, while speaking at the inaugural ceremony of the Anantnag-Qazigund rail link, the various measures New Delhi had taken, and is taking, to improve the quality of life in IOK (development schemes and youth-specific projects, allocation of money to various sectors, state elections, the hope to have municipal elections etc) and also cross-Line of Control to enable Kashmiris on both sides to connect. At the same time he expressed dissatisfaction over cross-LoC measures saying they were still not as people-friendly as they should be.

Another plus pointed out by observers is Singh’s greater ability today than during the period 2005-2007 to control the direction of political events at home given the fissures in both the Leftwing and Rightwing parties in India. At least in theory this is supposed to provide greater space to the Congress Party’s centrist approach, which is informed by realism rather than any ideological meme and therefore offers an innovative and flexible course of action.

In and of itself none of this can be faulted. But the context is important, as is the timing. A consideration of both may force Pakistan to be more cautious about what can be expected.

The visit was carefully timed and the speech was even more carefully drafted. Singh was supposed to visit IOK a week earlier than he did. The reason advanced was that the Union Railways Minister Mamta Banerjee was unavailable! More to the point, Singh likely wanted his IOK visit to sync with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to Pakistan. A smart move, what Singh said while in IOK was as much a signal to the US as to Pakistan. Also note that Singh is scheduled to visit the US on November 24 and then on return journey goes to Trinidad and Tobago for a 2-day CHOG (Commonwealth Heads of Government) meeting.

Meanwhile, there is a move by both sides to revive the back channel. Pakistan has already approached former Foreign Secretary Riaz Mohammad Khan for the assignment and while nothing has been finalised, Khan is reported to have accepted the role in principle.

The Pakistan Foreign Office has welcomed the speech by Singh and his comment that India wants to talk without preconditions. But the question is, and it’s an important one, what are the two sides going to talk about and to what end?

This is not nitpicking for several reasons. In 2007, after Pakistan and India exchanged non-papers on Kashmir, the two sides had come very close to finding a solution that moved away from the issue of political sovereignty and focused on the Kashmiris. The basis was former General-President Pervez Musharraf’s 4-point formula: make the LoC irrelevant; demilitarise Kashmir; give self-governance to the Kashmiris; and have a joint mechanism comprising Pakistan, India and Kashmiris to oversee the transition and make it work.

While hawks in Pakistan lambasted Musharraf for buckling under pressure from the US and India, the fact is that it was a highly creative solution which offered the two states a face-saver and, more crucially, gave Kashmiris hope for a dignified and non-violent solution.

Musharraf and Singh (as also former Pakistan foreign minister Khurshid Kasuri) are now on record as saying that the two sides were close to clinching a deal. But here the narrative changes. Singh was supposed to visit Pakistan that year. He never came. India says that was because Musharraf got into trouble at home.

This is how eminent Indian lawyer AG Noorani put it: “On May 2 last, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh revealed ‘Gen Musharraf and I had nearly reached an agreement, a non-territorial solution to all problems but then Gen Musharraf got into many difficulties with the chief justice and other forces and therefore the whole process came to a halt’.”

The narrative on the Pakistani side is that that was precisely the moment at which Singh should have come to Pakistan because the issue was not Musharraf-specific. But Singh decided not to because India was not prepared for the speed at which things had begun to move on the four-point track; also, Singh, unlike today, was under pressure from the Rightwing BJP. India was also concerned about the popularity Musharraf and his four points had notched in Kashmir across the political spectrum.

Pakistan’s former high commissioner to India, Aziz Khan, told me that he had insisted that Singh visit Pakistan and, as a precursor to movement on Kashmir, sign agreements with Pakistan on Siachen and Sir Creek. “I told Dr Singh that both were doable and it would help the two sides do more substantive things. But the Indian army would not let the government move,” Khan said.

Two things have changed since 2007. Pakistan is under more pressure internally and externally; and Singh has emerged from domestic political battles a clear winner. There is a third factor too. Following the Mumbai attacks, there is a near-consensus in India that talks must be made contingent on getting Pakistan to clean up. Some analysts also feel that it makes sense to wait and let Pakistan bleed so the negotiating space for Islamabad can be effectively reduced. Moreover, while India is amenable to US pressure for several reasons, the US does not seem decided on what its primary objective is: getting Pakistan to help it (US) stabilise Afghanistan or enhancing its (US) strategic partnership with India on the basis of the latter’s strategic objectives in the region.

It is important to note that Singh’s speech gravitated towards forward movement on the ‘humanitarian’ side of the conflict while indicating that ‘productive dialogue’ with Pakistan is only possible if Islamabad takes effective action against terrorism even though India knows the issue is far from black and white. Not surprisingly, Singh has also focused on Delhi’s internal track on Kashmir. This is a policy successive governments in India have tried to pursue. The idea is to get greater political space and legitimacy within the existing framework of Indian occupation in order to make Pakistan irrelevant to the issue. The policy so far has not succeeded.

Similarly, on “no preconditions” for talks, Singh is supposed to have said that while Delhi is prepared to talk, the “‘practical aspect’ is that there will be no headway until Islamabad brings terrorists under “effective control”. Indeed, his statements and the speech, if carefully deconstructed, reveal the hard prose of the situation, the outer poetic sheen notwithstanding (see the link to Singh’s speech). For every good sentiment expressed, there is a “but”. And the onus to do the right thing is entirely on Pakistan and its policies without any reference to what might have caused Pakistan to pursue those policies.

What does this add up to? Not much except that the two sides will begin to talk, most probably after the CHOG meeting. It will also depend on the next hearing of Hafiz Saeed’s case, against whom the government has almost no incriminating evidence. (Discussing the legalities of that case and the problem of mutual legal assistance between India and Pakistan requires another article.) Ceteris paribus, however, the two sides would revive the back channel and try some movement along the overt and covert tracks.

The question, however, is and it is the only substantive one: can they go back to that moment in 2007 when they came close to clinching a deal?

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Vivek_A » 06 Nov 2009 11:10

Such Gup

Through the roof

You’d think Bannu was the back of beyond and a real one horse town. No more, it seems. Although perpetually under curfew, land prices have sky rocketed of late and this is because the town’s successful “chip planters” are flush with dollars. These chip planters track high value targets in FATA for Drone attacks, drop the chips at the right place at the right time and an attack follows. They get their reward money and since the planters can’t think beyond Bannu, they’re buying up all the land.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby manish » 06 Nov 2009 11:14

Vivek_A wrote:TSPA's monica and TFT RAPE poohbah

It takes one to tango!

Ejaz Haider
The Pakistan Foreign Office has welcomed the speech by Singh and his comment that India wants to talk without preconditions. But the question is, and it's an important one, what are the two sides going to talk about and to what end?

Listing positives in India-Pakistan relations is usually an exercise either in starry-eyed idealism or misplaced optimism. Even so, let’s consider what analysts say are some positives.

India’s Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singh recently visited Indian-occupied Kashmir and offered an olive branch to Pakistan in continuation of what he is supposed to be wanting for a long time – i.e., peace with Pakistan. Reports also suggest he is prepared to talk to Pakistan without any pre-conditions. Following the decision to withdraw a division (some 15,000 troops), India has, according to some reports, begun “relocating” some elements of 39 Div from Rajouri and Poonch districts in what a military spokesperson said was a move “as per the periodical review of security situation”.

In addition, Singh listed, while speaking at the inaugural ceremony of the Anantnag-Qazigund rail link, the various measures New Delhi had taken, and is taking, to improve the quality of life in IOK ...
...
..

So 'IHK' is no longer in vogue?H->O?

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby V_Raman » 06 Nov 2009 11:21

shiv wrote:made them believe that Islam was the only glue that human societies need. This was absolutely wrong and I think Arabs and others understand that. But Pakis have not figured it out.


i have talked to many pakistani colleagues regarding how decentralized india is and they are totally ignorant. when i ask them about culture in pakistan, the only thing they mention "islamic culture"

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby santoshriyer » 06 Nov 2009 11:36

New Delhi: Union Home Minister P Chidambaram on Friday confirmed the presence of a Pakistani link to the terror plans of arrested Lashkar-e-Toiba men David Headley and Tahawwur Rana.

Both, US citizen Headley, 49, and Pakistani-born Canadian citizen Tahawwur Hussein Rana, 48, were arrested by the FBI in the US for plotting a major terror attack in India at the behest of Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT).

The duo have revealed that they were planning to attack National Defence College in New Delhi, two leading boarding schools located in prominent hill stations in a north Indian state and a few five star hotels in popular tourist spots.

Chidambarm while confirming the Pak angle –the first official word by the government – said, “Definitely there is a Pak link to LeT terror suspect Headley. He had visited Pak a number of times.”

He also confirmed that, at the insistence of the FBI, there have been some arrests in Pakistan in connection with the case.


“On the advice of FBI, two more persons have been arrested in Pakistan,” he said.

The development, once again, points towards Pakistan’s reluctance to act in tandem with India regarding issues concerning India’s security.

Incidentally, Pakistani media had claimed, yesterday, that Pakistan government had taken into custody the key suspect behind the plot to attack the National Defence College in New Delhi - leading to the exposure of the LeT.

As per a senior journalist from Asia Times, who was interviewed by a private news channel, Islamabad had information regarding the terror plot in advance.

Syed Shahzad said Pak officials had arrested an al Qaeda operative in September in connection with the planned attack.

However, the fact remains that Islamabad never communicated this to New Delhi.

Indian sleuths join probe

A team of Indian investigators comprising IB and RAW officials, who are in Chicago, have got permission from the US authorities to grill terror suspect David Coleman Headley, a report said yesterday.

However, there is still uncertainty whether the FBI has given permission to Indian investigators to interrogate co-conspirator Rana.

US media has reported that Headley and Rana have, during interrogation, confessed to receiving training from LeT.

The duo has reportedly revealed that they conspired with LeT commander Ejaaj Kashmiri to hit the facilities as well as employees of a Danish newspaper that published cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in 2005.

Kashmiri, closely associated with the killers of American journalist Daniel Pearl, lives in the Pak Occupied Kashmir. He currently holds the number two position in the Lashkar-e-Toiba followed by Abu Sayeed.

Kashmiri, who is also known as the next Osama-bin-Laden in LeT circles, is also a known expert in the guerrilla warfare


http://www.zeenews.com/news576588.html

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Nayak » 06 Nov 2009 12:55

Taliban captive won his release by cooking curry

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstop ... curry.html

Somen Debnath was travelling through the war-torn country as part of a five-year bicycle ride through 33 countries to promote Aids awareness.

But he was taken by armed militants – who assumed he was a spy – as he travelled through the remote region of Herat.

The Taliban kidnappers were so impressed with his banquet they decided he was ''safe'' and let him go.

Mr Debnath said: ''I cooked hot, spicy Indian food for them the way we have it in the Sunderbans in India.

Mr Debnath, who has a degree from India in zoology and fine arts, set off on his bike from his village of Sunderbans, east India, in 2004.

''At times, they beat me up in frustration for not understanding their commands. I was repeatedly asked whether I had read the Holy Koran, whether I was a Hindu, whether I was a Pakistani, why was I carrying exercise books, what notes had I taken.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 16:39

Pakistan to receive USD 500 Million from FoDP by December

That's all ? Peanuts from the TFTA friends ?

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 17:46

More information on the Headley interrogation
However, there was a difference in opinion between the Lashkar and the Al-Qaeda on this operation. While the Lashkar was keen on striking in India first, Kashmiri thought it would be better to complete the Denmark operation first. However, both outfits agreed to go ahead with the India operation first since it would grab more attention.

The one-eyed Ilyas Kashmiri, who was the founder of the 'Azad Kashmir' unit of HuJI, has become Al Qaeda now. The merger is therefore complete between the Punjabi Taliban and Al Qaeda.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 17:59

Iran accuses TSP of releasing Jundullah Chief just before suicide bombing
The deputy head of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guards charged on Friday that Pakistan arrested and then released the leader of Jundallah a few days before a suicide bombing claimed by the Sunni rebel group.

'We have precise information about the movement and places where terrorists are hiding,' the Fars news agency quoted Brigadier General Hossein Salami as saying.

'On September 26, Abdolmalek Rigi was arrested in one of the streets of Quetta but after one hour he was released following the intervention of the intelligence service of our neighbouring country,' Salami said.

'How is it possible that this guy can move freely (unless he is) under the protection of the intelligence services?' the Guards number two said, according to Fars.


But, you have to give it to the Pakistanis. Everybody knows what Pakistan is up to. Everybody knows that it is the Petri dish with the agar solution from which colonies of virulent bacteria spread and infest the world. Nobody dares to attack that nation though.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Philip » 06 Nov 2009 18:12

Apologies if posted earlier

http://in.reuters.com/article/worldNews ... 9820091102

French doubt Islamist role in Pakistan bomb-source
Mon Nov 2, 2009 11:42pm IST

PARIS (Reuters) - French secret service documents have cast doubt on a theory that Islamist militants were responsible for a 2002 bomb attack in Karachi that killed 11 French nationals, a source close to the case said on Monday.

The documents were declassified in October at the request of magistrates who will investigate the possibility that the attack was ordered by Pakistani soldiers angry with France over the non-payment of bribes tied to a defence deal.

"The documents, which are all top secret, show strong scepticism of the al Qaeda theory," the source said.

The 11 French naval engineers and technicians, who were building a French submarine, died when their coach was bombed as it left a Karachi hotel in May 2002. In all, 14 people were killed in the attack.

Pakistani authorities at first blamed Islamist militants and two men were sentenced to death for taking part, but their convictions were overturned on appeal in 2003.

The source also said the magistrates had dropped an arrest warrant for a suspected Pakistani Islamist leader, Mati Ur Rehman, whom they had been seeking as part of the investigation.

The French judges are studying the theory that the Pakistani soldiers ordered the attack after a dispute on the payment of commissions in Pakistan linked to the building of the submarine.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy dismissed the allegations as a "fable" when they surfaced in June.

The lawyer for the families of the victims, Olivier Morice, said the documents did not mention the submarine contract.

(Reporting by Thierry Leveque; writing by Anna Willard; editing by Tim Pearce)



Pak's infamous "crore commanders" handiwork,biting the hand that feeds them!

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 19:14

Pakistan is in a fix - Business Recorder Editorial
Pakistan is in a fix.{Hey, tell us something new} A substantial part of its budget for 2009-10 was to be financed from foreign sources, including the commitments made by the Friends of Pakistan (FoDP) in Tokyo on April 17, 2009 amounting to $5.513 billion. Japan and the US had announced pledges of one billion dollars each, while offers from other countries such as Australia, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Kuwait, Netherlands, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and UAE also appeared to be sizeable.

The disbursements, as is usual in such cases, were expected in stages but a major chunk was supposed to be received fairly quickly to enable the country to tide over its budget and the balance of payments crises. Most of the analysts now think that the whole exercise of requesting assistance from the FoDP was like a wild-goose chase and the authorities have no ground, at least for the time being, to prove them wrong.

An official of the Economic Affairs Division (EAD), familiar with the situation has told a newspaper that "not a single dollar has been disbursed to Pakistan as the pledges have not transformed into commitment". Asked to comment on the issue, Finance Minister Shaukat Tarin remarked that Pakistan will get 500-600 million dollars by the end of the second quarter of the current fiscal.{The second quarter ended a while ago}

Incidentally, he was also hopeful of getting the required amount during the first quarter, but Islamabad was forced to ask the IMF to bridge the $400 million gap in the absence of a response from "the friends". Obviously, Tarin would like to boost the morale of the nation by appearing to be optimistic, but the sad fact is that the FoDP meeting at Tokyo, looking from hindsight, was probably not worth the effort. :rotfl:

In fact, it may even be termed delusory because it gave birth to false hopes and encouraged the authorities to become complacent at the time of the budget when a lot of domestic efforts and a major policy shift were needed to stabilise macroeconomic indicators of the economy.

Misreading of the situation has also resulted in certain other undesirable consequences. The fiscal deficit target agreed with the IMF for the first half of FY10 has been missed by 0.2 percentage point of the GDP and the government has to request for a waiver for not meeting the performance criteria. The size of the budget deficit would have been much higher if the development expenditure had not been slashed.

Sticking to the IMF programme would, at least, keep the country solvent for the time being but the loans from the Fund would increase the debt stock that has to be repaid with interest overtime. Looking closely, it is no secret that Pakistani authorities are depending heavily on the largesse of foreign donors. For a sovereign country, this is an embarrassing, or even a humiliating situation. {Hey, more embarrassing when the said country is a Nuclear Weapon State possessing the 'Islamic Bomb'}

More plainly, the largesse may be forthcoming only as long as we continue to pander to the whims of foreign countries or multilateral institutions, willing to have a favourable look at our economy for reasons of their own. This is not how independent countries are managed and find their place in the comity of nations.{C'mon. You should ask the question why did such a situation come to pass ?}

The consequences at the domestic level are more than obvious. Social sectors have been starved of resources and development expenditures curtailed to the minimum to keep the budget deficit at a reasonable level in order to ensure financial stability. This has not only increased unemployment and poverty, but has severely undermined the development potential of the economy.

Increasing militancy and lawlessness in the country are some of the manifestations of a patently wrong approach to economic management. The potential to increase exports has not been realized due to problems in the energy sector, which is crying for more investment.

Even the issue of circular debt has not been resolved so far due to a serious lack of finances and inept policies. To get out of this messy situation, Pakistan needs to take bold steps, especially in the fiscal area, to reduce dependence on foreign resources. {How can that be achieved ? It is so easy to say that, but you guys have always lived out your lives on alms. You are so used to that} Unfortunately, however, the country has not been able to make reasonable progress on this front.

For instance, tax collections by the FBR at Rs 1157 billion, during 2008-09, were 92.6 percent of the original target and only higher by 14.8 percent than last year, resulting in a drop in the tax-to-GDP ratio. During the first quarter of 2009-10, tax collections were only marginally higher than in the same period last year.

In the face of mounting expenditures due to a variety of reasons, including a warlike situation, this is an untenable position and the IMF would be prepared to grant waivers only till the time the international community is on our side. The day we are not viewed favourably by foreign countries, especially the US, the IMF may change its colours and refuse to oblige. In a nutshell, the country is almost living on a dole {you realized that only after 62 years ?} and needs to break free from the old economic strategy that has brought Pakistan to this unsustainable and mortifying position.

To start with, the twin deficits of the economy have to be reduced to manageable levels without losing more time by resorting to all kinds of measures, which are bound to be harsh for almost all sections of society. The policy thrust for such a strategy is well known, but whether the leadership of the country has the stomach or even the inclination to go the whole hog to adopt this respectable route is a moot question. As an independent nation, we must take responsibility to manage our own house.{You decided to be a rentier state a long time back. You are too far down that road to turn back now. Good bye Pakistan}

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby archan » 06 Nov 2009 19:19

^^They got Islam, they not need nothing else.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby ashkrishna » 06 Nov 2009 19:53

pakistan ka matlab kya.... ha ha ha :rotfl:

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby kmkraoind » 06 Nov 2009 19:54

Pakistan has no more control on its rogue army

Pakistan has no more control on its army and the Inter-Services Intelligence officers, who are aiding militants in the country, according to a French investigative magistrate.

Former investigative magistrate Jean-Louis Bruguiere, who stepped down from that post in 2007, and now serves as the European Union’s envoy to Washington on issues related to the financing of terrorism, in a book points that Pakistan has lost control of its rogue military, the Los Angeles Times reports.French officials in Pakistan were the target? of threats and physical intimidation: A way? of dissuading us from returning,” Jean-Louis Bruguiere writes in his new book, “What I Could Not Say”.

Bruguiere was an investigative magistrate for three decades, a role that combines the duties of prosecutor and judge and allowed him to cultivate high-level contacts from Algiers to Moscow.

The book details French investigations of extremist activity in Pakistan, including a case in which officials went as far as hiding militants from CIA inspection teams at a training camp run by the Pakistani military, the paper reports.

Military handlers then sent the trainees on terrorist missions to the West, Bruguiere asserts.

He said that the United States made strategic errors in dealing with Pakistan, adding that it might be too late to clear the security forces of those who sympathize with the extremists.

Tracing a history of modern-day terrorism, the book describes the nine-year investigation of the 1989 bombing of a flight from Chad to Paris that killed 170 people, the Los Angeles Times reports.


Pakis is skiing downhill very fast, not that the world has noted it, but it is saying publicly. It is loosing all its goodwill and gaining contempt and hatred.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby raghava » 06 Nov 2009 20:05

SSridhar wrote:Pakistan is in a fix - Business Recorder Editorial
[b]Pakistan is in a fix.


Gurus,

I have a noob question to ask if I may.

Looking at the above, does TSP have the financial ability to fight a limited skirmish let alone a war?

I ask this because depending on which source one wants to believe - Kargil cost TSP between $500m to $1b.

TIA
- Raghava

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Gagan » 06 Nov 2009 20:06

SSridhar wrote:Pakistan is in a fix

Not to mention these FoDP meets provide a wonderful oppertunity for foreign jaunts and party-sharty at sarkari expense. I am sure they spend a couple of 100K dollars on each such jaunt. :D

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby ashkrishna » 06 Nov 2009 20:10

raghava wrote:
Gurus,

I have a noob question to ask if I may.

Looking at the above, does TSP have the financial ability to fight a limited skirmish let alone a war?

I ask this because depending on which source one wants to believe - Kargil cost TSP between $500m to $1b.

TIA
- Raghava


From the outset , it may look as if they are incapable of financially sustaining a war. But when the need arises money will pour from the usual sources SA,Aamir khan, rizald.etc. The paki military does not merely operate out of its budget allocation. It takes what it needs and whenever it needs it.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Gagan » 06 Nov 2009 20:13

raghava wrote:Looking at the above, does TSP have the financial ability to fight a limited skirmish let alone a war?

I would also like to know, what happens when they finally default to the international lenders, and what happens if their foreign currency reserves run out.
How does it affect the running of that country.
Will there be riots on the streets - food riots etc?
A majority of their electricity generation units are run on imported Oil, which they were getting free from the saudis. Now apparantly this has stopped (because they are nook noode and china has supplanted saudi needs?). What'll happen, will their electricity generation come to a complete halt? AFAIK even major cities are suffering 10+ hours of power outages, I suppose the story in smaller towns would be worse.

The ability to fight a war now, would depend on the fuel reserves and the ammo they have with them. It is the repair of the damaged infrastructure in the event of a war that they just don't have the ability to take care of. Still these guys want to provoke a Parakram type situation. I guess this is why PC was saying that there will be military retaliation (and no parakaram situation).

The corollary to this is that a major terrorist attack on India will only occur if one of the 3.5 supporters - I guess lizard, will give the go ahead and promise to take care of the political and economic ramifications.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2009 20:29

By end of circa 2002, the US helped reschedule Pakistan's debts amounting to USD 15 Billion. They will be up for payment in a few years' time.

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Re: Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan - September 15, 2009

Postby Singha » 06 Nov 2009 21:02

has pakistan ever repaid its international debts? the have perfected the fine art of projecting themselves on the verge of collapse and 'being too big to be allowed to fail' , gaining a rolling series of reschedulements based on geopolitical plays not fiscally prudent metrics.

as such I think they wont be losing any sleep over looming debt repayments.


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