China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

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ashish raval
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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby ashish raval » 16 Mar 2013 13:12

^^ why can someone not 'arrange' fedayeen from xinjiang community to leave this ship not worthy of floating for next few years while it is docked :twisted:

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby prashanth » 16 Mar 2013 15:27

ashish raval wrote:^^ why can someone not 'arrange' fedayeen from xinjiang community to leave this ship not worthy of floating for next few years while it is docked :twisted:


Not a very 'Indian' thought sirjee :) . We can do better than that. Let them bring their boat to our seas if they dare. We'll be ready with our Vikramaditya, Vikrant, equipped with Mig29s and NLCAs.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby subhamoy.das » 16 Mar 2013 19:39

Yawn..... All these longest and tallest hardware are like scare crows.....CHINA is surrounded by powerful countries and is also divided inside across the lines of hans, ujigars and tibets and also rich and poor and communists and democratics... I must admit, Porkis have more guts than them. At least they have the guts to open a fight with IA but these CHINESE and there stooge like NOKO only do drills and drills and drills and display and display... There is wise saying - empty pitcher makes a lot of noise....

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby PratikDas » 16 Mar 2013 20:26

China might make a lot of noise over the South China Sea and against the Japan and US alliance but against India they're fully engaged, be it with border incursions, map alterations, flanking moves at Gwadar and Sri Lanka, etc.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby NRao » 16 Mar 2013 21:07

We have a lot to look forward to, J-20, J-31, Y-20, J-10B, J-15, the list goes on.


On the contrary, since most of the technologies were either stolen or borrowed, the a roadpath cannot exist. Compared to pre J- 20 days, yes, plenty to look forward to. Post nothing. Unless you get to steal more - which is what even the President of the US was complaining about.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Misraji » 17 Mar 2013 12:15


Don
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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Don » 17 Mar 2013 17:01

Misraji wrote:Fifth Z-10 squadron in service

--Ashish

Hmmmm...interesting that means 60 Z-10 so far. I think to total number will exceed 240 eventually.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby shiv » 17 Mar 2013 17:40

Don wrote:
Misraji wrote:Fifth Z-10 squadron in service

--Ashish

Hmmmm...interesting that means 60 Z-10 so far. I think to total number will exceed 240 eventually.


Oh - should be done in a couple of weeks then?

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Don » 17 Mar 2013 20:52

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/2 ... a-War.html


Last Update: Saturday, 16 March 2013 KSA 12:40 - GMT 09:40
China in Iraq: winning without a war
Saturday, 16 March 2013

Dr. Naser Al-Tamimi Not long ago, Robert Kaplan, the well-known American writer, “complained” in The Wall Street Journal, saying: “... We have liberated Iraq so that Chinese firms can extract its oil.” The sentiment that was expressed by Kaplan was in fact reflecting the evolution of the situation in Iraq, where the Chinese presence was rising strongly. Tellingly, Beijing’s position in Iraq evolved quickly, from among the most outspoken of critics of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion to topple Saddam Hussein, to emerging as one of the biggest economic beneficiaries of the war in Iraq.

China’s Catching-up Game
Ten years after the American invasion, Iraq turned into an important energy / trade partner for China. Indeed, the trade between Iraq and China doubled almost 34 times. The volume of bilateral trade between the two states soared to $17.5 billion by end-2012 from small amount of $ 517 million in 2002. In the same period, the trade between Iraq and the U.S. increased only 5.6 times. The bilateral trade between both countries rose to $ 21.6 billion by end-2012 from $ 3.8 billion in 2002. Last year, China was both the second-largest purchaser of Iraqi exports, $ 12.6bn, (after the U.S. $ 19.6bn) and the second-largest supplier of imports, $ 4.9bn, (after Turkey $ 10.8 bn), according to latest data from the U.N. Comtrade data. The United States still Iraq’s largest trade partners, however the current trends suggest that China will soon overtake America to become Baghdad’s top trade partner.

Ironically, three important points emerged after a decade of the American occupation of Baghdad. (a) The U.S. imports from Iraq of crude oil in 2012 were less in volume in comparison before the invasion. For example in the 2002, the United States imported from Iraq 485 thousand barrels of crude oil per day (bpd), while the figure from China was almost zero. However, in 2012, America imported 473 bpd of crude oil; in comparison the volume of China’s total imports from Iraq hit about 315 bpd. (b) The first oil license awarded by Iraq’s government after the U.S.-led invasion was to state-run China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC) who won a US $ 3.5 billion development contract for Iraqi oil field Al-Ahdab in November 2008. And (c) Beijing and Baghdad recently consolidated their trade ties with the two countries signing of a cooperation deal on economic and technology and an exchange of notes on personnel training; during the Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki visit to China in July 2011, which was also the first visit by Iraqi prime minister to China in the over 50 years of history of diplomatic relations.

Within this context, IHS Global Insight argue that Iraq is extremely important for Chinese companies’ growth strategy, especially given that Iran is likely to face much of a standstill for years if not decades. Iraq’s production increases have matched the relative production decreases in Iran. As a result of Iranian oil production declines, Iraq became the second largest OPEC producer (after Saudi Arabia) in late 2012. Indeed, in a stunning turnaround, Iraq recently stabilized and increased its oil production, whereby at the end of 2012, it reached nearly 3 million barrel a day (mb / d) for the first time since 1990, and it can undoubtedly produce more according the International Energy Agency (IEA). Iraqi government is planning to increase production to 3.7 million barrels per day mb/d in 2013. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) believes the figures provided by the Iraqi government are very realistic. According to the latest data provided by the IMF, Iraq’s oil production will reach 3.6 mb/d by the end-2013, while the exports will rise to 2.8 mb/d in the same year, from 2.3 mb/d in 2012.

The Big Bet
Iraq is already the world’s third-largest oil exporter (after Saudi Arabia and Russia) and has the resources and plans to increase rapidly its oil and natural gas production as it recovers from three decades punctuated by conflict and instability. Iraq is estimated to have the fifth largest proven oil reserves (143.1 billion barrels) and the 12th-largest proven gas reserves in the world, as well as vast potential for further discoveries, according BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2012.

Beijing is betting big in Iraq. The view from Beijing is that a stable Iraq is good for the region and for China’s core economic interests. According to business Monitor International, (BMI), in November 2008, China and Iraq finalised a $ 3bn oil service contract for the development of the Ahdab oil field. The State-run Chinese National Petroleum Co. (CNPC) originally signed a Production Sharing Agreement (PSA) for the field in 1997. This is the first deal from the Saddam Hussein era to be honoured by the new Iraqi regime. While in November 2009, CNPC won a large stake in a $ 15 billion deal to develop the Rumaila oil field in southern Iraq, thought to be the second largest in the world. In December 2009, CNPC was awarded a 50% stake in the development of the Halfaya oilfield located southern Iraq. Halfaya is proven to hold 4.1 billion barrels of recoverable reserve and has production potential of 200 thousand to half million bpd. In February 2010, Beijing cancelled 80% of Iraq’s $8.5 billion debt to China, a move designed to further Chinese business interests in the country. In June 2012, CNPC finished the first phase of the Halfaya and increased production from 3,000 bpd to 100,000 bpd, 15 months ahead of schedule.

CNPC currently holds a 37.5% stake in the Halfaya field, a 75% stake in the al-Ahdab field and a 37% stake in the Rumaila field. Wang Dongjin, vice president of CNPC, estimates that Chinese state companies are currently helping in the production of some 1.6 million barrels a day in Iraq, more than half that country’s total output. Chinese companies are also producing 120,000 barrels a day from Halfayia and some 140,000 barrels a day from Ahdab. China’s initial success in Iraq also extends to the Kurdish Autonomous Region. In August 2009, the state-run, China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation (Sinopec) agreed to acquire Swiss energy company “Addax” in a $ 7.2bn deal. The deal has been approved by the Chinese government and it became effective on October 5, 2009. Subsequently, Sinopec gained access to two oil fields in northern Iraq; as Addax has a 30% stake in PSA for the Taq field ‘and’ a 26.67% working interest in the Sangaw North PSC oil field in Kurdistan. Additionally, there are also speculations (NASDAQ news) that China’s largest oil and gas producer - PetroChina - is interested in joining Texas-based ExxonMobil Corporation, for the development of West Qurna oilfield in southern Iraq. Both parties are yet to finalize on the size of stakes to be shared.

The Coming ‘Oil Superpower’
As for the future, in the IEA’s Central Scenario, that reflects its judgement about a reasonable trajectory for Iraq’s development, based on an assessment of current and announced policies and projects, Iraq’s oil production rises to 4.2 mb/d in 2015, more than doubles to 6.1 mb / d by 2020, jumps to 7 mb/d by 2025, and reaches 8.3 mb / d in 2035. The increase in Iraq’s oil production in the IEA’s Central Scenario of more than five mb/d over the period to 2035; makes Iraq by far the largest contributor to global supply growth. Over the current decade, Iraq accounts for around 45% of the anticipated growth in global output.

Iraq’s exports rise to 4.4 mb / d in 2020 and 5.2 mb / d in 2025, finishing the projection period at 6.3 mb / d. The IEA predicts that by 2020, Iraq will export 80% to Asia (3.5-4 m / bd) most of it will go to China. The IEA also predicts that China will become the main customer for Iraqi oil by the 2030s, with Baghdad overtaking Russia to become the world’s second-largest oil exporter by then. The IEA’s chief economist, Fatih Birol, recently said that: “Iraq will emerge as a major new oil producer by the 2030s. Its main customer will be China, and half of Iraqi oil production will go to China.”

Indeed, Iraq’s oil production potential is immense, but exploiting it depends on consolidating the progress made in peace and stability in the country and the need for infrastructure investments. In a high-case scenario, if all the various moving parts are aligned perfectly, the IEA forecasts that Iraq could crank up production to 9.1 mb/d by the end of this decade. It becomes the second-largest global exporter after Saudi Arabia and a key supplier to fast-growing markets in Asia. In a delayed case - which also is unlikely but could occur if the regional environment deteriorates and Iraq is engulfed in a larger regional conflict or oil prices crash - would see production rise marginally to 4 mb/d by 2020.

Difficult Road Ahead
To put Iraq’s potential in context, Baghdad in 2012 ranked sixth (after Saudi Arabia, Angola, Russia, Iran and Oman), in the list of key crude oil suppliers to China, where the ratio of imports to about 5.8% (about 315 thousand bpd) of China’s total imports. As by comparison, China imported over a million barrel per day (mb/d) from Saudi Arabia in 2012 (20% of China’s total crude oil imports), while Angola provided around 806 thousand bpd or 15% of total imports, nearly 9% or 489 thousand bpd came from Russia and around 442 thousand bpd or over 8% imported from Iran. But Iraq could jump to the third or the second largest supplier of oil to China over the next few years. However, the security situation and political developments in Iraq still a source of concern to Beijing.

Although the security situation has improved markedly over the past five years, Iraq is still far from stable. For China, the surge in imports of Iraqi crude oil carries risks because of the danger that deteriorating security, sectarian tensions, complex legal framework, endemic corruption, and lack of infrastructure could delay the increase in Iraq’s forecasted oil production forcing Beijing to look for alternative suppliers. The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) expects the political situation in Iraq to remain unstable, while the Global Insight argues that “Iraq’s delicate security condition poses the greatest downside risks to economic growth in the short term, as it could severely undermine development plans, cause a political gridlock, and erode consumer demand.” More worryingly, the increasingly civil war in Syria could spill over into Iraq creating dangerous sectarian conflict.

However, the EIU does not expect a repeat of the sectarian conflict that engulfed Iraq in 2006-07. Indeed, despite the gloomy political outlook, the IMF projects that Iraq to register the highest economic growth rates in the world, where the GDP is expected to expand rapidly in 2013 by more than 14% and Iraq’s economy to grow by a robust 10-11% on average during 2013-2017, driven primarily by rising oil production. This provides enormous opportunities for Chinese companies to expand in Iraq’s markets.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Don » 17 Mar 2013 20:57

Nexen has 5.6 billion barrel of crude oil in its Holding.


http://finance.yahoo.com/news/cnooc-fin ... BYA3PTwFAx.

CNOOC Finally Gets Nexen
By Zacks Equity Research | Zacks – Tue, Feb 26, 2013 2:48 PM EST.. .

China’s largest offshore oil producer, CNOOC Ltd. (CEO), announced today that it has finally wrapped up the $15.1 billion acquisition of Canada’s Nexen Inc. (NXY). The deal closed more than seven months after the biggest Chinese foreign takeover was announced.

This deal marks a significant milestone for CNOOC as it gets hold of Nexen’s biggest reserves in the Canadian oil sands. Nexen operates in western Canada, the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, Africa and the Middle East. Apart from oil sands, Nexen remains dynamic in natural gas exploration in shale rock formations. It owns approximately 300,000 acres of shale-gas blocks in the Horn River Basin in British Columbia.

In this connection, it is worth mentioning that China Petroleum & Chemical Corp/Sinopec (SNP) has inked a $1.02 billion deal with Chesapeake Energy Corp. (CHK). This gives the second-largest Chinese energy producer 50% share in 850,000 acres in the Mississippi Lime play in northern Oklahoma.

CNOOC currently retains a Zacks Rank #3 (short-term Hold rating).

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby NRao » 17 Mar 2013 21:04

Chinese diplomatic efforts will score a LOT of points, but only in the short run. Point being China is not really built for long term events. Such things take a LONG time to mature and the key there is that pretty much everything in a nation has to go hand-in-hand. China is very, very disjointed (this is not a knock on China - it is not easy. The US took some 100-150 years to gel and it was very traumatic).

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby RamaY » 17 Mar 2013 21:06

^ can Nexan (now CNOOC) make the oil from oil sands meeting Canadian environmental guidelines in an economic way (at what oil price this becomes economical?)

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby asprinzl » 18 Mar 2013 04:27

RamaY....i tthink the take over has more to do with Chinese desire to gain access to the assorted technologies involved.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Austin » 18 Mar 2013 05:42

Not sure how Oil news landed in this thread but the recent deal has more to do with China's Oil Import surpassing even the US and its growing appetite for Oil , China today is the largest Net Importer of Oil and that will continue to grow , so its natural they will scout the world for Cheaper Oil and technologies that can help them make more from it and more environmentally friendly.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Austin » 18 Mar 2013 05:42


ashi
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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby ashi » 18 Mar 2013 07:00

Austin wrote:Interior for Type 99 Tank

http://bmpd.livejournal.com/477960.html


Newer version of T-99
Image
Image

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby member_23370 » 18 Mar 2013 09:44

Wow the newer pics look grainier and worse than the old one.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby shiv » 18 Mar 2013 09:52

Bheeshma wrote:Wow the newer pics look grainier and worse than the old one.

Spy camera. It says 007 at bottom left.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby krishnan » 18 Mar 2013 12:30

No...thats the latest technology that makes it harder to take spy photos...it didnt work properly

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Don » 18 Mar 2013 19:05

asprinzl wrote:RamaY....i tthink the take over has more to do with Chinese desire to gain access to the assorted technologies involved.

I am sure tech transfer is important but not the main factor. First of all 5.6 billion barell of oil on Nexens holding is quite substantial its more than 60% of the entire proven crude oil reserve of India.

However most importantly China wants to strategically diversify its oil suppliers. Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Africa will be major suppliers but Russia, Central Asia, and Latin America, Canada will be substantial players as well. In case of a regional conflict like south asian war the oil supply will still largely continue.

http://business.financialpost.com/2013/ ... ith-china/

Russia eyes $30B oil-for-loans deal with China

14 Feb, 2013, 05.00AM IST, Reuters

Rosneft eyes $30 billion loan from China in exchange of oil

LONDON/MOSCOW: Rosneft is seeking to borrow up to $30 billion from China in exchange for possibly doubling oil supplies, making Beijing the largest consumer of Russian oil and further diverting supplies away from Europe.

Four industry sources familiar with the situation told Reuters Rosneft was in talks with China's state firm CNPC about the borrowing, which would echo a $25 billion deal the two companies clinched last decade.


http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Central_Asia/OA24Ag01.html


Sino-Kazakh ties on a roll
By Richard Weitz

Construction Work on One of China's Pipelines to Central Asia
The construction of China’s New Eurasian Land Bridge through Central Asia has been gathering speed in recent months and looks to make even greater progress in 2013. At the end of 2012, China and Kazakhstan opened their second major rail link at the Xinjiang-Kazakhstan border city of Korgas. The new link comprises a 300-km section in both countries that connects their rail networks from Jiangsu Province to the rest of Kazakhstan’s rail system, which itself is being expanded through enhanced China-Kazakhstan cooperation. On December 22, 2012, Kazakhstan Temir Zholy (KTZ), the national railway company of Kazakhstan, reported that Kazakhstan and China have started using the new railway crossing of Altynkol-Khorgos. It is expected cargo transportation will reach 10 million tons in 2015 and 15 million tons in 2020. Industry observers expect the Korgas Pass—which now connects China and Kazakhstan by a railway, a highway and an oil pipeline—to handle 20 million tons of cargo per year by 2020 and 35 million tons per year by 2030 (Xinhua, December 22, 2012; Trend, December 22, 2012) [

Energy the Driving Force for Sino-Kazakh Relations

In a 50-50 joint venture, the Chinese National Petroleum Corporation (CNCP) and KazMunaiGaz built a lengthy oil pipeline from Kazakhstan’s Atyrau port along the Caspian coast to Alashankou in China's northwest Xinjiang region. When it began operating on a limited basis in December 2005, the delivery marked the first eastward flow of Central Asian oil and China’s first receipt of imported oil by pipeline. Now, one fifth of Kazakhstan’s oil flows to China (People’s Daily, December 20, 2012). In 2010, the Central Asia-China pipeline began transporting natural gas from Turkmenistan through Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan to China. This 2,100-kilometer gas pipeline is expected to deliver around 40 billion cubic meters (bcm) annually by 2015.

In another joint CNCP-KazMunaiGaz project, Astana has invested $130 million to augment a $1.8-billion loan from the China Development Bank, to construct a 1,500-km natural gas pipeline from Beyneu in western Kazakhstan to Bozoi Shymkent. From there, the 50-50 owned Beineu-Shymkent Gas Pipeline LLP will connect with the Central Asia-China gas pipeline as well as provide gas to southern Kazakhstan, a region that must currently import gas (IANS, December 13, 2012). It also plans to construct a Pipeline “C” that would provide a third Kazakhstani gas pipeline into China. When all three conduits are fully operational in 2015, they will deliver up to 60 billion cubic meters of gas to China annually—or about half of the PRC’s anticipated demand for imported gas then (UPI, September 16, 2011). At the end of 2012, the CNCP opened the last section of its $22 billion, 8,704-km pipeline, which can carry as much as 30 bcm from Huoerguos on the China-Kazakhstan border in northwest Xinjiang Uygur region to Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong (IANS, December 31, 2012).


http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/201 ... azils-oil/

China gets jump on U.S. for Brazil’s oil

Two export pacts a coup for Beijing

BUENOS AIRES — Off the coast of Rio de Janeiro — below a mile of water and two miles of shifting rock, sand and salt — is an ultradeep sea of oil that could turn Brazil into the world’s fourth-largest oil producer, behind Russia, Saudi Arabia and the United States.

The country’s state-controlled oil company, Petrobras, expects to pump 4.9 million barrels a day from the country’s oil fields by 2020, with 40 percent of that coming from the seabed. One and a half million barrels will be bound for export markets.

The United States wants it, but China is getting it.



A chunk of Brazil’s oil real estate appeared on China’s portfolio in 2010, when Sinopec agreed to pay $7.1 billion for 40 percent of Repsol-YPF of Brazil, which has stakes in the now internationally famous Santos Basin, and the Sapinhoa field, which has an estimated recoverable volume of 2.1 billion barrels. Statoil of Norway also agreed that year to sell 40 percent of the offshore Peregrino field to Sinochem.


http://en-maktoob.news.yahoo.com/venezu ... 56867.html

Venezuela looks to China for economic boost

Trade between Venezuela, holder of the world’s largest oil reserves, and China grew to $18bn in 2011, a 24-fold increase from 2003, reported China Daily, a government-backed newspaper.


Venezuela exports more than 500,000 barrels of oil to the Asian giant daily, according to government figures, and plans to increase that to one million by 2015. The two countries had signed 300 bilateral agreements, including 80 major projects, according to a University of Miami study in 2010.


Venezuela's interim President Nicolas Maduro, who took the job following the death of President Hugo Chavez on March 5, held talks with Chinese officials over the weekend.

"The best tribute that we could give to our comandante Chavez is to deepen our strategic relationship with our beloved China," said Maduro, who once served as Venezuela’s foreign minister.


There are more examples but I am too lazy to look for it. :wink:

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby rsingh » 18 Mar 2013 22:02

Austin wrote:Interior for Type 99 Tank

http://bmpd.livejournal.com/477960.html


Comments are more interesting :rotfl:
It turns out the Chinese are again putting dust in the eyes? D-81 to T-62 installed ... it is extremely outdated tool with a lot of disadvantages.

And this

The T-62 installed 115-mm U-5TS. 125-mm D-81 is installed in series of tanks from T-64A. The Chinese have copied the gun, taking from someone T-72 in 1980.


China= Copy

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Samay » 19 Mar 2013 00:57

CHINA = C.C. (CARBON COPY)

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby shiv » 19 Mar 2013 06:24

Brad Goodman wrote:al bakis buying junk like there is no tomorrow
Pakistan buys 55% of China’s arms exports

China has overtaken Britain to become the world’s fifth largest arms exporter with 5% of the global trade, its highest position since the Cold War, a Swedish think tank said on Monday.

China’s arms exports in 2008-2012 grew by 162% compared to the previous five years, with most of them — 55% — going to Pakistan.


Pakistan has long been China’s key ally in South Asia. The report also named Myanmar, Bangladesh and Venezuela as importers of Chinese arms.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby RamaY » 19 Mar 2013 07:10

^ with what, Money or Wimmens?

P.S: there is a severe lack of wimmens in China. On the other hand Pakistan has lot of available women, since the men folk came out of the closet. So this is a fair relationship.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby NRao » 19 Mar 2013 07:17

However most importantly China wants to strategically diversify its oil suppliers.


And do what exactly?

While one side of the nation makes great progress, the other is corrupt, poor and stressed. (BTW, India too has this silly problem.)

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby ashi » 19 Mar 2013 10:46

Confidence sky-high over jumbo cargo plane

The 15-meter-high aircraft underwent a successful test flight on Jan 26.

The Ministry of Defense confirmed shortly after the successful test flight that the Yun-20, mainly developed by the Xi'an Aircraft Industry (Group) Co Ltd, has a load-carrying capacity of 66 metric tons.

It is 47 meters long, has a wingspan of 45 meters and a maximum take-off weight of 200 tons, Xinhua News Agency reported on March 3.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Leonard » 20 Mar 2013 04:50

Another one -- Bite's the Dust ... Wonder if the Chinese Rockets/Satellites will now start dropping like fleas -- since the "Xerox" machine has failed ..

http://washingtonexaminer.com/watchdog- ... le/2524691

>>
Bo Jiang, the Chinese national scientist employed by a NASA contractor for work at the space agency's Langley Research Center, was arrested Sunday by the FBI at Dulles International Airport as he tried to flee to China,

Jiang was employed by the National Institute of Aerospace, a Hampton, VA-based NASA contractor. The position afforded Jiang virtually unlimited, unescorted access to the NASA Langley facility, which is the location for classified research programs related to U.S. space defense technologies.

Jiang’s information “may pertain to the source code for high-tech imaging technology that Jiang has been working on with NASA. This information could have significant military applications for the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army.”

Before Jiang’s detention Sunday, the last time the FBI arrested a Chinese national in the U.S. on suspicion of espionage activity was 2006 in a case concerning aviation issues.

Doongfan “Greg” Chung, a former Rockwell Internationa and Boeing engineer was convicted in 2009 of economic espionage and acting as an agent of the Peoples Republic of China.

An FBI search of Chung’s home in 2006 found 250,000 Boeing documents in his possession.


<<

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby ashi » 20 Mar 2013 08:56

Leonard wrote:Another one -- Bite's the Dust ... Wonder if the Chinese Rockets/Satellites will now start dropping like fleas -- since the "Xerox" machine has failed ..

http://washingtonexaminer.com/watchdog- ... le/2524691

>>
Bo Jiang, the Chinese national scientist employed by a NASA contractor for work at the space agency's Langley Research Center, was arrested Sunday by the FBI at Dulles International Airport as he tried to flee to China,

Jiang was employed by the National Institute of Aerospace, a Hampton, VA-based NASA contractor. The position afforded Jiang virtually unlimited, unescorted access to the NASA Langley facility, which is the location for classified research programs related to U.S. space defense technologies.

Jiang’s information “may pertain to the source code for high-tech imaging technology that Jiang has been working on with NASA. This information could have significant military applications for the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army.”

Before Jiang’s detention Sunday, the last time the FBI arrested a Chinese national in the U.S. on suspicion of espionage activity was 2006 in a case concerning aviation issues.

Doongfan “Greg” Chung, a former Rockwell Internationa and Boeing engineer was convicted in 2009 of economic espionage and acting as an agent of the Peoples Republic of China.

An FBI search of Chung’s home in 2006 found 250,000 Boeing documents in his possession.


<<


And you think U.S don't spy on others?

shiv
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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby shiv » 20 Mar 2013 09:11

ashi wrote:And you think U.S don't spy on others?

No need to go on the defensive. US is not copying Chinese. China is copying US. Even you are saying it. This Chinese guy got caught so we're just having a laugh. Now we can use this news item as proof that China copies everything no?

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby ashi » 20 Mar 2013 09:25

shiv wrote:
ashi wrote:And you think U.S don't spy on others?

No need to go on the defensive. US is not copying Chinese. China is copying US. Even you are saying it. This Chinese guy got caught so we're just having a laugh. Now we can use this news item as proof that China copies everything no?


As a matter of fact, one of the correct things that China has done is start with coping/reverse engineering, and keep pursuing indigenization. There is no way China, or any country for that matter, can catch up in such a short period of time without copying/reverse engineering. A few decades ago, Japan/S.Korea were the synonym of cheap products and coping. Look where they are now. Of course they have the priviledge to buy technology from the west. China now in many areas still catching up, in many areas already have her own cutting edge invention. And how far has your technology transfer and local invention brought India to?

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby adityadange » 20 Mar 2013 09:57

ashi wrote:As a matter of fact, one of the correct things that China has done is start with coping/reverse engineering, and keep pursuing indigenization. There is no way China, or any country for that matter, can catch up in such a short period of time without copying/reverse engineering. A few decades ago, Japan/S.Korea were the synonym of cheap products and coping. Look where they are now. Of course they have the priviledge to buy technology from the west. China now in many areas still catching up, in many areas already have her own cutting edge invention. And how far has your technology transfer and local invention brought India to?


^^^ a drunkard explaining benefits of liquors.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby member_20292 » 20 Mar 2013 16:23

^^ I for once, agree with Ashi

copying works to get your levels up. Innovation comes next.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby nash » 20 Mar 2013 17:35

yes, very much like liquor which give you the feeling of getting stronger but,in long run, internally cause serious damage to vital organs.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby NRao » 20 Mar 2013 18:41

As a matter of fact, one of the correct things that China has done is start with coping/reverse engineering, and keep pursuing indigenization.


Some time back I was puttering around the net (with the help form Uncle google) and to my amazement I found out that China has been making engines (for aircrafts) and aircrafts since some 40-50s time frame!!!! Just check wiki. Mostly copies of Russian items, nonetheless making them. For 40-60 YEARS!!!!

Until the Israelis and French decided to pitch in China was in the dark ages.

The point I am trying to make is that China is STILL in the dark ages.

There is no way China, or any country for that matter, can catch up in such a short period of time without copying/reverse engineering.


China has nowhere close to “catch up”. Witness the new funds provided for engines (and rightly so). Witness China’s purchase of brand new Su-35s and plenty of engines for “her” planes!!! IF here J-20/31s, etc were THAT good, why would she buy more Su-35s? Because the PLAAF does not like the Chinese plans I bet.

A few decades ago, Japan/S.Korea were the synonym of cheap products and coping. Look where they are now.


In the commercial world Japan/SK are doing real great.

NOT in the military world. Both are still buying planes for their needs.

Of course they have the priviledge to buy technology from the west. China now in many areas still catching up, in many areas already have her own cutting edge invention. And how far has your technology transfer and local invention brought India to?


Does China really have cutting edge “inventions” or the ability to duplicate complicated stuff that they stole? IF it is the prior, well and good. Else you are stuck until the next hack.

India: ToT did get her technologies, but legal issues prevent her from using them elsewhere – which is where I think India is stuck. So, as an example, India seems to be able to make SCB, but the tech obtained from abroad can be used only for a certain product and not across the board.

I think/feel China is not in a great situation. Better than where she was about 10 years ago, but stuck where she is.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Singha » 20 Mar 2013 19:29

A middle aged us defence contractor with top secret clearance arrested in hawaii for passing on secrets to a 27 yr old chinese woman on a visa.
Info was about nuclear weapons, bmd monitoring abilities and radar stations in pacific rim.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby shiv » 20 Mar 2013 19:41

ashi wrote:
As a matter of fact, one of the correct things that China has done is start with coping/reverse engineering, and keep pursuing indigenization.


Yes. This has gone on from the 1950. The same copying. And China still has not caught up with Russia, let alone Sweden, France or USA.

What use is this copying? Talk about China. 60 plus years of Copying and still you have no engine. No non copied aircraft in service without significant foreign help. And a reputation that Indians are laughing at. Chinese just get upset at being laughed at and have to justify failures as successes. So stop bragging about a hole in your old underwear as if China designed it to be so. :D

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby Singha » 20 Mar 2013 20:38

I wonder if the cheen mata hari would be as hot as ana chapman. Maybe they copied there faithfooly also.

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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby VishalJ » 21 Mar 2013 03:04

Shenyang J-31
Image

Chengdu J-20
Image


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Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011

Postby adityadange » 21 Mar 2013 10:47

Singha wrote:I wonder if the cheen mata hari would be as hot as ana chapman. Maybe they copied there faithfooly also.


can you please elaborate what do you mean?


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