PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 17:01

Raja Bose wrote:The west may think Hitler was the worst, as far as Indians are concerned, the British were infinitely worst when they ruled, looted and starved India for over 200 years.



Churchill was a "good guy", at least in any history book I've ever read and no I'm not interested in reading Indian history text books. In fact, Churchill is considered one of the greatest men of the 20th century. So by the comparative property, if you say Hitler was better than Churchill (the British), then yes, that pretty much means Hitler is a "good guy" in my book.

Here's an easier example...

"The West may think Suzuki Maruti makes the worst cars, but we Indians think Ferrari S.p.A. makes cars much worst than Suzuki Marutis."

The non-Indian interpretation would be: these Indians think Suzuki Marutis are pretty damn good cars if they think Ferraris are much worst.

And seriously, the number of Vetos China cast in the P5 UNSC has zero significance to the fact China fought and won in World War II. Zero Significance. Another lame straw man.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 17:27

mahadevbhu wrote:Wong,

youre right that even totalitarian regimes are innovative.

Given its information control laws, I'm not sure about current and potential Chinese competence in the knowledge management and information technology field , which is increasingly enormous part of our collective economies.


Good, back on topic. This is a thread on the Chinese economy and innovation obviously will be very important to the Chinese economy this decade.

I know for a fact you can't post Tibetan self-immolation videos on YouKu. That video will be taken down very quickly.

So what??? Has that stopped China from creating "national champions" in the internet space (a vital battleground in the information economy race between the US and China) ??
The Chinese internet economy is still thriving today. The censorship hasn't stopped anything. China IS (not a WILL - an IS) surpassing the US internet economy as we speak.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 31 Mar 2012 18:09

Hmmph. Again, mystifying why cheeni posters seem to care so much about what we argumentative Indians think of them.

That said, its true that PRC is P5 and we are not. Period. WWII and who did what then is irrelevant to present day reality. I have accepted it and moved on. We will be tested when (and not if) UNSC passes binding resolutions against us. Until then the value of a UNSC perma seat is all idle talk only.

Regarding innovation, the PRC economy has shown quite a bit of innovation. So what if its borrowed or stolen. Its there and it works. I'd rather Dilli too do what is in our interests un-apologetically. Like we have in the pharma patents cases. Sorry if this rather D&G opinion diverts from the thread topic. Butr it is my opinion and I'm not gonna let my jingo-giri distort what I rationally think is the truth.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 19:13

Hari Seldon wrote:Hmmph. Again, mystifying why cheeni posters seem to care so much about what we argumentative Indians think of them.

That said, its true that PRC is P5 and we are not. Period. WWII and who did what then is irrelevant to present day reality. I have accepted it and moved on. We will be tested when (and not if) UNSC passes binding resolutions against us. Until then the value of a UNSC perma seat is all idle talk only.

Regarding innovation, the PRC economy has shown quite a bit of innovation. So what if its borrowed or stolen. Its there and it works. I'd rather Dilli too do what is in our interests un-apologetically. Like we have in the pharma patents cases. Sorry if this rather D&G opinion diverts from the thread topic. Butr it is my opinion and I'm not gonna let my jingo-giri distort what I rationally think is the truth.


Good, let's all stop talking about WWII then.

I'm here to learn the latest China bashing from the Western Press and its many different regurgitations.

I would love to discuss IDEAS about the Chinese economy:

"The Innovation Catch-22 for Authoritarian China"
"China's ARTIFICIALLY reduced birth rate meaning it will grow old before it grows rich"
"China's economy will collapse because it OWES Trillions of Gadzillions of Yuan to ITSELF"
"Authoritarian China is inherently unstable even though the average Chinese dynasty is older than the United States"
"China's Sex Ratio, Gender Equality & the Competition for Brides on GDP Growth"

These and many more IDEAS I would love to discuss with Indian members. You do represent the top 8% of India. The crème de la crème of Indian society, so your ideas do matter.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 20:54

^^^^

I gave 5 very relevant topics on the Chinese economy. You dont want to discuss any of them??

How about Chinese HSR and business productivity??

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Singha » 31 Mar 2012 21:30

http://www.topsecretwriters.com/2012/03 ... p-attempt/

Last week’s uprising may be a sign of things to come for communist China. 2012 serves as a watermark year, for many of China’s old guards will retreat into retirement.

Now, in their place, is a power vacuum waiting to be filled by the princelings, or offspring, of Mao-era revolutionaries. At stake is the control of the second biggest economy in the world and the ‘benefits’ that come with it.

With China minting a new billionaire every twenty days, 90% of which are communist party members, there is a lot to fight for. But will this end up as another Tianenman?

The Beijing coup was nothing less than a pre-emptive strike against one of China’s most charismatic and strongest new leaders, Bo Xilai. He is the first casualty in the chess match for preeminence in the fracturing government of China.




Who was Bo Xilai?

Bo Xilai, a princeling, was the talk of China for weeding out corruption in Chonqqing, a special development zone where corruption knows no bounds.

Bo marched into Chongqing and cleaned house, making him the poster boy for the so-called ‘just’ communist party. However, as the Chinese saying goes, “the nail that stands up gets pounded down,” and so did Mr. Bo.

For now, the communist propaganda machine is in overdrive — excoriating the man once hailed as the savior of China.

Allegations fly that Mr.Bo engaged in ruthless tactics — a red terror — to root out corruption in Chongqing. To make matters worse, the communists are also alleging that Mr. Bo was dirty, accusing him of connections with the Macau underworld and asking what part, if any, they played in his ousting.

The most recent scandal involves Neil Heywood who soon died after a business disagreement with Bo and/or his wife. The Heywood story is particularly troubling because his body was cremated. Thus, no real cause of death could be proven.



Trust vs. Corruption

So, what does this have to do with governing China? Everything.

Mr. Bo was a powerful man who won the hearts of the locals. As a matter of fact, upon his dismissal, the Chongqing forces were called out to quash any possible uprisings.

Bo was a man that Beijing feared; and when a person is feared by Beijing, they inevitably get cut down to size. In China, when a party member steps over the line, he or she is accused of corruption and tried before the press.

But how much of this can be believed? In China, a country who loses hundreds of billions of dollars to corruption, clean politicians stand out.

China’s current leader, Hu Jintao, has earned the moniker, ‘The Butcher of Tibet,’ for squelching dissent and maintaining order over the Buddhists. Supposedly, Hu Jintao’s son and Wen Jiabao’s wife have also been linked to corruption, but that is another case. As for the leaders of the party blaming Bo for his overzealous pursuit of corruption, can that be believed? One has to wonder whom to believe.

Beijing rolls on and Mr. Bo’s deeds and memories are being cleansed from the annals of the city of Chongqing as we speak. His policies have been overturned and the presence of his right hand man is being erased from the public eye.



Why 2012 is Problematic

The problem is that in 2012, over 60% of the leaders of China’s communist party and at least six members of the all-powerful Standing committee will be vacating their spots.

To those of us who enjoy free elections, this fact means little to nothing. In China, however, things are different. Throughout her 2000-plus years of history, China has consistently forced the leaders to change by the muzzle of a gun. In a country where Chinese-on-Chinese is typical, the party is nervous.

Bo represented the biggest challenge to the party. As a charismatic, beloved leader of the people, he was the first to fall. There are at least two contingents who stood to gain from his demise, but who will be next?

The juggling for the right to power over China has begun.

With Mr.Bo out of the way, Beijing can rest easier. Or can they? Surely the most recent coup attempts were no Tiananmen Square, they were worse. While the protests of 1989 were a sign of the times, and youthful zealots were calling for more transparency, last week was much more alarming.

Where Power and Loyalty Lie

The men in this new game are playing for keeps. They are not armed with Steno notebooks and pens quoting democratic slogans, they are men in possession of massive arsenals and nuclear warheads.

Hu Jintao and the communist press have reminded the military where their loyalty must lie. To punctuate this point, certain police forces were neutered—their power curtailed.


References & Image Credits:
(1) The Epoch Times
(2) Shanghaiist.com
(3) China Daily

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 31 Mar 2012 21:58

wong wrote:I would love to discuss IDEAS about the Chinese economy:

"The Innovation Catch-22 for Authoritarian China"
"China's ARTIFICIALLY reduced birth rate meaning it will grow old before it grows rich"
"China's economy will collapse because it OWES Trillions of Gadzillions of Yuan to ITSELF"
"Authoritarian China is inherently unstable even though the average Chinese dynasty is older than the United States"
"China's Sex Ratio, Gender Equality & the Competition for Brides on GDP Growth"

These and many more IDEAS I would love to discuss with Indian members. You do represent the top 8% of India. The crème de la crème of Indian society, so your ideas do matter.


Yawn. You still haven't figured out how markets operate then, do you? This board is a free and fair market of ideas and discussions. Some sell, others don't.

So *you* want to discuss something? Sure. Go ahead, make it interesting, factual, worthwhile, relevant, realistic and all that.If it is worthwhile, the free market will do the rest. But you can;t get 'discussion' on *your* ideas by fiat. Hmmph.

For the record, I find the 'ideas' you mention rather stale. Seems to me they only serve your megalomania than any knowledge gain. But then that's my opinion only. Don;t count on moi to 'engage' your discussions. Chale aate hain...

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Suraj » 31 Mar 2012 22:00

wong wrote:The warlord era that followed the collapse of the Qing Dynasty had long ended. Chiang had already consolidated power in China around himself, the KMT, and the Republic of China by the start of the war. (Yes, Mao was around then but he did not have political control of China, just like your Naxalites today.) In addition, Chiang was a recognized head of state by all the world major powers.

Recognized head of state ? He never had control over the country he claimed to rule. In fact, no one was in any position to assert authority over the country until Oct 1 1949. All he ever ruled for any duration was a tiny island off the coast, which was paradoxically 'recognized' as the 'representative of all China' until 1971, due to bizarre Cold War era compulsions. That's about as meaningful as asserting that His Holiness The Dalai Lama is the ruler of Tibet today, when all he does is run a government in exile.

The difference in India's case was that Aug 15 1947 was a transfer of power; before and after, a clear authority had control over territory. In China, it amounted to various sets of jokers intermittently slapping each other for 30+ years in between being sucked dry by the west and ransacked by Japanese.

Chinese (and Pakistanis) love to point out the Naxalite movement. I'd like to respond that GoI could steamroll them down, but they don't. Unlike an authoritarian state, we have to be measured in applying coercive force against fellow citizenry. However their record at preempting and squeezing dead assorted militancies is not in doubt. Like I mentioned previously, there's not a single successful formal secession from a militant movement. Ultimately GoI preempts, outlasts, kills or uses other dirty tricks. Oh, and the leader of the Naxalite movement was killed by the paramilitary in late 2011.

Anyway it's good to see the nonsense about 'gleat powel with UNSC veto' peter out; it means squat when you can neither affirm your own interests nor protect that of your greatest ally's. The only vetoes (of a total six) that China has successfully made were those either in conjunction with USSR/Russia (whose weight still counts far more) or beating down Taiwan membership motions by powerful nations like... Guatemala or Macedonia.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 22:32

Hari Seldon wrote:
wong wrote:I would love to discuss IDEAS about the Chinese economy:

"The Innovation Catch-22 for Authoritarian China"
"China's ARTIFICIALLY reduced birth rate meaning it will grow old before it grows rich"
"China's economy will collapse because it OWES Trillions of Gadzillions of Yuan to ITSELF"
"Authoritarian China is inherently unstable even though the average Chinese dynasty is older than the United States"
"China's Sex Ratio, Gender Equality & the Competition for Brides on GDP Growth"

These and many more IDEAS I would love to discuss with Indian members. You do represent the top 8% of India. The crème de la crème of Indian society, so your ideas do matter.


Yawn. You still haven't figured out how markets operate then, do you? This board is a free and fair market of ideas and discussions. Some sell, others don't.

So *you* want to discuss something? Sure. Go ahead, make it interesting, factual, worthwhile, relevant, realistic and all that.If it is worthwhile, the free market will do the rest. But you can;t get 'discussion' on *your* ideas by fiat. Hmmph.

For the record, I find the 'ideas' you mention rather stale. Seems to me they only serve your megalomania than any knowledge gain. But then that's my opinion only. Don;t count on moi to 'engage' your discussions. Chale aate hain...


So in the free market of ideas, Indians would rather spend pages and pages bashing a HSR rail system that has absolutely nothing to do with them or waste bandwidth on a non-coup in a Chinese economy thread? You want stale. That's stale. If students erecting liberty statues in the middle of Tiananmen Square isn't going to bring down the CPC, some guy from Chongqing certainly isn't going to either. Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy. If all we are going to do here is regurgitate some Friedman and Paul Samuelson ideas on China with a little bit of Indian Schadenfreude and Gordan Chang idiocy thrown in, that's the REAL wake-me-up YAAAAWN. WHY??? Because you guys have been doing the same thing for at least 10 years here and been dead wrong. I'll worry for China only when you guys change your opinion and only as a contrarian sign.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby AnimeshP » 31 Mar 2012 22:58

wong wrote:So in the free market of ideas, Indians would rather spend pages and pages bashing a HSR rail system that has absolutely nothing to do with them or waste bandwidth on a non-coup in a Chinese economy thread? You want stale. That's stale. If students erecting liberty statues in the middle of Tiananmen Square isn't going to bring down the CPC, some guy from Chongqing certainly isn't going to either. Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy. If all we are going to do here is regurgitate some Friedman and Paul Samuelson ideas on China with a little bit of Indian Schadenfreude and Gordan Chang idiocy thrown in, that's the REAL wake-me-up YAAAAWN. WHY??? Because you guys have been doing the same thing for at least 10 years here and been dead wrong. I'll worry for China only when you guys change your opinion and only as a contrarian sign.


Not only that ... in a free market of ideas a drone also spends pages and pages praising the super-duper value of HSR and sing paens to the CCP .. what to do ... we are like this onlee :D

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Singha » 31 Mar 2012 23:01

>> Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy

that is also my fervent and pious hope :mrgreen:

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby wong » 31 Mar 2012 23:09

Singha wrote:>> Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy

that is also my fervent and pious hope :mrgreen:


And let's hope India stays "democratic" for as long as possible too. Looks like we are in full agreement.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 31 Mar 2012 23:20

wong wrote:
Churchill was a "good guy", at least in any history book I've ever read and no I'm not interested in reading Indian history text books. In fact, Churchill is considered one of the greatest men of the 20th century. So by the comparative property, if you say Hitler was better than Churchill (the British), then yes, that pretty much means Hitler is a "good guy" in my book.


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
That is exactly my point. Your Churchill may have been a "good guy" for the British, he certainly was not as far as the Indians are concerned. All history can be seen from different viewpoints. I am sure you have heard of the phrase "One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter". If you haven't heard of it, just ask your Pakistani tallel than mountain fiend biladels who consider Osama Bin Laden as one of the greatest men of the 20th and 21st century. :lol:

Churchill and British leaders before him have been responsible for countless more Indian deaths than Hitler ever was so yes, for Indians he & the British were infinitely worse than Hitler. And as an Indian I will definitely give more weight to who is a good or bad guy from my country's perspective rather than some other foreign country's perspective - that's known in democratic countries as freedom and independence of thought, something I guess the Chinese are unfamiliar with.

wong wrote:And let's hope India stays "democratic" for as long as possible too. Looks like we are in full agreement.


Oh thank you for your good wishes! You thought you had made some snarky comment when in reality you really wished us well so Thank you! 8)

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 31 Mar 2012 23:26

^^If you don't like it, emigrate! :mrgreen:

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Singha » 31 Mar 2012 23:31

hitler let loose a 10 yr reign of terror and killed/gassed around 6 mil jews and another maybe 15 mil russians & allies from his invasions. net total of around 25 mil max.

england took over a vast country like india (pop was 500+ mil in 1947, so historically it has been high), misruled and raped the resources for a couple hundred years and had a economic growth rate of 1% per annum between 1857 to 1947 iirc with 90% poverty and 10% literacy. the bengal famine alone killed 4 million. if we tally up other famines in india and mass deaths due to callous british misrule, it will no doubt match hitler's tally easily

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famine_in_India

wiki estimates it at 60 mil under the Raj. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... op-420.jpg

Churchill sir had tea and cucumber sandwiches on a lush english lawn, while indians died in lakhs.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Prasad » 01 Apr 2012 00:04

Sirji,

Bengal famines (1770,1870s) = 4 mil each
South-India (Bangalore/Madras) Famine = 6-10 mil

The three alone put together equal anywhere between 15-19 million people dead!

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 01 Apr 2012 06:49

wong wrote:Because you guys have been doing the same thing for at least 10 years here and been dead wrong.

OK.So what? Just coz someone was wrong yesterday doesn't mean they'll also be wrong tomorrow. Past performance doesn't guarantee future returns and all that.

I'll worry for China only when you guys change your opinion and only as a contrarian sign.

I'm sure you've lacked the finesse to notice but I've long gone contrarian on China, its econ miracle, its inherent strengths to get things done, its ironclad discipline that allows it to prevent gravity's effects, its inevitable rise to superpowerdom and global dominance, etc etc etc. There is no China-India race, we lost it long ago. Soon we won't even be in China's league in terms of potential, forget performance as UPA III becomes a reality in Delhi. Pinpricks like Tibetian uprisings can and will be managed, by an iron hand as first resort and by ethnic cleansing, if necessary. The unapologetic pursuit of self-interest and the conviction in one's righteousness in PRC, India doesn't and couldn't have because of its very nature.

Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy.

Tathaastu.

If all we are going to do here is regurgitate some Friedman and Paul Samuelson ideas on China with a little bit of Indian Schadenfreude and Gordan Chang idiocy thrown in, that's the REAL wake-me-up YAAAAWN.

Aha. SO now I need your permission or approval to indulge in my idle speculation/ schadenfreude/ daydreaming etc.? Sorry, but this ain't the PRC. We'll jolly well talk about whatever we want, even if it doesn't suit your tastes much. And if you don't like that about this board, you can always emigrate. No?

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby sanjaykumar » 01 Apr 2012 08:16

How much GDP does this contribute?

http://tinyurl.com/73qz749

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Rahul M » 01 Apr 2012 09:22

total deaths by famine alone during british rule.

http://bharatrakshak.wikia.com/wiki/Tot ... s_in_India
http://bharatrakshak.wikia.com/wiki/Fam ... nsequences

so yes, from an Indian perspective churchill was a million times viler than hitler ever was. what US history books say doesn't matter. what wong is wong about is that there is no absolute truth in history.
I wonder if he knows that concentration camps for example were a british invention (during boer wars), or do US history books gloss over this little fact. in swearing by what you were spoonfed in school you are merely displaying your inability to think on our own. another example of lack of independent thought among current chinese of the communist variety.

so wong, if you studied in japan would tojo be a 'good guy' ? so what if he killed many chinese, many japanese think highly of him.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby jamwal » 02 Apr 2012 14:26

The Great British Tea Heist
in 1848 :shock: :rotfl:
In 1848, the British East India Company sent Robert Fortune on a trip to China's interior, an area forbidden to foreigners. Fortune's mission was to steal the secrets of tea horticulture and manufacturing. The Scotsman donned a disguise and headed into the Wu Si Shan hills in a bold act of corporate espionage.

As he made his way through the green tea factory, Fortune took note of something both peculiar and more than a little alarming on the hands of the tea manufacturers. It was the kind of observation that, once reported, would be an invaluable boon to the burgeoning Indian tea experiment, with the power to boost the sales of Indian tea over Chinese. While staring at the workers busy in the final stages of processing, he noticed that their fingers were “quite blue.”

Among the blenders and tasters of the London auction it was generally assumed that the Chinese engaged in all manner of duplicity, inserting twigs and sawdust into their teas to bulk up the loose leaves. It was said that the Chinese were brewing their own breakfast tea, saving the soggy leaves to dry in the sun, and then reselling the recycled product as fresh tea for the gullible “white devils.”

There was no trust in the trade, no faith in the goodwill of the Chinese manufacturers.

But the blue substance on the fingers of the Chinese workmen seemed to Fortune a matter of legitimate concern. What could be the source of this? He and others had long suspected that the Chinese were chemically dyeing tea for the benefit of the foreign market. He was now in a position to prove or disprove the charge.

He watched each step of the processing carefully, saying nothing, making notes, and occasionally asking Wang to put a question to a manager or worker. At one end of the factory the supervisor stood over a white porcelain mortar. In the bowl was a deep blue powder, made finer and finer with each grind of the pestle. The superintendent was in fact preparing iron ferrocyanide, a substance also known as Prussian blue, a pigment used in paints.
When cyanide is ingested, it binds to iron inside cells, interfering with the absorption of certain enzymes and compromising a cell’s ability to produce energy. Cyanide affects the tissues most needed for aerobic respiration, the heart and lungs. In high doses cyanide can bring on seizures, coma, and then cardiac arrest, killing quickly. At lower doses cyanide leads to weakness, giddiness, confusion, and light-headedness. Exposure to even low levels of cyanide over long periods of time can lead to permanent paralysis. Fortunately for the tea drinkers of Britain, Prussian blue is a complex molecule, so it is almost impossible to release the cyanide ion from it and the poison passes harmlessly through the body.

Elsewhere in the factory, however, over the charcoal fires where the tea was roasted, Fortune discovered a man cooking a bright yellow powder into a paste. The smell was terrible, like that of rotten eggs. The yellow substance was gypsum, or calcium sulfate dehydrate, a common component of plaster. Gypsum produces hydrogen sulfide gas as it breaks down. While the gas is produced naturally by the body in low doses, in high doses it acts as a broad-spectrum poison, affecting many of the body’s systems simultaneously, particularly the nervous system. At lower concentrations gypsum acts as an irritant; it reddens the eyes, inflames the throat, and causes nausea, shortness of breath, and fluid in the lungs. Consumed over the long term it might produce fatigue, memory loss, headaches, irritability, and dizziness. It can even induce miscarriage in women, and failure to thrive in infants and children.

Fortune estimated that more than half a pound of plaster and Prussian blue was included in every hundred pounds of tea being prepared. The average Londoner was believed to consume as much as one pound of tea per year, which meant that Chinese tea was effectively poisoning British consumers. The additives were not included maliciously, however, for the Chinese simply believed that foreigners wanted their green tea to look green.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby amit » 02 Apr 2012 16:00

Hari Seldon wrote:I'm sure you've lacked the finesse to notice but I've long gone contrarian on China, its econ miracle, its inherent strengths to get things done, its ironclad discipline that allows it to prevent gravity's effects, its inevitable rise to superpowerdom and global dominance, etc etc etc. There is no China-India race, we lost it long ago. Soon we won't even be in China's league in terms of potential, forget performance as UPA III becomes a reality in Delhi. Pinpricks like Tibetian uprisings can and will be managed, by an iron hand as first resort and by ethnic cleansing, if necessary. The unapologetic pursuit of self-interest and the conviction in one's righteousness in PRC, India doesn't and couldn't have because of its very nature.


Hari ji,

:D :D

You've single handedly contributed more to Wong jis cognitive dissonance than all the other posters here combined. I think it will take time for his brain to process (most likely the circuits will go kaput) the two dilemmas you have presented to him:

a) How can an Indian poster go against the prevailing opinion/mood on this thread and actually say China won and India lost and still remain a highly respected member and contributor to the forum?

b) How can somebody praise China's achievements and still not be overawed by the great Communist Party of China and its "achievements"?

I mean spare a thought for Wong ji. Nothing prepared him for this.

:)

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby amit » 02 Apr 2012 16:03

Singha wrote:>> Like it or not, the CPC is here to stay for at least another 200 years easy

that is also my fervent and pious hope :mrgreen:


+100.

I also pray and hope the CPC stays for another 200 years. On this issue we are in 400 per cent agreement with our Chinese guests. Let us all pray together for long life and prosperity of the CPC.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 02 Apr 2012 17:15

amit wrote:I mean spare a thought for Wong ji. Nothing prepared him for this.:)


Amit ji,

Different strokes for different trolls.

Actually, if you think like a kindergartner, its not hard to see wong's perspective... sorta like, "ain't I cuter, shinier and infra-structurer than SDRE yindia. How dare they still not be awed and actually talk back, eh?"

When you then take a slightly more mature perspective and ask "so what?", the wind leaves the sails very fast indeed. Only.

Jai hu, jai mao...

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby amit » 03 Apr 2012 11:03

Hari Seldon wrote:Jai hu, jai mao...


:-)

Very apt here. Indeed Jai hu, Jai mao...

:lol:

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 03 Apr 2012 12:36

Where are our deal biladels?? I am having withdrawal symptoms :(( :(( :((

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby anishns » 03 Apr 2012 18:37

^^^

They have been sent for Re-education...
Should be back soon.... :mrgreen:

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 04 Apr 2012 22:01

Aaha. I claim grand success in driving out 'em cheeni drones/trolls by vehemently agreeing with them to the point of boredom...or so I hope...:)

Time now to get the discussion back to PRC econo-remix...

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby zlin » 05 Apr 2012 04:53

Chinese build record breaking bridge: The world's highest, longest tunnel-to-tunnel bridge called Aizhai just open to traffic in China.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 05 Apr 2012 06:50

zlin wrote:Chinese build record breaking bridge: The world's highest, longest tunnel-to-tunnel bridge called Aizhai just open to traffic in China.


Wow! :shock: Great achievement! China should import this to other countries. 8)

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby zlin » 05 Apr 2012 08:08

The Super-long Railway Tunnels in China that is operational or u/c.

# Name (Chinese) Province Length km (mi) Tubextrack Year Completed Line(Chinese)

1. New Guanjiao Tunnel (新关角隧道) Qinghai 32.645 km (20.3 mi) 2x1 u/c Xining-Golmud Railway (青藏铁路)

2. West Qinling Tunnel (西秦岭隧道) Gansu 28.24 km (17.5 mi) 2x1 2013 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway(兰渝铁路)

3. Taihang Tunnel (太行山隧道) Shanxi 27.9 km (17.3 mi) 2x1 2007 Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan High-Speed Railway(石太客专)

4. South Lüliangshan Tunnel (南吕梁山隧道) Shanxi 23.4647 km (14.6 mi) 2x1 2014 Shanxi Central-South Railway (山西中南部铁路)

5. Middle Tianshan Tunnel (中天山隧道) Xinjiang 22.452 km (14.0 mi) 2x1 2012 Turpan-Kuqa 2nd Line Railway(南疆铁路土库二线)

6. Qingyunshan Tunnel (青云山隧道)Fujian 22.175 km (13.8 mi) 2x1 2012 Xiangtang-Putian Railway(向莆铁路)

7.Wushaoling Tunnel (乌鞘岭隧道) Gansu 21.1 km (13.1 mi) 2x1 2006 Lanzhou - Ürümqi Railway(兰新铁路)

8. Lüliangshan Tunnel (吕梁山隧道) Shanxi 20.800 km (12.925 mi) 2x1 2010 Taiyuan - Zhongwei - Yinchuan Railway(太中银铁路)

9. Muzhailing Tunnel (木寨岭隧道) Gansu 19.08 km (11.86 mi) 2x1 2013 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway(兰渝铁路)

10. Qinling Tunnel (秦岭隧道)Shaanxi 18.460 km (11.5 mi) 2x1 2002 Xi'an - Ankang Railway(西康铁路)

11. Shilin Tunnel (石林隧道) Yunnan 18.218 km (11.3 mi) 1x2 u/c Kunming - Nanning Railway(云桂铁路)

12. Taihangshan Tunnel (太行山隧道) Shanxi,Henan 18.125 km (11.3 mi) 2x1 2014 Shanxi Central-South Railway (山西中南部通道)

13. Xuefengshan Tunnel (雪峰山隧道)Fujian 17.892 km (11.1 mi) 2x1 2012 Xiangtang-Putian Railway(向莆铁路)

14. Xiuling Tunnel (秀岭隧道)Yunnan 17.623 km (11.0 mi) 2x1 2013 Dali-Ruili Railway (大瑞铁路)

15. Gaoganshan Tunnel (高盖山隧道)Fujian 17,612 km (10,943.6 mi) 2x1 2012 Xiangtang-Putian Railway(向莆铁路)

16. Zhongtiaoshan Tunnel (中条山隧道) Shanxi 17.35 km (10.8 mi) 2x1 u/c Yuncheng-Sanmengxia Railway (运三铁路)

17. Yongshouliang Tunnel (永寿梁隧道)Shaanxi 17.16 km (10.7 mi) 1x1 2012 Xi'an-Pingliang Railway (西平铁路)

18. Liupanshan Tunnel (六盘山隧道) Gansu 16.719 km (10.4 mi) 1x1 2012 Tianshui-Pingliang Railway (天平铁路)

19. Hadapu Tunnel (哈达铺隧道) Gansu 16.6 km (10.3 mi) 2x1 2013 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway(兰渝铁路)

20. Taiyueshan Tunnel (太岳山隧道) Shanxi 16.194 km (10.1 mi) 2x1 2014 Shanxi Central-South Railway (山西中南部通道)

21. Fajiushan Tunnel (发鸠山隧道) Shanxi 16.007 km (9.9 mi) 2x1 2014 Shanxi Central-South Railway (山西中南部通道)

22. Xiangshan Tunnel (象山隧道) Fujian 15.901 km (9.880 mi) 2x1 2011 Longyan-Xiamen Railway (龙厦铁路)

23. Erqingshan Tunnel (二青山隧道) Shanxi 15.851 km (9.8 mi) 2x1 2013 Taiyuan-Xingxian Railway (太兴铁路)

24. Heishan Tunnel (黑山隧道) Gansu 15.764 km (9.795 mi) 2x1 2013 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway(兰渝铁路)

25. Daiyunshan Tunnel (戴云山隧道)Fujian 15.623 km (9.7 mi) 2x1 2012 Xiangtang-Putian Railway(向莆铁路)

26. Guanshan Tunnel (关山隧道) Gansu 15.55 km (9.7 mi) 1x1 2012 Tianshui-Pingliang Railway (天平铁路)

27. Liulangshan Tunnel (六狼山隧道) Shanxi 15.175 km (9.4 mi) 1x2 2012 Zhungeer-Shuozhou Railway (准朔铁路)

28. Maotianshan Tunnel (冒天山隧道) Shaanxi 14.915 km (9.3 mi) 1x1 2011 Baotou-Xi'an Railway (包西铁路)

29. Dapoling Tunnel (大坡岭隧道)Yunnan 14.728 km (9.2 mi) 2x1 2013 Dali-Ruili Railway (大瑞铁路)

30. Bibanpo Tunnel (壁板坡隧道)Yunnan 14.7 km (9.1 mi) 2x1 2015 Shanghai-Kunming HSR (沪昆高铁)

31. Yanshan Tunnel (岩山隧道)Guizhou 14.695 km (9.1 mi) 2x1 Guiyang-Guangzhou HSR(贵广高铁)

32. Wuyishan Tunnel (武夷山隧道)Fujian 14.659 km (9.1 mi) 1x2 2012 Xiangtang-Putian Railway(向莆铁路

33. Dazhushan Tunnel (大柱山隧道)Yunnan 14.625 km (9.1 mi) 2x1 2013 Dali-Ruili Railway (大瑞铁路)

34. Sandu Tunnel (三都隧道)Guizhou 14.598 km (9.1 mi) 2x1 u/c Guiyang-Guangzhou HSR (贵广高铁)

35. Tianchiping Tunnel (天池坪隧道)Gansu 14.528 km (9.0 mi) 2x1 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway (兰渝铁路)

36. Dayaoshan Tunnel (大瑶山隧道) Guangdong 14.295 km (8.883 mi) 1x2 1987 Beijing - Guangzhou Railroad(京广铁路)

37. Jinguashan Tunnel(金瓜山隧道)Fujian 14.097 km (8.8 mi) 2x1 2012 Xiangtang-Putian)(向莆铁路)

38. YanmengguanTunnel(雁门关隧道)Shanxi 14.085 km (8.8 mi) 1x2 u/c North Datong-Puzhouzhen(北同蒲铁路)

39. Tianpingshan Tunnel (天平山隧道)Guangxi 14.012 km (8.7 mi) 1x2 u/cGuiyang-Guangzhou HSR (贵广高铁)

40. Tongmashan Tunnel (同马山隧道)Guizhou 13.929 km (8.7 mi) 1x2 u/c Guiyang-Guangzhou Railway (贵广高铁)

41. Yesanguan Tunnel (野三关隧道)Hubei 13.838 km (8.6 mi) 2x1 2009Yichang-Wanzhou Railway (宜万铁路)

42. Baofengshan Tunnel (宝峰山隧道)Guangxi 13.708 km (8.5 mi) 2x1 u/c Guiyang-Guangzhou HSR (贵广高铁)

43. Humaling Tunnel (胡麻岭隧道)Gansu 13.611 km (8.5 mi) 2x1 2013 Lanzhou-Chongqing Railway (兰渝铁路)

44. North Tianshan Tunnel (北天山隧道)Xinjiang 13.610 km (8.5 mi) 2x1 2009 Jinghe-Yining-Huo Erguosi Railway (精伊霍铁路)

45. Wanshoushan Tunnel (万寿山隧道)Chongqing 13.468 km (8.4 mi) 2x1 2012 Chongqing-Lichuan Railway (渝利铁路)

46. Shanyang Tunnel (杉阳隧道)Yunnan 13.465 km (8.4 mi) 2x1 2013 Dali-Ruili Railway (大瑞铁路)

47. Changhongling Tunnel (长洪岭隧道)Yunnan 13.294 km (8.3 mi) 2012 Chongqing-Lichuan Railway (渝利铁路)

48. Dabieshan Tunnel (大别山隧道)Hubei 13.256 km (8.2 mi) 1x2 2008 Hefei-Wuhan High Speed Railway (合武铁路)

49. Anlu Tunnel (安禄隧道)Yunnan 13.187 km (8.2 mi) 2008 Guanglu-Kunming Railway (广昆铁路)

50. Xiapu Tunnel (霞浦隧道)Fujian 13.099 km (8.1 mi) 1x2 2009 Wenzhou-Fuzhou Railway (温福铁路)

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby zlin » 05 Apr 2012 08:11

The Super-long Highway Tunnels in China that is operational or u/c.

# Name (Chinese name) Province metres(mi) Year_open Lanes x Tubes Road

1 Zhongnanshan Tunnel(秦岭终南山隧道) Shaanxi 18.02 km (11.2 mi) 2007 2x2 Xi'an-Zhashui Expressway

2 Micangshan Tunnel(米仓山隧道) Sichuan 13.8 km (8.6 mi) u/c 2x2 Bazhong-Shaanxi Expressway

3 Hsuehshan(雪山隧道) Taiwan 12.942 km (8.0 mi) 2006 2x2 5

4 New Erlangshan Tunnel(新二郎山隧道) Sichuan 13.433 km (8.3 mi) u/c 2x2 Yaan-Kangding Expressway

5 Maijishan Tunnel (麦积山隧道) Gansu 12.288 km (7.6 mi) 2009 2x2 Baoji-Tianshui Expressway

6 Baojiashan Tunnel (包家山隧道) Shaanxi 11.185 km (7.0 mi) 2009 2x2 Xiaohe-Ankang Expressway

7 Baotashan Tunnel (宝塔山隧道) Shanxi 10.480 km (6.5 mi) 2012 2x2 Pingyao-Yushe Expressway

8 Nibashan Tunnel (泥巴山隧道) Sichuan 10.007 km (6.2 mi) 2012 2x2 National Expressway G108, Yaan-Xichang Expressway

9 Zhongtiaoshan Tunnel(中条山隧道) Shanxi 9.67 km (6.01 mi) 2013 2x2 Yuncheng-Lingbao Expressway

10 Mayazi Tunnel(麻崖子隧道) Gansu 9km (5.6 mi) 2012 2x2 Wudu, Longnan-Guanzigou, Wenxian Expressway

11. Shanghai Yangtse River Tunnel (上海长江隧道)Shanghai 8.95 km (5.6 mi) 2009 2x3 Shanghai-Chongming Corridor 2 tubes, world's widest tunnel

12. Longtan Tunnel (龙潭隧道)Hubei 8.657 km (5.4 mi) 2010 2x2 Shanghai-Chengdu West Expressway

13. Zhegushan Tunnel (鹧鸪山隧道)Sichuan 8.55 km (5.3 mi) u/c 2x2 Wenchuan-Maerkang Expressway

14. Xueshanliang Tunnel(雪山梁隧道)Sichuan 7.957 km (4.944 mi) u/c 2x1 Chuanzhusi-Huanglong Highway

15. Balangshan Tunnel(巴朗山隧道)Sichuan 7.945 km (4.937 mi) u/c 2x1 Chuanzhusi-Huanglong Highway

16. Mixiliang Tunnel(米溪梁隧道)Shaanxi 7.938 km (4.932 mi) 2010 2x2 Ankang-Maoba Expressway

17. Kuocangshan Tunnel(括苍山隧道)Zhejiang 7.929 km (4.927 mi) 2008 2x2 Zhuji-Yongjia Expressway 2 tubes, 7.93km + 7.87km

18. Jiaozhou Bay Tunnel (胶州湾海底隧道)Shandong 7.8 km (4.8 mi) 2011 2x3 2 tubes

19. Fangdoushan (Jinzhaishan) Tunnel(方斗山隧道)Chongqing 7.605 km (4.726 mi) 2007 2x2 Zhongxian-Shizhu Expressway 2 tubes, 7.605km + 7.567km

20. Cangling Tunnel(苍岭隧道)Zhejiang 7.605 km (4.726 mi) 2008 2x2 Taizhou-Jinhua Expressway 2 tubes, 7.605km + 7.536km

21. Shimenya Tunnel(石门垭隧道)Hubei 7.52 km (4.67 mi) 2012 2x2 Yichang-Badong Expressway 2 tubes, 7.524km+7.493km

22. Motianling Tunnel(摩天岭隧道)Chongqing 7.353 km (4.569 mi) 2010 2x2 Yichang-Chongqing Expressway 2 tubes, 7.353km + 7.280km

23. Baiyun Tunnel(白云隧道)Chongqing 7.16 km (4.45 mi) 2009 2x2 Chongqing-Changsha Expressway

24. Xishan Tunnel (西山隧道)Shanxi 7.11 km (4.4 mi) 2011 2x2 Taiyuan-Gujiao Expressway 2 tubes 7.11km+7.03 km

25. Taining Tunnel(泰宁隧道)Fujian 7.039 km (4.374 mi) u/c 2x2 Jianning-Taining Expressway 2 tubes, 7.039km + 7.007km

26. Xuefengshan Tunnel(雪峰山隧道)Hunan 6.956 km (4.322 mi) 2007 2x2 Shaoyang-Huaihua Expressway 2 tubes, 6.956km + 6.946km

27. Tongsheng Tunnel(通省隧道)Hubei 6.887 km (4.279 mi) u/c 2x2 Shiyan-Fangxian Expressway

28. Queershan Tunnel(雀儿山隧道)Sichuan 6.887 km (4.279 mi) u/c 2x2 National Highway # 317

29. Wuchiba Tunnel(乌池坝隧道)Huibei 6.713 km (4.171 mi) 2008 2x2 Shanghai-Chengdu West Expressway 2 tubes, 6.713km + 6.708km

30. Yangjiao Tunnel(羊角隧道)Chongqing 6.682 km (4.152 mi) 2008 2x2 Chongqing-Changsha Expressway

31. Lüjialiang Tunnel(吕家梁隧道)Chongqing 6.664 km (4.141 mi) 2008 2x2 Zhongxian-Shizhu Expressway

32. Mingyueshan Tunnel(明月山隧道)Chongqing, Sichuan 6.557 km (4.074 mi) 2008 2x2 Dianjiang-Lingshui Expressway 2 tubes, 6.557km + 6.555km

33. Xinglingjing Tunnel(西凌井隧道)Shanxi 6.555 km (4.073 mi) 2011 2x2 Taiyuan-Jianxian Expressway

34. Donggongshan Tunnel(洞宫山隧道)Fujian 6.537 km (4.062 mi) 2012 2x2 Ningde-Wuyishan Expressway

35. Xiakou Tunnel(峡口隧道)Hubei 6.487 km (4.031 mi) 2012 2x2 Yichang-Badong Expressway

36. Putaoshan Tunnel(葡萄山隧道)Chongqing 6.308 km (3.920 mi) 2008 2x2 Chongqing-Changsha Expressway

37. Shuangfeng Tunnel(双峰隧道)Zhejiang 6.184 km (3.843 mi) 2008 2x2 Zhuji-Yongjia Expressway

38. Qinling I Tunnel(秦岭一号隧道)Shaanxi 6.144 km (3.818 mi) 2007 2x2 Xi'an-Hanzhong Expressway

39. Qinling II Tunnel(秦岭二号隧道)Shaanxi 6.125 km (3.806 mi) 2007 2x2 Xi'an-Hanzhong Expressway

40. Dabashan Tunnel(大巴山隧道)Sichuan 6.123 km (3.805 mi) 2011 2x2 Dazhou-Shaanxi Expressway 2 tubes, 6.123km+6.115km

41. Zhongxing Tunnel(中兴隧道)Chongqing 6.105 km (3.793 mi) 2009 2x2 Wulong-Pengshui Expressway 2 tubes, 6.105km+6.082 km

42. Fengshuiguan Tunnel(分水关隧道)Fujian 6.043 km (3.755 mi) 2012 2x2 Ningde-Wuyishan Expressway 2 tubes, 6.043km + 5.947km

43. Tiefengshan #2 Tunnel(铁峰山2号隧道)Chongqing 6.025 km (3.744 mi) 2007 2x2 Wanzhou-Kaixian Expressway

44. Xiang'an Undersea Tunnel (翔安海底隧道)Fujian 5.96 km (3.7 mi) 2010 2x3 2 tubes

45. Jieling Tunnel(界岭隧道)Hubei 5.681 km (3.530 mi) 2012 2x2 Yichang-Badong Expressway

46. Jiangjunshi Tunnel(将军石隧道)Sichuan-Gansu 5.585 km (3.470 mi) 2013 2x2 Guangyuan-Gansu Expressway

47. Meiguling Tunnel(美菰林隧道)Fujian 5.580 km (3.467 mi) 2003 2x2 Beijing-Fuzhou Expressway 2 tubes, 5.580km + 5.568km

48. Yunzhongshan Tunnel(云中山隧道)Shanxi 5.575 km (3.464 mi) 2011 2x2 Xinzhou-Baode County Expressway 2 tubes, 5.575km + 5.565km

49. Qiangfengling Tunnel(抢风岭隧道)Shanxi 5.570 km (3.461 mi) 2011 2x2 Lingqiu-Shanyin Expressway 2 tubes

50. Lajishan Tunnel(拉脊山隧道)Qinghai 5.53 km (3.44 mi) 2012 2x2 Xi-jiu highway

51. Huoshao'an Tunnel(火烧庵隧道)Hubei 5.5 km (3.4 mi) 2012 2x2 Yichang-Badong Expressway

52. Bayuan Tunnel(灞源隧道)Shaanxi 5.450 km (3.386 mi) 2012 2x2 Xi'an-Shangzhou Expressway 2 tubes, 5.450km+5.445km

53. Jiulingshan Tunnel(九岭山隧道)Jiangxi 5.44 km (3.38 mi) 2008 2x2 Wuning-Jian Expressway

54. Sanhuashi Tunnel(三花石隧道)Shaanxi 5.434 km (3.377 mi) 2012 2x2 Shiyan-Tianshui Expressway 2 tubes, 5.434km+5.431km

55. Qipanguan Tunnel(棋盘关隧道)Shaanxi 5.347 km (3.322 mi) 2009 2x2 Ningqiang-Qipanguan Expressway

56. Guling Tunnel(鹘岭隧道)Shaanxi 5.333 km (3.314 mi) 2008 2x2 Hanzhong-Manchuanguan Expressway 2 tubes, 5.333km+5.273km

57. Yanmengshan Tunnel(雁门关隧道)Shanxi 5.230 km (3.250 mi) 2003 2x2 Datong-[Yuncheng]] Expressway 2 tubes, 5.230km+5.135km

58. Tongluoshan Tunnel(铜锣山隧道) Sichuan 5.197 km (3.229 mi) 2009 2x2 Lingshui-Dianjiang Expressway 2 tubes

59. Jiahuoyan Tunnel(夹活岩隧道) Hubei 5.224 km (3.246 mi) 2010 2x2 Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway 2 tubes, 5.224km+5.146km

60. Fengjieliang Tunnel(分界梁隧道) Chongqing 5.085 km (3.160 mi) 2010 2x2 Chongqing-Yichang Expressway 2 tubes, 5.085km+5.080km

61. Caihongling Tunnel(彩虹岭隧道) Guangdong 5.068 km (3.149 mi) 2007 1x2 Shuanghe Highway

62. Dafengkou Tunnel(大风口隧道) Chongqing 5.003 km (3.109 mi) 2011 2x2 Wushan-Fengjie Expressway 2 tubes

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby anishns » 05 Apr 2012 09:20

Raja Bose!!!
See what you've done! Give them an inch....

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby svinayak » 05 Apr 2012 10:12

Hari, you cannot gloat quickly. Have patience!

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 05 Apr 2012 11:41

zlin, What a fantastic achievement! 8)

Do you also have a list of super long trains in China? I think there is much Chinese innovation here. I am truly in awe.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Hari Seldon » 05 Apr 2012 11:42

^^I am in more awe than you, raja bose! Hmmmph.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 05 Apr 2012 22:56

I think you made a mistake in the list.

3 Hsuehshan(雪山隧道) Taiwan 12.942 km (8.0 mi) 2006 2x2 5

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby paramu » 05 Apr 2012 23:06

That is okay bosemulla.... China is still amazing. I don't think India will ever catch up with PRC. They are the sooper pawar in waiting... May be eternally.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Prem » 06 Apr 2012 00:18

Any list of internationally recognized literary,intellectual work done in last 2,3 decades?

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby Raja Bose » 06 Apr 2012 02:05

paramu wrote:That is okay bosemulla.... China is still amazing. I don't think India will ever catch up with PRC. They are the sooper pawar in waiting... May be eternally.


I thought they were already a super power :shock: I don't think India should even try to catch up since its democratic system is too chaotic, flawed and inefficient. We pay too much attention to people's feelings and what they think and not enough attention on the main goal which is making money and projecting positive image.

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Re: PRC Economy - New Reflections : Dec 15 2011

Postby ashi » 06 Apr 2012 04:06

Raja Bose wrote: We pay too much attention to people's feelings and what they think and not enough attention on the main goal which is making money and projecting positive image.


Tell that to the hundreds of million of people who lives in slums and don't have enough food to get by daily that "you are paying too much attention" to their feelings.

I thought the previous effort that you put up to mock and bash China was better than this sarcasm which is neither witty nor funny.


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