Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby srin » 18 Feb 2013 18:09

There was some talk of making Sasser la motorable - would that be a feasible alternative route to Shyok valley ?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby rohitvats » 18 Feb 2013 23:27

srin wrote:There was some talk of making Sasser la motorable - would that be a feasible alternative route to Shyok valley ?


Never heard of that.

But I don't think we require it. One simply needs to follow the Shyok river due east and thence north to reach where Saser La would take one. The pass was used in summer because Shyok river would be in full flow and it was considered very dangerous to cross because of reasons I gave earlier.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby srin » 19 Feb 2013 00:04

Finally found it - this was by a serving IA officer posted in Leh. http://www.bcmtouring.com/forum/travelogues-north-india-f61/leh-diary-family-pets-t19139-91/#post437318

Now, a bit of news. During my last journey in the area (alone and via aerial route), I had clicked and posted a few pics of the Sasoma Loops. This road was under construction then. Today, this road to Saser La (52 Kms from Sasoma) is ready and is in use. These loops can be seen from far. It falls in restricted area but as per the news regarding new peaks being opened up for climbing, it will be thrown open to visitors in near future. As on date, area is out of bounds.


No point in building a road to Saser la, unless it goes down the other side to Shyok.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby anirban_aim » 19 Feb 2013 11:27



Dear Friends this news Item is pure DDM.

The Head of BRO is always from the Army and thats the way it has been envisaged from the organisation was created. The news that anybody is upset because of this pure DDM based on worst kind of Chai Biskoot Tales.

Secondly, In the recent past (last 5 years or so) there has been significant expansion in the organisation and in the meanwhile some new command posts were created for which senior officers from the Army or BRO Civillian officers weren't immeditaely avaialble, to overcome this, as a stop gap measure some junior officers were posted on deputation to higher formations as Officers in Charge. This is routine.

As and when Army and Civillian officers are available on promotion or deputation these posts will be filled with the officers of desired rank/seniority.

All command officer ranks are split evenly between Army and Civillian Officers and postings to some key posts (Directors at DGBR) are rotated between Army and Civil officers, this is strictly adhered to. At any time the no of CE/Brig rank officers are shared at 50%. No single post is earmarked for anybody and all who mater know this.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby VinodTK » 24 Feb 2013 00:39

Army Chief asks commanders to consolidate gains in J-K
JAMMU: Army Chief Gen Bikram Singh today exhorted senior commanders in the Northern Theatre to further consolidate their gains in counter-insurgency operations achieved during the past two years.

Gen Singh had an interaction with Lt Gen K T Parnaik, GOC-in-C Northern Command, and other senior officers in the Command Theatre at Udhampur, 65 kms from here.

"Senior commanders should further consolidate on their gains in counter-insurgency operations achieved during the past two years," Gen Singh said during his brief visit to the Northern Command Headquarters.

Due to bad weather, the Army Chief's aircraft had to land at Jammu and he went to Udhampur by road.

Gen Singh was apprised of the current security situation and the operational preparedness of the Northern Command.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby SSridhar » 24 Feb 2013 09:29

Forgotten IPKF Memorial Rediscovered in Palaly Radhakrishnan, The Hindu
A long-forgotten memorial to soldiers of the Indian Peace Keeping Force inside the Palaly high security zone has been re-discovered.

“The memorial was found late last year,” Indian High Commissioner to Sri Lanka Ashok K. Kantha told The Hindu . After Jaffna Consul General V. Mahalingam and a team verified the structure, the High Commission requested the Sri Lankan government’s support in sprucing up the memorial befitting martyrs.

“The Sri Lankan government was very cooperative and we thank it for its support,” Mr. Kantha said.

Mr. Mahalingam said: “Some people found it, and they informed us. Initially, we were not sure. But they took a few pictures and sent them to us.”

Commander of Jaffna security forces Mahinda Hathurusinghe and his team helped clear the wild growth and assisted reclaiming the memorial.

On Wednesday, Mr. Kantha, Mr. Mahalingam and others paid floral tributes at the place.

The memorial pays homage to 33 men of the Indian elite special forces, the 10 Para Regiment, who were cremated there. It comprises seven structures and has the names of all the soldiers. A release said the lives were lost in IPKF operations in the Northern Province between 1987 and 1989.

The regiment suffered significant casualties in one of its first battles. A company of 10 Para Commando, was heli-landed into the Jaffna Fort to raid the LTTE headquarters in the opening stages of the campaign on October 12, 1987.

The LTTE greeted the commandos with a hail of gunfire. It is not clear if all those buried in Palaly are from the first battle or from multiple battles.

My salute to these bravehearts and their families.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Baikul » 24 Feb 2013 12:08

SSridhar wrote:Forgotten IPKF Memorial Rediscovered in Palaly Radhakrishnan, The Hindu
A long-forgotten memorial to soldiers of the Indian Peace Keeping Force inside the Palaly high security zone has been re-discovered.
............

The LTTE greeted the commandos with a hail of gunfire. It is not clear if all those buried in Palaly are from the first battle or from multiple battles.

My salute to these bravehearts and their families.


Something I didn't know. Is this mistaken reportage, or standard IA practice in the field (I didn't think so, but then I'm no expert).

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Raja Bose » 24 Feb 2013 12:09

SSridhar wrote:Forgotten IPKF Memorial Rediscovered in Palaly Radhakrishnan, The Hindu
A long-forgotten memorial to soldiers of the Indian Peace Keeping Force inside the Palaly high security zone has been re-discovered.
...
The memorial pays homage to 33 men of the Indian elite special forces, the 10 Para Regiment, who were cremated there. It comprises seven structures and has the names of all the soldiers. A release said the lives were lost in IPKF operations in the Northern Province between 1987 and 1989.
...
The regiment suffered significant casualties in one of its first battles. A company of 10 Para Commando, was heli-landed into the Jaffna Fort to raid the LTTE headquarters in the opening stages of the campaign on October 12, 1987.

The LTTE greeted the commandos with a hail of gunfire. It is not clear if all those buried in Palaly are from the first battle or from multiple battles.


Even here DDM strikes. :roll: In the Jaffna university raid, Para Commandos lost 6 men whereas this memorial has 33 listed - how can they all be from the 1st battle?


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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby samverma » 24 Feb 2013 18:10

A shade off topic but this seems to be the appropriate thread....there were articles eons ago wherein the future soldier kit/weapons etc were being discussed...can we, just for theoretical brainstorming, discuss with images of what should the complete BDU with kit/weapon be for Indian soldiers in the next 5/10/15 years right from boots to the cap/helmet and everything in between?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby samverma » 24 Feb 2013 18:11

^^^^^ i forgot to add terrain wise

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Surya » 24 Feb 2013 20:14

its DDM

there is no burial there - its a memorial

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby RajD » 25 Feb 2013 20:10

Although, situation has changed dramaticaly after beheading of the Indian soldiers this article albeit dated looks still relevant from a few POVs. Found it interesting in light of the good general's aquittal from the encounter case last week.Tried to find the link in IE, TOI for the news but strangely could not. Posting the article in full. Hope, it is not posted before. Any comment, Gurus? http://www.newsinsight.net/Stop,chief.aspx#page=page-1
Stop, chief
Sly moves are afoot to withdraw AFSPA from Jammu and Kashmir.

By N.V. Subramanian (7 November 2012)

New Delhi: Whilst military writers are justifiably exercised over suggestions of track 2 peaceniks to pullout from Siachen, their anger must simultaneously focus on the army chief, General Bikram Singh, and his alleged shenanigans with the Jammu and Kashmir chief minister, Omar Abdullah, to withdraw the Armed Forces’ Special Powers Act (AFSPA) incrementally from the state.

AFSPA provides legal cover to the army in counterinsurgency operations. Under AFSPA, army personnel cannot be prosecuted for their actions without the consent of the Central government, which is rarely given. In J and K (as in Punjab and Assam earlier), it is the army which has contained terrorism. There was a time in the early 1990s when the Centre had given up on the state, when the first of the “pro-azadi” groups had spread its influence rapidly. It is the army which retrieved the situation when Central intelligence failed and the local police sided with the insurgency. AFSPA was amended and applied to J and K, and all told, it has assisted the state to keep on top of the terrorism situation.

AFSPA has been a bugbear for Omar Abdullah for no other reason than that he has been a failure as J and K’s chief minister and finds it politically expedient to demand its withdrawal. Omar has excellent communications skills but zero vision, in which he resembles the dynasts in power in Delhi and Lucknow. To boot, he has a fiery opposition leader in Mehbooba Mufti of the PDP who has an accommodative relationship with the insurgent elements of the state. When young and misguided Kashmiri stone-throwers two summers ago almost seemed to get the better of Omar Abdullah, another dynast, Rahul Gandhi, threw him a lifeline, on which basis he continues as chief minister.

Early in his tenure, Omar cooked up a bizarre scheme with the then Union home minister, P.Chidambaram, to hand over the paramilitaries’ anti-insurgency tasks to the local police, which is both mixed up with the separatists and otherwise inadequate for a bigger fighting role against them. Framed-up rape charges against some paramilitary troops in Shopian (later disproved) became the reason to seek the ouster of the paramilitaries from the Valley, nearly bowing to which demand Omar Abdullah and Chidambaram played into the hands of the terrorists, until this writer explained the insidious psy-war (Commentary, “Bad news”, 3 July 2009). Omar Abdullah’s demand for AFSPA’s withdrawal from Jammu and Kashmir has predated that crisis and grown stronger since.

Omar Abdullah believes AFSPA’s removal would open the Kashmiri floodgates of love and affection for him. Not true. Sheikh Abdullah was an iconic leader of Kashmir, and Kashmiris were willing to forgive him quite a lot. His son and Omar’s father, Farooq, is a bit of a buffoon, with no vision for Kashmir, but he is a genial mixer. Farooq gets on easily with his people, even though they may not agree with his politics. Omar Abdullah, on the other hand, is the least sociable of the Abdullah clan. He prefers running Kashmir with a handful of officials from the safety and security of his chief minister’s bungalow. He is distant with his own party colleagues and has little interaction with the people. There is no connect between Omar Abdullah and Kashmiris. He might as well be administrating the state from Delhi.

Omar Abdullah knows he is on a very weak wicket in J and K, and that he will be thrown out in the next election. He needs something -- anything -- to befuddle and bamboozle Kashmiris. Kashmiri politicians in their engagements with the Centre have traditionally played the Kashmir card, which in substance means, “After me, the Deluge.” With Kashmiris, these same politicians pose as being anti-Centre. Being politically savvy, the Kashmiris have seen through this game long ago. But Omar Abdullah, all the same, cannot give up posing, and in one of those poses, he wants AFSPA to be rolled back from Kashmir.

No army chief or field commander has supported Omar Abdullah. In his own inoffensive way, the defence minister, A.K.Anthony, has rejected Abdullah’s demand. In its confused libertinism, the Manmohan Singh government may yet agree to AFSPA’s withdrawal, but the rest of the political class, and particularly the BJP, will object. The strategic community will not stand for it. Faced with a wall, Omar Abdullah seemed to have reconciled to the continued operation of AFSPA, but the appointment of a new army chief, General Bikram Singh, appears to have given him a new unexpected opportunity.

The chief hurdle that General Singh faced in his appointment was a case of alleged human rights’ violation in 2001 in Anantnag in a place called Janglat Mandi. As a brigadier, he is supposed to have killed a beggar in a false encounter. A relatively unknown J and K NGO filed a PIL against him, which in turn became the basis for a second PIL in the Supreme Court against General Singh’s appointment as army chief, which was rejected. The Kashmir NGO, however, is pursuing its PIL in the state high court, and press reports allege a section of the army is trying to hush the matter in the interest of the chief.

There is new intelligence that suggests the army chief has allegedly pressed on Omar Abdullah to somehow bring the false encounter case to a closure. In return, General Bikram Singh has reportedly assured that the army will not oppose his demands on AFSPA as before. Except that a crucial army commander who has to author and initiate this changed line has refused, saying that any dilution of AFSPA will lead to a successful terrorists’ disruption of the 2014 general elections in the state, a key aim of Pakistan to internationalize the Kashmir issue all over again. General Bikram Singh has allegedly threatened the obdurate army commander with a transfer to a lesser command, but he remains unfazed. The army chief has now plans to get a supine army commander who will agree with his scheme to weaken and eventually remove AFSPA from Jammu and Kashmir.

All to save his skin.

General Bikram Singh has been bad news for the Indian Army from the start. That it would get so worse still comes as a surprise. Next you know he will signal a withdrawal from Siachen. This man must be stopped.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Sanku » 25 Feb 2013 20:25

^^^

We told you so?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby VinodTK » 26 Feb 2013 05:10

Army renews hunt for bunker-bursting rifles 8 years after bribery scandal
NEW DELHI: The Army is launching a fresh hunt for anti-material rifles, meant for "bunker-bursting" as well as "penetrating" light-armoured vehicles, eight years after its earlier project with South African company Denel got derailed mid-way due to kickback allegations and political mudslinging.

The Army is now ready with the technical parameters, or GSQRs (general staff qualitative requirements), for the fresh global tender for the anti-material rifles. The force wants the rifle — weighing not over 15 kg to ensure two soldiers can carry it -- with an effective range of over 1,000-metre to take on enemy bunkers and other field fortifications, "soft-skinned" armoured vehicles and low-flying helicopters, say sources.

The new anti-material rifle project will be a major one, with the first lot being imported directly and the rest indigenously manufactured after transfer of technology (ToT). The Army, apart from its other arms, wants each of its 355 infantry battalions to have at least four such specialized rifles that can fire special calibre high-explosive incendiary/armour-piercing ammunition.

The long-delayed quest for these rifles is just one of the several military modernization projects that have gone for a toss due to corruption scams and consequent blacklisting of armament majors. "The guilty should be hung...the entire procurement system needs to be overhauled to ensure national security requirements are not hit time and again," said a senior officer.

For instance, Army's failure to induct even a single advanced 155mm artillery gun since the Bofors scandal of the mid-1980s. "Blacklisting has proven counter-productive. Most major artillery manufacturers, like Denel, Rheinmetall, Singapore Technologies and Soltam, are blacklisted by India...It's only now the Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) and private players like the Tatas are developing 155mm howitzers," said a MoD official.

The anti-material rifles' story is similar. The UPA-I government in April 2005 had put on hold all dealings with Denel after it came to light that 12.75% commission was allegedly paid to a firm, Varas Associates, to swing the five contracts signed between July 1999 and March 2005.

The contracts were for 700 anti-material rifles and 398,000 rounds of ammunition, followed by ToT to OFB along with "knocked down kits" for another 300 rifles. The Army had inducted just around 300 rifles when the CBI registered the case in June 2005.

At that time, the Congress was using the case — along with the emergency purchases for the 1999 Kargil conflict and the Tehelka tapes — to go after George Fernandes, who was the defence minister in the NDA regime when the initial rifle contracts were inked. The CBI, however, is yet to make any major headway in the case.

Now, Army wants to induct light-weight anti-material rifles that are "man-portable" with a two-jawan crew. "The Denel rifles, while they have performed well, are quite heavy at 28-29 kg apiece. There are also major problems in importing its specialized bullets and ammunition," said an officer.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby vic » 26 Feb 2013 11:19

Denel rifles were great till they were imported. Now OFB has reverse engineered it, so it is junk.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby merlin » 26 Feb 2013 11:22

Is it Parnaik who the chief allegedly threatened?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby srin » 26 Feb 2013 11:23

vic wrote:Denel rifles were great till they were imported. Now OFB has reverse engineered it, so it is junk.


Is Vidhwansak the reverse engineered version ?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby vic » 26 Feb 2013 22:01

Yes, and we should use indigenous solutions as far as possible. Use a three men team till we are able to develop a lighter version of Vidhawank.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby ramana » 27 Feb 2013 03:55

Also consider kinetics. The mass is high due to the energy that has to be absorbed. May be the OFB model can have a Ti stock etc for weight reduction.

A dont see how 15 kg model can fire a 20mm shell? The OFB version has three different calibers and can barrels can be.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Shrinivasan » 27 Feb 2013 08:56

There is a news flash that a senior militant has been killed in the "Keri forward belt in Rajouri", no injuries or casualties for security forces. this seems to be an Army operation (may be RR)

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby vic » 27 Feb 2013 20:01

I am not saying that Vidhawansk is best but it is adequate and can be used. Also like Reinmetal may have trying to kill indigeous AD gun similarly I wonder about need for light anti material gun and Singapore Technologies offering one.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Aditya_V » 27 Feb 2013 20:32

Well the Denel Gun was banned as part of Aman ki Asha since it was causing too many Pakistani casualties. Vidhwansak can be made in numbers whiel reserch can go on to reduce weight. This saga is ridiculous.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby ramana » 27 Feb 2013 22:43

So using the specs laid out can anyone shortlist the candidates?

We can then speculate on the probability of the procurement going through!

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby nits » 28 Feb 2013 14:14

India hikes defence spending - India Thursday hiked defence spending to Rs203,672 crore, marking an increase of five percent over the outlay of 2012-13 at Rs193,407 crore.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby member_23844 » 28 Feb 2013 14:37

Now India should opt for 183 rafales and increase the number of c-130j to 36 from 12 to meet the current needs of the transport aircraft

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Sanku » 28 Feb 2013 14:38

rohitdkx wrote:Now India should opt for 183 rafales and increase the number of c-130j to 36 from 12 to meet the current needs of the transport aircraft


Nikhil T wrote:
Austin wrote:^^ How much in Billion Dollar ?


Since the exchange rate is relevant for Capital Expenditure

Budget day 2012: USD was Rs 49 => USD 16.22 billion
Budget day 2013: USD was Rs 54 => USD 16.01 billion

So really a decline of 1%. And this is excluding any allowance for 5-6% inflation that is common in defence contracts.


Austin wrote:The only time USD will be counted is when we import stuff and looking at our import list it will be significant chunk of our Capex

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Austin » 01 Mar 2013 16:50

Straight talk with former Gen V K Singh

http://youtu.be/LIJdS1dPLxU

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby VinodTK » 02 Mar 2013 22:50

Indian Army joins Twitter
Army's Additional Directorate General of Public Information (ADGPI) made its presence known on Twitter on Friday through the handle @adgpi.

While conversing on twitter on Saturday with Chandigarh-based lawyer Maj Navdeep Singh, Shashi Tharoor, union minister of state for human
resource development suggested that the new handle appeared a little bureaucratic and should contain 'Indian Army' in its name. Regulars on twitter agreed with Tharoor's suggestion and called for a better twitter handle since the Indian Army on twitter is still in its nascent stages.

Sources say that the Army is soon proactively going to make its presence known on social media with an official Facebook page or even a youtube channel in the offing.

Armies all over the world have been proactive on social media with the US Army leading the way. The US Army not only has most of its commands on twitter but also many senior officers are active on twitter and facebook. Many of the military branches have their own blogs, which are used for constructive exchange of ideas.

While the Indian army has traditionally shied away from technology due to the fear of security lapses, officers feel that most of such fears result from a
knee jerk reaction and there is not much secret or operational information that can be exchanged through social media so as to cause any threat to the security of the nation.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby SagarAg » 03 Mar 2013 06:34

^look at the people followed by the handle. :roll:

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby ramana » 05 Mar 2013 02:12

rohitvats, How do the IA soldiers keep warm in the cold weather tents in the high mountains?

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Nikhil T » 05 Mar 2013 03:58

SagarAg wrote:^look at the people followed by the handle. :roll:


Wish they'd have a simpler Twitter handle. There's @USArmy, @BritishArmy, @IDFSpokesperson, but we choose @ADGPI. Sigh.

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Ankit Desai » 05 Mar 2013 07:12

ramana wrote:rohitvats, How do the IA soldiers keep warm in the cold weather tents in the high mountains?


I let rohitvats answer that, meantime check out DRDO Hands Over Hi-Tech Shelters to the Indian Army For Use at High Altitudes

The shelter design is modular and all the services like HVAC, electrical, plumbing and water supply, sewage disposal, kerosene gensets and solar power are well integrated within the shelter. The shelters have been designed to withstand seismic activities upto a level of zone 5, wind velocities upto 55 m/sec and sub-zero temperature upto – 35 degree Celsius. The Carbon Dioxide level inside the shelter is closely monitored and maintained within the safe limits.


-Ankit

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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby krishnan » 05 Mar 2013 07:35


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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby sum » 05 Mar 2013 19:39

Interesting article:
Superseded Officers: Handle them with Compassion

It is the saddest sight in any social gathering to find all superseded officers huddled together in a corner. They appear more comfortable interacting with each other, stay in the background and avoid intermingling with others, especially the senior officers. Their deportment, appearance and bearing show a discernible lack of zest. They go through the paces of a social evening in a detached manner. Apparently, supersession hits very hard.

Search for recognition is one of the pursuits which all human beings indulge in and continuously strive for. Promotions and advancement in career are important aspects of their aspirations. It is more so in the army where rank fixes one’s place in the army’s hierarchy and is a conspicuous demonstration of an officer’s success in profession. Therefore, supersession hurts immensely and transforms personality overnight – many outgoing officers lose their ‘spark’, withdraw into their shell and become introverts.

Despite creation of additional appointments at the top, the manpower structure of the Indian army continues to be like a steep pyramid. Against the authorised strength of 46,500 officers, vacancies for generals and brigadiers are only 379 and 1088 respectively. It implies that the percentage of appointments of brigadier and above is a mere 3.2 percent. Most of the officers do not advance beyond the rank of colonel.

All service officers come through highly competitive examinations. Applicant to Post Ratio (APR) is a standard index used to indicate the number of candidates aspiring for the available posts through respective examinations. APR for the National Defence Academy varies between 450 and 500. As only one out of 450-500 candidates secures entry into NDA, it means that every selected candidate is brilliant and possesses necessary potential.


Supersession Hurts

Supersession in itself is quite distressing. The severity of shock becomes extremely painful in case of the officers who are confident of getting approved for the next rank. Being unprepared for such a prospect, the blow has a devastating effect on their persona. Perversity of the current system of annual performance appraisal is responsible for giving false hopes to the officers.

The annual performance report consists of two parts. The first part contains assessment of personal qualities and demonstrated performance. It is shown to the officer reported upon. The second part contains comments on his potential for promotion and is not shown to the assessed officer.

Lacking moral courage and with a view to keep their officers in good humour, many assessing officers grade their subordinates at 8 points and above (on a scale of 1 to 9 points) in the first part. Secure in the knowledge that the officers reported upon would never learn about the contents of the second part, unscrupulous assessing officers mark them as unfit for promotion.

As the shown part invariably borders on ‘outstanding’ grade, the officers reported upon become certain of getting promoted. The news of their non-approval comes as a bolt from the blue and they get shell-shocked. They fail to understand as to why they have been overlooked despite their outstanding reports. As is natural, they feel wronged and lose faith in the fairness of the system. With very few exit options, they do not know how to cope up with the heartbreak.

In a command oriented army, supersession impacts the psyche of the affected officers immensely and becomes a traumatic experience for them and their families. Many start suffering from acute persecution-complex and show signs of professional and social withdrawal.


Absurdity and Insensitivity of Organisational Response

Most unfairly, non-approval for promotion has come to carry an element of stigma of professional incompetence. It is forgotten that in a highly competitive environment, it is invariably a question of a few decimal points in the report that makes the difference in inter-se appraisal for the limited vacancies.

In a hierarchical organisation like the army, social events cannot be totally free from rank consideration. However, blatant social discrimination or what is euphemistically called ‘social apartheid’ is highly appalling and hurtful.

The organisation’s handling of the superseded officers is both irrational and insensitive. Instead of reassuring the officers that they are valued members of the organisation, it does just the opposite. Rather than assuaging their feelings, it intensifies their sense of hurt through thoughtless treatment.

It presupposes that all superseded officers would lack motivation to excel. Even highly qualified and competent officers are posted to lesser appointments, thereby wasting their potential. Worse, it sends a wrong signal to the affected officers, showing organisation’s lack of confidence in their commitment to deliver. They are treated as a liability which the organisation has to carry till their superannuation.

It is a very painful experience for the affected officers when they realise that their dedication to the organisation is considered suspect. Such an insulting treatment increases the hurt manifold – first a hopeful officer is denied promotion and then he is considered untrustworthy for important appointments.


The government has taken a number of measures to mitigate the adverse effect of supersession on the financial remunerations and the retirement age. However, it is the treatment meted out to such officers by the army that needs correction.

Instead of boosting the self-confidence of the superseded officers by reposing faith in their competence and reassuring them that they are valued members of the organisation, the army does just the opposite. Rather than ‘wasting them out’ on inconsequential appointments, their potential must be utilised.

…the army must understand the sensitivities of the superseded officers and their families. They should be handled with due care and empathy.

To start with, the current system of showing demonstrated performance and hiding potential promotes must be replaced either by an open or a closed appraisal system. False hopes should not be raised as disappointment can be heart breaking.

Secondly, most superseded officers possess vast experience. They welcome assignments of responsibility and excel in them. Conscious of their self-respect, they put in extra effort to ensure that no fingers are ever raised at their commitment and dedication.

Finally, the army must understand the sensitivities of the superseded officers and their families. They should be handled with due care and empathy. As is the norm, there should be no rank-based discrimination in the messes. Social inequities are an anathema to army culture and it breeds a sense of alienation among the superseded officers. Instead of considering them as ‘dead load’, their skills should be exploited. The army can ill-afford to let the potential of half of its officers’ strength remain untapped.

Katare
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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Katare » 05 Mar 2013 20:17

It's no different in any other field. Only 1 CEO, a few VPs and a hand full of Directors and couple of hundred managers would run a company with 100 K people.

Without this cut throat competition and rejection at each level, we'll end up with a very top heavy structure loaded with people who didn't really earn their place on merit alone. Financial compensation and help with finding other opportunities outside armed forces should be the way to solve this problem.

Surya
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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby Surya » 05 Mar 2013 20:26

It's no different in any other field. Only 1 CEO, a few VPs and a hand full of Directors and couple of hundred managers would run a company with 100 K people.


not exactly

in civilian field you can move on to another place?

Financial compensation and help with finding other opportunities outside armed forces should be the way to solve this problem.


Agree - but here is where the ******** at AHQ d1ck around. They still want you because you are very good at your jobn but do not want to promote you because you have stepped on many a sandmodel expert's toe. So they deny you an out and keep posting you around.

It takes another 3 - 4 years of running around and paperwork to make the exit (all the while praying that some d1ck will not mess your papers and make you chase that pension you deserve)

VinodTK
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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby VinodTK » 06 Mar 2013 08:08

China ahead: Indian army to be worst-hit by budget cuts
A 10.7% increase in China’s military spending for 2013-14 has triggered a sense of unease in India, which only marginally raised its defence allocation last week.

China’s defence budget now stands at $115.7 billion ( Rs. 5,94,000 crore), compared to India’s $37.3 billion (Rs.

Recording a double-digit growth over two decades, China’s defence spending is expected to overtake the US by 2035.

The meager hike in India’s defence spending threatens to derail some key modernisation plans of the army, at a time when the force is desperate to scale up its artillery capabilities.

Experts fear this year’s inadequate allocation is unlikely to give impetus to the Indian Army’s plans of buying artillery guns, anti-tank guided missiles and modern small arms.

The army needs more than Rs. 40,000 crore to buy this military hardware.

Of the three services, the experts say, the army is likely to feel the pinch most since the air force and the navy have already made some major acquisitions in the recent years.

The army has not bought a single new artillery gun since the Bofors scandal in late 1980s. A senior army officer said the fate of the Rs. 22,000-crore artillery modernisation plan looked uncertain in the current financial scenario.

Security affairs expert Brig Gurmeet Kanwal (retd) said, “We need committed funding for five-year defence plans. It is also critical to have indicative funding for the next 10 years to support the military’s 15-year integrated perspective plan.”

VinodTK
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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby VinodTK » 07 Mar 2013 06:10

India to raise 30,000 troops for border with China
NEW DELHI: Working towards upgrading its military infrastructure along border with China, India will raise another 30,000 troops for the infantry battalions of its Army, Rajya Sabha was told today.

"30 infantry battalions are proposed to be raised in the 13th Five year Plan towards enhancing combat capacity," Defence Minister A K Antony said in reply to a written query.

The Indian Army is planning to raise a Strike Corps for deployment along the China border which would mean raising of additional 90,000 troops for the force.

The Army has plans of raising the additional troops in the 12th and the 13th five-year defence plan periods. The Corps is proposed to be headquartered at Panagarh in West Bengal with its formations spread around north-eastern states sharing boundaries with China.

The Defence Minister further said the mobility of infantry battalions is proposed to be enhanced through introduction of superior vehicles with better cross-country mobility.

The budgetary allocation for capital acquisition for modernisation of Army during Financial Year 2012-2013 is Rs 13,724.14 crore, he said.

rohitvats
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Re: Indian Army: News and Discussions 15 Apr 2012

Postby rohitvats » 07 Mar 2013 13:29

^^^Good news.

30 Infantry Battalions will suffice for 3 x Infantry/Mountain Divisions + additional 1 x Infantry/Mountain Bde.

What is important to understand is that if components for MSC (2 x Mountain Divisions) are going to be raised between 2012-2017 (12th Five Year Plan), then, we can assume that the above increment ( in 13th Plan from 2017 to 2022) is in addition to what has been proposed for MSC.

Post 2002, it was surmised that IA wanted between 7-11 new divisions. With 2 x Division already operational in NE and 2 x Divisions required for MSC, these 30 Battalions/3 x Division would take the total to 7 new divisions being added to overall strength of the army.


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