China Watch Thread-I

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kmkraoind
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby kmkraoind » 28 Dec 2015 08:23

Defection delivers Beijing’s nuclear secrets to Washington

China’s most senior communist cadres have been told the party faces its most damaging case of treason since the founding of the regimen in 1949.

In a confidential speech to party cadres reported by two independent political magazines in Hong Kong, Meng Jianzhu, the country’s security tsar, revealed that the most closely guarded secret­s, including nuclear codes, had been lost to America.

Mr Meng was reporting on the failure of his attempts to lure back a leading defector and the fallout of the incident.

The state secrets passed to Washington included personnel data, communications codes, ­nuclear weapons launch protocols and blueprints of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound, the magazines reported.

Ling Wancheng fled to the US after his brother Ling Jihua, the right-hand man of former president Hu Jintao, was brought down by a scandal caused when his Ferrari-driving son was killed in a spectacular car crash in centra­l Beijing.

While Ling Jihua was ­detained by Chinese security, his brother escaped with a cache of 2700 classified documents as an insurance policy.
The Chinese leadership sent a security ­delegation, headed by Mr Meng, to demand his extradition from the US last year but it returned empty-handed.

“While at the head of the party’s central institutions, director of the office of the party and the nation, Ling dared to steal top secrets from the archives in his trust and these were ultimately handed to the US,” said Mr Meng, who described the breach as the most serious in 60 years.

The magazines, Qianshao and Chengming, said three categories of classified information were handed to the Americans.

Plans for the Zhongnanhai leadership retreat, a heavily ­protected enclave of villas and lakes near the palaces of the ­emperors in Beijing, were transferred, with details of its security passwords and communications codes.

The second category included information on command and control systems linking the ­Communist Party central committee in times of crisis with the state council, China’s cabinet, and the Central Military Commission, the supreme command of the armed forces.

Third on the list were launch protocols and procedures devised to guarantee control over China’s non-conventional weapons, including its nuclear deterrent, by the party central committee and the CMC.

Mr Meng is reported to have spoken angrily as he detailed the case against Mr Ling at an internal party meeting in southern China.

Ling Jihua was at the heart of power until the present leader, Xi Jinping, took over in 2012. He was “responsible for the safety, health and confidentiality” of the members of China’s ­supreme ruling body, the Politburo standing committee,
according to a profile prepared by Cheng Li of the Brookings Institution.

“He (was) also responsible for drafting key documents, collecting important information for ­decision-making and monitoring the implementation of central ­directives and the instructions of top leaders,” it added.

Chinese analysts believe the security chief’s speech may have been deliberately leaked to ­prepare opinion in the party for the eventual trial and conviction of Ling Jihua. The reports exculpated the man who now holds Mr Ling’s old job, Li Zhanshu.

Mr Li is even more powerful than his predecessor and accompanied the President on his tour of Britain, attending a state ­banquet with the Queen at Buckingham Palace.


This is big global news by any standards. I thought Chinese psyche of palace coups and backstabbingd were put to end by so called cultural revolution aka purge, but it seems Chinese are still retaining the ingrained philosophies.

I think Chinese are very vulnerable (psyche) than USSR, a few punches at right time and at right places make it a 10-15 nations again.

Adder later: I always wondered why sudden pro-India tilt by USA for past few months. May be the above provide answers. I think Mr. Ling's documents contain how China wants to treat US nuclearly, and that might have put Deep State of US in a "Rethink mode" and they thought propping another power in Asia is a best policy to check China.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 09:13

When did the US "tilt" towards India? Far from it.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Bhurishrava » 29 Dec 2015 16:45

http://news.yahoo.com/china-gives-itsel ... 59023.html
China gives itself right to mount anti-terror ops abroad

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby kit » 29 Dec 2015 17:40

dont think the US would trust any nation to do its job .. neither should India !

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 29 Dec 2015 21:30


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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby member_19686 » 02 Jan 2016 06:14

DECEMBER 31, 2015
Here’s why the Chinese may never be able to fully populate Tibet
by Susanna Pilny

Depending on who you ask, anywhere from a few hundred thousand to upwards of seven million Han (ethnically Chinese) have immigrated into Tibet Autonomous Region since it was invaded by China in 1950—but according to an international team of researchers, these Han are having a hard time reproducing in the high altitudes there.

The issues surrounding Tibet and China are, of course, complicated. In regards to the 1950 invasion, the Chinese government claimed (among many other things) that since Tibet was part of the Qing dynasty in the 1600s, it was merely quelling a rebellious province, as well as liberating it from a feudal form of government. Tibetans generally claim that they were an independent nation, and that they were and still are undergoing cultural genocide at the hands of the Chinese government.

Given that there are hundreds (if not thousands) of years of history here, this is a vast oversimplification of the issue. Yet, in the midst of all the contention, one thing is clear: The Tibetans seems to be better at reproducing at higher altitudes than the Han, and Han women and infants are suffering because of it.
Which is where Dr. Lorna Moore, a researcher from the University of Colorado, Denver who specializes in the effects of altitude on pregnancy and birth, steps in. She and other colleagues have studied the difference between the reproduction of Han and Tibetans at high altitudes for years, and have found some very interesting results.

“[The Tibetans] have higher birth weights because the babies are growing more normally in utero,” Moore explained. “We think that’s a result of having greater blood flow to the uterine circulation. And babies who are more normal-sized at birth have a greater chance of survival postnatally.”

One of Moore’s more important papers on this subject, which can be found in American Journal of Human Biology, studied 452 babies delivered to Han and Tibetan parents living between the altitudes of 8,900 and 15,400 feet in the Tibet Autonomous Region. At birth, the babies’ weight, sex, and gestational age were recorded.

Later, the ethnicities of the parents were documented, with 377 births to Tibetan parents and 75 to two Han parents or one Han and one parent of various heritage (either Tibetan, Mei, Moinba, or mixed Tibetan-Han). Of the latter, 65 babies were born to two Han parents.

The health conditions of the parents, along with their previous pregnancies (there were 863) and births (734), were recorded as well—from which they calculated prenatal and postnatal mortality rates separate from those of the 452 babies delivered at the time of the study.

High Han?

Interestingly, the study discovered that not a single Han birth happened above 12,500 feet, whereas Tibetan births happened at all altitudes. In fact, most Han who lived above that altitude descended to lower altitudes during the pregnancy, where they stayed for several years. Reasons cited for the move included health—like increased risk of pre-eclampsia—and family, such as a desire to be closer to family in China. The families typically returned to the high altitude when the child was three or four years old, said Moore.

Incidentally, the incidence of pre-eclampsia is usually triple at high altitudes for most populations who haven’t spent thousands of years at such an elevation, but it’s unclear if this trend holds true for the Han due to a lack of data.

“The difficulty is, there are not systematic medical records that are maintained or have been evaluated,” explained Moore by phone. “So there’s no way of knowing what the denominator is. It’s known that there are cases of pre-eclampsia, but you can’t calculate an incidence.”

Han health hazards

Besides where the births were located and possible maternal health risks, the study found that birth weight for both populations was affected by altitude as well; it decreased as altitude increased. However, the magnitude of the decrease was drastically different between the two.

“The Tibetan birth weights are similar to sea level values,” said Dr. Moore. “Whereas the Han birthweights are much lower.”

In fact, the birth weight of Han infants declined 66 percent more than that of children born to Tibetan parents. The Tibetan children weighed an average of 310 grams (or around 2/3 of a pound) more than Han babies between 8,900 and 9,800 feet, and a whopping 530 grams (roughly 1 and 1/8 pounds) more between 9,800 and 12,500 feet.

Further, the study found that prenatal and postnatal mortality was greater in the Han than in the Tibetans across all altitudes.

Tibetan blood is better

As to why these groups differ so drastically, the difference is primarily due to the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)—or a decreased growth rate of the baby inside the womb. IUGR itself is a result of genetics, as it appears that certain genes allow greater uterine blood flow and arterial oxygenation than normal at higher altitudes.

This notion was strengthened by one of Moore’s studies from this year, which is published in Pulmonary Circulation. When her team studied 30 Tibetan and Han infants born around 12,000 feet, the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) in the Tibetan infants was higher while awake or asleep. Whereas the Tibetan SaO2 values remained at 85 percent or above, the Han values fell below 70 percent.

As to what genes cause this difference, scientists have a few ideas. Indeed, according another of Dr. Moore’s papers, which is published in Physiological Genomics, the researchers identified 14 candidate regions of the Tibetan genome that may play a role in high-altitude birth adaptations.

Another paper published in Nature by separate researchers determined that Tibetans have a variant of a gene known as EPAS1, which regulates their levels of oxygen-toting hemoglobin. Their particular version of the gene apparently came from Denisovan ancestors—an extinct species of human that somewhat rarely interbred with Homo sapiens.

A small number of Han (perhaps one percent of the population) carry this rare variant of EPAS1, and it’s not likely to be the only gene at play that help the Tibetans alone survive the altitude—leading to intrauterine growth restriction in Han mothers. And it’s not likely they will be able to generate these genes any times soon, unless they have children with Tibetans.

“Any sort of natural selection processes that operated with the Tibetans would presumably operate with the Han, but we’re talking thousands of years,” said Moore.

“The only data that bears on that is in South America. Our studies (and others) have shown that the European-derived populations, despite having been there [at high altitudes in Bolivia] for 400 years, are still showing lower birth weights…In our Bolivian studies, where some of the European women in our sample had multiple generations of high-altitude ancestry, that number of generations didn’t seem to make any difference.”


http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/111 ... 8GPkk7a.99

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby member_19686 » 04 Jan 2016 19:04

Xinjiang Seethes Under Chinese Crackdown
点击查看本文中文版 Read in Chinese
By ANDREW JACOBSJAN. 2, 2016

KASHGAR, China — Families sundered by a wave of detentions. Mosques barred from broadcasting the call to prayer. Restrictions on the movements of laborers that have wreaked havoc on local agriculture. And a battery of ever more intrusive ways to monitor the communications of citizens for possible threats to public security.

A recent 10-day journey across the Xinjiang region in the far west of China revealed a society seething with anger and trepidation as the government, alarmed by a slow-boil insurgency that has claimed hundreds of lives, has introduced unprecedented measures aimed at shaping the behavior and beliefs of China’s 10 million Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking Muslim minority that considers this region its homeland.

Driving these policies is the government’s view that tougher security and tighter restraints on the practice of Islam are the best way to stem a wave of violence that included a knife attack at a coal mine that killed dozens of people in September.

As heavily armed soldiers rummage through car trunks and examine ID cards, ethnic Uighur motorists and their passengers are sometimes asked to hand over their cellphones so that the police can search them for content or software deemed a threat to public security.

In addition to jihadist videos, the police are on the lookout for Skype and WhatsApp, apps popular with those who communicate with friends and relatives outside China, and for software that allows users to access blocked websites.

“All of us have become terror suspects,” said a 23-year-old Uighur engineering student who said he was detained overnight in November after the police found messages he had exchanged with a friend in Turkey. “These days, even receiving phone calls from overseas is enough to warrant a visit from state security.”

Here in Kashgar, the fabled Silk Road outpost near China’s border with Pakistan and Afghanistan, officials have banned mosques from broadcasting the call to prayer, forcing muezzins to shout out the invocation five times a day from rooftops across the city. The new rule is an addition to longstanding policies that prohibit after-school religious classes and children under 18 from entering mosques. (The installation of video cameras on mosque doorways in recent months makes such rules hard to ignore.)

Southeast of Kashgar, shopkeepers in the city of Hotan seethed over a government decision to outlaw two dozen names considered too Muslim, forcing parents to rename their children or be unable to register them for school, according to local residents and the police.


To the north in Turpan, a fertile oasis famed for its grapes, a vineyard owner complained about new restrictions that bar Uighur migrant laborers from traveling there for the harvest, leaving tons of fruit to wither on the vines.

And farther north in Ghulja, an ethnically diverse city near the Kazakh border with a history of tensions, a pair of unemployed college graduates fumed about a crackdown prohibiting young men from wearing beards and women from veiling their faces. Those who ignore the rules are sometimes jailed, residents said.

“Me, myself, I’m not religious, but forcing our women to take off their head scarves is an affront to their dignity and makes many people angry,” said one of the men, who, like others interviewed, asked to remain anonymous for fear of punishment by the authorities.

Other measures contribute to the widespread perception that Uighur identity is under siege. Schools have largely switched to Mandarin as the main language of instruction instead of Uighur, and the government has begun offering cash and housing subsidies to encourage intermarriage between Uighurs and Hans, the country’s ethnic majority, who have migrated to the region in large numbers.

Surveillance, too, has been increased. Since 2014, Uighurs seeking to travel outside their hometowns have been required to carry a special card that lists phone numbers for the holder’s landlord and local police station. Many Uighurs complain that these “convenience contact cards,” as they are called, single them out for scrutiny.

“The state’s ability to penetrate Uighur society has become increasingly sophisticated and intrusive,” said James Leibold, an expert on China’s ethnic politics at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. “But while these new measures allow the party to nip a lot of problems in the bud, they also foster new forms of alienation and violence that ultimately weaken the party’s legitimacy and rule.”

After 43 people were killed in a pair of attacks in the regional capital, Urumqi, in 2014, Beijing began a “strike hard special operation” that it says has dismantled nearly 200 terrorist groups and resulted in the execution of at least 49 people. The state news media describes those caught in the crackdown as terrorism suspects or separatists seeking an independent Xinjiang, and blames recurring violence in the region on jihadists influenced or directed by agents overseas.

Foreign journalists seeking to examine such claims face a gantlet of challenges. Officials in Xinjiang seldom respond to interview requests. Those ubiquitous checkpoints prevent journalists from reaching towns and cities recently hit by unrest, and in other places, the sudden appearance of government minders makes it hard to speak with residents. Last week, Beijing expelled a French reporter for an article that criticized its harsh policies in the region.

Fear and resentment are widespread, though such sentiments often emerged haltingly and only in private.

Nervously rearranging the painted tambourines and traditional carved knives in her family’s tiny gift shop, a young woman in Urumqi wept as she described families torn apart by the recent detentions.

“In some homes, only the babies are left because the father and mother have been taken away,” she said, adding that many were serving three- or four-year sentences for violating religious regulations that provide no avenue for appeal. “We think it’s O.K. to live in China, but we wish they would treat us like they did before,” she said.

In Yarkand, a city in southern Xinjiang where violence claimed nearly 100 lives in 2014, an unwanted escort from the local propaganda bureau, Murat, vigorously defended the new restraints on religious life, saying they were needed to combat the sort of extremism that is convulsing parts of the Muslim world.

“When I was a kid, my mother used to wear sleeveless shirts, but now, because of the rise of conservative Islam, she no longer does,” said Murat, who did not want his last name to be used. “Without the government’s strong hand, we would become more like Iran, where they stone girls to death.”

It remains a matter of dispute whether radical Islam has taken hold among many Uighurs, the majority of whom subscribe to a moderate form of Sunni Islam. But the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and the Islamic State’s killing in November of a Chinese hostage in Syria have prompted Beijing to step up efforts to position its battle to pacify Xinjiang as part of the global war on violent religious extremism.

Experts outside China, however, say much of the bloodshed here is fueled by local grievances, among them job discrimination against Uighurs, endemic poverty and a widespread belief that the flood of Han migrants to the region is part of a government plan to dilute Uighur identity.

“What we’re seeing in Xinjiang is homegrown self-radicalization that is made worse by repressive policies and an attempt to hollow out Uighur culture and religious practices,” said Nicholas Bequelin, East Asia director for Amnesty International.

Most Uighurs, especially the educated and the middle class, have little interest in pushing back against Beijing, and not just because they are afraid. Abdul, 30, a home furnishing salesman who frequently travels across China for work, said he did not support an independent Xinjiang, citing the social instability and economic stagnation he has seen across Central Asia and the Middle East.

“Here in China, we are 56 minorities living together in peace,” he said, echoing the propaganda that blankets billboards across the region. But later, over a meal of lamb and fragrant rice, he angrily described how the police, alerted by front-desk hotel clerks, almost always visited his room when he was on business trips.

“I am Chinese; this is what it says on my ID card,” he said, his voice rising with emotion. But that same card also lists his ethnic identity, and his facial features — light eyes and an aquiline nose — set him apart in a nation that is 92 percent Han. “Sometimes I feel confused about what I really am,” he said.

Then he paused, glanced behind his shoulder, and leaned forward. “To be honest,” he said, “these days, the government’s policies make me so sick in the heart that I sometimes wish I wasn’t Chinese.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/03/world ... d=tw-share

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 05 Jan 2016 18:11

Glare from the past:


Image

gold plated that too. For a cool half a mil.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Vayutuvan » 06 Jan 2016 10:26

Mao was not that handsome :wink:

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 07 Jan 2016 03:14

http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php? ... 0674066427


As the rest of the world worries about what a future might look like under Chinese supremacy, Edward N. Luttwak worries about China’s own future prospects. Applying the logic of strategy for which he is well known, Luttwak argues that the most populous nation on Earth—and its second largest economy—may be headed for a fall.


For any country whose rising strength cannot go unnoticed, the universal logic of strategy allows only military or economic growth. But China is pursuing both goals simultaneously. Its military buildup and assertive foreign policy have already stirred up resistance among its neighbors, just three of whom—India, Japan, and Vietnam—together exceed China in population and wealth. Unless China’s leaders check their own ambitions, a host of countries, which are already forming tacit military coalitions, will start to impose economic restrictions as well.

Chinese leaders will find it difficult to choose between pursuing economic prosperity and increasing China’s military strength. Such a change would be hard to explain to public opinion. Moreover, Chinese leaders would have to end their reliance on ancient strategic texts such as Sun Tzu’s Art of War. While these guides might have helped in diplomatic and military conflicts within China itself, their tactics—such as deliberately provoking crises to force negotiations—turned China’s neighbors into foes. To avoid arousing the world’s enmity further, Luttwak advises, Chinese leaders would be wise to pursue a more sustainable course of economic growth combined with increasing military and diplomatic restraint.



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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 08 Jan 2016 19:44

Chinese logic: When in trouble distribute the blame across the spectrum and take the discussion on a tangent:

China, in Rebuke, Suggests U.S. Worsened Ties With North Korea

China has rejected criticism from the United States that its policies toward North Korea had failed, suggesting on Friday that it was the Americans, not the Chinese, who were largely to blame for the North’s embrace of nuclear weapons.

In a stern rebuke that reinforced tensions between the world’s leading powers days after North Korea claimed to have tested a hydrogen bomb, a Chinese official said that it was the responsibility of all countries — not just China — to persuade the North Korean government to abandon its nuclear program.

“The origin and crux of the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula has never been China,” Hua Chunying, a spokeswoman for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a regularly scheduled news conference in Beijing. “The key to solving the problem is not China.”

Ms. Hua did not mention the United States by name, but her remarks were a clear reference to the belief in China that efforts by the Americans to isolate North Korea economically and politically over the past decade have worsened the situation.

American officials have said that China, North Korea’s main ally, is uniquely positioned to discourage the North’s nuclear ambitions by cutting off oil shipments or disrupting its financial transactions. China is North Korea’s biggest trading partner, and the two countries have been allies for six decades.

On Thursday, Secretary of State John Kerry intensified pressure on Chinese leaders, saying that Beijing’s attempts to rein in North Korea had failed. “We cannot continue business as usual,” Mr. Kerry said at a news briefing in Washington.

The United States is drafting a United Nations Security Council resolution to further disrupt trade in North Korea, including a partial ban on allowing North Korean ships to enter ports around the world, American officials have said.

Over the years, China has taken modest steps to limit North Korea’s nuclear program, including by banning weapons shipments. But it has stopped short of more crippling sanctions, in part because of a fear that destabilizing North Korea could send a wave of refugees into China and cede territory along its border to South Korea, an American ally.

China’s president, Xi Jinping, who came to power in 2012, initially sought to keep a distance from the North, worried that its nuclear ambitions were threatening peace in the region. But in recent months, Mr. Xi sought warmer relations, sending a top official to meet with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader, in the fall.

On Thursday, Mr. Kerry took aim at China’s efforts to curry favor with the North. “China had a particular approach that it wanted to make, and we agreed and respected to give them space to be able to implement that,” he said. “That has not worked.”

Since North Korea’s claim of carrying out a nuclear test on Wednesday — which experts doubt was of a hydrogen bomb, a far more powerful weapon than the low-grade atomic devices Pyongyang has detonated before — several public officials and news media commentators in China have denounced Mr. Kim. But many have defended the Chinese approach to dealing with North Korea, blaming other countries for escalating tensions in the region.

A commentary on Thursday in People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s flagship newspaper, said the United States had “inescapable responsibilities for the current tension in the peninsula.”

On Friday, Global Times, a nationalistic, state-run newspaper, issued a fiery rebuttal to Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential candidate, who suggested that China should take the lead in stopping the North’s nuclear program or face trade sanctions of its own.

“In no way will China bear the responsibilities that the U.S., South Korea and Japan should take,” an editorial in the newspaper said. “The hostilities between them and Pyongyang are actually the source of the nuclear problems. The China-North Korea relationship should not be dragged into antagonism.”

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 08 Jan 2016 19:52

Those BRiets who make comparative videos and post them on youTube, beware. :) Or stick to LCA vs. J-17.

A German’s Video Likens Mao to Hitler, and China Wants Him Punished

:((

Chinese version of a fatwa.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jan 2016 08:20

vayu tuvan wrote:Mao was not that handsome :wink:

Yeah, they realized the mistake and therefore tore the statue down.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 10 Jan 2016 06:57

kmk, What need for defectors when Chinese mall is US designed!

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby UlanBatori » 10 Jan 2016 20:32

NRao wrote:When did the US "tilt" towards India? Far from it.

To paraphrase "Yes Minister":

U cannot stab someone in the back w/o Tilting towards them

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SaiK » 12 Jan 2016 01:29

http://www.thehindu.com/news/internatio ... 092402.ece

Q: How do these c**yapas manage to write such tailored articles? I can understand, against India they can crap all they want.. but saying China is having an edge over Russkies and USA is way beyond anything one can imagine.

Atul Aneja, is the remarkable c**yapa here on the spotlight.. they seriously take what is written from china online, and go gungho on it!
It only puts China as an advanced staged and organized North Korea or a Paki the worst case when pitted against both Russia and USA.

It is time Chindu is cleaned off such idiots.. of course, they are free to board a flight.. publish their articles from mainland and fatherland commie places or even pakis.. sheesh! it is time to send some crack job unit and give them a piece of our dharmic brains and define new sets of karmic laws on wild imaginations.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby deejay » 12 Jan 2016 10:57

Anti corruption drive sees another high profile Chinese in jail:

https://www.rt.com/news/328592-china-deputy-police-chief-jailed/

China’s ex-national deputy police chief jailed for 15 yrs in bribery scandal

Former Chinese deputy national police chief Li Dongcheng was sentenced to 15 years in jail on corruption charges, after the court found him guilty of taking millions of dollars in bribes, China Central Television reported.
CCTV had a brief announcement about the sentencing Tuesday morning. Li, 61, was accused of taking nearly 22 million yuan ($3.3 million) in bribes while holding various positions between 1996 and 2013, Xinhua news agency reported earlier.

Li had been on trial in the northeastern city of Tianjin since October. State media added that Li decided not to appeal the verdict.

The ex-deputy police chief worked at CCTV for 22 years, starting out as a photographer and rising to the ranks of a deputy head.

He also served as a deputy head of the ruling Communist Party’s propaganda department for seven years.

Li is just of latest former senior officials to be jailed under President Xi Jinping’s broad anti-corruption campaign.

...

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby deejay » 12 Jan 2016 19:26

China overhauls top military command amid sweeping reforms

https://www.rt.com/news/328613-china-army-command-reform/

China has replaced four departments of the Central Military Commission (CMC) with 15 new agencies, in a move intended to make the top command of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) more flexible and efficient.
The CMC is a dual organ of military control in China and is comprised of top party and military officials. It serves as the highest point of military command authority, and is the body responsible for Communist Party oversight of the armed forces. The four general departments that have been replaced – staff, politics, logistics and armaments – were all serving under the control of the CMC.

In organizational reforms announced this week, the general departments were replaced with 15 new bodies which come under the direct administration of the Commission. The new bodies cover a range of areas, including staff, logistics, R&D, political control and fighting graft in the military.

Image

...

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 12 Jan 2016 23:51

deejay, The more the hierarchy the more the float in the system leading to mess.

Looks like CMC wants more scrambled eggs for their ranks.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 13 Jan 2016 00:12

Appeasement.

4 to 15 !!!!!

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby A_Gupta » 13 Jan 2016 02:26

Since the threads where this item might better belong are locked, and I can't figure out what thread to use for China, here goes:
http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2016/01/12/wh ... -approach/
What “One Belt, One Road” Could Mean for China’s Regional Security Approach
PLA reform proposals would also establish the largest of five new military zones (hosting over one-third of China’s ground-based forces) in the nation’s far west, which could enhance their ability to address instability close to Central Asia.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SaiK » 14 Jan 2016 09:15

SSridhar wrote:
vayu tuvan wrote:Mao was not that handsome :wink:

Yeah, they realized the mistake and therefore tore the statue down.

mm.. I can see reasons for tearing down, but I'm still unable to get your wink & feel that Mao's statue is handsome. :mrgreen:

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby A_Gupta » 15 Jan 2016 08:30

http://zeenews.india.com/news/world/chi ... 45252.html
Chinese marines' desert operations point to long-range ambitions
Beijing: Days after China passed a new law that for the first time permits its military to venture overseas on counter-terror operations, its marines began exercises in the western deserts of Xinjiang, more than 2,000 kilometres from the nearest ocean.

The continuing drills are an indication, analysts say, that the marines, who have traditionally trained for amphibious assault missions, are being honed into an elite force capable of deploying on land far from mainland China.

China`s limited means to respond to threats abroad were highlighted by two incidents in November: when Islamic State executed a Chinese hostage, and the killing of three executives by Islamist militants who attacked a hotel in Mali.

China`s new counter-terrorism law, passed in late December, is aimed at protecting its expanding global commercial and diplomatic interests. But China`s military commanders are also trying to create a military in the likeness of the world`s most dominant power projection force, analysts say.

"They study what the Americans have done very carefully and it`s the mirror image effect," said Leszek Buszynski, a visiting fellow at the Australian National University`s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre.

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 27 Jan 2016 19:01

China steel capacity reduction to cut 0.4m jobs
MANILA: China’s plan to cut its steel production capacity by 100-150 million tonnes will lead to the loss of up to 400,000 jobs, the official Xin­hua news agency reported.

The production cut will lead to the layoff of up to 400,000 workers, Xinhua quoted Li Xinchuang, head of the China Metallurgical Industry Planning and Research Institute, as saying in a report late on Monday.

“Large-scale redundancies in the steel sector could threaten social stability,” Xinhua quoted Li as saying.

China’s steel sector, the world’s biggest, has been saddled with excess capacity for years, with some analysts esti­m­ating the surplus at around 300m tonnes, equivalent to three times the annual output of No. 2 producer Japan.

Apart from steel, China’s cabinet also said coal production capacity will be reduced by “a relatively large amo­unt”.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Philip » 02 Feb 2016 10:43

The best time to attack China!
And things are going to get much much worse since the 1-child per family policy has been abandoned.
China;s population will destroy itself and may also force it to destroy other nations to save itself!

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/f ... ay-station
At least 100,000 Chinese new year travellers stuck at railway station

Vast crowds of migrant workers stuck in Guangzhou’s main railway station during journey home for Chinese new year

A huge mass of stranded train passengers wait outside a railway station in China’s southern city of Guangzhou. Photograph: Bobby Yip/Reuters

Tom Phillips in Beijing
Tuesday 2 February 2016

Poor weather left at least 100,000 travellers stranded in a train station in southern China on Monday as they battled to return home ahead of Chinese New Year celebrations next week.

Vast crowds of migrant workers surged into Guangzhou’s main railway station hoping to make it back to their family homes ahead of Lunar New Year festivities on 8 February that will usher in the Year of the Monkey.

However, a bout of freezing weather and snow across eastern and central China saw at least 23 trains delayed, leaving many trapped in and around the station.

Aerial photographs published by one website showed a crush of bodies snaking towards the train station through metal barricades. About 176,000 passengers had been due to pass through the station on Monday alone.

“There are too many people and it is too crowded,” one stranded passenger, who was not named, told state broadcaster CCTV.

Local media said the situation was so severe that authorities declared a “level two emergency” and deployed more than 2,600 security guards to watch over the throng.

Guangzhou police chief Xie Xiaodan and Chen Rugui, a senior Communist party leader, were also dispatched to the scene in a bid to avert rioting and stampedes.

Policemen keep order among passengers stranded due to heavy snow in Guangzhou Railway Station.

Policemen keep order among passengers stranded due to heavy snow in Guangzhou Railway Station. Photograph: China Photos/Getty Images

A fatal stampede on Shanghai’s historic riverfront Bund on 31 December 2014 claimed dozens of lives and sparked a major political scandal in China’s skyscraper-packed financial capital.

This week’s poor weather has complicated what is already a hugely strenuous time for Chinese authorities.

The 40-day New Year travel rush - which began in late January and is often described as the greatest annual human migration on earth - is expected to see Chinese travellers make more than 2.91bn journeys this year.

Many of those on the move are migrant workers returning from factories in China’s manufacturing heartlands, in the region around Guangzhou, to their homes in the rural interior.

Thousands of passengers pack a main road as they wait to get into the Guangzhou Railway station. Photograph: Vincent Yu/AP

Stranded travellers took to social media to vent their frustration at the travel chaos.

“Just getting back home is so difficult,” one wrote on Weibo, China’s Twitter. “People have to stand in the rain for more than 10 hours.”

Others faced the disruption with humour. “China is never short of people,” quipped another Weibo user.
Additional reporting by Christy Yao

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Ashok Sarraff » 17 Feb 2016 01:17

First train from China to Iran stimulates Silk Road revival

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016- ... 100997.htm

First cargo train from China to Iran arrived in Tehran on Monday, indicating a milestone in reviving the "Silk Road," which has opened a new chapter of win-win cooperation between China and Iran.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 17 Feb 2016 03:34

And things are going to get much much worse since the 1-child per family policy has been abandoned.
China;s population will destroy itself and may also force it to destroy other nations to save itself!


Errrrr................ The probabilistic median looks real good for China:

Image

It is India, which has a small window now to work majik, that is liable to have issues.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Philip » 17 Feb 2016 13:28

China upping the ante in the Indo-China Sea with missiles being installed on the disputed islands.A small incident could lead to war.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... racel.html
China 'sends missiles to contested South China Sea island'
Beijing accused of increasing tensions in disputed area as satellite images appear to show missile batteries on Woody Island, part of the Paracels chain.

The alleged ongoing land reclamation by China on Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, west of Palawan, Philippines
17 Feb 2016

China has deployed an advanced surface-to-air missile system to one of the disputed islands it controls in the South China Sea, Taiwan and American officials said, ratcheting up tensions even as President Barack Obama urged restraint in the region.

Major General David Lo, a Taiwan defence ministry spokesman, told Reuters the missile batteries had been set up on Woody Island. The island is part of the Paracels chain, under Chinese control for more than 40 year but also claimed by Taiwan and Vietnam.

"Interested parties should work together to maintain peace and stability in the South China Sea region and refrain from taking any unilateral measures that would increase tensions," said Gen Lo.

An American defence official also confirmed the "apparent deployment" of the missiles.

Images from civilian satellite company ImageSat International show two batteries of eight surface-to-air missile launchers as well as a radar system, according to Fox News.

News of the missile deployment came as Mr Obama and leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations concluded a summit in California, where they discussed the need to ease tensions in the region but did not include specific mention of China's assertive pursuit of its claims in the South China Sea.

China claims most of the South China Sea, through which more than $5 trillion in global trade passes every year, and has been building runways and other infrastructure on artificial islands to bolster its claims.

Construction at Kagitingan (Fiery Cross) Reef in the disputed Spratley Islands in the south China Sea by China Construction at Kagitingan (Fiery Cross) Reef in the disputed Spratly Islands in the south China Sea by China Photo: EPA

"We discussed the need for tangible steps in the South China Sea to lower tensions including a halt to further reclamation, new construction and militarization of disputed areas," Mr Obama told a news conference.

The United States has said it will continue conducting "freedom of navigation patrols" by ships and aircraft to assure unimpeded passage through the region, where Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines and Taiwan have rival claims.

• Minor incident 'could spark war' in South China Sea

Mira Rapp-Hooper, a South China Sea expert from of the Centre for a New American Security, said it was not the first time that China has sent such weapons to the Paracels, under Chinese control since 1974.

"I do think surface to air missiles are a considerable development," she said. "If they have been deployed they are probably China's effort to signal a response to freedom-of navigation operations, but I don't think it is a totally unprecedented deployment."

USS Curtis Wilbur passed near Triton Island in the Paracel Islands

A US Navy destroyer sailed within 12 nautical miles of Triton Island in the Paracels chain last month in a move the Pentagon said was aimed at countering efforts by China, Vietnam and Taiwan to limit freedom of navigation. China condemned the US action as provocative.

China has said it would not seek militarisation of its South China Sea islands and reefs, but that did not mean it would not set up defences.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 22 Feb 2016 10:28

Chinese New Year celebrated at VIT, Vellore - The Hindu
Students of VIT University recently celebrated the Chinese New Year.

Songs, dance, comedy and a traditional Chinese opera were part of the celebrations.

While the Chinese faculty sang a Hindi song, four Indian students performed a Chinese traditional dance.

The university is celebrating the Chinese New Year since 2009.

‘Century of Asia’

G. Viswanathan, the university’s Chancellor, said the 21st century was the century of Asia, and if both China and India grow economically, the Asian economy will grow, a press release said.

About 200 Chinese students are studying in the university.


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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 24 Feb 2016 07:35

U.S. says China deploys fighter jets to disputed South China Sea island

China has deployed fighter jets to a disputed island in the South China Sea, a U.S. official told CNN on Tuesday.

U.S. officials said it's not the first time China has placed J-11 and J-7 fighter jets on the island after expanding the runway there in 2014.

The placement of missiles on the island, which appear to be permanently placed in concrete, is of greater concern, according to the officials.

The move comes as Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on Tuesday.

China last week deployed surface-to-air missiles on Woody Island, part of the Paracel chain in the hotly disputed sea, according to Taiwan and U.S. officials, in a move that has alarmed the country's Asian neighbors.

Chinese state media said defenses had been in place on the island for years, and denied it was militarizing the island.

Satellite images taken on February 14 appeared to show several missile batteries and support vehicles, according to ImageSat International, which took the images.

Taiwan's Defense Ministry last week said it had confirmed that surface-to-air missiles had been deployed. U.S. officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told CNN that commercial satellite imagery showed the deployment of missile batteries.
South China Sea territorial dispute

South China Sea territorial dispute 02:31

The news ratcheted up tensions in the volatile region, already home to messy territorial disputes, with a senior Japanese Cabinet member labeling China's actions unacceptable.

China controls the Paracel chain, but Taiwan and Vietnam also claim it; Brunei, Malaysia and the Philippines are also embroiled in disputes with China over regional islands and their surrounding waters..

Showdown in the South China Sea: How did we get here?

China's Defense Ministry has said defense facilities had existed on the islands for years, according to the government-run Global Times. It wasn't clear whether the report was referring to the surface-to-air missiles identified by Taiwan officials, which satellite imagery suggested had been deployed this month.

China has occupied Woody Island for 50 years.

The Global Times said the Paracel Islands were Chinese territory and that China had the legal right to deploy defensive measures to protect its territorial sovereignty and integrity. It blamed Western media for attempting to "hype up the so-called China threat."

China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Hong Lei told reporters last week that the "deployment of defense facilities in our own territory is appropriate and reasonable."

"It's aimed at improving our national defense capabilities and has nothing to do with so-called militarization," he told a press briefing.
Mischief Reef in the South China Sea in January 2012, left, and in September 2015, right. China appears to building a third airstrip on this reef, according to new satellite images analyzed by the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). All images used with courtesy of CSIS/Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative
5 photos: China's island building in the South China Sea

Reports of the missile batteries on Woody Island have prompted China's neighbors to appeal for restraint amid concerns Beijing was changing the status quo in the region.

Taiwan President-elect Tsai Ing-wen responded to the news by calling on "all parties to exercise self-control based on the principle of peaceful resolution of disputes in the South China Sea," according to Taiwan's official Central News Agency.

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Beijing's actions were unacceptable.


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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 09 Mar 2016 04:40

Chinese exports plunge 25% in February

That is the official figure.

Exports dropped sharply by 25.4% from a year earlier, while imports fell 13.8%.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 09 Mar 2016 04:44


NRao
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 10 Mar 2016 11:45


ramana
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 11 Mar 2016 00:34

NPR radio today morning was talking about the real estate bubble in China after the stock market collapse. Apparently $200K for a 600 sq. foot apartment in Shanghai and price goes up by $7.5K to $15K everyday. Yet same time there is a big glut of RE all over China.

News anchor was gloating if this is sign of a RE bubble before the collapse same as 2007 RE bubble in US and then the fall.

One saving grace is buyers have to put 30% down and pay market interest rates.

So no sub-prime galota.
What it mean is China RE is holding tank for people's money after the stock market crash.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 11 Mar 2016 01:17

Heard the same report. From a big picture POV, it is incomplete. Their FE reserves are nearly down by a cool trillions - a loss of a third. And as the same report mentioned, they have, what, nearly 200 miles of vacant housing? And yet the prices leap $15K per day!!! Go figure. A bubble is being created even if people plunk 30% up front. The property values are creating a bubble. What happens when these guys have no jobs due to a lack of exports? And the eco has not moved to services and internal consumption?

Smoke and mirrors.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 15 Mar 2016 02:50

Problems in PandaLand. Labor Unrest!!!!!! Not any simple unrest, A surging unrest

Incidents of labor unrest in China are increasing. According to the China Labor Bulletin (CLB), Chinese workers engaged in around 185 strikes in 2011. In 2015, the CLB reported 2944 strikes – 16 times as many. Better reporting and data collection may account for some of this growth – but even taking this into consideration, the increase in the frequency of labor protests is alarming.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 25 Mar 2016 10:38

BBC was reporting and hour ago, that 17 people arrested for criticizing Xi Peng handling current crisis.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby subhamoy.das » 25 Mar 2016 14:26

This is what happens when u have worlds largest population and yet go for a export driven economy. If u are a small country like Japan, SOKO, Thailand etc you can reach a per capita export which will propel u to a upper middle income country. People advocate that manufacturing results in service and hence consumption. But contract manufacturing does not drive service, unless u are doing innovation, and that is where Chinese model has gone wrong. Contract manufacturing only increases the kitty of the govt, which is the owner of the factory and not the people but the govt is not in a position to distributed to people without stoking inflation. So i would call this like a "water water every where but not a drop to drink" kind of situation. The rise in automation level of contract manufacturing worsens this situation.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 27 Mar 2016 00:23

China has a Growler version in test - J-16.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 29 Mar 2016 06:56

China on strike

What? :eek: :shock: :-? , running out of emoticons

Check out these guys recording:

...........|................................|........................................|

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