China Watch Thread-I

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arun
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby arun » 12 May 2017 08:49

X Posted on Managing Chinese Threat Thread and related to directly above post by Peregrine.

Text of the article titled “China should take competition from India seriously” that appeared in the Peoples Republic of China Communist Party and Government controll mouthpiece, Global Times:

China should take competition from India seriously

Source:Global Times Published: 2017/5/10 22:28:39

China should be wary of Indian competition

China and India are two neighboring countries with the largest populations in the world, an unusual geographical phenomenon. With a population of 1.38 billion, China's GDP grew 6.7 percent to more than $10 trillion in 2016, while the Indian Central Statistics Office estimated India's GDP growth for the full fiscal 2016-17 at 7.1 per cent.

While Indian GDP may lag far behind, the country remains a potential emerging market that has high attractiveness for global capital. A survey by Ernst & Young (EY) ranked India as the most attractive investment destination in the world. Among 500 executives from multinational companies involved in the survey, 60 percent considered India one of the top three investment destinations in 2015. The country's vast domestic market, low labor costs and skilled labor market are its most attractive features. As China's demographic dividend diminishes, India, with half of its population below the age of 25, is poised to take advantage.

An increasing number of Chinese companies have invested in India in recent years, covering such sectors as hardware, software and marketing. Smartphone manufacturers like Vivo, OPPO and Lenovo have already entered the Indian market; while mobile tools like SHAREit, UC Browser, Cheetah Mobile and APUS have also been downloaded by vast amounts of users. It is noteworthy that Chinese companies' investment in India has shifted from simply marketing to research and development (R&D). For instance, Chinese telecom company Huawei Technologies Co invested $170 million to open an R&D facility in Bengaluru, and announced its plan to join Prime Minister Narendra Modi's "Make in India" campaign.

Just as what happened with China in the past, the changes that are taking place in India may also point to great potential for development. With a large population of young people, which is not only the labor force but also a potential consumer group, India has the possibility of seeing explosive economic growth in the future. Therefore, we must pay close attention to the development of this unfamiliar neighbor.

One of our researchers raised a question: If India decided to copy China, what impact would it have and what should China do? By copying China, India may also develop an Internet economy and boost its infrastructure construction, along with investment-driven growth. In other words, India may turn itself into China 2.0, and let global investors decide whether to invest in China or India.

In our opinion, if India intentionally creates a competitive situation in front of global investors, it will pose a challenge for China. Because generally speaking, India does have the conditions to copy China's economic growth model thanks to its vast size and market, low labor costs and large population, which are all similar to China's conditions. In fact, based on the EY report, global investors are currently undecided.

Moreover, there are growing signs that India is succeeding in attracting more and more investment, which China should take seriously.

The Indian government appears confident about attracting investment. At present, India is committed to solar energy development, which attracts a large number of foreign investors. Prime Minister Modi hopes to boost the usage of clean energy over fossil fuels by building massive solar parks and is targeting $100 billion in investment in solar energy in the next five years, with the backing of loans from the World Bank. No other country could compete with India in supporting investors in the solar economy.

It should be pointed out that China has not conducted enough studies on India. From the perspective of think tanks, China cannot wait until India grows into an apparently promising competitor before discussing how to deal with the situation.

As such, China should develop a more effective growth strategy for the new era or it may become an unfortunate bystander watching India's success.

China needs to ponder and study the rise of the Indian economy carefully. With a young population, it is entirely possible for the emerging market economy to become China 2.0 to gain the attention of world capital.

The article was compiled based on a report by Beijing-based private strategic think tank Anbound.

Web Link Clicky

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Philip » 12 May 2017 13:22

China's OBOR.The jury is still out as what China wants is this gambit to make China the "dominant nation" on the planet.

OBOR + Old Beijing Origin Refuse.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... initiative
The $900bn question: What is the Belt and Road initiative?
It’s a confusing title but it could turn out to be the largest ever infrastructure project with close to a trillion dollars being invested across the globe
A stretch of the Karakoram Highway in Xinjiang, China, a region which could be transformed by Xi Jinping’s Belt and Road initiative infrastructure plans.

Tom Phillips in Beijing
Friday 12 May 2017 02.02 BST Last modified on Friday 12 May 2017 02.12 BST
On Sunday Chinese President Xi Jinping will welcome world leaders including Russia’s Vladimir Putin, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi to Beijing for what is billed as China’s most important diplomatic event of the year: a two-day forum celebrating Xi’s so-called ‘Belt and Road initiative’.

The Belt and what initiative?

Even Chinese officials have struggled to define the awkwardly-named scheme and a flurry of music-themed propaganda about Xi’s signature foreign policy in the lead-up to this weekend’s event has done little to clear things up.

World's biggest building project aims to make China great again
Read more
“It is not a solo song but a chorus,” one veteran Chinese diplomat claimed cryptically this week.

“[It is] a Chinese solution to global economic blues,” said the official news agency Xinhua.
Foreign minister Wang Yi has described the initiative as a “symphony of all relevant parties”.

In concrete terms, the Belt and Road initiative is an immensely ambitious development campaign through which China wants to boost trade and stimulate economic growth across Asia and beyond. It hopes to do so by building massive amounts of infrastructure connecting it to countries around the globe. By some estimates, China plans to pump $150bn into such projects each year. In a report released at the start of this year, ratings agency Fitch said an extraordinary $900bn in projects were planned or underway.

There are plans for pipelines and a port in Pakistan, bridges in Bangladesh and railways to Russia - all with the aim of creating what China calls a “modern Silk Road” trading route that Beijing believes will kick start “a new era of globalisation”.

According to the global consultancy McKinsey, the plan has the potential to massively overshadow the US’ post-war Marshall reconstruction plan, involving about 65% of the world’s population, one-third of its GDP and helping to move about a quarter of all its goods and services. Some describe Xi’s scheme as the biggest development push in history.

But why Belt and Road?

The Belt and Road initiative has two main prongs: one is called the ‘Silk Road Economic Belt’ (the belt) and the other the ‘21st Century Maritime Silk Road’ (the road).

Bewilderingly, the ‘road’ is not actually a road but rather a sea route linking China’s southern coast to east Africa and the Mediterranean. The ‘belt’ is a series of overland corridors connecting China with Europe, via Central Asia and the Middle East.

“It is a very confusing name,” admits Peter Cai, the author of a recent report about Belt and Road, who blames China’s propaganda-focused state media for failing to properly explain the concept to the world. “There is still a lot of confusion about what the Belt and Road initiative is and what it actually entails.”

The initiative’s Chinese name - yi dai yi lu or “one belt, one road” - rolls off the tongue far more easily.
When did it start and what has happened?

The initiative was officially launched in September 2013 when President Xi used a speech at a university in Kazakhstan to call for the creation of a “Silk Road Economic Belt”. The project was later expanded and re-branded with its current name.

Beijing has championed a number of achievements, foremost among them the $62 billion China-Pakistan economic corridor (Cpec), a sprawling web of motorways, power plants, wind farms, factories and railways, that supporters say will spark an “economic revolution” and create up to one million jobs in Pakistan. Other high-profile schemes include a $1.1 billion port project in Sri Lanka, a high-speed rail link in Indonesia and an industrial park in Cambodia.

Child won't sleep? Try explaining Xi Jinping's infrastructure dream to them :rotfl:

However, experts say that nearly four years after the initiative began most projects remain on the drawing board. “We really are at a very early stage of implementation,” says Cai, a fellow at Australia’s Lowy Institute. “It’s still early days to pass a judgement on the success or failure of the Belt and Road.”

At this weekend’s conference, China hopes to put some meat on the bones of Xi’s pet project.
Why is the Belt and Road initiative so important to China?
Observers say a number of overlapping goals lie behind China’s ‘Belt and Road’ campaign.

In many ways it is an economic plan designed to open up and create new markets for Chinese goods and technology at a time when the economy is slowing and to help export excess cement and steel capacity by shifting factories overseas to less developed countries. Beijing also hopes Xi’s initiative will help boost the economies of less developed border regions such as Xinjiang by linking them with neighbouring countries.

But many believe the Belt and Road initiative is also a geopolitical gambit to boost China’s regional clout at a time when Donald Trump’s US looks to be stepping back from Asia. “It’s about making China the dominant country in the region,” says Tom Miller, the author of a book about the scheme called China’s Asian Dream.

*(*Let's all work together to make this China's nightmare"!)

Cai said it was indisputable that Belt and Road would have geopolitical consequences, giving Beijing greater leverage over its neighbours. “It will give China more influence.”

How do other countries feel about it?

Xi’s initiative has been greeted with a mix of excitement and suspicion.

Miller, who has visited many of the countries involved, said many governments in central and south-east Asia were genuine cheerleaders. “There are certain countries, like Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, where it is literally keeping the lights on,” he said, pointing to massive Chinese power transmission projects in those nations.

Others, however, feared that by becoming indebted to Beijing they would become “economic vassals”. Some countries, such as India, suspect the project is simply a smokescreen China is using to seize strategic control of the Indian Ocean. India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has accused Beijing of trying to “undermine the sovereignty of other nations” and will shun this week’s summit. :mrgreen: 3 cheers for Mr.M!

Many in the west are also wary. Beijing has said 28 heads of state and government leaders will attend Xi’s forum but German chancellor Angela Merkel has turned down an invitation and US president Donald Trump is not expected to attend. Only one G7 leader, Italian prime minister Paolo Gentiloni, has confirmed.

The UK will be represented by the chancellor, Philip Hammond, suggesting Downing Street did not want to offend China’s leaders too much despite Theresa May’s decision to take a rain check.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Philip » 12 May 2017 13:47

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... initiative
World's biggest building project aims to make China great again
The ‘Belt and Road initiative’ could see hundreds of billions spent from Mongolia to Malaysia, Thailand to Turkmenistan and Indonesia to Iran
by Tom Phillips in Tashkurgan

Friday 12 May 2017 01.25 BST

When the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, unveiled what some call the most ambitious development plan in history, Zhou Jun decided almost immediately he should head for the hills.

The 45-year-old entrepreneur packed his bags and set off for one of his country’s most staggeringly beautiful corners: a sleepy, high-altitude border outpost called Tashkurgan that - at almost 5,000km (3,100 miles) from Beijing - is the most westerly settlement in China.

“I saw a great opportunity to turn this little town into a mid-sized city,” Zhou explained during a tour of ‘Europa Manor’, a garish roadside spa he recently opened for Chinese tourists along the Karakoram, the legendary 1,300km highway that snakes through China’s rugged western mountains towards the 4,700m-high Khunjerab Pass.

Zhou said he was part of a wave of entrepreneurs now pouring into this isolated frontier near Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, hoping to cash in on President Xi’s “Belt and Road initiative”, a multi-billion dollar infrastructure campaign that looks set to transform large swaths of Asia and the world beyond.

“This place is going to see big changes,” predicted Zhou, who hails from the central city of Xi’an, as he guided his visitors through an R&R centre filled with plunge pools, wicker chaise lounges and fake plastic trees.

This weekend world leaders including Russian president Vladimir Putin, Pakistani prime minister Nawaz Sharif and Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan will gather in Beijing to celebrate Xi’s plan, which supporters hail as the start of a new era of globalisation but sceptics see as a strategic ploy to cement China’s position as Asia’s top dog.

“The Belt and Road forum will go down as a landmark event in the history of Chinese foreign policy,” boasted a frontpage commentary in the Communist party’s official mouthpiece, the People’s Daily, on the eve of the event, which bears the unfortunate English acronym “Barf”.

As the last stop on the Karakoram before the border with Pakistan, Tashkurgan stands on the front line of one of the most ambitious components of Xi’s project: the $62bn China-Pakistan economic corridor (Cpec).

Officials in Beijing and Islamabad claim the corridor – a vast web of planned infrastructure projects running diagonally from the resource-rich region of Xinjiang in western China to the deep-water port of Gwadar on Pakistan’s Arabian coast – will spark an “economic revolution” in the south Asian country.

The jaw-dropping landscape of glaciers and grasslands around Tashkurgan, an ancient Silk Road trading hub that is home to China’s Tajik ethnic minority, has changed little in hundreds, if not thousands, of years. “It is worth a journey from England merely to see this place,” the British adventurer Robert Shaw marvelled after trekking through the region’s “stupendous peaks” in the late 1860s.

Children in the town of Tashkurgan. Photograph: Tom Phillips for the Guardian
But this obscure and secluded town is now bracing for a revolution of its own, as authorities cook up grand plans to transform it and the surrounding region.

In order to ferry people and equipment into this far-flung outpost, which is seven hours’ drive from the nearest major city, one of China’s highest altitude airports is being built just south of town on the Pamir plateau, a sparsely inhabited region previously the preserve of farmers, nomads and yaks.

Construction teams on both sides of the border have been rebuilding some of the most treacherous stretches of the Karakoram, the world’s highest transnational highway and a project that took two decades and more than 1,000 lives to build.

Further ahead, there are spectacular plans to build the so-called Khunjerab railway, a high-altitude line that would run roughly alongside the Karakoram and link north-eastern Pakistan with the Chinese city of Kashgar.

Such proposals are music to the ears of fortune-seekers such as Zhou who have flocked to this landlocked town to open improbably named businesses such as the Sea Front International Hotel.

Passengers sit in an open topped vehicle on the Karakoram Highway, Photograph: Tom Phillips for the Guardian
“The next 10 years are going to bring tremendous change,” Zhou boasted. He claimed, with a heavy dose of hyperbole, that the town’s future might resemble that of skyscraper-studded mega-cities such as Shanghai and Guangzhou.

Muzaffar Shah, a Pakistani salesman who was passing through the Chinese city on his way back from a shopping expedition to the bazaars of Kashgar, said he also sensed change was coming.

Shah remembered his first trip to Tashkurgan, in 1993, when “it was nothing”. “This is growing very fast [now] – very, very fast,” he added over a plate of yak curry by the Karakoram, which Chinese travellers call the China-Pakistan Friendship Highway. “Everything has changed.”

Over the coming years Tashkurgan is unlikely to be the only place to feel the effects of China’s infrastructure crusade, which some compare to America’s post-war Marshall plan to rebuild Europe.

Nuyuft Arkin, a 45-year- old farmer, outside the new home on the outskirts of Tashkurgan.

From Mongolia to Malaysia, Thailand to Turkmenistan and Indonesia to Iran, a slew of Chinese projects, including power plants, solar farms, motorways, bridges, ports and high-speed rail links, are set to be built with support from China’s banks and work force.

According to some estimates, China will bankroll some $150bn of infrastructure projects each year in countries that embrace Xi’s signature foreign policy initiative.

Tom Miller, the author of a recent book about Xi’s Asian infrastructure blitz, said the Belt and Road schemes were part of a vast wave of Chinese capital that was now “washing over the world”.

So many economic and geo-political goals lay behind the program that it defied one simple definition but essentially it was Xi’s answer to Donald Trump’s #MAGA: “Let’s Make China Great Again”.

“It is part of a push to cement China’s position as the undisputed power of Asia,” he said.

“China’s greatest strengths are financial – it has enormous economic muscle – and building infrastructure. So it is putting those things together and using its economic diplomacy to build roads, railways, ports, powerlines [that will help] integrate Asia [and] puts China at the centre of Asia.”

“It is very significant because China is the only country that has the capacity to build infrastructure like this and the only country that is willing to do it,” Miller added.

Child won't sleep? Try explaining Xi Jinping's infrastructure dream to them :rotfl:
Read more
“You can be very sceptical about what the Belt and Road itself means … but nobody doubts that China is lending a lot of money and building a lot of stuff.”

The winds of change have already been blowing in Tashkurgan and affecting its 40,000-strong population.

Physically and culturally, the town, which is the main home of the Sarikoli-speaking Tajik minority, is about as far from Beijing as you can get, without crossing China’s 22,000km border.

An exhibit at the local government museum, the Tajik Folk Culture Exhibition Hall, describes its natives as having “typical features of Caucasian race, with light skin coloration, golden yellow or dark brown hair, dark blue or gray brown eyes, thin lip, high nose, not high cheekbone, developed body hair and beard.”

Slowly, however, the make-up of the population is changing. Locals say the last decade has seen a major influx of Mandarin-speaking immigrants from China’s ethnic Han majority after the government began trying to boost the local economy by turning the picturesque border town into a tourist destination.

Those efforts intensified following an outbreak of deadly ethnic rioting in Xinjiang’s capital, Urumqi, in 2009 as authorities began pushing for a burst of “leapfrog” economic development that might calm the province’s violence-hit south.

Miller said one of the Belt and Road initiative’s key aims was to bring development and stability to China’s deprived periphery by linking such regions with overseas markets.

“Particularly in Xinjiang, China believes that economic development can help solve some of the security questions with its own militant Muslim minority and Islamist problems over the borders. They think that if you give people jobs and economic hope then perhaps they will be less inclined to foment insurgencies and other things,” he said.

“I think they are mistaken there … but that is how they think,” Miller added.

A Chinese flag flies over Tashkurgan. Photograph: Tom Phillips for the Guardian
The ever-present security forces on Tashkurgan’s otherwise tranquil streets give it the feel of an Alpine resort crossed with the West Bank and public expressions of dissent are rare.

Asked how they felt about the town’s future, locals firmly stuck to the party line and said they were hopeful Xi’s project would inject new life into the area.

“We fully support the Belt and Road initiative,” beamed Narzi Baygim, a 23-year-old Tajik tour guide who said she hoped it would bring more tourists to the region. “I think it will help connect China to other countries and to promote friendship.”

Rebiya, a 22-year-old interpreter, said she was glad to have been born and raised in such a scenic and pristine corner of China. “Living here is like living in heaven,” she said.

But development was welcome, she said, shrugging off the suggestion that Tajik traditions might be diluted by the influx of outsiders.

“[Our culture] has been passed down over the past 2,000 years and has become part of our DNA,” she said. “I don’t think it will vanish just because of economic development.”

While business people are banking on the transformation of the region around Tashkurgan, not everyone is convinced the reality will live up to Xi’s grand vision. Some point out that since the Belt and Road initiative began in 2013 trade between Xinjiang and foreign countries has actually fallen.

Rahber Khan, the owner of a Pakistani restaurant near the town’s main square, said he feared most Chinese investment was destined for the strategic port of Gwadar, not the impoverished region where his family lived.

“Maybe in the future we are growing but right now we don’t see anything good in front of us,” said Khan, 39, who is originally from Ghulkin, a village just over the border.

“I’m not sure if it’s coming or not,” he said of plans to connect Pakistan and China with the Khunjerab railway, adding: “It’s just talking.”

Before this weekend’s summit in Beijing, China has trumpeted its commitment to the “game-changing” initiative in a barrage of state-sponsored propaganda.

“At a time when certain western powers are retreating into protectionism and isolation, China has been promoting the globalisation of the economy in a spirit of openness and inclusiveness,” the official news agency Xinhua declared.

The English-language China Daily newspaper described the drive as “one of the most important public goods China offers the world”.

Outside Khan’s restaurant, the Communist party has also set out its stall, stamping its message onto a giant red billboard that towers over Tashkurgan’s main square.

“Build a beautiful Xinjiang!” the sign reads. “Make a Chinese dream come true!”

Additional reporting by Wang Zhen

Neshant
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Neshant » 13 May 2017 07:13

They must have massive over-capacity problems in their country if they are promoting such boon doggles overseas.

The construction bubble must be getting ready to burst in their country.

Furthermore, which country wants to be a dumping ground for even more Chinese made products and bigger deficits via this one belt road method.

India should preserve its internal markets for local industries and western FDI.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby kittoo » 13 May 2017 07:27

Neshant wrote:They must have massive over-capacity problems in their country if they are promoting such boon doggles overseas.

The construction bubble must be getting ready to burst in their country.

Furthermore, which country wants to be a dumping ground for even more Chinese made products and bigger deficits via this one belt road method.

India should preserve its internal markets for local industries and western FDI.


Nevertheless india should be wary and track this project closely, even more so as it goes through PoK. This could be dangerous for us (and beneficial for Pakistan, double whammy). We should find ways to counter it.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby arun » 14 May 2017 20:18

X Posted from the International Military Discussion thread.

The ballistic missile launch was perfectly timed to upstage BARF ie: Belt And Road Forum being held in the Peoples Republic of China leading one to wonder if the missile launch was not a case of North Korea thumbing their noses at their Peoples Republic of China Patrons:

North Korea blights China's One Belt, One Road party with missile launch

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Neshant » 18 May 2017 09:00


Agasthi
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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Agasthi » 18 May 2017 10:03

A couple of observations on Chinese here in Down under. Not sure if this is right thread but take it is a compilation of some Chinese characteristics and a few questions seeking answers:
1. They are being blamed for the real estate crisis in most large cities especially in Sydney which i believe is largely true. Whites indirectly call them 'overseas investors' lest they be accused of racism. The rumor is that liquid cash is being used to buy properties not bank transfers. They don't seem to invest much in Indian dominated suburbs and tend to push whites out once they get in.
2. The love for gambling. Don't know whats the reason for this addiction, however a chinese colleague said "life is a gamble anyways so why not risk a bit more"
3. They seem to turn to Christianity more than any other immigrant (other than Korean maybe) and they are not even poor unlike the poorer indian converts back home. The churches here in sydney is choc-a-bloc with this nation. Is this an after effect of being under communist rule? Don't they have their own spiritual heritage to fall upon. I hardly see any indian or middle eastern immigrant mimic this. If the Sri-lankan tamil community can fall back upon their spiritual heritage after all they have been through, why not the chinese?

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby A_Gupta » 19 May 2017 04:46

https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/arti ... n-says-q-a

Xi Revamping China's Military to Win Wars, Finkelstein Says: Q&A
Bloomberg News
May 18, 2017, 5:00 PM EDT

‘Most profound changes to the Chinese military since 1950s’
Former Pentagon official David Finkelstein speaks in interview

In China, President Xi Jinping wants to ensure his nation can fight -- and win -- modern wars. To do that, he has been overseeing a sweeping overhaul of the People’s Liberation Army since 2015.
...
Xi is reducing troop levels by 300,000, mostly from the army. He is expanding China’s navy and added new rocket, cyber and outer-space capabilities. Old departments have been eliminated and China’s Central Military Commission, the Communist Party body that runs the military, has been strengthened. The number of military regions has been reduced to five from seven “joint theater commands” responsible for planning and operations.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby putnanja » 21 May 2017 19:28

By killing CIA informants, China stifled US spying

The Chinese government systematically dismantled CIA spying operations in the country starting in 2010, killing or imprisoning more than a dozen sources over two years and crippling intelligence gathering there for years afterward.

Current and former US officials described the intelligence breach as one of the worst in decades. It set off a scramble in Washington’s intelligence and law enforcement agencies to contain the fallout, but investigators were bitterly divided over the cause.


Some were convinced that a mole within the CIA had betrayed the United States. Others believed that the Chinese had hacked the covert system the CIA used to communicate with its foreign sources. Years later, that debate remains unresolved.

But there was no disagreement about the damage. From the final weeks of 2010 through the end of 2012, according to former US officials, the Chinese killed at least a dozen of the CIA’s sources.
...

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby hanumadu » 21 May 2017 20:17

Agasthi wrote:A couple of observations on Chinese here in Down under. Not sure if this is right thread but take it is a compilation of some Chinese characteristics and a few questions seeking answers:
1. They are being blamed for the real estate crisis in most large cities especially in Sydney which i believe is largely true. Whites indirectly call them 'overseas investors' lest they be accused of racism. The rumor is that liquid cash is being used to buy properties not bank transfers. They don't seem to invest much in Indian dominated suburbs and tend to push whites out once they get in.


The situation is the same every where from bay area to vancouver to london to australia. All english speaking countries covered.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Neshant » 22 May 2017 04:51

A sign of things to come...?

"We Will Go To War; We Will Fight You": China's Xi Threatens Duterte If Philippines Drills For Oil
May 20, 2017 6:40 PM

The Philippines' outspoken president Rodrigo Duterte got a glimpse of the true snarling, belligerent Chinese dragon hiding behind the cheerful, globalist Panda facade earlier this week, when in response to a claim that his country was prepared to drill for oil in a disputed part of the South China Sea, China's president Xi told him matter-of-factly that in that case he should prepare for war.

In a meeting on Monday between the two presidents, Duterte asserted his nation's sovereignty over disputed South China Sea territory citing last year's ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration. "We intend to drill oil there, if it's yours, well, that's your view, but my view is, I can drill the oil, if there is some inside the bowels of the earth because it is ours," Duterte said in a speech, recalling his conversation with Xi.

That prompted a surprisingly abrupt retort from Xi:

“Well, if you force this, we’ll be forced to tell you the truth. We will go to war. We will fight you,” Duterte on Friday quoted Xi as saying.

The unexpectedly direct response, coming just days after China hoped to set the world at easy with its new globalist ambitions after it officially launched the Silk Road regional infrastructure project last week, caught China watchers by surprise. It stunned Duterted as well. The Philippine president has long expressed his admiration for Xi and said he would raise the arbitration ruling with him eventually, but needed first to strengthen relations between the two countries, which the Philippines is hoping will yield billions of dollars in Chinese loans and infrastructure investments.

Duterte recalled the same story about his discussion with Xi on oil exploration in a recorded television show aired moments after the speech. He said Xi told him "do not touch it" and added that Xi had promised that the arbitration ruling would be discussed in future, but not now. It most likely won't be.

As a reminder, the Hague award from July 2016 clarified Philippine sovereign rights in its 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone to access offshore oil and gas fields, including the Reed Bank, 85 nautical miles off its coast. It also invalidated China's nine-dash line claim on its maps denoting sovereignty over most of the South China Sea. China has repeatedly said it would not comply with the Court's ruling, setting the stage for potential conflicts in the future between China and its neighbors.

Eager not to lose face domestically, Duterte said China did not want to bring up the arbitral ruling at a time when other claimant countries, like Vietnam, might also decide to file cases against it at the arbitration tribunal. It was not the first time the firebrand leader has publicly discussed the content of private meetings with other world leaders.

According to Bloomberg, Duterte's remarks come just after China and the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations agreed on a draft framework for a code of conduct governing actions in the region. The countries exchanged views on "the importance of appropriately handling concerns, incidents and disputes involving the South China Sea", the Chinese Foreign Ministry said in a statement that gave few details.

Judging by Duterte's comments, China's resolution protocol is simple: it's either our way - which means you stay out of it completely - or war.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-05-2 ... s-drills-o

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 25 May 2017 21:57

X Posted on Managing Chinese Threat Thread

Moody's makes Modi smile with China's first rating downgrade in 30 years

Has ratings firm Moody's Investors Services just given Prime Minister Narendra Modi a chance to drive the Indian economy faster? Moody's downgraded China's long-term local and foreign currency issuer ratings today by one notch to an A1 rating from AA3, citing expectations that the financial strength of the world's second biggest economy would erode in the coming years.

"The downgrade reflects Moody's expectation that China's financial strength will erode somewhat over the coming years, with economy-wide debt continuing to rise as potential growth slows," Moody's said. Rating downgrade will raise borrowing costs for China.

The downgrade is not likely to give India an edge over China as its rating still remains among the highest. Yet, the downgrading signals to the Yet, the downgrading signals to the international community that all is not well with China, especially when it is launching its ambitious one-belt one-road initiative which aims at global dominance.

Though India lags far behind China in several fields, the communist country is getting wary of India's gains in foreign direct investment (FDI), technology and manufacturing.

China faces dwindling foreign exchange reserves when India is aggressively pushing itself as a destination for foreign investment. Recently, President Xi Jinping had vowed to open up China like never before. Premier Li Keqiang has also announced that foreign firms would be treated the same as domestic firms when it comes to licence applications, standard setting and government procurement and would enjoy same preferential policies under Made in China 2025 initiative. In 2015, India was for the first time the leading country ($63 billion) in the world for FDI by capital investment, overtaking China ($56.6 billion) and the US ($59.6 billion). This had set the alarm bells ringing in the Chinese establishment.

China is also scared of India overtaking it in manufacturing in the long term as labour costs in China are rising. Global Times, a Chinese establishment newspaper, wrote recently in an article headlined 'China should pay more attention to India’s increasing manufacturing competitiveness': “Although India is still in its initial stage of developing export-oriented manufacturing industries, the country has great potential to emerge as a regional hub for labour-intensive industries. One recent analysis showed China’s manufacturing hourly wage in 2016 was roughly five times that in India.”

The trigger for the article was India’s exports to China increasing 42% in January this year. Though China has a big edge over India in bilateral trade, it wants to see if the rise in Indian exports is a flash in the pan or a trend.

The importance of Moody's China downgrade may be more symbolic than substantial for the communist country. Though India cannot be seen as China's economic rival for the far bigger economy of China, it certainly benefits from any drop in sentiment about China in the outside world.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Rajdeep » 27 May 2017 08:40


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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 30 May 2017 02:54

This is truly impressive.

Is China Outsmarting America in A.I.?

Beijing is backing its artificial intelligence push with vast sums of money. Having already spent billions on research programs, China is readying a new multibillion-dollar initiative to fund moonshot projects, start-ups and academic research, all with the aim of growing China’s A.I. capabilities, according to two professors who consulted with the government on the plan.

China’s private companies are pushing deeply into the field as well, though the line between government and private in China sometimes blurs. Baidu — often called the Google of China and a pioneer in artificial-intelligence-related fields, like speech recognition — this year opened a joint company-government laboratory partly run by academics who once worked on research into Chinese military robots.

China is spending more just as the United States cuts back. This past week, the Trump administration released a proposed budget that would slash funding for a variety of government agencies that have traditionally backed artificial intelligence research.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby ramana » 31 May 2017 06:59

Rethinking Next China

Steve Roach

Rethinking Next China

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby NRao » 31 May 2017 08:37

The Billionaire Gadfly in Exile Who Stared Down Beijing
The biggest political story in China this year isn’t in Beijing. It isn’t even in China. It’s centered at a $68 million apartment overlooking Central Park in Manhattan.

That’s where Guo Wengui, a billionaire in self-imposed exile, has hurled political grenades at the Chinese Communist Party for months, accusing senior leaders of graft using Twitter as his loudspeaker. He escalated his attack by claiming that members of the family of China’s second most powerful official, who oversees the country’s anticorruption effort, secretly own a large stake in a major Chinese conglomerate.

The Chinese government responded by unleashing the state-controlled media to enumerate Mr. Guo’s alleged frauds, and asking Interpol to put out a global warrant for his arrest.

But then something unexpected happened. China stood down. The state media campaign against him tapered off. In mid-May, Mr. Guo announced on Twitter that his wife and daughter — previously barred from leaving China — had been allowed to visit him in New York.

Greater Corruption in China? A Billionaire Says He Has Evidence APRIL 15, 2017

“We need to root out some of the robbers of this country,” Mr. Guo, referring to China, told two New York Times reporters this month at his apartment. To emphasize the point, he wrote it out in Chinese in a notebook. “We are against using corruption to root out corruption.”

Mr. Guo’s allegations are unproved, and some of his claims have been outlandish and easily debunked. Yet amid his barrage of charges about China’s powerful and wealthy are claims that have turned out to be accurate. And the government’s treatment of Mr. Guo, whose former political patron was one of China’s highest-ranking intelligence officials, suggests he may be taken seriously, perhaps even supported, by some officials in Beijing.

Mr. Guo’s most recent claims have reverberated across China and fed unease on Wall Street about doing business there. The assertions, if substantiated, could upend politics in China, the world’s second-biggest economy, possibly driving a wedge between President Xi Jinping and Wang Qishan, the anticorruption czar.

Mr. Wang, the focus of Mr. Guo’s allegations, has close ties to Wall Street, with enormous influence over China’s financial sector. Mr. Guo’s assertions come just months before a Communist Party meeting that will decide whether Mr. Wang, recently the focus of speculation that he may become China’s next prime minister, will remain on the party’s elite Politburo Standing Committee.

Mr. Guo’s Twitter broadsides have continued, and his ability to stare down the world’s most powerful authoritarian nation has underscored the mystery, in China and abroad, about how he acquired his billions, what he knows and who, if anyone, is backing him.

Ruthless, or a Hero?

Mr. Guo’s ambitions, like his personality, are big and sometimes baffling. He says he has a plan to exorcise graft from the party, bring rule of law to China and put ties with America on a stable track by ending decades of Chinese skulduggery on trade. At other times, he explains his corruption allegations as an act of vengeance for a long-ago death. He could just be a man feeling pressure, his assets frozen in China, and bad investments and lawsuits chipping away at his fortune.

No one better represents the marriage of the party and money than Mr. Guo, known as Miles Kwok outside China, who parlayed relationships with some of China’s most powerful officials to help build a global portfolio including hotels, office buildings and securities brokerage firms.

Show Mr. Guo a spreadsheet listing the shareholders of the giant Chinese company HNA, which has been buying up businesses in the West, and he’ll rattle off the names of the prominent families that he claims really control their stakes. Ask him to map out family trees for those names, the key to tracking ill-gotten wealth in China, and he’ll do it from memory, down to the sisters, the cousins and the aunts.

“The allegations with regard to HNA simply aren’t true,” a spokesperson for HNA said.

Over a decade ago, the Chinese Communist Party welcomed businessmen into its ranks. In turn, those tycoons helped make the sons and daughters of the revolution rich while helping the country show spectacular growth rates. Now, armed with information, one of them has strayed.

“These people have power and influence and knowledge,” said William C. Kirby, a professor at Harvard Business School. “Many of them are easily controlled. But others go off the reservation.”

Mr. Guo has gone farther than anyone else. When the party retaliated against him, the state-controlled Beijing News reported that he was suspected of obtaining a “fraudulent loan” worth 3.2 billion renminbi ($466 million) from one state-owned bank. Another publication, Caixin, referring to documents from Mr. Wang’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, said that Mr. Guo had arranged for $299 million of client funds at a securities firm he controlled to be illegally transferred out of it.

The government’s most potent weapon was the release in April of a videotaped confession by Ma Jian, a former spymaster and political patron to Mr. Guo. He said he had accepted more than $8.7 million in gifts from Mr. Guo in exchange for favors, including frequent interventions with officials to short-circuit any obstacles to his property projects. “Guo Wengui, to ingratiate himself with me, to thank me, and to maintain his relationship with me, gave me a huge amount of benefits,” Mr. Ma said in the video. Mr. Guo did not respond to requests for comment.

Mr. Guo’s presence in the United States poses a dilemma for the Trump administration, which is seeking China’s cooperation to rein in North Korea’s nuclear ambitions. In recent years Mr. Guo provided Washington with insights into Chinese politics through his visits with embassy officials in Beijing, according to a former senior administration official.

Mr. Guo, who is a member of Mar-a-Lago, President Trump’s private Palm Beach club, is eager to get close to the powerful. On Tuesday, he wrote on Twitter that he flew to Washington for meetings at the Trump International Hotel. He contributed to charitable work by Tony Blair, the former British prime minister, who calls him a friend.

When the Times reporters visited Mr. Guo’s apartment at the Sherry-Netherland hotel in late April, he stepped away to take a phone call in another room, with the speakerphone on. His assistant explained that a top aide to Mr. Xi was on the line. The implication was obvious: Despite his unprecedented public tirades against some top officials, Mr. Guo was communicating with the one who matters most.

As with many of Mr. Guo’s claims, it wasn’t possible to verify who was on the other end of the call, but the episode was fully in keeping with Mr. Guo’s showman personality. That flair for the dramatic is typical of him, said one longtime acquaintance who was present when he took calls from Mr. Ma, the former intelligence official.

Many Chinese dissidents and journalists working outside the state media umbrella cast Mr. Guo as a hero for his outspoken criticism. Some who know him, though, say that he can be ruthless. A Beijing vice mayor who once stood in the way of his securing property rights for an elaborate plaza at the 2008 Olympic Games park was ousted and given a suspended death sentence for bribery after Mr. Guo obtained a tape showing the official having sex with a mistress.

Mr. Guo also takes aim at news organizations that write unflattering articles about him. In 2015, Caixin wrote an investigative article about his business and political connections. In response, Mr. Guo accused its editor of having an affair and a child with his former business partner. Caixin is suing Mr. Guo for libel.

His public attacks against the leadership of the country he fled two years ago began in January. Through Twitter, and in a televised interview last month on Voice of America, Mr. Guo said a top police official, at the behest of Mr. Xi, had asked him several years ago to look into Mr. Wang’s family finances.

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When the Chinese government eased up on its attacks against Mr. Guo, the about-face suggested that the Communist Party’s top leadership may not agree on how to deal with him, according to Victor Shih, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, who studies finance and politics in China.

“If the party were unified in opposing Guo Wengui, his family would have had much harsher treatment,” he said.

Seeking Revenge

Away from his homeland, Mr. Guo still enjoys the high life. On Twitter, where his profile page portrays him as a male version of the Mockingjay from the “Hunger Games” series, he showed off his new private Airbus jet. When giving a tour of his 18th-floor New York apartment — shared with a bichon frisé puppy — he pointed out the Lalique crystal chandelier, Louis XVI furniture and an ancient Chinese watercolor painting. The monthly maintenance fees alone for the apartment are $58,000.

Photo

An entrance to Mr. Guo’s home in Beijing. One real estate agent estimated its value at about $230 million.
Mr. Guo boasts of multiple residences around the world, including in Beijing, London, Tokyo, Abu Dhabi and Hong Kong. His oceanside home there, with sweeping views of Repulse Bay, sits on two lots that Mr. Guo’s son bought for 880 million Hong Kong dollars ($113 million) in 2011, according to property records.

His lakeside property in Beijing is modeled on a traditional one-story courtyard home but is far more elaborate, with multiple levels, a cavernous closet with hundreds of identical suits, and a pool, in a complex of more than 86,000 square feet. One real estate agent in Beijing estimated its value at about $230 million.

Mr. Guo took Mr. Kirby, then a Harvard dean, on a two-hour tour of the property in 2004. The group was ushered into a private theater, the lights dimmed, and Johann Strauss Sr.’s “Radetzky March” began to play as Mr. Guo made a videotaped introduction to a development he planned near the site of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. He and a Beijing vice mayor then asked Harvard to locate a campus on the complex, Mr. Kirby recalled.

At dinner, he pressed his case, all the while watching a Chinese soap opera on a tiny television screen. “It was, still to this day, the most bizarre evening I have ever spent in China,” Mr. Kirby said. (Harvard did not take Mr. Guo up on his offer.)

Mr. Guo says the motivation for his corruption allegations is simple: He claims the state shot one of his brothers in 1989 and he has been plotting his revenge ever since. The circumstances of the death are murky, though, like much of Mr. Guo’s story.

Mr. Guo says that during the 1989 Tiananmen student protests, he was arrested for giving money to the student movement and jailed for two years. But an overseas Chinese website, citing court documents, says that Mr. Guo had been arrested in a fraud involving oil sales and that his brother was killed when he and Mr. Guo attacked police officers.

He says he was born in May 1970, one of 10 boys in a family with ties to the Chinese Army from a small town in eastern China’s Shandong Province. (Legal documents say he was born in February 1967.) In prison, Mr. Guo, who has only a middle-school education, learned about Chinese history and other topics from educated inmates, he said.

After his release in 1991, Mr. Guo met a prominent businesswoman who introduced him to wealthy investors. Soon after he built a hotel in the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou, which became a meeting spot for government officials.

Those contacts and relationships with other officials, including Mr. Ma, the spy chief, helped Mr. Guo build his empire. He expanded into finance, acquiring a large stake in a securities brokerage firm. In 2014, the Hurun Report, which tracks the fortunes of China’s elite, estimated his wealth at $2.3 billion. But that same year, Mr. Guo’s ambition to take control of one of China’s biggest brokerage firms fell apart and he had a dispute with his business partner, who was later jailed.

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Since then, he has lived abroad and his assets in China — he claims 120 billion renminbi ($17.4 billion) in all — have been frozen. Mr. Guo is facing financial pressures.

One hedge fund in Hong Kong, the Pacific Alliance Asia Opportunity Fund, recently sued him in New York, saying that he owes $88 million, a sum that includes millions of dollars in interest in loans from 2008. The fund wants to seize his New York apartment.

Last year, he sued the Swiss bank UBS, arguing that he was misled in a series of transactions that resulted in a $500 million loss for him, but the suit was dismissed. Caixin published an article last week saying that Mr. Blair had introduced Mr. Guo to Abu Dhabi’s crown prince. Mr. Guo later used money from Abu Dhabi to finance a failed takeover of a Chinese securities firm, which resulted in the loss, Caixin reported.

A representative for Mr. Blair did not address whether Mr. Blair had made introductions for Mr. Guo. Mr. Guo said the article was groundless.

One claim Mr. Guo made in March regarding the hidden wealth of a prominent Chinese family could be substantiated by company documents, The Times reported in April. Going after Mr. Wang, though, is particularly risky.

Mr. Wang, 68, has a reputation for being a problem solver who has worked closely with American executives, including Henry M. Paulson, the former chief executive of Goldman Sachs and Treasury secretary. His many protégés are in influential positions throughout China’s government.

Mr. Wang did not respond to faxed questions sent to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection in Beijing.

“Wang Qishan has been the model of clean and competent, and all but untouchable,” said William Zarit, the chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China. “Should his star fall, business and government players should be concerned about their own safety.”

There’s no sign that Mr. Guo is letting up. Before the Communist Party meets this fall to pick a slate of top leaders, Mr. Guo plans his most dramatic assault of all: a live event, perhaps from Lincoln Center, that will focus on Chinese corruption.

“I want it to be carnival-style with a big screen,” he said. “We will sing. We will cry and we will talk about the world.”


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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 04 Jun 2017 08:18

Brand Shaolin’s Indian genes - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
At any given time of the year, busloads of tourists visit the Shaolin temple — the home of Kung Fu and Chan or Zen Buddhism. Despite the usual cacophony, inevitable wherever legions of travellers visit a world heritage site, the overall atmosphere at the monastery base is surprisingly becalming. The red and black buildings that dot the sprawling temple complex along a gentle gradient blend pleasingly with the green abundance of the Songshan Mountains that seem to embrace the monastery.

With 1,500 years of history — it was destroyed and re-built several times — the Shaolin temple is one of the most powerful exhibits of China’s soft power. Its often controversial abbot, Shi Yongxin, also called the ‘CEO monk’, has never lost sight of running the complex as an efficient, market-driven enterprise, but without losing its soul. This has ensured that the temple, in Central China’s Henan province, has had a steady revenue stream. Ticket sales have soared ever since the 1982 release of the Hollywood blockbuster Shaolin Temple , starring Jet Li in the lead role. Once inside the complex, visitors do not mind spending the extra yuan on a Kung Fu demonstration by monks.

The mesmerising performance is the result of the practitioners’ mastery over a combination of Qigong and Kung Fu. Qigong is a set of exercises that trains the mind to focus, and energises the body. Kung Fu imparts a complementary physical dimension of speed, power and precision. A late evening sound and light show, spanning nearly two hours, is also a money-spinner. Set against the backdrop of towering cliffs, a live performance by more than 600 artists narrates the story of Zen Buddhism — a harmonious combination of Mahayana Buddhism and China’s Taoism.

History and folklore

Acknowledged the world over as a global brand, the story of the Shaolin Temple, however, seems to underplay its critical Indian part. A combination of history and folklore traces the origin of the temple to the reign of Emperor Xiaowen, who set up the monastery as an abode for Buddhabhadra, a wandering Indian Buddhist monk. Apart from spreading Nikaya Buddhism, Buddhabhadra is credited with laying the foundations for Kung Fu. Another prominent Indian figure, Bodhidharma, arguably, steered the temple’s spiritual direction towards Zen Buddhism. According to a hazy admixture of history and legend, the monk may have belonged to present day Tamil Nadu or Kerala and landed up in China on the urgings of Prajnatara, his ageing guru.

If Zen Buddhism and Kung Fu are takeaways of a Sino-Indian spiritual fusion, China’s famous Buddhist grottoes epitomise yet another trans-Himalayan enmeshment — in the field of architecture and art. The Longmen Grottoes, an hour’s drive from the Shaolin Temple, are a fine example of what is called Serendian art — the confluence of the Graeco-Buddhist Gandhara School, known for depicting Buddha in human form, and a Chinese artistic tradition. Serendian art has flourished and evolved in and around the Hwang He or Yellow River, the cradle of Chinese civilisation. Bisected by the Yi River — a part of the Yellow River system — the imposing limestone cliffs of the Longmen mountain and the Xiangshan mountain are home to a jaw-dropping 1,00,000 Buddhist statues.

In Dunhuang, an oasis town in the nearby Gansu province, there is yet another symbol of Serendian art. Hewn out of solid rock in the bone-dry Gobi desert, the Mogao grottoes, housed in hundreds of intricately painted caves, describe the epic journey of Buddhism, from its home base in India to China.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby yensoy » 04 Jun 2017 10:58

Wonder what Han soldiers do in icy Tibet? Here is a clue (which I stumbled upon during some random browsing)
In 1978, after graduating from high school, she passed the People's Liberation Army's exams, and became an artist soldier in Nyingchi Prefecture, Tibet. Her main activity there was entertaining in the musical theater. She also served briefly as an Army nurse. Ling later stated that during her time in Tibet she, along with other female performers, was regularly plied with alcohol and sexually abused by older male officers, including one instance of rape that led to a pregnancy, which she was forced to terminate with an abortion. She cites this period of sexual abuse for her subsequent struggles with alcohol addiction.[3] Subsequently, Bai spent some time in a mental hospital.


from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bai_Ling, first time I heard of "artist soldier". Although apparently Mrs Eleven is one too, having made it to Brigadier General rank based on her singing skills causing a lot of resentment among "fighting soldiers".

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 13 Jun 2017 23:29

X Posted on the STFUP Thread

Chinese daily blames Indian, Western media for exaggerating impact of Quetta abduction

A Chinese state-run newspaper blamed the Indian and Western media on Tuesday for exaggerating the impact of the abduction of two Chinese nationals in Quetta last month.

“Some Indian and Western media intend to exaggerate the impacts of the incident,” the Global Times wrote in its editorial.

Lee Zing Yang, 24, and Meng Li Si, 26, were abducted in Jinnah Town of the provincial capital on May 24. Later, the Islamic State terrorist group claimed it had killed the abductees. However, the claim could not be verified as yet.

“They aim at badmouthing and disrupting China-Pakistan economic cooperation by linking the terror act caused by religious conflict to the political and economic cooperation between the two countries,” the editorial read.

According to the paper, South Korea missionaries misguided the two Chinese nationals into preaching Christianity.

“Apart from recruiting young people in China, South Korean missionaries send teenagers to conduct missionary activities in Muslim countries,” it said. “Compared to Chinese, more South Koreans have been killed abroad due to risky missionary activities in conservative regions,” it maintained.

“The atrocity committed by the Islamic State is appalling,” the editorial read. “But it cannot drive a wedge between China and Pakistan, nor will the construction of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) be disrupted.”

On Monday, Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan was told that the couple belonged to a group of Chinese people who had obtained a business visa for Pakistan but were engaged in “preaching”.

However, instead of carrying out any business activity they went to Quetta where they were engaged in evangelical activities under the garb of learning Urdu from a Korean national, Juan Won Seo, who owns the ARK Info Tech Institute.

The minister said it was highly unfortunate that a misuse of the terms of business visa contributed to the unfortunate incident of the abduction. He directed secretary interior to investigate the matter and ensure that such misuse did not occur in the future.

China has pledged to invest $57 billion in Pakistan in projects linked to its “One Belt One Road” infrastructure plan aimed at linking China with the Middle East and Europe.

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 14 Jun 2017 12:51

X Posted on the STFUP Thread

CPEC-loving Pakistan needs to learn from Beijing’s recent treatment of Muslims

NEW DELHI: China is walking an extra mile to operationalise China-Pakistan Economic Corridor under the One Belt One Road (OBOR) project but Beijing's recent treatment of Muslims in Xinjiang region has lessons for Islamabad, which is relying heavily on the corridor to change its economic fortunes.

In a latest move, the Chinese authorities have banned the use of names such as Muhammad, Haji, Islam and Imam for babies in Xinjiang. Names that start with 'Turk' — such as Turkizat and Turkinaz — have also been banned.

The Chinese authorities claim that this move will curtail 'religious fervour'. The new law also prevents people from rejecting 'radio, television or other public facilities and services', marrying in accordance with religious rather than legal procedures, and using the 'halal' principle to interfere with the 'secular life of others', according to people familiar with Beijing's latest moves to dictate lifestyle of the Muslim community.

Last year, the Chinese authorities had imposed a ban on 'abnormal' beards and full-face and body coverings for the Muslims. The new code also comes after the appointment of Chen Quanguo as the chief of the Xinjiang unit of the Communist Party of China. Chen had earlier quelled protests in Tibet.

Beijing's tough measures in Xinjiang include neighbourhood 'grid' reporting systems, widespread checkpoints and searches, extensive electronic surveillance, confiscation of passports and compulsory political education courses for Uyghurs who visited abroad.

"The legislation codifies security policies that have been applied patchily throughout the region in recent years as part of government efforts to combat religious extremism. It also forms part of a response to a series of deadly attacks in Xinjiang and in other parts of China. Since 2011, China has spent more per annum on domestic security than on external defence. The cost of China's domestic security policies — once euphemistically known as 'stability maintenance' but increasingly described as 'national security' — is likely to escalate in the future. Many of these costs will be difficult to measure in monetary terms," Ben Hillman, senior lecturer at the Crawford School of Public Policy of the Australian National University, pointed out in a recent paper titled 'China's dangerous ethnic policies in Xinjiang'.

"The increasingly draconian security policies adopted in Tibet and Xinjiang target entire populations and have become sources of deep resentment," Hillman explains in his paper. "They create the perception that Uyghurs and Tibetans are second-class citizens in China, and that the Chinese Communist Party does not value or respect local cultures despite the existence of formal laws that purport to safeguard minority rights...development policies that are rapidly transforming and homogenising cultural landscapes, and assimilationist policies that are said to promote inter-ethnic 'mingling', but amount to little more than incentives for adopting secular Han Chinese ways," according to Hillman.

However, China's policies toward Uyghurs and its 20 million strong Muslim community might draw ire of its Muslim majority neighbours in Central Asia, key to Beijing's OBOR initiative, according to China watchers. Uyghurs were allegedly involved in an attack on the Chinese embassy in Kyrgyzstan in 2016 and Thai police allege that Uyghurs carried out a bombing in Bangkok in 2015 that killed 20 people, mainly Chinese tourists.

"If China is perceived as anti-Islam, its home-grown Uyghur extremists might not be the only threat," Hillman said in his paper. "Chinese citizens and assets could become targets for terror outfits in Central Asia, South Asia and the Middle East. Chinese-funded ports, railways, canals, dams and pipelines could become vulnerable to terrorist attacks."

Two Chinese nationals were recently killed in Pakistan, following which Chinese President Xi Jinping snubbed Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif at the SCO Summit last week in Kazak capital Astana.

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 19 Jun 2017 00:59

X Posted on the STFUP Thread

Chinese netizens demand China to send army to Pakistan to fight IS

BEIJING: Agitated over killing of two Chinese nationals in Pakistan by ISIS militants, Chinese netizens have been demanding that China should send troops to Pakistan to fight against the dreaded terror group.

The reports about killing of two Chinese nationals in Pakistan's restive Balochistan province, has generated a cascade of discussion on Weibo, a Twitter-style Chinese social media platform, with many users calling for revenge, Hong Kong based South China Morning Post reported today.

Social media users are demanding the Chinese government to send troops to Pakistan to seek "payback" for the killing of the two Chinese nationals, the daily said.

"We shall start a war against ISIS, killing them on behalf of the two murdered Chinese," said a user going by the name Zhou Qi Bei Hou.

"It is time to fight violence with violence," another user, Lingchen99096, said.

Pakistan government's claim that the two Chinese nationals were involved in illegal preaching activities has ignited more anger.

"The Pakistani government said they were told that the two Chinese were missionaries. I was just wondering, who told them," the Post quoted one Weibo user as saying.

It is rare that netizens in China could let loose such a barrage of criticism against Pakistan on social media which is controlled by heavy firewalls by Chinese authorities.

It is not clear how this barrage of criticism on the social media appeared despite the firewalls.

Chinese Foreign Ministry on June 9 said Beijing was informed by Pakistan officials that a Chinese man and a woman identified as Lee Zingyang, 24, and Meng Lisi, 26, who were kidnapped last month from Quetta may have been killed.

Reports from Pakistan said the two were killed by Islamic State group after being abducted by gunmen dressed as policemen in Quetta in restive Balochistan province last month.

Chinese officials have yet to confirm the deaths, but a spokesman from the Chinese foreign affairs ministry said on Wednesday that Beijing was investigating whether the two were illegally preaching in Pakistan before they were abducted.

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 20 Jun 2017 23:46

X Posted on the STFUP Thread

China to build dam in Pakistan that World Bank, ADB refuse to fund

NEW DELHI: Pakistan claimed on Monday that China has offered to make a dam project on the Indus River that India objects to, a part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) , said the state-run Radio Pakistan.

The information about the project, the Diamer-Bhasha Dam, was conveyed by Pakistan's state-run power utility to a committee of the country's National Assembly on Monday. Earlier this month, Pakistan's planning minister Ahsan Iqbal told Reuters in an interview that "Pakistan expects China to fund" the project.

The Diamer-Bhasha Dam is a project that both the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) have refused to touch because India objects to its location, which is in the Gilgit-Baltistan region. India claims the region is a part of Kashmir. A little over a year ago, the US was making noises about supporting the project and India didn't shy away from showing it was peeved.

Muzamil Hussain, the chairman of the state-run power utility said that currently no mega hydro-power projects are included in CPEC, which is why both Pakistan and China are seriously considering making the Diamer-Bhasha a part of it.

Two years ago, the World Bank refused to come on board as a lender for the dam project, because Pakistan didn't want to seek a no-objection certificate from India for the project. And last November, the ADB too declined to fund what's said to be a $14 billion project.

Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif last December approved "in principle" the financing plan+ for the 4500 megawatt Diamer-Bhasha dam. He told his Water and Power secretary to begin preparations to start work on the dam before the end of next year.

The Daimr-Bhasha Dam was first announced in 2006 and the foundation stone for it was laid in 2011.

Pakistan envisages the dam project will generate 4,500 megawatts of electricity, Reuters reported earlier this month. A vast new reservoir is also expect to regulate the flow of water to farmland that is vulnerable to increasingly erratic weather patterns, the news agency added.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby nits » 22 Jun 2017 15:11

The so called "Weather" of all time "weather" ally is having trubulence it seems :lol:

Pakistan tightens business, work visas for Chinese nationals

Chinese nationals seeking business visas for Pakistan would have to show an invitation from a body recognized by Pakistani missions
The ministry also decided to become stricter on long-term visa extensions for Chinese citizens already in Pakistan

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Philip » 23 Jun 2017 14:24

Great strides being made by China mastering the English language! Ck out the pics in the site!

Say WHAT? Hilarious signs from China show what happens when the little details are lost in translation
Embarrassing English translations have been amusing baffled tourists to China
These ridiculous translation fails can be found on signs, menus, and tourist sites
Now Chinese authorities are cracking down, vowing to get rid of the mistakes
They believe these 'Chinglish' signs are damaging their country's image abroad
By Sam Duncan For Daily Mail Australia

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z4koWHPz7P
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 23 Jun 2017 17:46

US will need India to counter China: US think-tank

WASHINGTON: Even as the Trump administration is cosying up to the Chinese, the US will need India to counter Beijing's growing influence in the world, a top American think-tank has said.

Describing India as a "key piece in the jigsaw" for the US, the Atlantic Council urged the Trump administration to prioritise its ties with New Delhi.

"Given the advancements that China has made both economically and militarily, the US will need to channel considerable resources to assert its global and regional primacy," Atlantic Council, a top American think-tank said in a policy paper 'Transforming India from a Balancing to Leading Power' released ahead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit here.

"To accomplish this, India remains a key piece in the jigsaw for the US. President (Donald) Trump will need to assure India that it is not merely a regional prop to balance Beijing's power in the region, but a top priority for US foreign policy under the Trump administration," said the policy paper authored jointly by the former Union Minister Manish Tewari and Bharat Gopalaswamy, director of the South Asia Center of the Atlantic Council.

"While Trump has favoured rapprochement with Beijing so far, there is need for more initiative and effort from Washington to ensure that India-US relations continue to strengthen. The Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative proposed by Senator John McCain could be one effective way to signal the United States' intent towards India," it said.

The proposed $7.5 billion funding, if approved, could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come, they wrote.

Noting that during his campaign, Trump indicated that strengthening US-India ties would be a top priority for his administration, the two authors said Trump went on to woo India by openly vilifying China on a host of issues not limited to the South China Sea.

"However, since he was sworn into office, Trump has displayed an unprecedented degree of warmth in his attitude towards China, leaving Indian observers puzzled," it said.

"In his first few months in office, President Trump has demonstrated that Asia continues to be a major focus of US foreign policy," the policy paper said.

"His administration has addressed a multitude of issues related to China and the Korean Peninsula in a short time frame, reiterating US interests in the region. That being said, a more pressing concern is whether President Trump will work to enhance the stature of the Indo-American relationship in the same vein as his predecessors," Tewari and Gopalaswamy said.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 23 Jun 2017 17:59

Peregrine wrote:US will need India to counter China: US think-tank

. . . . The proposed $7.5 billion funding, if approved, could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come, they wrote. . .

What is this USD 7.5 B funding? India needs no 'funding'.

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China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 23 Jun 2017 19:37

SSridhar wrote:
Peregrine wrote:US will need India to counter China: US think-tank

. . . . The proposed $7.5 billion funding, if approved, could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come, they wrote. . .
SSridhar wrote:What is this USD 7.5 B funding? India needs no 'funding'.
SSridhar Ji :

Here is the the Paper "ISSUE BRIEF" at the Atlantic Council - South Asia Center :
Transforming India from a Balancing to Leading Power

The Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative proposed by Senator John McCain could be one effective way to signal the United States’ intent towards India. The proposed $7.5 billion funding, if approved, could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come.

Here is the speech in respect of "The Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative" :

McCain proposes $7.5 billion of new U.S. military funding for Asia-Pacific

The head of the U.S. Senate's Armed Services Committee, John McCain, has proposed $7.5 billion of new military funding for U.S. forces and their allies in the Asia-Pacific, where tensions have been rising over China's territorial ambitions.

The funds, $1.5 billion a year for five years to 2022, could be used to boost U.S. munitions stocks in the region, build new military infrastructure, such as runways, and to help allies and partner countries increase their capabilities, an aide to McCain and a U.S. military official said.

The funding proposal was contained in a White Paper issued by McCain last week entitled "Restoring American Power." His committee is expected to discuss it at a budget hearing on Tuesday.

“Senator McCain believes the United States must sustain its enduring commitment to the security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region," a spokesman for McCain, Dustin Walker, said.

"The Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative ... would ... make U.S. regional posture more forward-learning, flexible, resilient, and formidable," he said. "These funds would boost operational military construction, increase munitions procurement, enhance capacity building with allies and partners, and expand military exercises and other training activities.”

An official in the administration of new U.S. President Donald Trump, who took office on Friday, said he believed McCain's proposal was "very much in general alignment with the administration's goals in the region."

Trump has vowed to take a tougher line with China and to build up the U.S. military, although it is unclear whether he will succeed in lifting caps on defense spending that have been part of "sequestration" legislation.

A U.S. military official, who did not want to be identified, said the funds could go to construct new military runways in countries such as Australia and the Philippines and to make up a shortfall of munitions that the head of the U.S. Pacific Command, Admiral Harry Harris, complained of last year.

"There's a shortfall in the total number of munitions and also a quality gap," the official said, adding that more sophisticated missiles were needed in the region to counter China's "anti-access, area-denial" strategy.

On Monday, the new U.S. administration raised the prospect of worsening tensions with China when it vowed to prevent Beijing from taking over territory in international waters in the South China Sea, something Chinese state media has warned would require Washington to "wage war."

Sir Ji : It is not India that will get the Funds, but these funds will be used by the US Armed Forces Capacity and capability to
"counteract & contain" the Chinese.

Your views please.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 23 Jun 2017 20:27

Peregrine wrote:It is not India that will get the Funds, but these funds will be used by the US Armed Forces Capacity and capability to
"counteract & contain" the Chinese.

Your views please.

Peregrine ji, obviously, when Manish Tiwary talks about how this fund 'could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come', it means a part of this fund is going to be earmarked for India. With LEMOA in place and CISMOA & BECA being discussed, India might be also a destination for military infrastructure upgrading even though there may not be a permanent presence of American forces on Indian soil for obvious reasons. China is keenly watching the developments. But, it cannot be that China rides roughshod over Indian security concerns through all sorts of actions for six decades now but expect India not to do whatever India feels is in its national interests. isn't it?

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Peregrine » 23 Jun 2017 22:00

SSridhar wrote:Peregrine ji, obviously, when Manish Tiwary talks about how this fund 'could be a starting point for further India-US engagement in the years to come', it means a part of this fund is going to be earmarked for India. With LEMOA in place and CISMOA & BECA being discussed, India might be also a destination for military infrastructure upgrading even though there may not be a permanent presence of American forces on Indian soil for obvious reasons. China is keenly watching the developments. But, it cannot be that China rides roughshod over Indian security concerns through all sorts of actions for six decades now but expect India not to do whatever India feels is in its national interests. isn't it?
SSridhar Ji :

Chacha started the “Hindi-Chini Bhai-Bhai” slogan. I given to believe as early as 1950 the Indian Generals warned Chacha about the Chinese commencing the building of a road in Aksai Chin – Chacha told the Generals “Not to Worry” – The Chinese are our Brothers.Chacha made two in Blunders with the Chines i.e. he handed over the Security Council seat to the Chinese and accepted the Chinese Take Over of Tibet.

He further compounded his “Democratic & Secular” status of agreeing with Liaqat Ali to stop Indian Muslims from migrating to Pakistan. In addition when the Army and People complained about the East Pakistani Muslims Flooding into Assam, West Bengal and the North East States – be complained to Fakhrudin Ahmed who assured Chacha that the Muslims coming into the North East would vote for the Congress Chacha was satisfied and accepted this “Flooding with East Bengalis”.

After THE China-India war Nehru, in the Lok Sabha, pooh-poohed the Chinese take over of Aksai Chin as “not a blade of grass grew in Aksai China”. Ram Manohar Lohia, the Socialist asked to have “Nehru’s Head” as nothing grew on it.

Now we are suffering. It might take three or four Modi-like Leaders & PMs of India to undo the damage done to India by the Congress – right from Nehru to Man Mohan Singh via I K Gural and his Ilk – and bring an outcome with China and its “lap dog” which is able to restore some sort of balance in India’s relationship with them. Note : "China used to address all nations allied with the USA as the "Running dogs of the American Imperialists". Now with Clapistan under the Chinese heel Clapistan can be named as the "Lap Dog of the Fly Lice walas" Other suggestions welcomed!

All I can say is “More Power to Modi” and do understand the “Constrains” he is burdened with our sordid past.

+++END RANT+++

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby sivab » 23 Jun 2017 23:37

https://twitter.com/Leopard212/status/8 ... 3679721472

Wandering Baba‏ @Leopard212

A skirmish has been reported on Indian side of Sikkim-Bhutan-Tibet Tri junction (East of Chumbi Valley)
Chinese troops hit Indian bunkers.

This action by Chinese troops have led to Kailash Mansarovar Yatra via Nathu La being suspended.

Chinese destroyed recently repaired Indian bunkers, at Dokala, 14 days ago.

This was an innocuous statement from the Foreign Office, on the troubling situation as it exists in Sikkim.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby sivab » 25 Jun 2017 02:06

https://twitter.com/Swamy39/status/878251770404716545

Subramanian Swamy‏Verified account @Swamy39

The Chinese army I.e., PLA is getting restive. So fasten your seatbelts folks




https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/878607408477519872

Saurav Jha‏ @SJha1618

Yup, there are reports of PLAA destroying bunkers in the Sikkim-Bhutan-Tibet tri-junction.

Saurav Jha‏ @SJha1618 7h7 hours ago

The Chinese seem to be getting jittery about their position in the Chumbi valley. They destroyed the Indian bunker in the Dokala area.

Saurav Jha‏ @SJha1618 7h7 hours ago
Replying to @SJha1618

Not only does the PLA want to offset its vulnerability in the Chumbi Valley they are also signalling towards the Siliguri Corridor



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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 25 Jun 2017 07:00

Has there been firing? How did the PLA destroy our bunkers?

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby Paul » 25 Jun 2017 08:48

@SJha1618
·
13h

With Obama, the Chinese weren't particularly sure as to what the US stance would be vis a vis an India-China conflict. With Trump they are.
±±+++++++++++
Can someone decipher this statement by jha?

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby shiv » 25 Jun 2017 08:58

SSridhar wrote:Has there been firing? How did the PLA destroy our bunkers?

Videos of past incidents have always involved manual dismantling of "bunkers"/fortifications built of small boulders

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby sivab » 25 Jun 2017 09:00

According to unconfirmed report on SM, chinese broke decades long ceasefire. But the guy who reported this appears to be some kind of MOD official based on my observations in the past.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 25 Jun 2017 09:16

Paul wrote:@SJha1618
·
13h

With Obama, the Chinese weren't particularly sure as to what the US stance would be vis a vis an India-China conflict. With Trump they are.
±±+++++++++++
Can someone decipher this statement by jha?

Paul, my understanding is that after the Xi-Trump meeting in Florida, the Chinese side is very upbeat with Trump unlike during the Pressidential campaigns when Trump was hitting hard at China over job losses, trade issues, currency manipulation & North Korea.

While Trump decided on H1B visa (which hit India badly), he never took any punitive actions against the China-related issues. Even on North Korea, Trump is not riding roughshod though we know that election campaign rhetoric cannot be translated into action upon assuming power. It may be that China now helped the evacuation of the American student held in Pyongyong.

Obama played his cards close to his chest while Trump seems contrarian. Obama openly advocated the 'Pivot' and upped the ante by engaging very closely with India militarily. His Secretary of Defense, Ashton Carter, single-handedly raised the India-US relationship to almost the levels of India being a member of the NATO.

Though some ASEAN members felt that the US could not be relied upon when it came to China even during Obama's term, the Chinese might have assessed that Trump is way too inward-looking as his priority is something else and has not only a poor grasp of international affairs but may not be interested in taking on a mighty China. Also, the deal-making businessman that Trump is, the mercantile-oriented Chinese might have been completely assured of 'handling' him. The proposed visit by his son-in-law to Beijing and Trump's own visit there later this year are good indicators. The U-turn on OBOR and Trump Administration's decision to attend the BRF would certainly have been very positively viewed by the Chinese. Then, there is the decision by Trump to shutdown TPP which was a threat to China. All these are China-positive moves. Of course, the situation changed lately (much after the Xi-Trump meeting) with Trump's visit to Riyadh and the Qatar-GCC developments where Trump seemed to be an active participant. But, the Chinese might feel that the India-China issue is vastly different and has no correlation with the West Asia-Qatar-Iran issue.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby rsangram » 25 Jun 2017 09:17

THE BUZZ

China's Secret Landgrab (No, Not in the South China Sea)

Zachary Keck
June 23, 2017


http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-bu ... -sea-21296

"Bite by kilometer-size bite, China is eating away at India’s Himalayan borderlands,” Brahma Chellaney, one of India’s foremost strategic thinkers, warned in a recent op-ed. “For decades, Asia’s two giants have fought a bulletless war for territory along their high-altitude border. Recently, though, China has become more assertive, underscoring the need for a new Indian containment strategy.”


And now they destroy our bunkers. And not a peep from our government.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby sivab » 25 Jun 2017 09:33

http://www.news18.com/news/india/china- ... 42213.html

China Refuses Entry To Kailash Mansarovar Yatris After ‘Border Skirmish

According to sources, the situation in Nathu-la evolved after an incident of skirmish at Dokala area of Sikkim. The sources said Chinese PLA troops destroyed a newly repaired bunker of India around 10 days ago. This has led to a tense border situation between the two sides. A recent flag meeting also failed to resolve the situation.

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Re: China Watch Thread-I

Postby SSridhar » 25 Jun 2017 09:46

Weeks before Li Keqiang visited India in c. 2013, there was a stand-off in Depsang Valley. The PLA demanded that India dismantle some bunkers. India acceded to the demands of dismantling some Indian structures and withdrawing Indian forces facing the Chinese and the stand-off ended.

The Chinese actions are very subtle and cunning. By destroying Indian bunkers, by repeatedly incurring into Indian territory, by creating a stand-off lasting weeks, by signing the BDCA and holding India to that but PLA itself violating with impunity etc., China is restricting Indian troops patrolling the LAC and slowly pushing the perception of the LAC further inland into India.


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