Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

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JwalaMukhi
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby JwalaMukhi » 02 Jul 2013 05:55

Now some glimpse of what real news looks like, although sanitized, but better than
BullS*** Broadcasting Corp...
http://mg.co.za/article/2012-04-20-colo ... tain-again
Image
Destroyed evidence
However, among the documents are a handful indicating that many of the most sensitive papers from Britain’s late colonial era were not hidden away but simply destroyed. These papers give the instructions for systematic destruction issued in 1961 after Iain Macleod, secretary of state for the colonies, directed that post-independence governments should not get any material that “might embarrass Her Majesty’s government”, could “embarrass members of the police, military forces, public servants or others such as police informers”, might compromise intelligence sources, or might “be used unethically by ministers in the successor government”.


http://mg.co.za/article/2012-04-18-brit ... n-botswana
Secret colonial-era files released this week show that Britain tried to test poison gas in Botswana in World War II after plans for SA were nixed.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... atrocities
The British government's suppression of evidence was scarcely necessary. Even when the documentation of great crimes is abundant, it is not denied but simply ignored. In an article for the Daily Mail in 2010, for example, the historian Dominic Sandbrook announced that "Britain's empire stands out as a beacon of tolerance, decency and the rule of law … Nor did Britain countenance anything like the dreadful tortures committed in French Algeria." Could he really have been unaware of the history he is disavowing?

Elkins reveals that the British detained not 80,000 Kikuyu, as the official histories maintain, but almost the entire population of one and a half million people, in camps and fortified villages. There, thousands were beaten to death or died from malnutrition, typhoid, tuberculosis and dysentery. In some camps almost all the children died.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby JwalaMukhi » 02 Jul 2013 06:28

The perfidy didn't change when ukstanis were committing crime. Nor did it change when they deny and ignore it. Sadly nor will it change ever. Does the UK Press has any integrity to actually distance itself from the leaders, who were presiding over such injustices or call for an inquiry into such criminal activities and force them to resign from public office. Nary a pip or squeak from any of the enlightened ukstanis, but quickly occupy the moral highground to call for "hooman rites" and other such on puny crimes in other nations.

What a joke of a press that indulges in moral highstanding, truly a travesty of integrity.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Agnimitra » 02 Jul 2013 07:22

eklavya wrote:The BBC covers the social pathologies in the UK very extensively:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01swd7g
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01rxfjt

One is about black immigrants in the UK. The other is about the dirty secrets of Shariah courts in the UK. I suppose you consider this adequate "self"-criticism?

The other two were about problems with Brit old age homes and homes for orphans or some such thing. You consider such reportage a reasonable balance to all the self-promotion that BBC indulges in?

eklavya ji, what is the proportion of positive to negative reportage on India by the BBC?
And I mean just BBC English. I won't ask you about, say, BBC Persian, where each and every report on India I have seen over the past year has been crassly denigrating of India.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby brihaspati » 02 Jul 2013 07:43

eklavya,

Sure you show your servitude to the Brit not only as a nation but also culturally - and thereby prove again the sliminess induced in Indian origin claimant Brit interest servants or Brit hagiographers. I guess you not only have a hagiography obsession, but also have left behind your reading abilities with your reason at the Brit doorstep?

The list you have provided do not show "sexual abuse in the UK" - [1] with judicial and police skepticism (2) groping and abuse in public (3) social apathy and denigration of the victim (4) social attitudes that blame the victim for rape or abuse (5) stereotyping etc. You have provided this list claiming this as an answer to my specific question on sexual abuse in UK - addressing the social and admin angles as reported in the BBC docu on India!

You think "witchcraft"+"elderly care home neglect"+"domestic violence"+"sharia council" between them represent BBC honesty and unbiasedness in showing its own society at large's attitudes towards "sexual abuse"? How far have you gone down the lunatic road in defence of whitewashing the BBC? These comprise your concept of sexual abuse?!!!

Are you still avoiding the direct question : are you aware of documentaries on sexual abuse in UK? Have you seen any? Can you compare the contents and conclusions with that made by BBC on India? Were you disgusted and informed by such documentaries?

Your answer is important, and I think that you know very well why you cannot answer those questions. In defence of your BBC or other UK media double standards of representation, you will have to lie one way or the other, and there are very concrete materials to catch you immediately. You will go on wriggling about this - but you will never acknowledge having seen one and be able to refer to it, and that again will be a slimy and dishonest tactic copied from and typical of the elite of the culture you whitewash.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby brihaspati » 02 Jul 2013 09:00

Folks should read up Sanjay Srivastava's book - Constructing Post-Colonial India using the "Doon school" as a case study. He makes all the usual noises required to gain acceptance in the same target audience he exposes as hypocritical and "manufacturer" of a "nonexistent reality" such as calling the demolition at Ayodhya "barbaric" "horrific" etc. But he also situates the contradictions and hypocrisies that resulted from a British enthusiasm for foisting a society and elite that would be situated firmly not just within English-language-education but also serve as a bastion of "reality" constructed specifically to be different/separate/contrasting to the larger reality of the nation.

In as much as the School functions as an important adjunct of Indian liberalism— embodying and magnifying all its attitudes: ‘modernity’, ‘rationality’, ‘secularism’—we must also see it as embodying all its vicious contradictions and all its monstrous hypocrisies. And it is here, in the attempt to circumvent the contradictions and obscure the hypocrisies, that the ‘strategy of the real’ takes on an urgency all its own; the task of fabricating the real—in the telling and retelling of its myth of order, merit, and efficiency—and of maintaining its cohesiveness has always attracted the support (as I have argued throughout the book) of a very wide cross-section of the Indian intelligentsia.



Srivastava indicates - without realizing that he himself is subconsciously perhaps doing the same thing he accuses the Doon school of - an important angle to understand why we see the phenomena on this thread and in the public sphere of India.

In summary - he proposes the model that the Doon School represents the historical continuity and legacy of an attempt at producing an elite/intelligentsia that would hold itself into an imaginary [in the sense of not matching the larger extant reality of the nation] sub-nation/metropolis that differentiates itself from the "outer" world of the nation, and in conscious counter and contra-position to the imagined "other" of the larger society of the nation.

Its own contradictions of propagating a myth of "rational/science/egalitarian/merit" principles of social "contract" while differentiating itself from the larger society, as well as inherent and unavoidable elite background of its students whose social and life experiences from family background remains diametrically opposite and privileged to the "other" - leads to increasing isolation from the society at large, and increasing and desperate attempt to paint the "other" as "fascist/atavistic/barabaric/primitive".

In a way, these are minds trapped between the contradictory worlds of colonial/imperialist collaboration between elites of the ruling and the ruled - and the post-colonial world where the protection by the former imperial master is no longer certain, and the "school" serves as a psychological bastion to preserve an intellectual microcosm. A self defined superior, "rational/scientific/liberal/secular" island trying to defend itself against barbarians of the nation at large.

Took out Srivastavas book tonight after wondering about eklavya and his peculiar reactions. But in a way this is perhaps also the problem that reflects in our Congress leadership, especially in the dynastic strain and the intellectual hagiographic circle that they have mutually fostered. This is the source of their violent hatred of the "other" out in the "nation", and so intriguingly possibly linked to a particular imperial experiment in English-public-school model for India - creating a manipulable future ruling sub-elite for India - who, crucially, will always separate themselves out from the real nation into an imagined "island" of self-defined superior civilization.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Vayutuvan » 02 Jul 2013 09:29

Probably some people want to flit around in personal air-transport from one bacchanalian party to the next around the globe while the toiling by the day masses are kept satisfied with a black "gOLi" during the night lest they rise up and tear down the high towers of the lord chancellors of the exchequer.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby member_19686 » 07 Jul 2013 18:09

Britain's Contribution to Wahabbism, Poison Gas experiments on Indian Soldiers

A Good insight into Britain’s role in encouraging Wahhabism. Also How Indian soldiers along with others were used for Mustard Gas experiments.And finally a look at the view from the street on British Democracy



http://www.hinduhumanrights.info/britai ... -soldiers/

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Cosmo_R » 07 Jul 2013 19:12

anupmisra wrote:Repeat after me: .....


After me.

Sorry could not resist :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK8iNBiO05M

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vishvak » 13 Jul 2013 22:25

Secular riots in Ireland after police reject "yearly" July 12 parade that "officially commemorate a 17th-century battlefield victory by the Protestants over Catholics".
Dozens Injured in Northern Ireland as Protestants Riot Over Blocked Parade Route
Such rapid changes have rattled Protestants and contributed to a rising alienation from the police, most vividly shown during widespread street blockades throughout December and January. The reason then was a surprise decision by Catholic members of the Belfast City Council to reduce sharply the flying of the British flag outside City Hall. As with the increasing restrictions on Orange Order parade routes, Protestants saw the move as further challenging the public expression of their British identity.

During Friday’s street fighting, rioters shouted anti-Catholic and anti-Irish epithets at officers and mocked their allegiance by draping their vehicles in the green, white and orange flags of the Republic of Ireland

Does it mean that British have gained much more strength in North Ireland as compared to Irish?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby anupmisra » 14 Jul 2013 16:54

Cosmo_R wrote:
anupmisra wrote:Repeat after me: .....


After me.

Sorry could not resist :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK8iNBiO05M



yeah! The old "walk this way" routine. Been there, done that...

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 14 Jul 2013 17:57

Some 10 years ago I visited NI and the RI.Belfast was a revelation.Full of confidence,bristling with vigour in the aftermath of the various agreements signed between the two sectarian entities.I liked what I saw.There was a fab play I saw based upon a comedy TV series about the "troubles",which poked fun at all sides.It was packed.The biggest problem then facing NI was the rise of Proddie gangs who controlled the drugs and vice fighting between themselves.The then head honcho,nicknamed the "Brigadier" aka "Mad Dog" Adair,fled to Scotland strangely enough on the very same ferry that I used! I read about it the next day.Unfortunately,the ferry service from Stranraer to Belfast has been stopped today and I was unable to repeat my former voyage on my last visit.

The "marching season" which commemorates the victory of King William of Orange over King James the second at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.It marked the continuance of Protestant rule over parts of Ireland.(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Boyne)

Throughout the history of the Orange Order, Orange walks have faced opposition, generally from Catholics and nationalists, given that the parades are seen as sectarian and triumphalist. Although many nationalists find the parades offensive wherever they take place, conflict usually only arises when a walk passes through or near a Catholic-dominated area. During The Troubles many marchers were verbally abused or had things thrown at them. The marching season required high levels of police involvement to prevent major outbreaks of violence, and as a result parading was banned in the region on several occasions in the early 1970s, although the ban was never in place on the 12th of July.[3]


There has been unease on both sides about the power sharing agreement that exists today with rebel splinter groups on both sides resorting one more to an armed "solution".There have been attempted bombings and assassinations.The peace today is going through a difficult time.

More interesting is the expected referendum in Scotland on Independence in 2014.It is going to be a close run affair.The Tory govt. is puling out all stops with constitutional reform in the House giving more powers to English MPs to vote on matters within England,in an effort to stop a "yes" vote.The issue,commonly known as the "West Lothian" question in the UK appears to be gaining more supporters for Independence.Some Scots who were earlier sceptical of it are now convinced that Independence is the natural way to go.The rise and success of the UKIP ,and right-wing EDL in England which shows off the "splinters" of English politics is perhaps making Scots look at their own unique heritage and desire to be free of English rule.The one unanswered Q is whether in any successful vote,the Queen will still be head of state.The issue is cleverly being fudged by the SNP! It is most unlikely that this will change-at least for the first few years of Independence,but who knows later on,the Scots may decide to have their own King instead chosen from their own clans.Bonnie Prince Charlie ,your cause might have its day!

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vishvak » 15 Jul 2013 00:53

My heart goes out to the people affected by secular riots, as well as to those who may wonder why there are riots when Catholic and Protestants belong to the same religion and still at such places can't find peace and love!

I think Indians should send a delegation explaining how such intolerance and violence has no place in a civilized society. In fact, British have had one of the most prosperous colonial lifestyle during barbaric colonial times; as also the fact that the British have had very decent and perhaps among world's best education system even after barbaric colonial times were over.

People in UK need to be educated by us to think how this is absurd completely. This is not normal and these are not normal people in normal times. In fact the whole fact of a 17th century war between Protestants and Catholics is shocking considering how British were lecturing others on civilized life. Much more education is needed in UK about this. EDL is another case in point.

About Prince and Princess in UK:
wealth and royal legacy
There is no mention of wealth of Diana or Kate.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby nvishal » 15 Jul 2013 01:22

Protestants colonizing catholic lands.

Image

Ireland(catholic) needs to man up and take northern ireland back from england(protestant).

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 15 Jul 2013 02:29

A fascinating expose of O'Bomber's "disposition matrix",a euphemism for protocol for drone strikes against the ungodly species,with particular reference to British citizens who took to terrorism.Read the full report in the link.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/ju ... ion-matrix
Obama's secret kill list – the disposition matrix

The disposition matrix is a complex grid of suspected terrorists to be traced then targeted in drone strikes or captured and interrogated. And the British government appears to be colluding in it

the "disposition matrix".
The euphemisms of counter-terrorism

When contemplating the euphemisms that have slipped into the lexicon since 9/11, the adjective Orwellian is difficult to avoid. But while such terms as extraordinary rendition, targeted killing and enhanced interrogation are universally known, and their true meanings – kidnap, assassination, torture – widely understood, the disposition matrix has not yet gained such traction.

Since the Obama administration largely shut down the CIA's rendition programme, choosing instead to dispose of its enemies in drone attacks, those individuals who are being nominated for killing have been discussed at a weekly counter-terrorism meeting at the White House situation room that has become known as Terror Tuesday. Barack Obama, in the chair and wishing to be seen as a restraining influence, agrees the final schedule of names. Once details of these meetings began to emerge it was not long before the media began talking of "kill lists". More double-speak was required, it seemed, and before long the term disposition matrix was born.

In truth, the matrix is more than a mere euphemism for a kill list, or even a capture-or-kill list. It is a sophisticated grid, mounted upon a database that is said to have been more than two years in the development, containing biographies of individuals believed to pose a threat to US interests, and their known or suspected locations, as well as a range of options for their disposal.

It is a grid, however, that both blurs and expands the boundaries that human rights law and the law of war place upon acts of abduction or targeted killing. There have been claims that people's names have been entered into it with little or no evidence. And it appears that it will be with us for many years to come.

The background to its creation was the growing realisation in Washington that the drone programme could be creating more enemies than it was destroying. In Pakistan, for example, where the government estimates that more than 400 people have been killed in around 330 drone strikes since 9/11, the US has arguably outstripped even India as the most reviled foreign country. At one point, Admiral Mike Mullen, when chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, was reported to be having furious rows over the issue with his opposite number in Pakistan, General Ashfaq Kayani.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Johann » 15 Jul 2013 19:07

nvishal wrote:Protestants colonizing catholic lands.

Image

Ireland(catholic) needs to man up and take northern ireland back from england(protestant).


The Protestants of NI are of Scots, not English descent. But if you go back earlier Western Scotland and its highlands was in fact settled by people from northern Ireland, which is why you'll see the same names, and much of the same Celtic heritage on both sides of the Irish Sea.

For that matter Ireland has been one of the largest sources of immigration to England. The fact that no one even notices them as 'immigrants' is a mark of how much things have changed since the days of landlords posting signs saying 'no dogs, no blacks and no Irish.' Perhaps it was the Beatles that marked the turning point, but huge numbers of English people today have recent Irish ancestry.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Vayutuvan » 16 Jul 2013 10:45

Johann ji, so how is your above comment relevant to current situation in NI which is part of a (religious) war torn but very old country in the world? Past is past. People should forget and forgive. This brotherly fight should be patched up pronto, otherwise, I tell ya, it can spin out of control. Irish can go nuclear overnight and the region can become the most dangerous place on earth.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vishvak » 16 Jul 2013 11:13

Irish don't seems to pak themselves on geopolitical location 'advantage', with all the bells whistles and nukes to save their resources only. That is where perhaps common God comes in.

We have phottaa-tootaa misphortunate neighbor in pakistan where scientists could go nuclear in one week in 1998! By the way, British are part of NSG aka nuke blackmail group for decades while pakis have been carrying out black market of stolen nuke tech knowhow. British are lucky that way.
From NSG on wiki
The NSG was founded in 1974 in response to the Indian nuclear test earlier in that year.

After Indian nuclear tests in 1974, 47 different countries formed NSG! The same countries were silent about nuke black market.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby panduranghari » 16 Jul 2013 13:20

Philip wrote:Some 10 years ago I visited NI and the RI.Belfast was a revelation.Full of confidence,bristling with vigour in the aftermath of the various agreements signed between the two sectarian entities.I liked what I saw.There was a fab play I saw based upon a comedy TV series about the "troubles",which poked fun at all sides.It was packed.The biggest problem then facing NI was the rise of Proddie gangs who controlled the drugs and vice fighting between themselves.The then head honcho,nicknamed the "Brigadier" aka "Mad Dog" Adair,fled to Scotland strangely enough on the very same ferry that I used! I read about it the next day.Unfortunately,the ferry service from Stranraer to Belfast has been stopped today and I was unable to repeat my former voyage on my last visit.

The "marching season" which commemorates the victory of King William of Orange over King James the second at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.It marked the continuance of Protestant rule over parts of Ireland.(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Boyne)

Throughout the history of the Orange Order, Orange walks have faced opposition, generally from Catholics and nationalists, given that the parades are seen as sectarian and triumphalist. Although many nationalists find the parades offensive wherever they take place, conflict usually only arises when a walk passes through or near a Catholic-dominated area. During The Troubles many marchers were verbally abused or had things thrown at them. The marching season required high levels of police involvement to prevent major outbreaks of violence, and as a result parading was banned in the region on several occasions in the early 1970s, although the ban was never in place on the 12th of July.[3]


There has been unease on both sides about the power sharing agreement that exists today with rebel splinter groups on both sides resorting one more to an armed "solution".There have been attempted bombings and assassinations.The peace today is going through a difficult time.

More interesting is the expected referendum in Scotland on Independence in 2014.It is going to be a close run affair.The Tory govt. is puling out all stops with constitutional reform in the House giving more powers to English MPs to vote on matters within England,in an effort to stop a "yes" vote.The issue,commonly known as the "West Lothian" question in the UK appears to be gaining more supporters for Independence.Some Scots who were earlier sceptical of it are now convinced that Independence is the natural way to go.The rise and success of the UKIP ,and right-wing EDL in England which shows off the "splinters" of English politics is perhaps making Scots look at their own unique heritage and desire to be free of English rule.The one unanswered Q is whether in any successful vote,the Queen will still be head of state.The issue is cleverly being fudged by the SNP! It is most unlikely that this will change-at least for the first few years of Independence,but who knows later on,the Scots may decide to have their own King instead chosen from their own clans.Bonnie Prince Charlie ,your cause might have its day!


Philip,

It's interesting what you write about Scottish referendum. I think unless Parliament in London gives a huge financial incentive to Scotland(which they cannot afford to right now), Scotland will go its own way. It will soon be followed by Northern Ireland.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Johann » 16 Jul 2013 15:58

matrimc wrote:Irish can go nuclear overnight and the region can become the most dangerous place on earth.


The Irish have about as much interest in nuclear energy of any sort as Bhutan or Nepal does.

The Irish and British governments don't have a territorial dispute with each other. The UK, NI Ireland and the channel islands have been part of a common travel area for most of the 80 years of Irish independence - unlike someone coming from the EU you don't even need a passport to cross the border.

The IRA rejected both the legitimacy of both the Irish Republic and the partition of Ireland. So as you can imagine the Irish government was generally helpful to the British government. That is why the IRA always had to look further afield to places like Nazi Germany and Qadhaffi's Libya if they wanted serious help. In any case Sinn Fein, the IRA's political wing is now in government having achieved more through negotiations and elections than ever did with semtex and armalites.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vishvak » 16 Jul 2013 21:37

Fortunately for UK, world powers never created any billion $$ aid programs or black market of nukes in Ireland. Wonder why and what's difference. The same God would come there to avoid this perhaps.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Shanmukh » 17 Jul 2013 03:10

Johann wrote:The Irish have about as much interest in nuclear energy of any sort as Bhutan or Nepal does.


Maybe the PIRA would be interested in the nukes? Maybe we should sell it to them and then weep and wail and wring our hands about the insecurity of the British region?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 17 Jul 2013 12:10

Indian general 'followed before knife attack' in London

the trial of the attackers of Gen. Brar is underway

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 17 Jul 2013 15:21

Details of case of the attempted murder of Lt.Gen.Brar in London by Khalistanis.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/cr ... 11051.html

Sikh separatists tried to slash throat of retired Indian general in London revenge attack, court hears

Tuesday 16 July 2013

Four Sikh separatists tried to slash the throat of a retired Indian general in a revenge attack carried out on the streets of London, a court heard today.

Two of the men and a female co-defendant appeared in court accused of attacking Lt Gen Kuldip Singh Brar last year. They, along with one man who has already admitted his part in the attack and another who has never been arrested, believed retired Lt Gen Brar to be responsible for atrocities committed at the Golden Temple of Amritsar during the Indian army's crackdown on Sikh separatists in 1984, the prosecution alleged.

The prosecutor Annabel Darlow said that one of the defendants Harjit Kaur, 39, tracked the retired soldier as he holidayed in the West End with his wife Meena. She told the jury her case would prove that Ms Kaur passed on the Brars' whereabouts to the attackers on the day of the alleged assault in September last year.

The other two men Mandeep Sandhu, 34, Dilbag Singh, 37, were accused of carrying out the attack itself. All three standing trial have been charged with wounding the 78-year-old Lt Gen Brar with intent. Barjinder Sangha, 33, has admitted the same charge, the court heard. The last alleged accomplice is not involved in the case at Southwark Crown Court.

"Kuldip Brar was slashed right across the neck with a knife. He sustained very deep cuts to his face and neck," said prosecutor Annabel Darlow. She added: "Each took part in an enterprise to cause Kuldip Brar serious harm."

And Ms Darlow said: "The four [men] acted in a group, deterring anyone else from becoming involved and going to General Brar's aid and sheltering the knifeman from view. Harjit Kaur too played a crucial role silently, unobtrusively following the Brars."

Harjit Kaur wore a pink shirt as she listened to the proceedings from the dock. Her co-defendant Mandeep Sandhu wore a white shirt with dark pinstripes and Dilbag Singh a grey t-shirt. The men wore Turbans and long, dark beards. None spoke and interpreters assisted all three throughout.

Lt Gen Brar, himself a Sikh, said that he was given one of India's highest levels of protection as a result of "unlimited" threats to his life. Giving evidence via videolink from India this afternoon, he said that one website declared him the "number one enemy of the Sikhs". Another threat he said he received read: "there have been seven attempts on his life which have not succeeded, but the eighth one will."

He was not protected, however, on his trip to London, which he said was a private holiday. He added that he and his wife, who have been regular visitors to London for more than a decade, did not want a security detail because they preferred to enjoy a normal holiday. "We wanted to meet our friends and walk in Hyde Park," he said. Their protection has now been stepped up as a result of the attack, the General added.

As the prosecution opened its case today, the jury saw CCTV evidence Ms Darlow said showed the four men running away from the scene of the crime. The jury also saw footage the prosecution said showed the General falling to the floor immediately after the attack.

The jury heard that the prosecution will attempt to show that the defendants were in constant contact via mobile phone, despite rarely contacting each other before that weekend. Ms Darlow alleged that most of the group met in London at the city’s Central Gurdwara, before reconnoitring the hotel their alleged target was staying in and launching their attack.

They were tracked down, Ms Darlow said, after one of the group's discarded mobile phone was found at the scene and handed in.

Mandeep Sandhu, from Birmingham, Dilbag Singh, from London, and Harjit Kaur, from London, all deny the charges. The trial continues.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby member_19686 » 21 Jul 2013 06:54

Missionary Education and Empire in Late Colonial India 1860-1920 - Hayden J. a. Bellenoit http://www.scribd.com/doc/105125696/mis ... -bellenoit

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby brihaspati » 21 Jul 2013 10:35

Johann,
semtex and armalite provide the right excuses to invent and/or create a "moderate" among the "rebellious" and oh-so-peacefully and by-negotiations-onlee hand over or share power. The British state's nobility and integrity of character prevents it from ever acknowledging tiredness or retreat before military or militant movements. So it became a standard spin to spin a myth of "peaceful-gifting-of-power' onlee in each and every case where the Brits faced exhaustion or eventual kick in the gluteals if they had insisted on retaining imperial status quo.

The Irish were no exception. Neither in 1922, nor in the 90's. The Free state took a position against the IRA line not just because IRA de-recognized both the free state as well as Partition [Valera was ambiguous with solid political reasons - remember?] - but for very similar reasons of competing for the same political base, and a fear of the potential of a majority opinion consolidation against compromises or appeasement by the ex-rebel-turned-civilized-gov attitudes shown in India by the Congress post independence. The Brit gov's role in cultivating the pro-treaty group is pretty much well-known. Recent revelations also show the amount of British secret service penetration around the leadership of the IRA/Sinn Fein.

So the story is not so straightforward.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby panduranghari » 29 Jul 2013 17:21

Strange happenings in India.

Image
This man goes scot free.

This one does not.

Man-arrested-over-abuse-sent-to-feminist-campaigner

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Murugan » 31 Jul 2013 11:08

Today, 31st July is Death Anniversary of Great Martyr UdhamSingh, who killed Dwyer at Caxton Hall

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE0fzXshn2k

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE0fzXshn2k[/youtube]

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Haresh » 31 Jul 2013 19:59

India to speed up investigations into deaths of Britons

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... itons.html

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Haresh » 31 Jul 2013 20:01

Britain's first Muslim MP Mohammed Sarwar appointed governor of Punjab

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... unjab.html


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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 01 Aug 2013 11:42

UK enforces £3000 bond on visitor's visa from India.
India kept in same bracket as Nigeria, Iraq, Pakistan etc.
Indian govt calls it s 'retrograde step' and accepts it.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Kakkaji » 02 Aug 2013 00:13

IndraD wrote:UK enforces £3000 bond on visitor's visa from India.
India kept in same bracket as Nigeria, Iraq, Pakistan etc.
Indian govt calls it s 'retrograde step' and accepts it.


I think it is high time India withdraws from that farce called the Commonwealth.

What benefits, if any, does India get by continuing to be a member of the Commonwealth?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vishvak » 02 Aug 2013 01:26

Considering how pak is NATO ally in war on terror, UK should be put in same bracket. Especially for giving ISI free run in propaganda about terrorism in Punjab J&K etc etc.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 02 Aug 2013 01:50

lets accept it, India's image has taken a dent from a corrupt, lame duck spineless govt with MEA in shambles, China, UK every one knows India won't react if punched on. Any one still thinking we are emerging superpower?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Anindya » 02 Aug 2013 04:37

Leicester child prostitution trial: 'Other Sikh girls' involved with men

A child prostitution trial has heard that "other Sikh girls" were involved with men who paid a 16-year-old girl for sex.

The girl told police she had been selling sex after she found out other girls were being "spoken to" by the men, Leicester Crown Court heard.

Three men from Leicester are on trial accused of sexual offences against her.

Aabidali Mubarak Ali, 39, Rakib Iacub, 20, and Wajid Usman, 22, deny all of the 22 charges.

Three other men have already pleaded guilty to related charges.

'Not the only girl'

In a police interview played to jurors, the girl said other Sikh people in Leicester had approached her family with concerns their daughters might be "in the same situation".

She told police: "I've been told I'm not the only girl. There are other Sikh girls."

She added that it worried her that other girls could be involved.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby eklavya » 02 Aug 2013 04:54

brihaspati wrote:You think "witchcraft"+"elderly care home neglect"+"domestic violence"+"sharia council" between them represent BBC honesty and unbiasedness in showing its own society at large's attitudes towards "sexual abuse"? How far have you gone down the lunatic road in defence of whitewashing the BBC? These comprise your concept of sexual abuse?!!!


Maybe the below is the sort of thing you were looking for?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b02qvpdq

brihaspati wrote:Are you still avoiding the direct question : are you aware of documentaries on sexual abuse in UK? Have you seen any? Can you compare the contents and conclusions with that made by BBC on India? Were you disgusted and informed by such documentaries?


The answer to all those questions is Yes. So, what is your point?

brihaspati wrote:You will go on wriggling about this - but you will never acknowledge having seen one and be able to refer to it, and that again will be a slimy and dishonest tactic copied from and typical of the elite of the culture you whitewash.


Didn't I specifically say that "Britain has every imaginable social ill"? Is that what you call "whitewash"?

Radha Bedi's documentary on the BBC deserves to be screened and viewed.

I still find it very odd that a documentary by an Indian woman evokes this sort of impassioned and abusive response from you, but when your attention is drawn to a prominent American woman (Naomi Wolf) writing about "Ending India's rape culture" you simply dismiss it as something appearing in a Canadian paper, and therefore unimportant. Naomi Wolf is well aware of the sexual crimes that happen in the US, but her article did not refer to them. Why do you have such a problem with Radha Bedi's documentary, but not with Naomi Wolf's article?

You made the statement below, which frankly is just plain wrong:

brihaspati wrote:BBC rarely shows up its own homebase's seamy underbelly to the extent or level it goes for cherrypicking about other societies - especially India.


The BBC examines the ills of British society in great detail.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby eklavya » 02 Aug 2013 05:02

Kakkaji wrote:What benefits, if any, does India get by continuing to be a member of the Commonwealth?


The democratically elected rulers of India get to plunder the wealth of the common people when they organise the common wealth games. This is already more beneficial than imperialists looting the wealth of the common people, right?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 02 Aug 2013 15:53

Said before,the Commonwealth is not just Britain alone,it encompasses many other former colonial states who share some common values,which we can leverage to great extent on all fronts.That English is a common language known to all, it also helps.Britain acts like a "hub",offering special priviliges to member states,with other nations the spokes of the Commonwealth "wheel". It may be still derisively referred to as an "old boys club",but clubs have their virtues.These days trade is as important as being a "strategic partner",a distinction of dubious benefit.

Latest news of US-UK intel cooperation...for a price!
http://www.theguardian.com/world/intera ... rd-snowden

GCHQ: inside the top secret world of Britain's biggest spy agency

Files leaked by Edward Snowden reveal how the NSA pays for and influences some of the UK's intelligence gathering programmes. The documents also give unique insights into the challenges faced by the agency and the concerns it has about how to tackle them

wo years ago, GCHQ’s annual sports day took place on Wednesday, 15 June at the Civil Service Sports Club in London. A mixed six-a-side football tournament was the centrepiece of the day, with matches kicking off at 11am sharp.

The event was a jolly for those routinely cooped up in the agency’s distinctive doughnut-shaped headquarters in Cheltenham, and they were furnished with six pages of rules and regulations to ensure fair play.

"Each team MUST field at least ONE lady player at all times," the note said. "Appropriate footwear shall be worn. No crocs, sandals or flip-flops will be allowed. The wearing of shin-pads is COMPULSORY."

Of all the highly classified documents about GCHQ revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden, this has to be one of the least sensitive. But it offers a glimpse into the world of the 6,100 people crammed into the open-plan and underground offices at GCHQ; the fact there is a sports day at all reveals something about the agency which most people outside their bubble could not appreciate.

Last year, GCHQ organised trips to Disneyland in Paris, and its sailing club took part in an offshore regatta at Cowes. It has a chess club, cake sales, regular pub quiz nights and an internal puzzle newsletter called Kryptos. A member of Stonewall since last year, GCHQ has its own ‘Pride’ group for staff who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. There is even a paranormal organisation. Describing itself as "GCHQ’s ghost-hunting group", it is open to staff and their partners "whether they are sceptics or believers" for visits to "reputedly haunted properties".

Staff date themselves on the internal directory, "GCWiki", by their "internet age", a measure of how many years they have been adept on the web.

They make friends during annual family open days, or via messages on the agency’s internal version of MySpace, which they have called SpySpace.

Colleagues are likely to find people cut from the same cloth. The agency’s 2010/11 recruitment guide says GCHQ needs high-calibre technologists and mathematicians familiar with the complex algorithms that power the internet. It has room for a sprinkling of accountants and librarians. Classicists need not apply.

Nobody at Cheltenham is particularly well paid, compared to the private sector at least – a junior analyst might earn £25,000. "We can offer a fantastic mission but we can’t compete with [private sector] salaries," one briefing note lamented.

In a world of its own, GCHQ is a complex, secret community, which is tightly bound by its location outside the capital, the nature of its people, and the secrecy in which their work has to be done.

When it was built in 2002 the "doughnut" was the biggest construction project in Europe. It is now home to a parallel world – one that mirrors the society around it while being set apart by high walls of secrecy and the vastly superior technology concealed within.

Today this intensely private organisation is under a spotlight it has never had to face before, as its methods and practices come under unprecedented scrutiny, thanks to the release of files that would otherwise have been locked away for another 30 years.

Snowden wanted to reveal the extent of the surveillance activities being undertaken by GCHQ and its American equivalent, the National Security Agency (NSA), and the stories published by the Guardian have certainly done that.

Before the 30-year-old analyst turned whistleblower, only a few people outside GCHQ had heard of "Tempora", the programme that gives the agency access to the fibre-optic cables which carry the world’s phone calls and web traffic; only they knew it had developed an ingenious way of storing this material for up to 30 days.

Only those in the intelligence community had heard of "Prism", another initiative that has given the NSA – and GCHQ too – access to millions of emails and live chat conversations held by the world’s major internet companies, including Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Apple.

Teams of analysts at GCHQ now have the authority and the technical capacity to tap directly into the nervous system of the 21st century and peer into the lives of others. Dig deeper into the drily worded, acronym-filled files, and there are other insights about the challenges faced by GCHQ, and its own anxieties about meeting them.

And while politicians, including the prime minister and William Hague, the foreign secretary, have led the defence of the agency from the questions posed by the recent revelations, the papers show the agency is not always at ease with itself. There is understandable concern about being left behind by technology, and a desire to drive itself on so it can continue to feed high-quality intelligence to the "customers".

They include the government, the domestic security service, MI5, and the Secret Intelligence Service, MI6.

But the "customer" the agency frets about most is the NSA. In numerous papers, GCHQ reveals its need to keep the Americans happy, and how it regards this as an overriding priority.

It is not hard to see why; the Guardian has discovered GCHQ receives tens of millions of pounds from the NSA every year, money it has come to rely upon to build and maintain its collecting and decoding capabilities. In turn, the US expects a service, and, potentially, access to a range of programmes, such as Tempora.

Those campaigners and academics who fear the agencies are too close, and suspect they do each other’s "dirty work", will probably be alarmed by the explicit nature of the quid-pro-quo arrangements.

Though there is evident excitement within GCHQ that new responsibilities in recent years have made it Britain’s pre-eminent intelligence agency, it has been accompanied by occasional pauses for reflection, and worry that the agency cannot cope with those demands.

In an internal document published in August last year, one of GCHQ’s most senior officers set out his fears. The officer, one of the team responsible for managing the Tempora project, used a power-point presentation to explain to colleagues the far-reaching way GCHQ’s "mission role had changed".

He reminded his team that new techniques had given it access to vast amounts of new data or "light" – emails, phone calls and Skype conversations garnered from internet cables. But the officer was obviously disconcerted.

"Over the last five years, GCHQ’s access to ‘light’ [has] increased by 7,000%," he explained. The amount of the material being analysed and processed had increased by 3,000%, he said – another startling admission.

"GCHQ is breaking new ground and in doing so, testing our systems and processes to the full. Our challenge today is to achieve success against tomorrow’s demands starting from yesterday’s capability."

But he warned the agency was ill-equipped to do this: "The complexity of our mission has evolved to the point where existing mission management capability is no longer fit for purpose."
A document last year set out GCHQ's concern about the agency's ability to cope with new demands
New threats, new enemies, new challenges - the rise and rise of GCHQ

Perhaps it isn’t surprising such concerns have been raised in private around the corridors of GCHQ. Over the past decade, the agency’s portfolio has evolved into something barely recognisable to its most celebrated alumni – the Nazi code-breakers of Bletchley Park.

GCHQ’s core business was always the "gathering intelligence based on intercepted communications". It still does this, but the days of putting "clips on copper wires" to hear phone conversations are long gone.

The world has embraced –computers, tablets and mobile phones, and the need to find valuable information amid vast amounts of digital traffic created by them has become more difficult.

GCHQ has been tasked with finding the solutions, mindful that the potential rewards are high; never before has the agency had the opportunity to build such a complete record of someone’s life through their texts, conversations, emails and search records.

The use of cyberspace by criminal networks and other states to attack government departments and British businesses has opened a new dimension of silent warfare. With its technological and computing background, GCHQ has been told to defend the nation – and to develop the means for counter-attack.

Once a niche area, this is regarded by Downing Street as a "Tier One" national security priority because of the damage being done to the UK economy, and the danger of British defence secrets being stolen by stealth through sophisticated hacking attacks.

The pressure on the agency to deliver on all these fronts was made clear in GCHQ’s corporate plan for 2009, the first year in which Sir Iain Lobban was director. In his foreword, he warned colleagues the agency had to do more.

"This needs to be the year when we achieve real traction with our internet age transformation so we can continue to deliver in the future what HMG [Her Majesty’s Government] and our allies have come to expect of us.

"Over the last five years we have seen GCHQ change from being simply an intelligence producer into a genuine operational partner for the military and civilian customers."

The report added: "Put simply, HMG expects value from GCHQ which at least matches the £1bn a year that is being invested in us each year."

With so much now resting on the agency, its influence has spread across Whitehall. GCHQ now has liaison officers working inside MI5, MI6 and the Soca, the serious and organised crime agency. It takes the lion’s share of the £1.9bn budget for Britain’s intelligence services, and has a staff that is more than twice the size of the combined workforces of MI5 and MI6.

GCHQ also has a hefty presence in the Cabinet Office, which is responsible for setting the UK’s cyber security strategy. Defending the nation is the Cabinet Office’s priority – but from whom?

In an internal report in 2010, GCHQ described with remarkable candour the threats posed to the UK from cyberspace, eschewing the mealy-mouthed formulations adopted by ministers – and Lobban – in public.

The government has consistently maintained it is too difficult to point the finger at any particular country when it comes to cyber attacks. The 33-page report written by GCHQ’s Cyber Security Operations Centre makes a nonsense of that. Beijing is to blame, it says.

"China has a capable and very wide-ranging cyber programme targeting the full spectrum of governmental, military, and commercial targets. The Chinese mount a large number of relatively unsophisticated attacks, often using publicly known vulnerabilities and have successfully compromised networks globally.

"This assessment is based only on the attacks that have been detected, and does not preclude more sophisticated and targeted attacks from China."

The report adds: "Allegations of Chinese involvement in cyber attacks are unlikely to deter China from carrying out similar attacks in future, or from censoring its population’s access to the internet.

"China is a major player in the global telecommunications market. In addition to the threat of industrial espionage to sustain this position, there is an inherent risk of Chinese equipment being used for intelligence purposes.

"Chinese industrial espionage comprises the single greatest threat to US technology … Various UK companies have also been targeted and large amounts of data have been lost."

Insisting that British interests are "under sustained attack", the paper is highly critical of Russia. It says Moscow "operates a sophisticated, mature and successful cyber programme, using an extensive global internet-based infrastructure".

"The programme employs a wide variety of malicious software, and poses a significant threat to UK networks.

"Targeting of UK government departments is assessed to be a priority for Russia, and is likely to be ongoing. Governments, industry and academic institutions across a range of sectors have been targeted. Russia is judged to pose a threat to UK communications in a variety of countries, and UK data may be at risk due to compromises of networks outside of UK control."

But the document says the UK has started a fightback of sorts.

"The UK is developing and testing offensive cyber capabilities, although policy is not yet in place to underpin all potential opportunities."

In June, 2010, a new "Cyber Development Centre" was opened at GCHQ’s –sister base in Bude, north Cornwall, which is a hub for the analysis of intercepted satellite and internet traffic. Since then, GCHQ and the Ministry of Defence have been working on a secret programme to provide the military with new cyber weapons "to achieve desired effects in the run-up to or during a –conflict", another file explained.

In a top secret memo, the director of cyber operations at GCHQ told colleagues the agency needed to turn cyber into "another capability alongside air, sea and land forces." The coalition committed £650m to cyber security during the 2010 strategic defence and security review ; defence sources have told the Guardian half of this cash went to GCHQ to give the UK attacking capabilities against other states.
Over the last three years GCHQ has developed a range of techniques to sweep up personal data
Mastering mobile phones - 'any time, any place anywhere'

While cyber warfare is regarded as one of the agency’s top priorities, it has two other pressing technological challenges that are treated with equal significance.

The rise of smartphones and the widespread use of encryption by internet service providers to protect the privacy of web users has also caused them great anxiety.

Much of GCHQ’s focus over the past 20 years has been snooping on people’s desktop and laptop computers. But now people are using mobiles and tablets as mini-computers; they can do internet searches wherever there is a 3G signal, and use a range of apps for –communicating with friends and colleagues.

The agencies have had to rethink what they do because it is much more difficult to target information from hand-held devices, particularly when so much email traffic is now routinely encrypted to stop hackers finding out what you are saying, doing, and paying for.

GCHQ realised the gravity of the problem; it could spend millions of pounds developing systems to sweep up and store vast amounts of information from these devices, but the value of this database would "weaken over time" if the material was encrypted, a briefing explained. The agency’s many and varied sifting and analysis tools – which search for key words, names and patterns – would become increasingly redundant.

A GCHQ internal review for 2011/12, said: "The two major technology risks that GCHQ has to face next year are the spread of ubiquitous encryption on the internet and the explosion in the use of smartphones as mobile internet devices. Over time both of these technologies could have significant effect on our current trade craft."

In July last year, GCHQ circulated a document which put the challenge in context. The agency estimated that by 2015, 90 per cent of all internet traffic would come from mobile phones, and that there were already 100 million smart phones being used across the world. The mobile, said GCHQ, was the "most prolific customer product ever invented."

"Mobiles are already far more than just phones and will continue to evolve in the future. GCHQ is playing catch-up. Our exploitation of mobiles is fragmented, uncoordinated." The document revealed GCHQ had launched a new "mobile" project which was designed to "exploit mobile devices".

"Not just collecting voice and SMS and geo-locating phone," the document said, "but getting intelligence from all the extra functionality that iPhones and BlackBerrys offer. Mobile is all about staying one step ahead of how our targets are sharing info on the go."

That seems to be a reference not only to the calls people make, but the emails they send, the internet searches they make, and the messages they post on social media sites. The agency said it needed a comprehensive approach that would "deliver more than a quick fix. We need a solution that will adapt and grow as mobile phones evolve".

Another paper encouraged analysts to see the exponential rise of mobile technology as an opportunity for GCHQ, given the richness of the intelligence on offer. "The world is going mobile. Mobile telephony has already overtaken landlines … Google Apps already has over 30 million users. This is good news. It allows us to exploit the mobile advantage."

The end-goal was ambitious. GCHQ said it wanted to be able to "exploit any phone, anywhere, any time".

Was this legal? By 8 February, 2011, GCHQ was reporting internally that "legal assurances [were] now believed to be good", though it is unclear what this refers to.

The mobile project has now been absorbed into the over-arching "Mastering the Internet" programme (MTI), which was established by GCHQ to allow it to capture as much information as possible from the world wide web.

The Guardian has seen documents which make clear "a surge" of mobile activity by the agency over the past three years has helped it make up lost ground. Papers said GCHQ was now capable of "attacking" hundreds of apps, and a "mobile capability map" from June last year stated the agency had found ways of looking at the search patterns, emails and conversations on many commonly used phone services.

In July last year, the head of the MTI programme congratulated the analysts working on the top secret project.

"This is a big step towards us developing capabilities to exploit mobile opportunities," he said. "Please pass on our thanks to all the team…"
The portfolio set out how much money GCHQ would recieve from NSA last year
GCHQ's most demanding customer: the NSA

There is one recurring worry that appears to infuse all of GCHQ’s work, and is mentioned in numerous documents; the need to satisfy the demands of the NSA. This is an anxiety that has been developing since the early years of the second world war. In 1940 and with Britain’s position desperate, Winston Churchill sent Lord Lothian, his ambassador to the US, to negotiate with President Roosevelt over ways the countries could share intelligence.

Churchill offered secret details of Britain’s latest developments in radar and other scientific fields; in return he asked from the Americans for "certain information of a technical nature". These tentative exchanges evolved into a complex intelligence sharing relationship. In 1947, the UK and USA signed an agreement, together with Canada, Australia and New Zealand which was initially known only as the "secret treaty".

The deal gave birth to an acronym – UKUSA – and an extraordinary deal among these English-speaking nations. Each would devote its cryptological resources to different regions of the world. The alliance is also known as Five Eyes. The relationship is not completely lopsided; thanks to its colonial history, the UK has been able to offer the NSA access to a network of listening stations across the globe, in places such as Hong Kong.

One of its most important outposts is RAF Menwith Hill in Harrogate, north Yorkshire, a British military base in name alone. Since the 1950s, "MHS" has been the NSA’s satellite surveillance and interception hub in Europe and it remains much coveted by Washington. But the UK’s leverage has to be applied with care.

Nobody in Whitehall wants to risk a repeat of the calamity of 1973 – when President Richard Nixon ordered an end to intelligence sharing with Britain, having taken a dim view of Prime Minister Edward Heath’s cosiness to Europe, and his haughty attitude to the US. Britain’s spy agencies were horrified when the taps were turned off, and it took a change of government in both countries for relations to get back on an even keel.

In the decades since then, the NSA has become the world’s biggest intelligence-gathering organisation, a position that has left its allies uncomfortably reliant on its financial and technical resources.

The Snowden files reveal just how much the UK is in hoc to the US.

There are details of payments made to GCHQ by the NSA, and vignettes which point to the UK’s need to do America’s bidding or risk losing favour with the senior partner.

The UK’s comparatively weak oversight regime, and the flexibility of British laws are referred to as "selling points" to Washington – a clear –indication, perhaps, that the US expects –Britain to help in areas it finds too difficult because of America’s own rules and regulations. At the very least, it suggests the UK trades on the weak oversight regime that British ministers have been fighting so hard to defend.

In December 2009, GCHQ, published a strategy document which highlighted the agency’s most significant concerns for the future. Chief among them was this: "US perceptions of the UK/USA partnership diminish, leading to loss of access, and/or reduction in investment in accesses of interest to the UK."

The money spent by the NSA would seem to reinforce some critics’ fears that GCHQ has become, to some extent, a subsidiary of the American intelligence giant. The papers show the NSA has been making regular payments to GCHQ for a number of years. In 2009, the NSA gave the agency £22.9m.

The following year, the GCHQ mid-year review acknowledged it was receiving £118m of external funding, "mostly from the Home Office, –Ministry of Defence and the NSA". The NSA contribution amounted to £39.9m, which included £4m to support GCHQ’s work for Nato forces in Afghanistan, and £17.2m for the UK’s Mastering the Internet project.

America also contributed £15.5m to "radically enhance the infrastructure at Bude" in north Cornwall – one of GCHQ’s five sister bases. "Securing external NSA funding for Bude has protected the [core] budget," the GCHQ document explained.
Some of the money from the US was used to upgrade GCHQ's sister site in Bude, North Cornwall

This paper acknowledged GCHQ is dependent on the "NSA’s continued investment in key technologies of interest to the UK". The "2011/12 investment portfolio" was also specific; it said external funding would reach £150.7m, and £34.7m would come from the NSA.

The cash injections appear to give the US considerable influence over what programmes GCHQ intends to pursue.

"The portfolio will spend money supplied by the NSA and UK government departments against agreed requirements," the paper explains.

No wonder, perhaps, that the NSA makes continual demands, which the British agency struggles to meet. In 2010, GCHQ admitted the Americans had "raised a number of issues with regards to meeting NSA’s minimum expectations … we are still short of the full NSA ask".

It added: "The NSA ask is not static and retaining ‘equability’ will remain a challenge for the near future."

On one decryption project, GCHQ feared if it failed to "deliver" it would "diminish NSA’s confidence in GCHQ’s ability to meet minimum NSA requirements".

The following year, GCHQ was obviously keen to avoid finding itself in the same position. Senior officers reassured the agency’s investment board – which signs off where money will be spent – that "the portfolio includes an appropriate level of contribution as viewed from the NSA perspective".

The NSA is also a demanding customer of GCHQ’s foreign capabilities, particularly in the Middle East. A blueprint for the future of Cyprus – a hub for military intelligence-gathering across the region – said this had to "remain resourced and equipped … to maintain healthy relationships with USA customers".

The papers show the NSA pays half the costs of one of Britain’s Cyprus-based surveillance systems, and that GCHQ has been worried that recent cuts in spending have been affecting its –ability to serve up the right amount of quality intelligence to the US.

"This is not sustainable if numbers reduce further, and reflects badly on our commitments to the NSA," said a senior manager writing in April last year.

The American money came at a –crucial time for GCHQ. In 2010, it –suffered what it called a £60m "super cut" in funding as part of the coalition government’s efforts to bring down Whitehall spending. The agency had taken steps to mitigate the loss, by reduced costs on a number of programmes.

"We feared that due to the current state there would be a risk that the money supply may be reduced at short-notice," a report said. "This proved to be the case with government cuts in year to GCHQ’s budgets."

"Simply doing everything we do today more efficiently will come nowhere near close to bridging the funding gap," another report explained.

"To do more of the new it’s now vital that we cease doing some of the old, making firm decisions on activities which no longer produce sufficient value."

When GCHQ is able to provide the Americans with useful material, or access to intelligence they did not have, the British are cock-a-hoop. This was particularly obvious when GCHQ started tapping traffic from undersea internet cables, which is referred to as Special Source Events in the documents, or by the codename Tempora.

In 2011, the agency boasted that sharing this database with the Americans highlighted "the unique contribution we are now making to the NSA in providing insights into some of their highest priority targets".

GCHQ also boasted that it had given the NSA 36% of all the raw information the British had intercepted from computers the agency was monitoring. The intelligence had been "forwarded to NSA", the document explained.

It added: "We can now interchange 100% of GCHQ End Point Projects with NSA."

This suggests the NSA potentially has access to all the sifted and refined intelligence gathered by GCHQ.

The agency was also keen to take credit for the role it played providing information to the NSA over two attempted terrorist attacks in the US.

The first involved the man who tried to blow up an airliner bound for Detroit on Christmas Day, 2009. The suspect, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, hid the device in his underpants, and has since been jailed for life.

Five months later on 1 May, 2010, there was an attempted car-bombing in New York’s Times Square. Faizal –Shahzad, a 30-year-old Pakistani-born man who became a US citizen in 2009, has since been jailed.

In the mid-year review for 2010/11, GCHQ proclaimed: "Our partners have felt the impact of our capability too, with NSA in particular, delighted by our unique contributions against the Times Square and Detroit bombers."

What those contributions were is not explained. We know the NSA is forbidden from spying on American citizens; in the case of Shahzad, this question remains – was GCHQ doing it for them?
Keeping the US happy to remain the UK's no1 priority

Two years ago, GCHQ set out in a –colour-coded diagram its priorities for the coming years, and described its relationship with the US in terms of what it could offer, and hope to get in return.

It declared the UK/USA agreement "remains our pivotal partnership" and that Britain’s help to the Americans has been "rewarded".

"Through our work with the NSA, other US government departments acknowledge our contribution to their cyber agenda. We are recognised and rewarded for having consistently punched above our weight across those areas that matter most to the US."

It added: "Sharing of data between GCHQ and NSA has increased significantly. Technology and roadmaps align well. We both accept and accommodate NSA’s different way of working."

That might be a reference to the tighter legal and regulatory regime in which the NSA has to operate. This includes abiding by the Foreign Intelligence Service Act (FISA) and scrutiny by FISA courts. Not so in the UK, and the document explained this is another area where GCHQ can help the US.

"We are less constrained by NSA’s concerns about compliance," it said. "We handle mutual operational compliance issues readily."

Despite ministers insisting Britain’s intelligence agencies are tightly controlled and regulated, the comparative looseness of this regime is regarded as an important "selling point" for Washington.

In the UK, GCHQ needs only to get the authority of a minister to win approval for mass surveillance under a little-known section of the Regulatory Investigatory Powers Act 2000.

In July 2010, this advantage was made explicit in a GCHQ strategy document which described "a desired end state" for what it could offer the NSA within three years.

"In 2013, we will have access to and make readily available, data of the highest possible value to facilitate cyber operations. We will have exploited to the full our unique selling points of geography, partnerships, the UK’s legal regime and our skilled workforce."

Britain, GCHQ admitted, is reliant on this compliant legal framework "for continued access" to the undersea internet cables that carry "UK transit traffic at scale".
GCHQ publishes regular reviews of its performance - and its fears for not meeting the NSA's demands
Undercover and under the spotlight

Most of the staff at GCHQ are so involved in their own projects they may not always have had time to contemplate all the repercussions of what they are being tasked to do.

One document drafted by analysts involved in an encryption team noted: "We’re good at solving the technical challenges, chipping away at hard problems over a period of time. We are less good at communicating scale of the problem to others. Perception [is] that we are in our own little world…"

And so they are. It is a world of decoding and cake sales, programming and pub quizzes.

There is no hint of politics in the documents, though there appears to be a strong sense of engagement in the world beyond British shores.

In 2009, several employees organised a "ride and stride" to raise money to feed the Palestinian population in Gaza, where they described the humanitarian situation as "extremely dire".

Staff cycled, ran or walked a total of 2,230 miles – the distance from Cheltenham to Gaza – to help Palestinians "survive extreme deprivation".

But those who join this elite club are under no illusions about the secrets they are expected to keep.

There are protocols on the clearing of desks at the end of the day, with particularly sensitive documents being locked in special cupboards, the keys to which are then stored in other reinforced –lockers which can only be opened by following a set of complex instructions.

The strictures accompany GCHQ workers lucky enough to travel abroad on the job. Analysts sent to a global congress on mobile technology in Spain three years ago went undercover as "trainers".

Getting in to the most interesting talks however took some ingenuity.

"As an ‘exhibitor pass’ holder I had to invade the personal space of one of the door ladies to distract her from scanning my badge," one of the analysts reported back.

The British delegates reported they were not the only spies undercover that weekend. "Interestingly enough we spotted several NSA’ers who recognised us but were also using some light cover so we kept our distance."

And, of course, anyone who works for GCHQ can never talk about work to anyone outside the circle of trust.

In a prescient footnote to the guide published two years ago, the author said: "GCHQ has been in the media spotlight a fair bit recently and you may get some individuals asking you about aspects (for example, they may get you to comment on stories around GCHQ being asked to monitor all emails). Under no circumstances enter into any dialogue around these topics."


http://www.theguardian.com/world/intera ... rd-snowden

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3246
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Kakkaji » 02 Aug 2013 16:49

The US is a former British colony, and an English speaking country to boot. Why is it not part of the Commonwealth?

What benefits does UK as a hub provide to the spokes?

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3246
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Kakkaji » 02 Aug 2013 16:58

What influence does India have on Commonwealth countries in Africa that China, a non-member of Commonwealth, does not have?


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