Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

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panduranghari
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby panduranghari » 04 Jan 2017 14:59

Please listen to Kwame Anthony Appiah's Reith Lecture http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/article ... ony-appiah

Its really good.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby rgosain » 05 Jan 2017 01:01

g.sarkar wrote:
https://scroll.in/magazine/825253/sebas ... pic-legend
FAMILY TREES
Sebastian Malhotra Coe: The little-known Punjabi connection of an English Olympic legend
Lord Coe might seem the quintessential posh Englishman. But he has an interesting Indian link.
.....
So it would come as a surprise to many that the posh Lord Coe is the grandson of a Punjabi gentleman named Sardari Lal Malhotra.
Family tree
It is a romantic story. Sardari Lal was an Indian student from a middle class family who went to England to study law in the 1920s. While in England, he met an English girl, Vera Swann, a member of Uday Shankar’s dance troupe, and they fell in love and got married. But life for an inter-racial couple in London was not easy in those days, and Sardari Lal and Vera decided to move back to India.
.....
Lord Coe is a somewhat polarising figure in Britain today. One the one hand, he is disliked by some as being overly posh and arrogant. But on the other hand, he is attacked by right wing goons for his Indian heritage. On Stormfront.org, a White Nationalist mouthpiece, for example, there is a detailed discussion on Lord Coe’s ethnicity: it notes that he is 1/8 Punjabi, and and chillingly, discusses how “Indian appearance fades out quickly within a generation or two.… This goes to show how nationalists must use a great deal of discernment and look beyond appearance when judging who is white and who isn’t”.
.....

Gautam


At times, it can be difficult to differentiate between jihadists and their supposed counterparts on the nazi fringes, and though there is a lot of mutual enmity between the groups, there is a view that there are a lot of factors that are common.
Seb Coe has never hidden his Indian background and has always let it be known at every opportunity. There was a chance of him representing India in the Moscow 1980 Olympics,had the UK boycotted the event following the USSR's invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, but that never came to pass and he competed successfully for the UK .
If India is serious about Track and Field athletics to encourage greater sports participation for both males and females at all ages, then Lord Coe is the man for such a legacy. Britain went from a third rate Olympic power 20yrs ago, to being in the top 4 for the gold medal haul, at the last three olympics.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby g.sarkar » 05 Jan 2017 02:08

I hope you looked at the website Stromfront.org. It is a very interesting site. 1/8th black means that Mr. Coe is considered to be an octoroon. One drop of non-White blood makes him black, irrespective of how he looks. In the eyes of the Volksbewusst if you are not white you can be either Niederrasse (low race) or Untermench (non-human). These beliefs are ingrained with the extreme right. The Neo-National Socialists were always active in the UK, and with the fulfillment of Brexit, the economic situation can only get worse. US are declining and without the European support and the lack of the colonies, UK is up the creek and will decline rapidly. This will bring rising unemployment and an increase of the far right wing activities. Most Indians there are extremely competitive, and this breeds resentment among the whites and this resentment will increase.
Gautam

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 05 Jan 2017 20:44

Unease & unrest in Yorkshire after police sharp shooters kill a second gen Paksitani man allegedly involved in drugs & firearms , his father (a property magnet) has compared the incidence to killing of Mark Duggan by police which cause riots for days in UK.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... l#comments

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Neela » 06 Jan 2017 03:51

I am aware Britain is paedo central of the world.
But didn't know they have descended to treating the handicapped so poorly


No-one ever stands up on the Tube. But the worst part is the tutting': Blind ex-doctor, 37, straps a camera to his guide dog to capture the daily abuse he is subjected to by commuters

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby panduranghari » 07 Jan 2017 16:42

Beijing signals end of China-UK ‘golden age’

The Chinese singled out Mrs May’s abrupt decision in July to review the French-led £18bn Hinkley Point nuclear power plant, indicating she had national security concerns about the project.

CGN, a Chinese state energy group, has a 33 per cent stake in Hinkley, which it took with the explicit aim of winning the right to install its own technology in a subsequent nuclear power station planned for Bradwell in Essex.

While Mrs May ultimately decided to go ahead with Hinkley, she also announced planned new restrictions on the foreign ownership of critical national infrastructure assets that Downing Street has yet to clarify. These could potentially imperil the Bradwell project.

“Hinkley was good, but we are concerned about what comes after Hinkley with the other nuclear projects,” said one of the Chinese officials. “There is no clarity on that.”

The Cameron government was heavily criticised for being too eager to appease Beijing in order to win trade. But Mark Boleat, head of policy at the City of London Corporation, said that Mrs May’s indecision over Hinkley had courted a breach in relations by wrongfooting Beijing so publicly.

“The Chinese might decide they are dealing with someone serious and treat them accordingly,” Mr Boleat said. “But alternatively they could decide [their partners] are not predictable and draw different conclusions.”

/snip/

The “golden era” was conceived by Mr Osborne as a grand bargain in which the UK would offer Chinese investors and companies access to its infrastructure markets in return for privileged treatment, including the City receiving a big share of the expanding international market for renminbi finance.

The Chinese sovereign bond programme was designed to signal Beijing’s official stamp of approval for London as its key non-Asian financial centre partner. Meanwhile, the so-called stock connect programme would have allowed UK-based institutional investors direct access to trade in some of China’s largest and most liquid stocks.

London Stock Exchange said that stock connect remained on track but there was no timetable for implementation.


Oh goody. The demise of the 'city' continues. Osborne now not in any position of power, wanted to secure his retirement. Now he might decide to get down on all 4 legs and seek something else.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby panduranghari » 07 Jan 2017 16:55

Over the Christmas vacation, I happened to go to Birmingham. I think every 2nd person was a peaceful sporting a cumulus-nimbus that would put Gandalf to shame. The entourage of the peacefuls always have at least 4 kids on an average. A few Namdhari Sikhs walked out of a shopping centre sporting their blue attire and carrying all the 5 'Ks'. I overheard a group of 4 peacefuls annoyed that the Sikhs are allowed to carry the Kirpan while they cannot. Chuckles! Because these 3 Namdharis were about 6 feet plus tall, well built. Even without their kirpans they could easily toss these peacefuls without much trouble.

North of England seems to be lost to these. My last visit to Birmingham was over 10 years back and it was most certainly not this bad.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby g.sarkar » 11 Jan 2017 05:57

http://www.spiegel.de/international/eur ... 29194.html
Brexit Confusion
A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma
Six months after the EU referendum, the government in Britain still has no plan for leaving the bloc. What does Brexit really mean?
January 10, 2017 05:30 PM Print FeedbackComment
They came here in the search for answers. Students, pensioners, married couples, men looking weary after a long day's work, women holding a glass of red wine -- around 60 people altogether. Members of London's middle class are gathered at the Tabernacle, a former church in the Notting Hill neighborhood. They have a lot of questions. What will happen when Britain leaves the European Union? Will the country become poorer? And what kind of society will develop here at Europe's periphery?
Entry to this evening's event in Notting Hill, "The Brexit Effect: How Brexit Will Change Life, Work, Politics and Business in the UK," cost 26 pounds (30 euros) and similar events are springing up all over the country these days. There are podium discussions and conferences -- and every single one of these events offers proof of the vacuum that exists following the referendum, and of the considerable thirst for answers. There are also a dozen Brexit books on the market as the publishing industry seeks to fill the gap. At least someone seems to be profiting from the country's departure from the EU.
A man wearing a dark suit bounces onto the stage. Anand Menon is a professor for European politics at London's renowned King's College. Another expert. If there's anyone who knows the future -- at least the contours of it -- then it's Menon. But Menon also seems at a loss. Sorry, he says, he has no idea what will happen.
An admission price of 26 pounds for answers that nobody can offer. Not on this evening, not in Notting Hill and, indeed, nowhere in Britain. So far, Theresa May's government hasn't produced anything providing even the remotest clues about where this journey will take Britain. Instead, the prime minister's strategy has focused on empty platitudes. "We will make a success of it," "Brexit means Brexit" or "I want to have the best possible Brexit deal."
....
In the back right of the auditorium, a hand goes up. "I own a home in Spain," says on older man. "What now?"
Indeed. What now?
The question hangs over the country like a gathering storm. The strange part is that in Westminster, the center of power, a sort of ignorant serenity prevails despite the uncertainty. If you listen to politicians, advisers and those who fought for Brexit, you encounter a united front of unshakeable optimism. It seems as though a large part of the government has set up a parallel universe in which the laws of logic have been suspended and everyone believes that everything will somehow go well -- as long as one keeps smiling.
This gap between wish and reality could be observed at the EU summit in mid-December. In Brussels, the prime minister stood among her counterparts as though invisible, completely ignored. All around her, summit participants pecked each other on the cheeks, but nobody spoke to the prime minister and she wasn't invited to a joint dinner. On Twitter, people gave her the nickname "Theresa No Mates."
May has undergone a remarkable transformation in recent months. She voted for Britain to remain in the EU, but only weeks after taking office she wasn't even willing to provide EU citizens living in Britain with a guarantee they could stay. In October, she allowed her home secretary to speculate about the possibility of making British companies provide lists of their foreign employees and her health secretary raised the specter of firing doctors from other EU countries. As often happens with converts, it looks as though May is seeking to become Britain's most passionate Brexit advocate.
In her new year's address, she softened her tone somewhat and spoke of a "truly united Britain" she would like to build. Politically, however, she remains a hardliner. She insists that she will secure the right deal for Britain once she sits down at the Brussels negotiating table.
Alienation in Europe
In Britain, this aura of toughness has helped, particularly because she has the right-wing Daily Mail, with its 3.5 million readers, on her side. But it is damaging her in the rest of Europe. Britain will be dependent on the goodwill of other EU countries if May wants to conclude separation talks by 2019. She will also need to bridge the gap until a British-European free trade agreement can be reached.
Gradually, the recognition is growing, even within the Brexit camp, that the clean break from the EU that many dreamed of will never happen. Even Liam Fox, secretary of state for international trade, recently said that Britain may ultimately remain a partial member of the EU customs union. "At the moment, everything and nothing is possible," says Stephen Booth. He has agreed to an interview in his office near Downing Street, which is packed full with stacks of paper and cardboard boxes. These are the offices of Open Europe, a small, government-aligned organization with six employees who played a central role in the referendum. Booth and his colleagues feed ideas to the powers that be and prepare political options for the government. Open Europe supports a broadening of the free trade zone, albeit without the protectionism and centralized bureaucracy of Brussels. In other words: It supports a Europe minus much of the EU.
....

Gautam


Gerard
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Gerard » 15 Jan 2017 20:09


Philip
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 16 Jan 2017 17:58

Partition-British bast*rdry ,partition secrets exposed in new film! Churchill -may he rot in hell forever for his grand crime against humanity-Partition.
Chadha's film though tries to whitewash Lord Mountbatten's role as "executioner" of undivided India putting the blame on Lord Curzon,who had a crisis on his hands after the Mutiny (First War of Independence),and his wife used to seduce Pandit Nehru into toeing the British line.However,from more and more info that is now appearing 70 yrs since the event,it is abundantly clear that Britain's ruling elite had no intention whatsoever to leave India in anything but a mess,which they fondly hoped they could still control from afar.The Pakis and their martial races were the favoured nation and people of the establishment,why the '48 war to grab Kashmir from India was instigated by British army officers still advising the Pakis.Using MI-5 operatives,they still for a decade had their influence in India's IB too! For sheer b*stardry,you can't beat the British. Chadha remember after all is a British subject NOT Indian,and has been partly brainwashed about the positive influence of the Raj.A pity. True,there were many good British nationals who loved India and served India well during the Raj,but the Mounbattens and Churchill were destroyers of India. Let history tell the true story.


https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/j ... -partition
A British film with a Punjabi heart: director’s personal take on partition
A new account of the human toll of India’s breakup premieres next month
Hugh Bonneville as Lord Mountbatten and Gillian Anderson as his wife, Edwina, in a scene from Viceroy’s House.

The opening lines of Viceroy’s House, British director Gurinder Chadha’s epic new film, are barked out in Hindi by a tough colonial Scot at the head of a vast team of flunkies who, only 70 years ago, were ensuring the smooth running of the 340-room palace in New Delhi that was headquarters for British rule of an entire subcontinent. The scene then shifts to two Indian staff overheard irreverently discussing an alabaster bust of Queen Victoria, the empress who “never even set foot in India”.

It is a world familiar from popular films and television dramas set during the Raj. But something is different. The traces are being kicked over after 200 years of subservience. The British are about to relinquish their hold on the “jewel in the crown” of empire.

The most exciting period and historical films of 2017

When Chadha, best known for her 2002 film Bend It Like Beckham, set out to tell her story of “the people’s partition” of India, she wanted to focus on the lives of those affected, rather than linger on the terrible violence that marked the creation of India and Pakistan in 1947.

“‘The people’s partition’ was actually my working title seven years ago when I began,” she told the Observer. “I wanted to show the emotional impact, not the fighting. My maternal grandmother came to live with us in the 1970s and she was still totally traumatised. When she sat with us to watch telly she would be disturbed by conflict of any kind. We laughed at her, but she would say, ‘You don’t know what happened to us!’”

What the director could not guess was that her personal film, which premieres at the Berlin film festival in February, would also challenge accepted history. Studying the archives, Chadha came across confidential government documents that support a revisionist view of the lead-up to Indian independence, which was finally declared at the stroke of midnight on 15 August 1947. The British decision to draw a line through the whole of south Asia, creating two religiously defined new nations, was not entirely forced on them by the warring communities. It was, in fact, an idea hatched by Churchill during the war to protect British strategic interests. *(Here it is,the chicanery of that sh*tworm supreme,Churchill!)

Gurinder Chadha: ‘I was absolutely furious when Downton Abbey came out first, but now I am so grateful. The genre has become global in a very big way.’ Photograph: Sophia Evans for the Observer
“My big headline message is still that partition was a blunder. But the more I read, I found that secret British moves to retain influence over the port of Karachi gave me a new plot twist,” said Chadha. “History is always written by the victors, as we say at the outset of the film, and I was told at school that partition was ‘our’ fault because the Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus had fought with each other. But a document in the British Library marked ‘Top secret: only for circulation among chiefs of staff’ makes it clear the British felt they could not just hand all India back just after the war. The solution was for a Pakistani regime, friendly to Britain, to control Karachi, on the borders of Afghanistan, and not India.”

Chadha’s film stars Hugh Bonneville as the last viceroy, Louis Mountbatten, and Gillian Anderson as his influential wife, Edwina. When Viceroy’s House comes to British cinemas in March, it will be the first film to be released in two languages: English and Hindi.

“Bend It Like Beckham was the first film to be number one at the box office in both Britain and India, and this is just as proud a moment for me,” said Chadha. Her screenplay, co-written with her husband, Paul Mayeda Berges, and Moira Buffini, was inspired by her own family story. Chadha’s grandparents had been forced from their house in what is now Pakistan to travel as refugees to a new, Hindu-dominated India.

All the same, Chadha wanted to take a balanced view. “I have had to jump into so many camps to make this film. I wanted to be able to sit and watch it in London, in Delhi and in Lahore,” she said. A fair portrayal of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, leader of the Muslim League and the first governor general of Pakistan, was particularly important. “I told Denzil Smith, who plays Jinnah, that I wanted him to smile in this film. He is usually made such a villain.”

Early in Chadha’s research she met Prince Charles at a charity event and told him she planned a film about Mountbatten’s handling of Indian independence and partition. Intrigued, the prince suggested some further reading. The prince will probably be pleased that Mountbatten, a favourite great-uncle, is largely let off the hook by Chadha. Charming, respectful and diplomatic, Bonneville’s earl has no clue he is being used as a benign front for divisive British plans.

“One has to understand that throughout India Mountbatten is vilified,” said Chadha. “But when Narendra Singh Sarila, who wrote The Shadow of the Great Game, was working on another book with an assistant in the British Library in 1997, he found documents that prove that early plans for the shape of a future Pakistan were kept hidden,” said Chadha.

“I can see it was the right thing for the British government to do, from their perspective. They wanted a base to help control Russia. That was ‘the great game’ then and it continues.” :oops:

Mountbatten’s wife emerges from the film as a strong and modernising force. “The story is partly about a marriage. Edwina was very political and pushy, I think, although Mountbatten had been chosen to go out to India precisely because he wasn’t a politician,” said Chadha.

Lord and Lady Mountbatten and Mahatma Gandhi

Lord and Lady Mountbatten and Mahatma Gandhi in New Delhi in March 1947, shortly before partition. Photograph: AP
An affair between Indian leader Jawaharlal Nehru and Lady Mountbatten is alluded to in a couple of shots, but Chadha judged it was not central to her tale. “It is widely known there was an immense closeness there, but, from what I gathered, the relationship was consummated after this period.”

Anderson’s Edwina battles prejudice inside Viceroy’s House and later helps refugees. These scenes were based on archive footage and on conversations with Lady Pamela Hicks, the couple’s daughter, now 87. “Pamela told us her mother sent back a Miss Hudson to the home counties when it was ‘discovered she was racially prejudiced’, so we put it in the film,” said Chadha.

While some historians blame Mountbatten and the British for religious violence that saw hundreds of thousands killed, others criticise Gandhi for aligning his politics with spiritualism and, later, with Hinduism. Chadha acknowledges this fault, but traces the fatal divisions back to a former viceroy, Lord Curzon.

A key wedding scene in the film shows Indians of all religions happily recognising each other’s faiths. “For centuries they had got on with the common principle that if you had a faith, it was OK. It was a binding thing,” she said. “There was conflict within that, of course. In 1857 the unrest known in Britain as the Indian Mutiny broke out. The Brits panicked and so Lord Curzon introduced the colonial concept of ‘divide and rule’.”

In 2006 Chadha was the subject of the BBC’s long-running history show, Who Do You Think You Are?, and found the experience “an emotional rollercoaster”. Visiting her grandfather’s home for the first time, she found Pakistani people living there who, like her family, had been forced to leave their former homes.

In 1941 the population of Karachi had been almost half Hindu, while a third of the inhabitants of Delhi were Muslim. A decade later there were almost no Hindus in Karachi and 200,000 Muslims had left Delhi.

The refugee journeys scarred even surviving families. Chadha’s other grandmother lost her grip on sanity for ever when her baby, Chadha’s aunt Tripat, died from starvation.

“Someone came and placed a rock on the baby’s chest. They wrapped her in a cloth and she was taken to the river. You can’t talk to my aunts about it even now. My story is just one of many,” said Chadha.

The Viceroy’s House is the centre of this tale of division. Chadha had planned an “Upstairs, Downstairs” approach, looking at life in the state rooms and in the servants’ quarters and was annoyed when Downton Abbey reached television screens first. “I was absolutely furious,” she said, “but now I am so grateful. The genre has become global in a very big way.” The hit ITV drama series also gave her a viceroy in Bonneville.

The Viceroy’s House, designed by British architect Edwin Lutyens, is now the state home of the Indian president. A visit from Chadha confirmed its “great presence. Impressive architecture was considered a necessary part of colonial rule. It was only completed in the early 1930s and I don’t think Lutyens would have expected it to be turned over to Indian hands just 20 years later.”

Chadha hoped to make a film like the British Raj films she loves: A Passage to India and Gandhi. “But it is my personal view. What makes this film British, with a Punjabi beating heart, is its sense of fairness. People will have quibbles, but Pakistanis seem to feel it shows they survived and Indians see all the British skulduggery.

“In Britain we can feel some guilt, but also now see what the politicians were trying to secure.”

ROAD TO DIVISION
1857 The Indian Mutiny, a rebellion against the British East India Company, known in India as the first war of independence.

1905 Lord Curzon, the British viceroy, formulates the “divide and rule” policy and partitions Bengal on 16 October into two new provinces: Bengal, and Eastern Bengal and Assam.

1945 PM Winston Churchill, leaving office, bequeaths the government a secret wartime plan to retain influence of the key strategic port of Karachi after Indian independence.


1946 First of a series of religious massacres in Calcutta.

March 1947 A new viceroy, Lord Louis Mountbatten, arrives with his wife, Edwina, and daughter, Pamela. Rioting and killing continues. Negotiations with Nehru, Jinnah and Gandhi fail.

15 August Independence is declared at midnight and two days later partition creates the Dominion of Pakistan (which included the future Bangladesh). The largest mass migration in human history follows, displacing 14 million Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 16 Jan 2017 20:17

^
Mountbatten was only a 'villain' by indirection, in that he helped to carry out policies that the British had many years before, formulated. Note that Mountbatten is criticised in some quarters for his views of Jinnah and of Pakistan( not surprisingly, by our old Australian friend Neville Maxwell) so that alone is an indicator he wasn't a bad person, and that he was favourably inclined toward India to a fair degree.

The real criminals, as Philip has very correctly and spiritedly pointed out, were Churchill and Curzon. Linlithgow, Wavell, and the various British governors and lower level civil servants and army officers, were also the big time scumballs. Shameless apologists for colonialism and for the independent state of Pakistan, like L.F Rushbrook Williams and Ian Stephens, are more or less in that group.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Jan 2017 20:48

^^^ according to Sarilla's book, the Americans were also deeply involved in this plan, so lets not let them off the hook either

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby rsingh » 16 Jan 2017 23:27

Trump is Uk's darling now. He just mentioned that he'll make Brexit work and it was all frau Merkels fault. Whole day pee pee see has been singing in praise of lord Trump. how quickly time changes.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Prem » 17 Jan 2017 01:07

rsingh wrote:Trump is Uk's darling now. He just mentioned that he'll make Brexit work and it was all frau Merkels fault. Whole day pee pee see has been singing in praise of lord Trump. how quickly time changes.

On FZ show yesterday, EX Ambassador to Russia from UK was all positive on Russia and designating China as main competitor to WEST. The French scholar Bernard Levy was trying hard to paint Russia as villain. in his (racial) view ,Lithuania feeling insecure is more important than threat from China.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby surinder » 17 Jan 2017 06:01

Gurinder Chadha's movie is going to be interesting. It is interesting to see that Indian origin UK residents will understand it better and seek to see clarify their roles. They may do a better job at exposing the Colonial brutality more than Indians themselves have done.

What were the secret documents that Gurinder Chadha saw? We should find out so that they are brought out into the open and into historians hands before they are removed and whitewashed. Was it by accident that they leaked out, like the stuff from Mau-Mau rebellion suppression? Narinder Singh Sarila also saw some documents like this.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 17 Jan 2017 11:10

True,the US was "handmaiden" at partition.Why did the US want DG so much which saw Britain blackmail Sir Sewoo Ramgoolam into handing over DG as the price for the independence of Mauritius? Both preferred the "martial" Pakis to Gandhi's loincloth veggie Indians Harrow educated Nehru,smittem by Lady Edwina, would still depend upon British military assistance-as we did during the formative years post-Partition.We would under Heru generally fall in line.His NAM ambitions and tilt towards Russia and Socialism were a rude shock to them,but they kept him and India under control through the Commonwealth Club.

It will take a century after partition for the tsunami of Partition,the waves receding into ripples for an Indo-Pak peace.More likely is the further disintegration of the sub-continent,as planned by the Brits,but most likely after my lifetime.The Chinese factor of support for Pak with direct Chinese mil presence on Paki soil will keep it unified for longer. If the US does not take on China forcefully in the Pacific,we will have to tke extraordinary measure to keep ourselves alive and afloat in the wake of the Chinese military juggernaut which threatens the entire Asia-Pacific region right upto the Gulf.

PS: One post-Parition Anglo-US operation failed though,that of the dismemberment of Sri Lanka.DG was useless for heavy repair facilities for the USN,etc.SL was found to be the next best bet.Using a section of the Tamil minority led by fascist fuhrer Prabhakaran,a 25 yr. long civil war encoouraged to persist until the GOSL gave into unreasonable LTTE demands for a de-facto separate state. That India would not allow and with covert help aided the GOSLs of the day to defeat the LTTE at sea. Internecine warfare and rebellions saw the LTTE split into two,which was the beginning of the end. Even to the end,the US/UK combine tried their best to extricate Fuhrer P and his top cronies.This defiance by the little island and extermination of the LTTE,dumping decades of covert western mischief into the Indian Ocean,enraged the two major western powers.This is why the sword of war crimes against the GOSL still hangs over the new SL govt.as it tries to extract as much blood from the new regime as it can.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Yagnasri » 17 Jan 2017 11:30

But now SL in the bed with China.

Trumpzella is going to be darling of huge sections of EU nations which do not like ME flood unleashed by AM. But unfortunately for Desi living in EU the same fellows are also skinheads.Just like Obomber is loved by left loonies, Zee is now loved by skinheads.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 17 Jan 2017 18:11

trump is cautiously welcomed by the brexiters but overall there is HUGE scepticism about Trump in the EU and former-EU (;-))
very few people are going rah-rah over him
I would say that his antics are costing him more now than what he has potentially enabled politically

saying that NATO is obsolete alone is going to cause too many dhoti-shivers, never mind his other rants

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby komal » 17 Jan 2017 18:22

I've always wondered why UK didn't go full board and also partition India on the south by recognizing Travancore and Hyderabad (Deccan) as independent states.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 17 Jan 2017 18:27

komal wrote:I've always wondered why UK didn't go full board and also partition India on the south by recognizing Travancore and Hyderabad (Deccan) as independent states.


the logic was only to ensure a western compliant state on the right-flank of the largest oil basin on earth. India was judged to be unlikely to play that role, whereas a smaller, dependent Pakistan would do it gladly. just like turkey on the left flank.

this was meant to secure the oils of Arabia and Persia against a Soviet thrust to the warm waters of the Arabian/Red seas

so whilst the british wanted a quick exit, the need to create a Pakistan served a wider western geostrategic need

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby LokeshC » 17 Jan 2017 18:36

Philip wrote:.More likely is the further disintegration of the sub-continent,as planned by the Brits,but most likely after my


What are you talking about? Disintegration of which entity in sooth assia. The likelier prospect is that Britshit locusts will disintegrate themselves to F(ormer) UK. Good riddance.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Prem » 18 Jan 2017 11:26

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/nri ... 620391.cms
UK student visa issues must be sorted out: Indian envoy

LONDON: India has expressed concern over the massive drop in Indian students coming to study in the UK and called for sorting out of visa issues. Indian High Commissioner to the UK Y K Sinha, who took charge of his post in London last month, highlighted the sharp contrast between rising Indian student numbers in countries like the US and Australia and even across Europe. "In the field of education we have a bit of a problem because the number of Indian students doing extremely well everywhere they go," Sinha asserted. Even countries like Germany have over 10,000 Indian students and France has 5,000. They are actively going into campuses in India to attract students, he said. "In the field of IT, our professionals are renowned the world over. It is very important that our IT professionals can come and work and go back. They will contribute immensely not only to the local economy but also the global economy, which is what they are doing in Silicon Valley and the rest of the world," the Indian High Commissioner said. Stressing on the need for both countries to continue to engage in a manner that will be a "win-win situation" for India and the UK, he highlighted the visit of British Prime Minister Theresa May to India last November as "particularly significant" in having further enhanced the "very substantial economic engagement". "We have a very good economic engagement with the UK, with trade in goods about 14 billion dollars and another 5 billion dollars in services. But besides that, the UK is a very important in terms of investment scope, being the largest G20 investor into India and and 800 Indian companies operate here, bringing about a billion plus in taxes to the Exchequer and employing over a 100,000 people," Sinha said.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 18 Jan 2017 18:46

Europe derides the nouveau "Mrs.T",T.May,over her Brexit speech.Enjoy the front pages pics in the link.

'Little Britain': newspapers in Europe mock UK and Theresa May over PM's Brexit speech
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/01 ... ms-brexit/

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby g.sarkar » 19 Jan 2017 12:05

http://www.spiegel.de/international/eur ... 30529.html
Theresa May's Brexit Plan
I Want, I Want, I Want
Theresa May wanted to show a friendly yet tough face to her country's European allies. But her Brexit speech showed one thing above all: The British prime minister is blind to reality.
If it was Theresa May's goal to flood Europe with a glut of adjectives, then she was extremely successful on Tuesday. After Brexit, the British prime minister said, the United Kingdom will be "stronger, fairer, more united and more outward-looking." It will be a "secure, prosperous, tolerant" country, a "great, global trading nation" that is a good friend and ally.
But beneath the wave of superficial pleasantries, something much more uncompromising soon made an appearance behind the lectern at Lancaster House: the hard, craggy side of Ms. May. If the rest of Europe doesn't cooperate, the prime minister said, if the EU seeks a punitive deal in the course of the Brexit negotiations, it would have negative consequences for all involved.
Far from being a conciliatory address, May's speech was a catalogue of demands topped with a dash of threat. A great many of her sentences began with: "I want."
.....
May is prepared to throw everything on the negotiating table that her country can offer the rest of Europe, including intelligence services, nuclear weapons and cooperation in the fight against terrorism. The prime minister didn't explicitly say so, but her message is clear: You on the Continent profit significantly from our contributions to European security, so don't push us away. That would be uncomfortable for everybody.
What is clear is that the government in London remains dependent on the goodwill of two partners: the EU and Donald Trump. Each has elements of risk. As soon as Britain, at the end of March, submits its formal, Article 50 notification to the EU of its intention to leave the bloc, time will no longer be on the country's side. If she's lucky, May will have 18 months to complete the divorce proceedings. When it comes to the framework that will govern the exit negotiations, Britain finds itself in a weak position. Furthermore, the EU has little interest in showing too much leniency with Britain and thereby risking that other countries might be tempted to follow the UK out the door.
When it comes to Donald Trump, nothing has changed: The situation remains unpredictable and chaotic. Even if May's government grovels its way into the good graces of the incoming U.S. president, it is unlikely that a British-American free-trade agreement would be completed as quickly as many Brexit fans in the UK hope. In this regard, May should be more honest with the citizens of Britain.
May used the majority of her Tuesday speech to promise her country a glorious future, but it is one over which she only has limited control. In the worst case scenario, it appears that she would rather slam the door shut and risk a cold, mucky Brexit than agree to a painful compromise. No deal is better than a bad deal, she said on Tuesday. If that is how she speaks with friends, one wonders how she might deal with enemies.
.....

Gautam

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby chetak » 19 Jan 2017 13:59

komal wrote:I've always wondered why UK didn't go full board and also partition India on the south by recognizing Travancore and Hyderabad (Deccan) as independent states.


hyderabad certainly tried then as the ltte (currently lying low) and Ejs are trying with eelam. the number of countries which covertly/overtly supported the ltte and their eelam bid is well known.

After the lankan slaughter of the ltte, the very same forces are consolidating once again but this time on the Indian side, because of the conducive conditions they have created for EJ command and control along the TN coastal zones.

I wonder about the congis and particularly the mafia queen's undue haste and eagerness to partition AP against the express wishes of the the state legislature. Under whose behest was this done and for whose benefit??

This has once again caused the coalescing of minority forces both in AP and in telengana.

So who is to say that such extraneous forces have completely stopped their power plays??

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Singha » 19 Jan 2017 16:28

another victory for lion pride radical islamism.
why did people of UK vote for brexit (a) overbearing EU babus making up the rules (b) green tide from africa/ME/afpak

http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/18/news/ec ... index.html

those whom predators want to target they first id and separate out from the moving herd...I hope for UKs sake the wildebeest puts up a fight and survives

the felines are moving slowly in the tall grass...just selling arms to saudis and managing their money and summer vacations is not going to appease the radical elements

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 19 Jan 2017 17:08

imo - both a. and b. are myths that are being used to drive opinion

on a. eu does make some rules, but there is bigger discontent with Westminster - there are a range of reasons, all to do with London good, everywhere else bad (i.e. inequality) - oh yes and London is a global city full of foreigners (ergo foreigners are bad)

on b. the bigger issue is east European migrants from new EU member countries. the brits have for years been putting the clamps on dark migration, they have no control on the EU free movement of people issue; Germany has taken the lead in Syrian refugee settlement - UK and France have taken miniscule numbers - but of course el farragio has exploited images of marching columns of Syrian refugees to drive point b.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Prem » 20 Jan 2017 01:21

It is anticipated the debate will commence after 11.30am on Thursday 19th January.
Kashmir Debate in British Parliament on
Thursday 19 January 2017 MPs will debate a motion on Kashmir.
The Motion to be debated
"That this House notes the escalation in violence and breaches of international human rights on the Indian side of the Line of Control in Kashmir; calls on the Government to raise the matter at the United Nations; and further calls on the Government to encourage Pakistan and India to commence peace negotiations to establish a long term solution on the future governance of Kashmir based on the right of the Kashmiri people to determine their own future in accordance with the provisions of UN Security Council resolutions."

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby ramana » 20 Jan 2017 01:33

Prem, Also Germany has 130% of the India trade with UK.

So why bother about UK?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Prem » 20 Jan 2017 03:22

Little Britain is in Pain after going on fast track to show It's Little Brain. Teresa May met her Pey in PM Modi who was not impressed with he Sari wearing trick. She think India needs Britain but reality is OWA=Other way around.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby g.sarkar » 20 Jan 2017 04:44

komal wrote:I've always wondered why UK didn't go full board and also partition India on the south by recognizing Travancore and Hyderabad (Deccan) as independent states.

There was a popular opinion (in Great Britain that is) that India being very diverse, multicultural multi-lingual and without any unifying force, in the absence of a benign and paternalistic guiding hand of the British Raj, would disintegrate into warring factions based on language, religion and cast . In that case Pakistan would be the sole power in the sub-continent.The British empire would control Pakistan and Pakistan would control the rest of India. Mr. Churchill had also made many disparaging comments about the Indian leadership being ineffectual and greedy, if I remember correctly.
Gautam

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby UlanBatori » 20 Jan 2017 05:05

The Motion to be debated
"That this House notes the escalation in violence and breaches of international human rights on the Indian side of the Line of Control in Kashmir;


Wonder why we don't have BeeJayPees to introduce a "motion"
"That this Sabha notes the escalation in violence and breaches of international human rights on the British side of the Line of Control in Northern Ireland, and inside Pakistani side of the Line of Control in Brighton and Bradford, as well as the rise in stupidity in the British House of Lotus-Eating Lawds and Leeches."

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby UlanBatori » 20 Jan 2017 05:06

Wonder how "international hyooman rites" can be violated inside India. Rites of Pakis who come in without visas, under the wire?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby sanjaykumar » 20 Jan 2017 05:10

That would be PETA.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Cosmo_R » 20 Jan 2017 05:31

If our idiots in parliament were not so obsessed with self interest, it would have been interesting to hold a debate moving support for Scotland's independence from the UK and asking them to have the UN resolve the issue.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Pathik » 20 Jan 2017 06:24

The day is not far when this thread and STFUP thread will need to be merged

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Kashi » 20 Jan 2017 07:37

So did the tea party or whatever passes for a debate in the House of Comode finally happen?

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 20 Jan 2017 14:57

these debates usually originate from MP's who have a large mirpuri contingent in their constituencies
have to hand it to the paks - they are nothing if not persistent with these (loose) motions

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby rsingh » 21 Jan 2017 23:40

Headline in Daily Mail (tabloid but still more respected the anything printed in india everyday)
Why he may be the best that has happened to Britain after 2nd WW.
He gave political elite both barrels

al-guardian is in depression,shock and demoralized.


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