Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

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arshyam
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby arshyam » 28 Feb 2017 19:46

^^ Good riddance :lol:

Kaziranga report gets BBC banned from tiger reserves for 5 years - ToI

I hope they are thrown out of other wildlife parks as well. It was these very same British, under whose rule the tiger (and most other wildlife) became endangered. A land where multitudes of human populations had inhabited for millennia had so much wildlife thanks to a sustainable way of life lost most of it in ~150 years of British rule. And these morons have a problem with us trying to protect and regrow what's left. Go figure.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Singha » 28 Feb 2017 20:49

Aye british officers killed more wildlife in huge scale.
In bharatpur one dukes party killed 22000 ducks in one day. They would eat 1 duck each max

Just killing for the sake of sport. By middle ages all large mammals in west europe were hunted to death except a few small bears hiding in spain. Ever wonder why the alps do not have snow leopards cougars and pumas which andes himalayas and rockies do. No yaks no bisons all killed long ago.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby LokeshC » 28 Feb 2017 21:23

There are a few stereotypes i "believe" in and one of them is that there are a lot of psychopaths from that part of the world. For what reason i do not know.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Singha » 28 Feb 2017 21:25

The extent of rape and pedophilia that went on in isolated places under the godlike powers of british officials with no oversight must have been high
Maybe a bit moderated where memsahibs also were onsite.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby sanjaykumar » 28 Feb 2017 21:29

A study I came across once suggested westerners are more aggressive than most of the other people studied.

I have never seen this followed up nor can I locate the one I saw.
Certainly the barbarism of European violence in the twentieth century, against each other, would support such a contention.

The etiology or ethology of violence may be merely opportunity and technology or autonomy to inflict it. It may also be memes or genes.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Yayavar » 01 Mar 2017 01:38

vinod wrote:There is a UK-India 2017 year of culture programme which began with hosting at Buckingham palace etc. What does BBC do? As usual, does the drainage inspection and comes up with this...http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-39058436 They recorded this many months ago but was timed to release with this initiative.

What the hell is BBC's problem?


One can quibble about timing but this is a horrible situation. I've met many punjus - mostly sikhs but non-sikhs too - who have left their families. Some have married in Europe and abandoned those back at home; and others who pine for what they left behind but dont want to go back since they did not make big. Funnily some left after selling land and are now labourers in others' lands in Europe. So some unprincipled diaspora from UK/Canada might go the other way to take advantage - it needs to be brought out.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Yayavar » 01 Mar 2017 01:41

Singha wrote:Aye british officers killed more wildlife in huge scale.
In bharatpur one dukes party killed 22000 ducks in one day. They would eat 1 duck each max

Just killing for the sake of sport. By middle ages all large mammals in west europe were hunted to death except a few small bears hiding in spain. Ever wonder why the alps do not have snow leopards cougars and pumas which andes himalayas and rockies do. No yaks no bisons all killed long ago.


After reading corbett in high school I was keen on other such books. And came across a few Amreeki and other angrez adventurer books. But their writings seldom had any sensitivity and it was ususally a massacre of animals - most of these books were set in Africa. I gave up and have Corbett on my shelf still.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Neela » 01 Mar 2017 03:07

Singha wrote:The extent of rape and pedophilia that went on in isolated places under the godlike powers of british officials with no oversight must have been high
Maybe a bit moderated where memsahibs also were onsite.


If you use statistics from 2012/2013 , about 65 kids are abused every day in Britain.
Thats roughly 3 kids every hour.
Actual numbers could be much much higher since not all cases are reported. The problem is exacerbated as kids struggle to understand it as abuse and in the long term tend to become abusers themselves. So this makes Britain very unsafe for childred.

For a tiny country, this is very abnormal and points to a psychopathic society & fundamentally flawed culture. It appears behind the shallow sophistication, Britain is actually unsafe.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Singha » 01 Mar 2017 10:06

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History ... %80%931290)#Massacres_at_London_and_York_.281189.E2.80.931190.29

Capping a long history of persecution it seems between 1290 to 1655 all jews were expelled by royal firman from england carrying only portables and forfeiting immovable property. Most went to poland where they got legal rights.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby vinod » 01 Mar 2017 17:28

Yayavar wrote:
vinod wrote:There is a UK-India 2017 year of culture programme which began with hosting at Buckingham palace etc. What does BBC do? As usual, does the drainage inspection and comes up with this...http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-39058436 They recorded this many months ago but was timed to release with this initiative.

What the hell is BBC's problem?


One can quibble about timing but this is a horrible situation. I've met many punjus - mostly sikhs but non-sikhs too - who have left their families. Some have married in Europe and abandoned those back at home; and others who pine for what they left behind but dont want to go back since they did not make big. Funnily some left after selling land and are now labourers in others' lands in Europe. So some unprincipled diaspora from UK/Canada might go the other way to take advantage - it needs to be brought out.


Are you saying this happens only by punjus (or people from India) who does this? Now domestic abuse or abandoning doesn't happen in any other community including British!! May be welfare system for single mums in Britain is a scam!

The point is, these kind of things happen. Adequate support and justice should be given as in any case. No one is denying that. The inadequacies should be highlighted but trying to bring a spot light on just Sikhs (or Indians in general) at the time of India-UK initiative is nothing but mischief.

Singha wrote:Its a paki and arabi dominated channel so nothing surprising

That doesn't excuse them. Its a UK channel run by goras. These won't be done and timed as such without prior input about these kind of initiatives from govt. sources.

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Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Peregrine » 01 Mar 2017 21:26

X Posted on the STFUP Thread


I SHOULD HAVE LISTENED TO INDIA MORE : UK FORMER PM TONY BLAIR
Cheers Image

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 09 Mar 2017 01:45

Trial of man accused of terror-related offences delayed so he can fast for Ramadan http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03 ... um=twitter

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby astal » 09 Mar 2017 03:52

Best argument against "The British created/contributed/improved India" I have seen so far. Though we may not agree with Shashi Tharoor's politics. He is on a roll especially in the excerpt in the Guardian.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/08/india-britain-empire-railways-myths-gifts

It is worth buying the book just for the arguments and his style is more British than Brits.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 09 Mar 2017 13:46

Enjoy this from Sashi Tharoor!

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... yths-gifts
'But what about the railways ...?' ​​The myth of Britain's gifts to India
Apologists for empire like to claim that the British brought democracy, the rule of law and trains to India. Isn’t it a bit rich to oppress, torture and imprison a people for 200 years, then take credit for benefits that were entirely accidental?
Holding court ... the lieutenant-general of the Punjab takes tea with maharajas and Rajas in 1875.

Shashi Tharoor
Wednesday 8 March 2017
Many modern apologists for British colonial rule in India no longer contest the basic facts of imperial exploitation and plunder, rapacity and loot, which are too deeply documented to be challengeable. Instead they offer a counter-argument: granted, the British took what they could for 200 years, but didn’t they also leave behind a great deal of lasting benefit? In particular, political unity and democracy, the rule of law, railways, English education, even tea and cricket?

Indeed, the British like to point out that the very idea of “India” as one entity (now three, but one during the British Raj), instead of multiple warring principalities and statelets, is the incontestable contribution of British imperial rule.

Unfortunately for this argument, throughout the history of the subcontinent, there has existed an impulsion for unity. The idea of India is as old as the Vedas, the earliest Hindu scriptures, which describe “Bharatvarsha” as the land between the Himalayas and the seas. If this “sacred geography” is essentially a Hindu idea, Maulana Azad has written of how Indian Muslims, whether Pathans from the north-west or Tamils from the south, were all seen by Arabs as “Hindis”, hailing from a recognisable civilisational space. Numerous Indian rulers had sought to unite the territory, with the Mauryas (three centuries before Christ) and the Mughals coming the closest by ruling almost 90% of the subcontinent. Had the British not completed the job, there is little doubt that some Indian ruler, emulating his forerunners, would have done so.

Divide and rule ... an English dignitary rides in an Indian procession, c1754. Photograph: Universal History Archive/Getty Images
Far from crediting Britain for India’s unity and enduring parliamentary democracy, the facts point clearly to policies that undermined it – the dismantling of existing political institutions, the fomenting of communal division and systematic political discrimination with a view to maintaining British domination.

In the years after 1757, the British astutely fomented cleavages among the Indian princes, and steadily consolidated their dominion through a policy of divide and rule. Later, in 1857, the sight of Hindu and Muslim soldiers rebelling together, willing to pledge joint allegiance to the enfeebled Mughal monarch, alarmed the British, who concluded that pitting the two groups against one another was the most effective way to ensure the unchallenged continuance of empire. As early as 1859, the then British governor of Bombay, Lord Elphinstone, advised London that “Divide et impera was the old Roman maxim, and it should be ours”.

Since the British came from a hierarchical society with an entrenched class system, they instinctively looked for a similar one in India. The effort to understand ethnic, religious, sectarian and caste differences among Britain’s subjects inevitably became an exercise in defining, dividing and perpetuating these differences. Thus colonial administrators regularly wrote reports and conducted censuses that classified Indians in ever-more bewilderingly narrow terms, based on their language, religion, sect, caste, sub-caste, ethnicity and skin colour. Not only were ideas of community reified, but also entire new communities were created by people who had not consciously thought of themselves as particularly different from others around them.

Large-scale conflicts between Hindus and Muslims (religiously defined), only began under colonial rule; many other kinds of social strife were labelled as religious due to the colonists’ orientalist assumption that religion was the fundamental division in Indian society.

Muslim refugees cram aboard a train during the partition conflict in 1947 ... the railways were first conceived by the East India Company for its own benefit. Photograph: AP

It is questionable whether a totalising Hindu or Muslim identity existed in any meaningful sense in India before the 19th century. Yet the creation and perpetuation of Hindu–Muslim antagonism was the most significant accomplishment of British imperial policy: the project of divide et impera would reach its culmination in the collapse of British authority in 1947. Partition left behind a million dead, 13 million displaced, billions of rupees of property destroyed, and the flames of communal hatred blazing hotly across the ravaged land. No greater indictment of the failures of British rule in India can be found than the tragic manner of its ending.

Nor did Britain work to promote democratic institutions under imperial rule, as it liked to pretend. Instead of building self-government from the village level up, the East India Company destroyed what existed. The British ran government, tax collection, and administered what passed for justice. Indians were excluded from all of these functions. When the crown eventually took charge of the country, it devolved smidgens of government authority, from the top, to unelected provincial and central “legislative” councils whose members represented a tiny educated elite, had no accountability to the masses, passed no meaningful legislation, exercised no real power and satisfied themselves they had been consulted by the government even if they took no actual decisions.

As late as 1920, under the Montagu-Chelmsford “reforms”, Indian representatives on the councils – elected by a franchise so restricted and selective that only one in 250 Indians had the right to vote – would exercise control over subjects the British did not care about, like education and health, while real power, including taxation, law and order and the authority to nullify any vote by the Indian legislators, would rest with the British governor of the provinces.

Shashi Tharoor: Britain should pay India damages over colonial rule
Democracy, in other words, had to be prised from the reluctant grasp of the British by Indian nationalists. It is a bit rich to oppress, torture, imprison, enslave, deport and proscribe a people for 200 years, and then take credit for the fact that they are democratic at the end of it.

A corollary of the argument that Britain gave India political unity and democracy is that it established the rule of law in the country. This was, in many ways, central to the British self-conception of imperial purpose; Kipling, that flatulent voice of Victorian imperialism, would wax eloquent on the noble duty to bring law to those without it. But British law had to be imposed upon an older and more complex civilisation with its own legal culture, and the British used coercion and cruelty to get their way. And in the colonial era, the rule of law was not exactly impartial.

Crimes committed by whites against Indians attracted minimal punishment; an Englishmen who shot dead his Indian servant got six months’ jail time and a modest fine (then about 100 rupees), while an Indian convicted of attempted rape against an Englishwoman was sentenced to 20 years of rigorous imprisonment. In the entire two centuries of British rule, only three cases can be found of Englishmen executed for murdering Indians, while the murders of thousands more at British hands went unpunished.

The death of an Indian at British hands was always an accident, and that of a Briton because of an Indian’s actions always a capital crime. When a British master kicked an Indian servant in the stomach – a not uncommon form of conduct in those days – the Indian’s resultant death from a ruptured spleen would be blamed on his having an enlarged spleen as a result of malaria. Punch wrote an entire ode to The Stout British Boot as the favoured instrument of keeping the natives in order.

Political dissidence was legally repressed through various acts, including a sedition law far more rigorous than its British equivalent. The penal code contained 49 articles on crimes relating to dissent against the state (and only 11 on crimes involving death).

Rudyard Kipling, ‘that flatulent voice of Victorian imperialism would wax eloquent on the noble duty to bring law to those without it’. Photograph:

Of course the British did give India the English language, the benefits of which persist to this day. Or did they? The English language was not a deliberate gift to India, but again an instrument of colonialism, imparted to Indians only to facilitate the tasks of the English. In his notorious 1835 Minute on Education, Lord Macaulay articulated the classic reason for teaching English, but only to a small minority of Indians: “We must do our best to form a class who may be interpreters between us and the millions whom we govern; a class of persons, Indians in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals and in intellect.”

The language was taught to a few to serve as intermediaries between the rulers and the ruled. The British had no desire to educate the Indian masses, nor were they willing to budget for such an expense. That Indians seized the English language and turned it into an instrument for our own liberation – using it to express nationalist sentiments against the British – was to their credit, not by British design.

The construction of the Indian Railways is often pointed to by apologists for empire as one of the ways in which British colonialism benefited the subcontinent, ignoring the obvious fact that many countries also built railways without having to go to the trouble and expense of being colonised to do so. But the facts are even more damning.

The railways were first conceived of by the East India Company, like everything else in that firm’s calculations, for its own benefit. Governor General Lord Hardinge argued in 1843 that the railways would be beneficial “to the commerce, government and military control of the country”. In their very conception and construction, the Indian railways were a colonial scam. British shareholders made absurd amounts of money by investing in the railways, where the government guaranteed returns double those of government stocks, paid entirely from Indian, and not British, taxes. It was a splendid racket for Britons, at the expense of the Indian taxpayer.

The railways were intended principally to transport extracted resources – coal, iron ore, cotton and so on – to ports for the British to ship home to use in their factories. The movement of people was incidental, except when it served colonial interests; and the third-class compartments, with their wooden benches and total absence of amenities, into which Indians were herded, attracted horrified comment even at the time.

Asserting British rule during the war of independence, also known as the Indian mutiny, 1857. Photograph: Universal History Archive/Getty Images
And, of course, racism reigned; though whites-only compartments were soon done away with on grounds of economic viability, Indians found the available affordable space grossly inadequate for their numbers. (A marvellous post-independence cartoon captured the situation perfectly: it showed an overcrowded train, with people hanging off it, clinging to the windows, squatting perilously on the roof, and spilling out of their third-class compartments, while two Britons in sola topis sit in an empty first-class compartment saying to each other, “My dear chap, there’s nobody on this train!”)

Nor were Indians employed in the railways. The prevailing view was that the railways would have to be staffed almost exclusively by Europeans to “protect investments”. This was especially true of signalmen, and those who operated and repaired the steam trains, but the policy was extended to the absurd level that even in the early 20th century all the key employees, from directors of the Railway Board to ticket-collectors, were white men – whose salaries and benefits were also paid at European, not Indian, levels and largely repatriated back to England.

Racism combined with British economic interests to undermine efficiency. The railway workshops in Jamalpur in Bengal and Ajmer in Rajputana were established in 1862 to maintain the trains, but their Indian mechanics became so adept that in 1878 they started designing and building their own locomotives. Their success increasingly alarmed the British, since the Indian locomotives were just as good, and a great deal cheaper, than the British-made ones. In 1912, therefore, the British passed an act of parliament explicitly making it impossible for Indian workshops to design and manufacture locomotives. Between 1854 and 1947, India imported around 14,400 locomotives from England, and another 3,000 from Canada, the US and Germany, but made none in India after 1912. After independence, 35 years later, the old technical knowledge was so completely lost to India that the Indian Railways had to go cap-in-hand to the British to guide them on setting up a locomotive factory in India again. There was, however, a fitting postscript to this saga. The principal technology consultants for Britain’s railways, the London-based Rendel, today rely extensively on Indian technical expertise, provided to them by Rites, a subsidiary of the Indian Railways.

Mother and children ... the British left a society with 16% literacy, a life expectancy of 27 and over 90% living below the poverty line. Photograph: Bettmann/Bettmann Archive
The process of colonial rule in India meant economic exploitation and ruin to millions, the destruction of thriving industries, the systematic denial of opportunities to compete, the elimination of indigenous institutions of governance, the transformation of lifestyles and patterns of living that had flourished since time immemorial, and the obliteration of the most precious possessions of the colonised, their identities and their self-respect. In 1600, when the East India Company was established, Britain was producing just 1.8% of the world’s GDP, while India was generating some 23% (27% by 1700). By 1940, after nearly two centuries of the Raj, Britain accounted for nearly 10% of world GDP, while India had been reduced to a poor “third-world” country, destitute and starving, a global poster child of poverty and famine. The British left a society with 16% literacy, a life expectancy of 27, practically no domestic industry and over 90% living below what today we would call the poverty line.

The India the British entered was a wealthy, thriving and commercialising society: that was why the East India Company was interested in it in the first place. Far from being backward or underdeveloped, pre-colonial India exported high quality manufactured goods much sought after by Britain’s fashionable society. The British elite wore Indian linen and silks, decorated their homes with Indian chintz and decorative textiles, and craved Indian spices and seasonings. In the 17th and 18th centuries, British shopkeepers tried to pass off shoddy English-made textiles as Indian in order to charge higher prices for them.

The story of India, at different phases of its several-thousand-year-old civilisational history, is replete with great educational institutions, magnificent cities ahead of any conurbations of their time anywhere in the world, pioneering inventions, world-class manufacturing and industry, and abundant prosperity – in short, all the markers of successful modernity today – and there is no earthly reason why this could not again have been the case, if its resources had not been drained away by the British.

If there were positive byproducts for Indians from the institutions the British established and ran in India in their own interests, they were never intended to benefit Indians. Today Indians cannot live without the railways; the Indian authorities have reversed British policies and they are used principally to transport people, with freight bearing ever higher charges in order to subsidise the passengers (exactly the opposite of British practice).

This is why Britain’s historical amnesia about the rapacity of its rule in India is so deplorable. Recent years have seen the rise of what the scholar Paul Gilroy called “postcolonial melancholia”, the yearning for the glories of Empire, with a 2014 YouGov poll finding 59% of respondents thought the British empire was “something to be proud of”, and only 19% were “ashamed” of its misdeeds.

All this is not intended to have any bearing on today’s Indo-British relationship. That is now between two sovereign and equal nations, not between an imperial overlord and oppressed subjects; indeed, British prime minister Theresa May recently visited India to seek investment in her post-Brexit economy. As I’ve often argued, you don’t need to seek revenge upon history. History is its own revenge.


PS:Ratan Tata,owner of JLR,the "jewel in Britain's auto crown",will heartily agree!

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Neela » 22 Mar 2017 20:58

Stabbing , car mowing down multiple people in UK being reported in UKingdom now

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Yagnasri » 22 Mar 2017 21:06

some 4 to 12 people are injured. One police officer attacked and injured.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Rishi Verma » 22 Mar 2017 21:11

Cross post in paki forums as a paki link will emerge soon

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lalmohan » 22 Mar 2017 21:13

knife attack in houses of parliament, police officer stabbed, attacker shot by armed response
pm whisked away
police no comment until facts are established
air ambulance on scene

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 22 Mar 2017 21:15


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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby ssundar » 22 Mar 2017 23:44

Rishi Verma wrote:Cross post in paki forums as a paki link will emerge soon


They already unequivocally called it a "Terror Attack", Saar. That implies it ain't Paki.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 23 Mar 2017 00:02

four people have died including one police man in UK parliament attack
Image

Image
crashed car of suspect

Image
bearded suspect : looks like of African origin

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Rishi Verma » 23 Mar 2017 00:05

Looks like a paki to me

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby KJo » 23 Mar 2017 00:20

Tharoor is really good at bitchslapping Brits. I wish he was with the good guys.


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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 23 Mar 2017 00:26

Rishi Verma wrote:Looks like a paki to me


Westminster attacker Abu Izzadeen was an associate of Anjem Choudary.

Image

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Rishi Verma » 23 Mar 2017 00:29

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03 ... -know-far/

Who was the attacker?

No details are yet known, although eyewitnesses described seeing an Asian man in his 40s carrying a knife.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 23 Mar 2017 00:30

Image

Image

BREAKING: Reports name the #London attacker as hate preacher Abu Izzadeen. He was sentenced to jail in January.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 23 Mar 2017 00:30

Asian is political term used by UK presstitues for Muslim.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby IndraD » 23 Mar 2017 00:33

Abu Izzaden is originally from Jamaica. His real name was Trevor Brooks.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby A_Gupta » 23 Mar 2017 00:44

Interesting. November 20, 2015, this article after passing through Google translate gives this:
http://orf.at/stories/2310692/
Romania reinforces border controls with Hungary
Just a few days ago, the Hungarian police had arrested two British Islamists who wanted to travel by rail to Romania. One of them was the hate preacher Abu Izzad[en]. Both had been serving prison sentences in Great Britain for supporting terrorism and had been released under the condition of not leaving the country.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Lilo » 23 Mar 2017 00:48

Is Siddharth Varadarajan the judwaa bhai of Anjem Choudary ?

ImageImage

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby UlanBatori » 23 Mar 2017 01:20

Why do these BritPakis call him "Asian man"? Last I checked even Cristoforo Mixeduppo Colombo did not call Jamaica "Asia". Called it WEST indies. U c y we may sometimes appear less than adulatory about the United Quackdom?

These racist sh1ts rush out with "Asian Man With a Knife" hate propaganda. It's a Western Beardo With a Car.

This is now like an epidemic. Islamic Terrorist gets in car. Islamic Terrorist sees crowd. Islamic Terrorist drives into said crowd. Bodes ill for freedom of all.

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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Neela » 23 Mar 2017 01:39

Tommy Robinson


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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby KJo » 23 Mar 2017 02:13

It's amazing how foolish and naive Europeans are. How did these idiots rule the world??

https://www.quora.com/How-do-Swedes-fee ... ir-country
How do Swedes feel about having so many Muslims in their country?

If we turn fleeing people away, telling them that they're not welcome in our part of the world, that we consider them worth less than we are, where do you think they'll turn in their desperation? Eventually they might look to organisations like IS, because they have no-where else to go.

To those who are afraid of Daesh or claiming that muslims coming to our country will perform some kind of coup-d'état: You want to make sure a person doesn't end up being your enemy? Make him your friend, clothe him, feed him, give him shelter. :rotfl:

chetak
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Posts: 20533
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby chetak » 23 Mar 2017 02:35

KJo wrote:Tharoor is really good at bitchslapping Brits. I wish he was with the good guys.

O-VK2sDZCQw




This guy is not one of the good guys but still, it's game set and match.

We should get the hell out of the commonwealth and other silly colonial and demeaning legacies. We don't need these losers

chetak
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby chetak » 23 Mar 2017 02:43

Peregrine wrote:X Posted on the STFUP Thread


I SHOULD HAVE LISTENED TO INDIA MORE : UK FORMER PM TONY BLAIR
Cheers Image


burka butt calls herself "south asian".

Why?? Isn't she simply a traitorous Indian??

UlanBatori
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby UlanBatori » 23 Mar 2017 02:50

(Yawn). All this about someone driving drunk in a city with crazy traffic. As for Tony B.Liar, his parents are the ones who should apologize for not aborting him.

Singha
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Singha » 23 Mar 2017 09:26

:rotfl:
Syndicated feed from ndtv.

There should not be a single thought about what his identity is," said Pola Uddin, a member of the House of Lords. "This is a moment of reflection for all Londoners, and should lead us to consider the fact that we largely haven't experienced such attacks before, while other cities have."

Dominic Grieve, a Conservative MP, said the mayor was not in a difficult position owing to prior statements on terrorism and security - "none whatsoever," he said.

The message the mayor has sent to London residents is fitting, said Digby Jones. "You're safer in London than you've ever been," he said. "If this turns out to be an act of Islamic terrorism, I think the fact that the man is a Muslim is utterly and completely irrelevant."

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

Pathik
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Pathik » 23 Mar 2017 10:13


Rishi Verma
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Rishi Verma » 23 Mar 2017 10:17

This A'hole was a suspect but has been ruled out as he is in jail at the moment. But one can see where UKstan is heading by breeding such snakes in their country. He wants to create a Eurabia :rotfl:


Philip
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Re: Indo-UK News and Discussion - April 2013

Postby Philip » 23 Mar 2017 10:42

Terrible tragedy,13 planned attacks previously scotched the police say,one's condolences to the families of those killed and maimed and the Brit. people.
But how did this all come to pass? On BRF for a v.long time now,we've spoken how Britain for decades pandered to Paki and Islamic entities,from the days of Partition,to the Afghan conflict when the Soviets intervened,supporting Islamic fundamentalism ,OBL,et al,and allowing them to find safe havens in the UK."What ye sow ye shall reap,sow the wind,reap the whirlwind",old adages.Sadly British pol. parties , trying not to lose their Muslim votebanks,have tried to walk the razor's edge between closing down on the fundamentalists and turning a bind eye to their preachers of hate and allowing the mosques and clerics supporting such terror to flourish. Britain must now radically change its attitude towards countering such terror if it does not want a repetition of this outrage again and again.

The forces of evil have taken their cue from 9/11,where aircraft were hijacked and used to cause mass destruction. With airline security extremely tight these days,such repetitions are v.difficult .The Nice truck attack,killing over 80 people is now the popular method of attacking targets anywhere in a city. Zones around high security places like the UK parliament, popular tourist spots,etc. must be turned into mini-fortresses,pedestrianised,allowing selected vehicles to enter into. It is also sad that the British "bobbies" who are never armed,lost one of their own in this incident.perhaps non-lethal weapons like tasers,etc.BP vests,etc. must be given to them so that they have some means of countering armed attackers instead of being unarmed.

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/lon ... 44691.html

A terror attack in London was inevitable, but something made it different from Nice and Berlin
The current threat level in the UK is classified as 'severe', meaning an attack is highly likely

Kim Sengupta Defence Editor
The Independent Online
westminster-shooting-car-.jpg
The scene outside Parliament on Wednesday in the immediate aftermath of the deadly attack
The current threat level in the UK is classified as “severe”, meaning that an attack is highly likely, and it has been long expected that London would be revisited by terrorism.

One recurring theme of concern was of a “Mumbai-style” attack, with teams of gunmen with explosives carrying out multiple raids and seeking to take hostages, a scenario replicated in the Paris atrocity of 2015.

What took place today was more like the recent massacres in Nice and Berlin, with a vehicle being used as a weapon with lethal effect. Unlike in those two cities, however, the terrorist here was armed with a knife and not a gun.

Under the circumstances, the measures to protect the Houses of Parliament itself worked – but at a cost. The car being used for the attack, a dark-coloured hatchback, crashed into railings outside, but in any event, the entrance is blocked by metal barricades which would have prevented entry.

READ MORE
Westminster attack: Tributes for dead pour in
Bus driver who was on Westminster Bridge describes scenes of terror
Tributes to police officer killed in Westminster attack
A strike at the heart of our democracy
The attacker was shot dead after getting into the grounds, but not before he had managed to stab a police officer to death.

The attacker claimed two more lives and injured 20 others, some of them seriously, when he drove on to the pavement on Westminster Bridge on the way to the Parliament building. But that, unfortunately, could have happened in any public road near or far from Parliament.

There are other possible scenarios. The car could have been packed with explosives or the attacker could have been carrying a gun.

That would have, almost certainly, led to an even greater number of casualties. There are contingency procedures in place for that, including flying in a SAS team to deal with an ongoing situation. But the only way to prevent that would be to bar vehicles from the vicinity of Parliament.

In pictures: Westminster shooting incident

Even that would not necessarily guarantee total safety, as the IRA’s mortar launch at Downing Street in 1991 showed.
It was inevitable that an act of terrorism would take place sooner or later. In the aftermath there will be debate about additional security measures and whether that infringes on civic society.

Less than half an hour after the carnage a member of the public, stopped at a police cordon, demanded to know “Why not? It’s a free country”. The response was, “Not at the moment it’s not”.


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