Indian Space Programme Discussion

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Vipul
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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Vipul » 16 Jul 2014 05:28

SAC making making life support system sensors for India’s space mission.

The Ahmedabad-based Space Applications Centre (SAC) is playing a pivotal role in realizing India's dream of launching its own astronauts into the space.The SAC is developing sensors critical to life-support system in the capsule that will carry not one but two astronauts of Indian team on their independent journey into space and back.

The recent Union budget that allocated Rs 171 crore for the GSLV Mark III rocket programme with the capability of carrying humans has fueled the ambitious project.

The SAC scientists are at critical stage of devising sensors in the capsule that will help sustain humans on board — keeping track of their health, regulate flow of life-supporting gases like carbon dioxide released by humans, supply right amount of oxygen and maintain the right atmospheric pressure within capsule. It will also regulate presence of other gases like methane and nitrogen.

"The sensors and life-supporting systems will play a pivotal role in India's manned missions into space in the future. The efficacy and reliability of these sensors and instruments over longer periods of time in space travel are vital for future missions," says director SAC, Isro, A S Kiran Kumar.

A test run with a dummy capsule is scheduled over the next few months. Isro officials said that testing is significant to know endurance of the capsule while it gets launched in space and then returns to earth's atmosphere. It would also test the accuracy of the entire programme as the capsule would come down in Bay of Bengal. The decision for manned flights would be taken by the Union cabinet shortly, said officials.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 18 Jul 2014 06:43

India plans another Mars mission in 2017-20 timeframe - ToI
India is planning a "follow-on" mission to the Red Planet between 2017 and 2020 having a lot of scientific content, chairman of Isro K Radhakrishnan announced here on Thursday.

Radhakrishnan said that the final decision will depend upon the success of the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) orbit insertion on September 24, 2014. The Isro chief announced this at the TIFR while addressing a large gathering of scientists and students from Kirti and Jai Hind Colleges.

Pointing out that the current mission was mainly to demonstrate Isro's capability to execute the nail-biting orbit insertion, he described the second one as a scientific mission.

Regarding the current Mars Orbiter Mission, he said that 79% of the journey was completed.

The Isro chief explained that for the September 24 orbit insertion, the challenges include the liquid apogee motor restarting after 300 days."If we are successful in the first attempt we will be the first country in the world to accomplish it and also the first Asian country to achieve it," he said.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 18 Jul 2014 09:06

Validation of the insertion maneuver will open a huge area of research. I wonder when the next GSLV Mk 2 launch will occur?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Kakarat » 19 Jul 2014 22:02

Dauria Aerospace To Build Two Lightweight Telecom Satellites for Indo-U.S. Venture

FARNBOROUGH, England — Satellite services provider Aniara SpaceCom LLC of India and the United States on July 15 said it has contracted with Russian/German satellite builder Dauria Aerospace to launch two all-electric Ku-band telecommunications satellites together on an Indian Geostationary Satellite Launch Vehicle, or GSLV, rocket in late 2017.
...
Wei Sun, Dauria’s managing director and a veteran of small-satellite builder Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. of Britain and Germany’s OHB AG, said the NextStar-1 and NextStar-2 geostationary-orbiting satellites to be built for Aniara will use all-electric propulsion, lowering their launch weight and permitting a dual-stacked launch aboard the newest variant of India’s GSLV.
...

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 22 Jul 2014 22:21

"I wonder when the next GSLV Mk 2 launch will occur?"

They originally said before September, which is now very unlikely. For the remainder of the year, there really should be one GSLV Mark 2 launch, a GSLV mark 3 experimental launch in August, and one more PSLV mission with IRNSS-1C. Sound accurate?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby raj-senthil » 22 Jul 2014 23:43

Varoon Shekhar wrote:"I wonder when the next GSLV Mk 2 launch will occur?"

They originally said before September, which is now very unlikely. For the remainder of the year, there really should be one GSLV Mark 2 launch, a GSLV mark 3 experimental launch in August, and one more PSLV mission with IRNSS-1C. Sound accurate?



IRNSS-1D is also planned for this year as per various news reports,but seems unlikely seeing the delays on mk3.

I came across this video few days back (sorry if already posted), where PM asks ISRO chairman about the launch of mk3 and he confirms back saying it is August. Hence i believe mk3 launch would not be pushed beyond August. :-?

The video gives good info on PSLV & GSLV.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7X5jyTVjRo

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby symontk » 23 Jul 2014 08:42

ISRO has time and launch pad for two more PSLV launches. Since GSLV mk3 is already on pad, it would go by August. Delays are part of the all D, E and X launches. Only C & F can go as planned

It would have been great if they can launch a follow on GSLV Mk2 this year end. The GSLV launch this year January was actually planned for last year. I hope they stick to the calendar to launch this year's one too

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby arun » 23 Jul 2014 10:15

Goodbye HAMSAT-VO52 – Rest In Peace

HAMSAT which was launched by PSLV-C6 on May 5, 2005 along with Cartosat-1 ceased operation on July 11, 2014 following failure of onboard lithium Ion batteries and was formally decommissioned by ISRO on 21st July 2014.:

With heavy heart, I sadly convey, that our little angel ‘HAMSAT VO-52’ would no more be able to offer her services to the ‘Amateur Radio Fraternity. HAMSAT VO-52 succumbed in Space on 11th July 2014, while she was on her 49,675th orbit, due to the failure of on-board lithium ion batteries that have met their end of life.

Although her desires were to be at work with other systems and sub-systems working normal as per the latest telemetry received, the on-board computer recurring to ‘Reset’ mode due to the failure of batteries is preventing her to do so. Hence, it is decided not to expect any more meaningful and reliable services from HAMSAT VO-52.

Since 11th July, every best possible effort has been put in by the spacecraft controllers here in ISTRAC Bangalore to revive her back to life and to help her with work load, so she won’t be swamped when she returns, but with no luck. Though it is hard, the HAMSAT VO-52 designers and controllers insist that the time has come to let the little angel free in space to go drifting on her own from their care and custody.

Thus, today 21st July 2014, ISRO have decommissioned ‘HAMSAT-VO52′ officially. ...................

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_27164 » 23 Jul 2014 17:09

what was expected life span of this satellite?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_27164 » 23 Jul 2014 17:51

I recently travelled to goa and while returning I found my co-passanger to be an isro employee. he was working on pyros for stage separation mechanism and is involved in vehicle assembly. summary of our conversation is as follows. i believe most of the things are already known.

1) gslv mk3's solid rocket boosters are the 4th largest boosters in the world. they are thrust vectoring engines which is not commmon for any solid rocket motor. some special type of rubber plates are used for this. it is very difficult because most of the materials cannot stand to the heat.

2) the vikas engine is not exactly based on viking engine. although they are similar but plenty of things are different in vikas than viking.

3) in pslv stage 1 separation is done through explosives but for stage 2 and 3 a belt mechanism is used. it is something like men's belt used for trousers. it has hooks at 2 points (imagine that two points on a circle which are opposite to each other. if connected by straight line, it will become diameter of the circle)

4) the interstage in gslv is there to protect nozzle of upper stage. gslv being big rocket, has heavy stages. diameter of the nozzel is hardly about 100mm less than outer diameter of the vehicle. when the stage separates, the vehicle is generally inclined to certain angle. so when it drops down, due to less error margin it may damage the exaust. so interstage is introduced. interstage clears the length of nozzle from lower stage so it separates without any problem. since interstage itself is very light it is safely separated after lover stage is separated.

5) if you are in quality control and you find any small bug in the system you can go to highest level no matter what your designation/position is to ensure safety. due to this culture pslv is highly reliable. but as a down side of this it results in delay of launch. sometime people unnecessarily do this just for personal ego problems or to prove themselves above others. this is one of the reasons in delays in gslv program including mk3.

6) supply chain of pslv is established so nicely that all the hardware required upto pslv c30 mission is already in place. recent mission was c23 (or 24. sorry i cannot recall)

7) when asked about cryogenic engine he said russia gave us engines with staged combustion technology because it is more complex and will take more time for us to master (my thought- maybe they thought we may even fail.) meanwhile we started developing our own engine and gas generator technology was chosen since it is relatively easy. we had progressed fairly well under nambi narayanan there but that attempt was scuttled by famous isro spy case. that is the reason gslv mk3 will have new cryo engine. but as staged combustion engine is up they are planning to use it on mk3 in future for obvious reason.

so all in all it was real treat for jingo like me.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby ramana » 23 Jul 2014 19:44

aditya, Lots of great stuff for people like me.

Thanks for the info.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby dinesha » 31 Jul 2014 21:12

Image

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby K Mehta » 01 Aug 2014 12:04

Technical Problems of GSLV -PIB release
The Government has sorted out the technical problems of Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) which may carry heavy satellites and put them into orbit. The earlier flights GSLV-F02 on July 10, 2006, GSLV-D3 on April 15, 2010 and GSLV-F06 on December 25, 2010 could not accomplish the mission objectives due to technical problems.

In GSLV-F02 flight, the primary cause of mission failure has been the loss of thrust in one of the liquid strap-on motors of the first stage. The anomalous behavior was attributed to the malfunctioning of propellant regulator of the gas generator system in this strap-on motor.

The GSLV-D3 flight, with indigenous cryogenic upper stage, failed as the indigenous cryogenic engine after its ignition couldn’t sustain the combustion beyond 1 second, due to the anomalous stoppage of Fuel Booster Turbo Pump.

In GSLV-F06 flight, with Russian cryogenic upper stage, the primary cause of the failure was the untimely and inadvertent snapping of a group of ten connectors located at the bottom portion of the Russian Cryogenic Stage, due to structural failure of the Lower Shroud.

Based on the suggestions made by the failure analysis committees, ISRO has implemented the modifications and improvements in GSLV, which include independent inspection and quality checks for all critical components and sub-assemblies, change of bearing housing material, revision of tolerances and seal clearances of Fuel Booster Turbo Pump of Cryogenic Engine, redesign of the Cryogenic Stage Lower Shroud, revision of connector mounting scheme and wire tunnel configuration.

After implementing the modifications and improvements in GSLV, the next flight GSLV-D5 was successfully launched on 5th January 2014 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota.

India has prepared its own indigenous cryogenic engines meant for GSLV and flown in GSLV-D3 and GSLV-D5. Cryogenic engine required for next flight GSLV-D6 is also prepared and is undergoing acceptance testing.

This was stated by Union Minister of State for Science and Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences, D/o Atomic Energy and D/o Space Dr. Jitendra Singh in a written reply in Rajya Sabha today.

Indigenous Production of Cryogenic Engine -PIB release
The Cryogenic Engine of 7.5 Tonne thrust meant for Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) is indigenously produced and successfully flight tested in GSLV-D5 flight on 5th January 2014. The Cryogenic Engine of higher thrust (20 Tonne) meant for next generation of GSLV viz. GSLV-MkIII launch vehicle is under advanced stage of development. Design and Development tests of sub-system elements of this new high-thrust cryogenic engine have been carried out successfully.

Cryogenic engines are already in production in Indian industries. So far, eleven cryogenic engines for GSLV and two higher thrust cryogenic engines for GSLV Mk-III have been realized.

In the twelfth five year plan, 192 Crores has been allocated for realisation of cryogenic engines and stages, under GSLV programme.

This was stated by Union Minister of State for Science and Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences, D/o Atomic Energy and D/o Space Dr. Jitendra Singh in a written reply in Rajya Sabha today.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_27164 » 01 Aug 2014 17:54

Thanks Ramana,

In my post above I forgot to mention one crucial thing. While we were talking about mangalyan, he said that the major reason behind its precise performance wrt trajectory is because of highly accurate predictions of planetary motions. India(n) is very good at predicting the positioning of planets, stars etc and this is because of our research in astronomy and mathematics from thousands of years and knowledge gained from it.
I felt very proud at that moment about our ancestors for their great work with nearly zero infrastructure at disposal. its their sheer talent that brought us success even after thousands of years.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby juvva » 04 Aug 2014 16:56

Some details about MOM's MOI :

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/in ... /1275814/0

-MOI @ 7:30 am on 24th Sep. 2014.
-MOI commands will be uploaded to the s/c 3 days in advance.
-Fuel required for MOI = ~240 Kg.
-Delta V = -1 Km/s.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby PratikDas » 05 Aug 2014 05:45

arun wrote:Goodbye HAMSAT-VO52 – Rest In Peace

HAMSAT which was launched by PSLV-C6 on May 5, 2005 along with Cartosat-1 ceased operation on July 11, 2014 following failure of onboard lithium Ion batteries and was formally decommissioned by ISRO on 21st July 2014.:

With heavy heart, I sadly convey, that our little angel ‘HAMSAT VO-52’ would no more be able to offer her services to the ‘Amateur Radio Fraternity. HAMSAT VO-52 succumbed in Space on 11th July 2014, while she was on her 49,675th orbit, due to the failure of on-board lithium ion batteries that have met their end of life.

Although her desires were to be at work with other systems and sub-systems working normal as per the latest telemetry received, the on-board computer recurring to ‘Reset’ mode due to the failure of batteries is preventing her to do so. Hence, it is decided not to expect any more meaningful and reliable services from HAMSAT VO-52.

Since 11th July, every best possible effort has been put in by the spacecraft controllers here in ISTRAC Bangalore to revive her back to life and to help her with work load, so she won’t be swamped when she returns, but with no luck. Though it is hard, the HAMSAT VO-52 designers and controllers insist that the time has come to let the little angel free in space to go drifting on her own from their care and custody.

Thus, today 21st July 2014, ISRO have decommissioned ‘HAMSAT-VO52′ officially. ...................

aditya_dange wrote:what was expected life span of this satellite?

AMSAT: VO-52 “Hamsat” end of mission
Pasted below is the message from Mr. R. Suresh, Mission Director:

HAMSAT, the first small satellite by ISRO has been Decommissioned after nearly a decade of service to the World Ham community.

A true masterpiece among small satellites, designed for one year mission life, but exceeded all expectations by serving for almost 10 years. A truly autonomous satellite, with “Zero maintenance“ in terms of Mission operations, it provided a springboard to test many new concepts such as BMU. LI-ion based power system, automatic Spin rate control and Auto SAOC for maintaining the Satellite attitude without any ground commanding.

HAMSAT known as “OSCAR-52” among the Amateur HAM operators has been very popular because of its high sensitivity receiver and strong transmitter. Indian Radio Amateurs on many occasions conveyed to us that they have been greatly honored to share the adulations showered on ISRO and INDIA by the International Radio Amateur for gifting this wonderful satellite “HAMSAT”.

I take this opportunity to applaud the HAMSAT teams at ISAC, ISTRAC and other centre for their efforts and support, which has made ISRO proud among the HAM users across the globe.

R,SURESH

MISSION DIRECTOR

HAMSAT

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby krishnan » 05 Aug 2014 11:12

wow, a 10 times its actual life span, thats amazing

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby JayS » 05 Aug 2014 11:53

aditya_dange wrote:Thanks Ramana,

In my post above I forgot to mention one crucial thing. While we were talking about mangalyan, he said that the major reason behind its precise performance wrt trajectory is because of highly accurate predictions of planetary motions. India(n) is very good at predicting the positioning of planets, stars etc and this is because of our research in astronomy and mathematics from thousands of years and knowledge gained from it.
I felt very proud at that moment about our ancestors for their great work with nearly zero infrastructure at disposal. its their sheer talent that brought us success even after thousands of years.


OK, let me get this straight. Does it mean ISRO actually uses the Ancient Indian astronomical methods for calculation of planetary positions?? I mean how the ancient research and knowledge is empowering ISRO in better prediction ability of planetary motions?? Is is superior to that of someone say NASA??

I am expert in neither Indian Astronomy nor the modern Space Flight mechanics. I have done two courses in Indian Astronomy out of curiosity during my college days. The methodology used by Indian Astronomers is simple but highly effective and accurate for its time. But I have an impression, these methods are inadequate for the kind of accuracy needed for deep space mission trajectory calculations. So I am asking.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_27164 » 05 Aug 2014 14:12

nileshjr wrote:
aditya_dange wrote:Thanks Ramana,

In my post above I forgot to mention one crucial thing. While we were talking about mangalyan, he said that the major reason behind its precise performance wrt trajectory is because of highly accurate predictions of planetary motions. India(n) is very good at predicting the positioning of planets, stars etc and this is because of our research in astronomy and mathematics from thousands of years and knowledge gained from it.
I felt very proud at that moment about our ancestors for their great work with nearly zero infrastructure at disposal. its their sheer talent that brought us success even after thousands of years.


OK, let me get this straight. Does it mean ISRO actually uses the Ancient Indian astronomical methods for calculation of planetary positions?? I mean how the ancient research and knowledge is empowering ISRO in better prediction ability of planetary motions?? Is is superior to that of someone say NASA??

I am expert in neither Indian Astronomy nor the modern Space Flight mechanics. I have done two courses in Indian Astronomy out of curiosity during my college days. The methodology used by Indian Astronomers is simple but highly effective and accurate for its time. But I have an impression, these methods are inadequate for the kind of accuracy needed for deep space mission trajectory calculations. So I am asking.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby govardhanks » 05 Aug 2014 15:38

nileshjr wrote:
aditya_dange wrote:Thanks Ramana,

In my post above I forgot to mention one crucial thing. While we were talking about mangalyan, he said that the major reason behind its precise performance wrt trajectory is because of highly accurate predictions of planetary motions. India(n) is very good at predicting the positioning of planets, stars etc and this is because of our research in astronomy and mathematics from thousands of years and knowledge gained from it.
I felt very proud at that moment about our ancestors for their great work with nearly zero infrastructure at disposal. its their sheer talent that brought us success even after thousands of years.


OK, let me get this straight. Does it mean ISRO actually uses the Ancient Indian astronomical methods for calculation of planetary positions?? I mean how the ancient research and knowledge is empowering ISRO in better prediction ability of planetary motions?? Is is superior to that of someone say NASA??

I am expert in neither Indian Astronomy nor the modern Space Flight mechanics. I have done two courses in Indian Astronomy out of curiosity during my college days. The methodology used by Indian Astronomers is simple but highly effective and accurate for its time. But I have an impression, these methods are inadequate for the kind of accuracy needed for deep space mission trajectory calculations. So I am asking.


So far I know there was a society in India which was trying to decode much of the work but they only could do a fraction of it, which is in detail here in the below link, that is what was in till 1998, what happened after that I don't know.
http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu//full/1998BASI...26...11R/0000011.000.html
For the details about planetary motions before Kepler,
http://faculty.fullerton.edu/cmcconnell/Planets.html#10
Read one more article (a counter perhaps), which tells the ancient Indian texts give models of planetary motions and algorithms for computing mean and true longitudes of the planets.
http://people.sc.fsu.edu/~dduke/india8.pdf

PS: That is something high end mathematics and physics guys do. :)

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 05 Aug 2014 19:53

http://isro.org/rep2014/index.html

The ISRO annual report for 2013-2014 is finally out, on August 5th! Some nuggets as usual. Nice to know that Oceansat-2 and Resourcesat-1 are still operational. Wish they would be more forthcoming about GSAT-8 and GSAT-10, as to how many channels are being broadcast through them, to clear up any doubts in the public's mind.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 05 Aug 2014 23:21

lets not go overboard with historical astronomy (and My Grandfather used to do pretty precise calculations for his work manually based on ancient texts)- of course they did a wonderful work for their time and are to be lauded and not forgotten but current data is based on recent work and the level of accuracy is many fold. For eg relativistic effects etc could not have been dreamt of while doing those calculations and can be important for eg even in GPS analysis (at that speed and distance ie near earth). That's the level of accuracy the astronomers are gunning for

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 06 Aug 2014 07:01

Desi GPS Services Likely by Next Yr, Says ISRO Scientist
By Express News Service Published: 03rd August 2014 08:23 AM Last Updated: 03rd August 2014 08:23 AM
VELLORE: A desi Global Positioning System (GPS) service is on the anvil and will be available from the middle of next year, according to a top scientist of the Indian space agency.

“We will be able to offer our own indigenous GPS service with the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS), being developed by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO),” said Dr K Sivan, Director of ISRO’s Thiruvananthapuram-based Liquid Propulsion Systems Center. He disclosed this to the media on the sidelines of the 23rs convocation of the Thanthai Periyar Government institute of Technology here on Saturday.

At present, India is making use of satellite services of other countries for the navigation applications using GPS. The IRNSS, developed by ISRO, would soon offer position information to users in India with accuracy for various applications such as mobile phones, terrestrial, aerial and marine navigation, disaster management etc . Out of the seven satellites planned, two have been already launched and the third one would be launched soon. By the middle of next year, the IRNSS would be able to provide GPS services to Indian users, Sivan said.

Stating that the launch of GSLV Mark III next month would provide a greater thrust to the country’s deep-space programme, he said “We are pragmatically pushing forward the development of semi-cryogenic technology.” Demonstration of larger launch vehicles that could carry around 4 ton satellites is being planned in the next couple of months. ‘Human in Space’ programme was also gaining momentum and GSLV Mark III would accommodate a special module on experimental basis.

He said, the next focus after the Mars mission was towards exploration of the solar system and deep space astronomy. As new applications are being developed, the size of satellites had to be increased and ISRO was planning to develop 10 tons satellites soon.


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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28452 » 10 Aug 2014 19:38

prasannasimha wrote:lets not go overboard with historical astronomy (and My Grandfather used to do pretty precise calculations for his work manually based on ancient texts)- of course they did a wonderful work for their time and are to be lauded and not forgotten but current data is based on recent work and the level of accuracy is many fold. For eg relativistic effects etc could not have been dreamt of while doing those calculations and can be important for eg even in GPS analysis (at that speed and distance ie near earth). That's the level of accuracy the astronomers are gunning for


Sir what was your Grand Father doing,if you don't mind,out of curiosity.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 10 Aug 2014 20:54

ray_donovan wrote:
prasannasimha wrote:lets not go overboard with historical astronomy (and My Grandfather used to do pretty precise calculations for his work manually based on ancient texts)- of course they did a wonderful work for their time and are to be lauded and not forgotten but current data is based on recent work and the level of accuracy is many fold. For eg relativistic effects etc could not have been dreamt of while doing those calculations and can be important for eg even in GPS analysis (at that speed and distance ie near earth). That's the level of accuracy the astronomers are gunning for


Sir what was your Grand Father doing,if you don't mind,out of curiosity.

Well he was a part time Astologer while he was an MA in Sanskrit and a Diplomat in Commerce and was a secretary for what today is ASTRA IDL (was called MITL which made the famous MITS Linctus codeine etc) .Part of the Astrology calculations involved precise computation of planetery positions etc and I out of curiosity used to see him doing those calculations (usually doing the calculations to 1/60th of a second and then rounding it off to a second referring to works of Varahamihira Bhaskara and Aryabhatta.

If you see the large sundials in Jaipur etc you will get an idea of the accuracy of their calculations which are inherently limited by lack of preecision due to engineering issues at that time.Today we are talking of Atomic clock accuracy etc so things are different.So not to decry Varahamihira . Aryabhatta etc who did a wonderful job and were geniuses for their era but today's Astronomy is more accurate to a much higher degree of accuracy which would have been impossible even a couple of centuries back.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 10 Aug 2014 20:55

Isro set for next generation communication satellites
Acquiring modern capabilities would allow the space agency to launch communication satellites in the higher frequency bands
BS Reporter | Hyderabad August 10, 2014 Last Updated at 19:10 IST
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Read more on: Isro | Communication Satellites

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The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) has announced its intent to acquire latest satellite platforms and payload technologies to fuel its prowess for launching next generation communication satellites.

Explaining this, Isro chairman K Radhakrishnan said, "The space organisation was in the process of developing various technologies and also in the process of finding a suitable foreign industrial alliance to acquire the technology and upgrade its current satellite platforms to meet the future demand."

Acquiring such capabilities would allow the space agency to launch communication satellites in the higher frequency bands with about 15 kW of power, and a data handling capability in the range of 100 giga bits per second that can meet the growing demand for broadband internet and rural telecom connectivity in the country, said Isro.

"In the next five years, we are getting into a new level of communication satellite technology to give a satellite that delivers three-times the power we are giving today, and can provide a revolution in the country's broadband communication," he added.

On its own part, Isro has bigger plans. Its human space flights through the experimental flight of GSLV Mark-III scheduled for "launch in the next 2-3 months".

While Isro's workhorse launching vehicle PSLV has carved a niche by scoring 26 wins out of the total 27 missions till date, the existing GSLV and the upcoming Mark-III would give it the strategic edge for introducing higher capacity communication satellites into space.

"The first experimental flight of GSLV Mark-III with passive cryogenic stage and that too in a crew module would be a precursor to the possible human space flight," said Radhakrishnan during his chief guest address here today at the convocation of BITS Hyderabad 2014 batch.

He said the capacity of Mark III launching vehicle was capable of placing "4-4.5 tonne capacity communication satellite in the geostationary orbit".

The existing PSLV is compatible for launching 1.8 tonne communication satellites and it is 2.2 tonne for the GSLV.

Speaking on the Mars Orbiter Mission, he said its success would position India as the first Asian nation to do it and the only country globally to achieve maiden mission accomplishment.

The Mars Orbiter Spacecraft has traversed nearly 88 per cent distance till now and the next operational milestone is the insertion of spacecraft into the Martian orbit on September 24 this year.

India is also jointly working with the NASA to develop a unique satellite system meant for disaster managment and others, and is set for launch in 2019-20, according to him.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_23694 » 10 Aug 2014 21:08

experimental flight of GSLV Mark-III scheduled for "launch in the next 2-3 months".


Again next 2-3 months :(( . This is patience testing. Time frame for the launch shifts to Oct-Dec .
What is causing the further delay . Any news please

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby sanjaykumar » 11 Aug 2014 04:11

I think they mean in the next 2 to 30 months.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby arun » 22 Aug 2014 19:50

ISRO spokesperson confirms delay of launch of GSLV Mk III . No new launch date indicated. The excuse for delay is the Mars Mission :roll: . Rather a lame excuse :( :

BANGALORE: With the mars orbiter mission (MOM) taking clear priority, the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) has postponed the key GSLV-MKIII experimental mission, which was initially scheduled for launch in the last week of this month.

Notwithstanding the great success the PSLV class of launch vehicles, GSLV holds the key for many of Isro's future programmes including Chandrayaan-II and the proposed human spaceflight programme. An Isro spokesperson, confirming the postponement, said: "...We don't have a date as of now. The priority is MOM," the spokesperson said.


Isro postpones GSLV-MKIII flight scheduled in August

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28716 » 26 Aug 2014 01:52

https://www.facebook.com/isroofficial/p ... =3&theater

Do we make these instruments ourselves in India??

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby tushar_m » 27 Aug 2014 07:46

The five payloads on-board Indian space agency ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Image

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Rien » 28 Aug 2014 13:41

SSridhar wrote:The Isro chief explained that for the September 24 orbit insertion, the challenges include the liquid apogee motor restarting after 300 days."If we are successful in the first attempt we will be the first country in the world to accomplish it and also the first Asian country to achieve it," he said.

First country in the world!!! :D I am so sick and tired of 6th or 7th country syndrome.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 29 Aug 2014 09:00

arun wrote:ISRO spokesperson confirms delay of launch of GSLV Mk III . No new launch date indicated. The excuse for delay is the Mars Mission :roll: . Rather a lame excuse :( :

BANGALORE: With the mars orbiter mission (MOM) taking clear priority, the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) has postponed the key GSLV-MKIII experimental mission, which was initially scheduled for launch in the last week of this month.

Notwithstanding the great success the PSLV class of launch vehicles, GSLV holds the key for many of Isro's future programmes including Chandrayaan-II and the proposed human spaceflight programme. An Isro spokesperson, confirming the postponement, said: "...We don't have a date as of now. The priority is MOM," the spokesperson said.


Isro postpones GSLV-MKIII flight scheduled in August


Not necessarily.They may need to use the Master control facility , ranging equipment and manpower to monitor the Mars insertion.Remember we are doing this for the first time (In bioth cases) and to bog down manpower may not be wise.Its not that they are playing Gilli Dandu here so they may want to allocate resources accordingly. Do you think it is wise to also launch the GSALV Mk III for the first time when they are also concentrating on the MOI ? Everyone forgets that these things ahve been done only a by a few nations and historically the smallest of errors have scuttled Mars missions so why cast aspersions ?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 29 Aug 2014 09:02

rakesh_ebull wrote:https://www.facebook.com/isroofficial/photos/pb.1448364408720250.-2207520000.1409000530./1542195052670518/?type=3&theater

Do we make these instruments ourselves in India??

Yes all payloads are Indian in Origin.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby merlin » 04 Sep 2014 14:14

I don't think this article was posted - ISRO: Extreme Engineering

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28714 » 04 Sep 2014 14:23

prasannasimha wrote:
rakesh_ebull wrote:https://www.facebook.com/isroofficial/photos/pb.1448364408720250.-2207520000.1409000530./1542195052670518/?type=3&theater

Do we make these instruments ourselves in India??

Yes all payloads are Indian in Origin.


Actually most components are imported and the instruments are assembled here. Sure the design may be Indian but EM actuators, chips etc are not Indian. Only some are. Even SOC's use chips that come from outside.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby JTull » 04 Sep 2014 15:20

George wrote:
prasannasimha wrote:quote="rakesh_ebull"https://www.facebook.com/isroofficial/photos/pb.1448364408720250.-2207520000.1409000530./1542195052670518/?type=3&theater

Do we make these instruments ourselves in India??/quote
Yes all payloads are Indian in Origin.


Actually most components are imported and the instruments are assembled here. Sure the design may be Indian but EM actuators, chips etc are not Indian. Only some are. Even SOC's use chips that come from outside.


Everything is from outside onleee!

Even the coal for the electricity is imported from Australia.

Hell, our DNA came on a meteorite.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 04 Sep 2014 19:37

"Not necessarily.They may need to use the Master control facility , ranging equipment and manpower to monitor the Mars insertion.Remember we are doing this for the first time.."

Possibly, but then why state that they are going to test the GSLV Mark 3 in August or September( and that too after postponing it from June) They would surely have known about the Mangalyaan issue. They can't be so absent-minded or unprofessional that they would be thinking "Oh we forgot, there's Mangalyaan entering the Mars orbit in September, so we should postpone the GSLV until October". That sounds implausible.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion

Postby member_28108 » 04 Sep 2014 23:55

Varoon Shekhar wrote:"Not necessarily.They may need to use the Master control facility , ranging equipment and manpower to monitor the Mars insertion.Remember we are doing this for the first time.."

Possibly, but then why state that they are going to test the GSLV Mark 3 in August or September( and that too after postponing it from June) They would surely have known about the Mangalyaan issue. They can't be so absent-minded or unprofessional that they would be thinking "Oh we forgot, there's Mangalyaan entering the Mars orbit in September, so we should postpone the GSLV until October". That sounds implausible.

Varoon the logistics may have become more than they initially planned.Also they want to launch GSLV in a monsoon free window.I wouldn't be surprised that they may want an important dignitary to be around during the launch - hundreds of reasons. Other issues may have also cropped up which were not predicted.remember that this is the first test launch of a new rocket.Also somehow I feel there is also a cat and mouse game going on and something will be done different that is not being publicized. remember there ahve been muliple attempts to sabotage our space program.


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