China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

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VinodTK
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby VinodTK » 18 Dec 2014 03:18

Chinese army intrudes again in Ladakh, pushed back after 3-hour stand-off
NEW DELHI: Barely two months after a fortnight long stand-off between Chinese and Indian forces was resolved in Ladakh, China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) made another incursion on Tuesday leading to a standoff for over three hours. While the last standoff (in September) took place in Chumur-Dhemchok area, the latest one has been reported from near Chushul which is reeling under -30 degree celsius temperature.

Home ministry sources said the incursion began in much the same way as the September standoff with civilians from both sides quarreling over rights to the differently-perceived 40-odd sq km spread. As the quarrel escalated, sources said, Chinese PLA entered Indian territory to support its civilians.

At this, Indian forces rushed to the spot asked Chinese forces to retreat to their territory and managed to push them back after about three hours.

"This was not the same as the September standoff when matters had really escalated. But given that Chinese continue to come in despite unfavourable weather shows their intent to continue to needle us. Earlier incursions were never heard of in winters. For the past couple of years, they have become common. Our forces, however, are prepared and have been responding with equal force," said a home ministry official.


The incident is both a reflection of increasing Chinese aggression on the border and strengthening Indian assertion in the area. Government sources say the forces have been asked to be more proactive and assertive vis-a-vis China on the border, leading to daily patrolling along certain areas on the border and greater interception of Chinese soldiers when they move towards Indian side.
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member_27164
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_27164 » 18 Dec 2014 10:27

I think India should start arresting or at least detain people. be it civilian or military persons under some sort of illegal trespassing rule (if there is one, good. else make new one). this would send some assertive message. we must first make it clear that it is 'indian territory' than 'disputed territory.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby milanforever » 18 Dec 2014 20:11

J-20 prototype 2015 spotted

Image

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby kmc_chacko » 18 Dec 2014 22:10

Why all the Chinese fighters photos are taken from inside the bushes ? so many open spaces are available nearer to the plane.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby brar_w » 18 Dec 2014 22:25

Because people routinely risk their lives for just one shot of the holy J-20 and hiding behind leafless trees hoping that they give them some protection. Also, if the J-20 knows you are taking its picture it becomes invisible.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby arshyam » 18 Dec 2014 23:56

brar_w wrote:Also, if the J-20 knows you are taking its picture it becomes invisible.


:rotfl:

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby krisna » 19 Dec 2014 00:40

^^^^
it is like bikini showing everything but hiding the vital assets. 8)

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_20067 » 19 Dec 2014 00:47

Ding wrote:J-20 prototype 2015 spotted

Image


Ding Dong.... ... you guys always seem to have some random bush to take the scoop... you can focus beyond those branches..? ... after all the technologies-- are you taking picture with a potato?

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Khalsa » 19 Dec 2014 03:20

Okay so here is a really relaxed reason and I am not taking the mickey out of them.
The answer is based on psychology of us all.

The aim of taking the photo from the bushes is to slowly implant the idea into your brain that the photographer is on your side and is a trusted source and therefore what he/she captures is the truth and present.

Why ?
If they did official shots as they often do sometimes we go on about Photoshopping and angles of shadow and la la la la ... I could go on forever.
We do that and I have seen that (don't deny it, if you don't then others do) .... we often close our eyes and say there is no plane, there is no plane.
We come out ignorant.
They don't want us to be ignorant and uninformed, they want us threatened by their weapons and might and running scared making bad decisions.
So what do they do ?

So they do an unofficial shoot, through the bushes, makes you feel as if you are viewing it yourself or viewing the work of a person who is not on the Chinese side (therefore on your side).

The idea is to plant the idea that the photographer is on your side and is therefore capturing the truth without influence or reason.
which maybe true... i.e the plane is there and does exist and does fly. I am not disputing that.

This is an old trick used in Army recruitment centres and police rifles recruitment centre.
You are more motivated to join the force when one of you says we must, instead of the officer or recruitment officer says.
They will often plant their own as prospective candidates in the midst. The person selling you the message must be a trusted source, either make him invisible or make him one of your own and therefore trusted.


But Yeah I love those shots... always reminds of the 80s fauji movies.... spying through the glasses.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby brar_w » 19 Dec 2014 07:42

That this is a part of their psyops is pretty much a given and most who have followed this pattern know of this. Not a big deal, some practice psyops at airshows, some in the media and some use these tactics. Part and Parcel!

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_28788 » 19 Dec 2014 08:38

The classic Sun Tzu's war philosophy -

'Appear weak when you're strong. Appear strong when you're weak'

PLA is taking that philosophy to heart but they lack the sophistication to make that deception look genuine!

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_27164 » 19 Dec 2014 12:07

i always had a doubt regarding photos like above. cant resist talking out now. if chinese really want to keep their program secret why dont they secure their premises with concrete walls and merely plant bushes or metal wire fencing? does it cost more than 4 trillion dollars to the chinese?
on my way to office i pass by military engineering college. they dont run any secret programs there for sure but whole premises is secured with some 8-10 feet tall wall.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby krishnan » 19 Dec 2014 12:21



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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Shreeman » 24 Dec 2014 07:43

What is making chinese air force planes fall out of the sky?: Widows deman action as decades old planes are dubbed "widowmnakel". Some are questioning the need to spend billions on an arms race with arch rival japan.

Image

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby ravip » 24 Dec 2014 08:04

Look at the left hand side of the pic the piolt body is blurred. Most probably he is dead, but shockingly people are standing watching the body without covering it with some cloth.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby shiv » 24 Dec 2014 09:13

Shreeman wrote:What is making chinese air force planes fall out of the sky?: Widows deman action as decades old planes are dubbed "widowmnakel". Some are questioning the need to spend billions on an arms race with arch rival japan.

http://i.imgur.com/qMbVF1w.jpg


There is a guy kneeling just beyond the blurred dead body on the left. Beyond the kneeling guy is a truncated oval object that looks like the front face perspex of a cockpit. As far as I know only the J-7 and J-8 have that sort of front plate. But tthe green/yellow colour of the wreck suggests a test/experimental aircraft

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Shreeman » 24 Dec 2014 09:23

^^^ It is said to be a newly built JH7. Most details fit. Could have been entirely new or mid-life upgrade.

The point is bichhars will start to leak out more and more.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_28840 » 24 Dec 2014 11:07

^^ Made in China no? Seriously what do people expect?

Sarcasm aside,

The Actual crash rate for the PLAAF would be pretty high. I base this on several facts,

1) The Degree of censorship in China is pretty high, its only because of the level of penetration of cellphone cameras , internet and messaging / imaging sharing apps, that even this information is getting out.

2) Western analysts have rated the PLAAF pilots on average of not getting to fly more than 10 - 20 hours per pilot per year, as opposed to the 150 Hours Average mandated for NATO forces (coincidentally IAF pilots get around 100 - 150 hours). So while the PLAAF on paper has a combat strength in several thousands, their pilots on average are only marginally trained (with the exception of a few elite / showcase formations). At this point i would estimate that even the PAF is probably better trained on average than the PLAAF, which is quite hilarious to say the least.

Their Increasingly belligerent government has probably realized that if any of the surrounding countries calls its bluff, there will be an All Out Slaughter of its paper dragon forces. So while pretty much every surrounding nation is rapidly modernizing, expanding and trying to form alliances, you can imaging what is running through the minds of the Politburo in Beijing who are renown for the Paranoid World View.

So at this point, they have finally decided its about time they start looking at upping the quality of their pilots before the much predicted war within the next two decades, involving the PRC, and the more they begin flying the more crashes we can expect. As i always say the only aircraft that never crash are the ones that never fly.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby brar_w » 26 Dec 2014 07:52

UAVs And Passive Radars Shown At Zhuhai (Subscription)

The Zhuhai airshow last month featured dozens of new systems, ranging from real hardware and detailed mockups to wall charts and videos. But China’s policy of secrecy remains in force, with the result that the real-world military importance of some exhibits was hard to determine.
One example is China’s employment of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). There were dozens of UAV models, from hand-launched types to the Avic Pterodactyl (also known as Wing-Loong), which is in the same class as the General Atomics MQ-1A Predator 1. The Pterodactyl has reportedly been sold to Saudi Arabia, and appeared in an outdoor exhibit surrounded by small weapons, one reminiscent of the RaytheonSmall Diameter Bomb-Increment 2.

With a 2,650-lb. maximum takeoff weight and 20-hr. endurance, Pterodactyl has the elements of a modern UAV, including satcoms and line-of-sight (LOS) data links. (The military appears to favor UHF links, using Yagi arrays for LOS data links.) The question is what role it fills for China: The West uses armed UAVs to provide overwatch for convoys and small ground units, and for counterterror strikes, but China has no such operational needs.
However, two videos depicted potential applications. CASC (China Aviation Supplies Corp.) showed a UAV providing maritime targeting data for the CX-1 supersonic ramjet-powered antiship missile. CETC (China Electronics Technology Corp.) depicted a Shaanxi Y-8JB High New 2 electronic reconnaissance aircraft (one of a series based on the Y-8, China’s version of the Antonov An-12) and a Y-8 operating with UAVs.

Manned/unmanned teaming in maritime reconnaissance and strike could be important. When the Soviet Union established a reconnaissance-strike complex to target U.S. aircraft carriers, the most difficult task was locating the carrier within a strike group. Manned aircraft could do the job but were vulnerable to defenses. Small UAVs—with the Y-8 standing off and acting as a controller and relay, reducing reliance on satcoms—could shadow the carrier group and be semi-expendable. Indeed, if the UAVs are cheap enough, they become a “cost-imposition” weapon, drawing in defensive aircraft and missile assets that cost more than the UAVs.

Two novelties from Avic were the Nimble-Loong tactical UAV, which falls between Boeing-Insitu’s ScanEagle and Integrator in size and uses the same suspended-cable skyhook recovery system, and the new and more experimental VD200, a 440-lb. tail-sitting, twin-engine UAV.

Another Zhuhai debutant that could have military antecedents and a military mission was the FT-1 mobile space-launch vehicle, carried on an extended semi-trailer truck and capable of lifting 300 kg (660 lb.) into low Earth orbit. With three solid propulsion stages (plus a restartable liquid fourth stage) and grid-type first-stage control fins, it is likely to share some technology and components with the DF-31 mobile intercontinental ballistic missile.

Although it was billed as part of an emergency space system, including a range of compact satellites, the FT-1’s design raises the question of what non-military purpose is served by a fully road-mobile launcher (as opposed to a launcher that can be easily transported from factory to launch site). A mobile launcher would, however, be valuable in a conflict that escalated to space, because it would be a means of replacing disabled spacecraft and be independent of fixed, soft and easily targeted launch sites.

Among UAV concepts on display was the VD200, a tail-sitting design from Avic. Credit: Bill Sweetman/AW&ST
Among UAV concepts on display was the VD200, a tail-sitting design from Avic. Credit: Bill Sweetman/AW&ST
Displays hinted strongly at CETC’s work on passive radiofrequency (RF) detection and tracking systems. On the static line was a CETC-Nanching directional RF receiver designated YLC-20, with dual antennas to cover different frequency bands. It is for coastal use and capable of detecting surface targets beyond the horizon due to atmospheric ducting of RF energy, a company official said. Multiple units can be used for target location.
The designation YLC-20 has also been applied to a multi-station passive surveillance system—similar in principle to the Czech Vera and Tamara systems—using omnidirectional receivers and time-difference-of-arrival techniques to locate RF sources. It is possible that the directional receiver is an adjunct to passive systems. A more modern passive system, the CETC DWL002, was shown in model form. It uses multiple mast-mounted receivers and a radial array that resembles Selex-ES and Airbus products.

Such passive location systems often rely on emissions from a target, but a Nanching official confirmed that the YLC-20 and other passive means also locate signals from active radars, scattered by the target. The result is a bistatic or multistatic radar system, which can—to some extent—negate the effects of stealth shaping. A wall chart described the CETC JY-50 passive radar, designed for exactly that purpose and featuring a large, directional multi-element array.


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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby vaibhav.n » 27 Dec 2014 13:02

China’s New Mechanized Infantry Division in Tibet

The role of Xinjiang and Tibet as both suppliers and conduits of resources necessary for China’s continued economic growth has resulted in a reevaluation of both regions’ importance. Xinjiang, with its domestic oil fields in the Tarin Basin and its role as a hub for oil and gas pipelines arriving from Central Asia, has become China’s main source of non-seaborne petroleum. Tibet, on the other hand, possesses large amounts of zircon, chromium, rutile, magnesium and titanium that are needed by China’s heavy industries. Large amounts of cobalt and copper also lie astride the Qinghai-Tibet Railway.

The strategic value of these regions and their resources has resulted in the increased deployment of China's offensive mechanized forces to these regions in order to prepare for any contingencies that might threaten its interests.

China’s new mechanized infantry division, developed from these trials, was recently unveiled and has been described as being two generations ahead of current mechanized infantry divisions. Organized and equipped to fight as independent battle groups specifically on mountainous and urban terrain, its equipment is lighter in weight and firepower than the PLA's armored and tank divisions tasked to defend the nation. Its theaters of operation include Xinjiang and Tibet where the division’s lighter vehicles and support weapons can operate in areas where the communications infrastructure is described as underdeveloped at best.

The structure of the armored and infantry divisions follow the standard PLA triangular organization, consisting of three infantry or armored platoons to a company, three companies to a battalion, three battalions to a brigade and three brigades to a division. The division is comprised of three mechanized infantry brigades, one tank brigade, one artillery brigade, one air defense brigade, one helicopter wing and a logistics unit directly subordinate to the corps. The division headquarters is composed of an engineer battalion, an electronic warfare battalion, a chemical defense battalion, the division headquarters itself (which is company sized), air defense units and a guard company for headquarters protection. The division’s artillery, intelligence and aviation structure are taken from the U.S. Army’s experimental Division.

The major difference in the new structure as opposed to previous configurations is that there are now four Type 86 infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) in each platoon instead of three. This provides the platoon command with its own vehicle, allowing, for the first time, elements such as a forward observer or engineering teams to be attached to the platoon. This enables the platoon to be the lowest tactical unit whereas before, this was at the company level. There are a total of 351 Type 86 IFVs in each division that are supported by an artillery brigade of 72 122mm self-propelled guns and a tank battalion of 99 main battle tanks. Type 89 armored command vehicles are liberally provided throughout the division down to the company level to provide command and control capabilities.

A division has 27 air defense vehicles and has 108 man-portable air-defense systems (MANPADS) available for air defense at any time. They come under the operational control of the air defense brigade.

In line with the lighter vehicles, the divisional air defense brigade is composed of one battalion of 24 towed 57mm anti-aircraft guns and one battalion of 18 towed twin 37mm anti-aircraft guns. An air defense platoon of six Model 95 self-propelled anti-aircraft guns and one light surface-to-air missile launcher are attached to the artillery brigade. A new addition to the division is a helicopter wing with one squadron of six Z-9G attack helicopters and one transport squadron of six Mi-17 helicopters. These are lighter units that are likely to be augmented for operations. Logistics are provided by corps assets that are attached to the battle groups as required.

The vehicles and weapons in the new mechanized division are lighter than those in other PLA mechanized units, reducing their logistical footprint and providing tactical mobility, allowing for more roads and bridges to be used during operations. Lighter units are also more easily refueled and resupplied. On the few good roads in the rural regions of Xinjiang and Tibet, the ability to operate for extended periods is an invaluable advantage. Presently, only wheeled armored fighting vehicles operate in Tibet; tracked IFVs armed with 30mm automatic cannons and heavier support weapons would greatly assist these forces in the event of a widespread insurgency or an attack by Indian forces.

Heavier forces that might be utilized to augment the new division have also been developed. Support units drawn from the Beijing MR Command, including the Sixth Armored Division, have a structure similar to that of the mechanized infantry division. Its company structure is the same as the tank brigade in the new mechanized infantry division. There are two tanks at the battalion headquarters whereas in the mechanized infantry battalion tank brigade there are none. There are therefore 35 Type 88B or Type 99 main battle tanks per battalion and 105 main battle tanks per brigade.

Supporting artillery brigades are equipped with 72 152mm Model 83 self-propelled guns and the new PLZ45 155mm self -propelled gun that is being introduced into PLA service. The latter is capable of firing the Chinese built version of the Russian KBP laser guided round. The air defense brigade has a battalion of 24 57mm towed anti-aircraft guns and one mobile surface-to-air missile launcher. Anti-armor capability can be augmented by an anti-tank regiment, which is more of a small battalion in size, and contains six PTZ89 120mm self-propelled guns and 18 Red Arrow 8 anti-tank guided missile launchers. These are light enough to supplement the mechanized division in isolated areas.

The PLA’s new mechanized infantry division is undoubtedly well suited for operations in Xinjiang and Tibet, given the lighter footprint of the vehicles as well as the simpler logistics requirements as opposed to those of heavier armored units.


For TOE nuts an account on PLA capabilities growth and possible future roadmap to be countered. Compare this to the more sophisticated and modular US Army BCT concept with 4 BCT/Div. The US stress on operational level of warfare is clearly evident. Furthermore, I would suppose differing BCT types could be mixed and matched at a division level to provide an optimum response to possible contingencies. What remains to be seen is unlike the West and to some extent IA, how the PLA copes with a structure which lays emphasis on a high tempo free flowing info dominated warfighting versus the typical set-piece battle they would be more willing to be comfortable with.

1. Heavy BCT
2. Stryker BCT
3. Infantry BCT

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby VinodTK » 29 Dec 2014 04:48

China set-up study units on border allegedly indulging in propaganda programmes
New Delhi: Security agencies have found that close to four dozen Chinese study centres and other monasteries are present along India’s frontiers with Nepal and Bhutan and are allegedly indulging in propaganda programmes. The development comes at a time when both the countries are often witnessing incidents of incursions by Chinese PLA troops along the icy frontier in Jammu and Kashmir leading to long-standing border disputes between the two neighbours.

A report prepared by the lead intelligence gathering agency at these two frontiers —Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) — said that 22 China Study Centres (CSC) have come up in the Nepalese territory, with 11 of them operating bang on the 1,751 km long Indo-Nepal border. “These centres are propagating subjects of Chinese culture, traditions, teachings and economy to the population in Nepal which is a cause of concern as India’s frontiers with Nepal and Bhutan are open and unfenced,” a source said.

The report, accessed by PTI, said these centres are giving special impetus on propagation of their work in the fertile 'Terai' areas of the Himalayan nation, especially Jhapa and Ilam districts, which have strong trade, economic and ethnic ties with India. The force has time and again prepared special reports on these centres which security agencies feel are indulging in “anti-India propaganda” even as the CSCs maintain that they aim to teach Chinese language to locals and disseminate cultural information about China and its various art forms.

Apart from the CSCs, the snoop wing of the border guarding force has reported that 22 monasteries have also come up along the border areas with Bhutan in the Indian territory between the districts of East Sikkim to Jaigaon, a small town in West Bengal near the Bhutan border, also known as the gateway to the neighbouring country at Phuentsholing. “These monasteries have come up in the last four-five years but their growth ratio is doubtful as there is no proportionate Buddhist population where they are situated and operating. These centres are supposed to carry out religious activities,” the source said.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Liu » 30 Dec 2014 18:38

it is reported that 055 Cruiser has been launched in CHina..
it will be the world largest Aegis warship and be the strongest escort for AC Group.


055 Superstructure Close Up A close up photo of the 055 cruiser's test bed shows the front of the ship's superstructure. As the test bed mockup is still undergoing construction, it is unclear where the Type 348 radars will be placed on the superstructure, though it is likely that they could be located above the bridge, on the integrated mast, which itself is also a work in progress. China Defense Forum
Photos in April 2014 show that the Chinese naval electronic testing range in Wuhan is building a 110 meter long, 23 meter wide metal structure (as seen on Google Earth). That same range had hosted a full scale replica of the Liaoning aircraft carrier for testing its electronic systems. The new structure is believed to be a mockup of the long awaited Type 055 guided missile cruiser (CG), planned to be a principal future Chinese surface combatant. The scale is significant, as it indicates the cruiser will be the largest Asian multirole surface warship since the end of World War II. The front of the building possesses a prominent superstructure that clearly is meant to house the 055’s bridge, communications system and Type 348 S Band radars. Furthermore, Chinese media speculates that the 13,500 ton 055 will have at least 128 vertical launch systems for anti-air and ant-ship missiles, an integrated mast (similar to the US Zumwalt destroyers under construction), and two heavy Z-18 anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters. Upon the expected commissioning date of 2017-2018, the 055 CG will provide the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) with a significant gain in blue water surface capability to both defend Chinese waters and project power to distant shores.

http://img.cjdby.com/data/attachment/fo ... .thumb.jpg
http://www.sinaimg.cn/dy/slidenews/8_im ... 422449.jpg
http://img.cjdby.com/data/attachment/fo ... c60kao.jpg

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby brar_w » 30 Dec 2014 19:30

Largest AEGIS warship? What the heck are you talking about. Do you realize that AEGIS is a system and not something that is a generic term for a mission?

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Shreeman » 30 Dec 2014 19:31

Liu: What pray is the role, if one might ask, for the 10,000+t "coast guard" ships? Will they be adversarial to the Dodko types?




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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby deejay » 04 Jan 2015 20:04

brar_w good stuff those. Very interesting. TFTA !!!

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby deejay » 04 Jan 2015 20:06

This news which I spotted on twitter from a BRF handle tweet:

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?cid=1101&MainCatID=11&id=20150103000132&utm
India has 'partial advantages' over China's Chengdu Military Region

CNA 2015-01-03 17:30 (GMT+8)

PLA's soldiers patrol the Qinghai-Tibet highway in Golmud, Qinghai province, Nov. 2008. (File photo/CNS)

PLA's soldiers patrol the Qinghai-Tibet highway in Golmud, Qinghai province, Nov. 2008. (File photo/CNS)

India enjoys "partial advantages" over the Chengdu Military Region of China, in the event that a conflict were to break out in the two nations' border areas, Hong Kong-based Phoenix Television reported Friday.

The People's Liberation Army's Chengdu Military Region has recently staged a series of military drills, with India as its proposed target.

According to post-drill reviews conducted by officers in the Chengdu Military Region, which is tasked with guarding China against Vietnam and India, the China-India border area, located mainly in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, has two geographic characteristics–high altitude and cold weather–both of which are equally unfavorable to India and China.

The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau has an average altitude of 4,500 meters above sea-level.

However, India enjoys "partial advantages" in battle preparedness, especially in the transportation and supply of military personnel and materials in high-altitude mountainous areas, the report said.

Besides, India has largely enhanced its skills in electronic warfare in the surveillance, interference and paralysis of its enemy as a result of military cooperation with the United States, Russia and Israel.

But, the PLA said, its greatest advantage against India is its deployment of the high-accuracy mid-range Dongfeng-16 missiles in Yunnan and Guizhou provinces.

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Rahul M » 04 Jan 2015 20:15

vaibhav, what's the source of that TOE article on PLA ?

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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Philip » 04 Jan 2015 20:33

China's latet Tang class 096 SSBN to carry 24 misiles. Two reports.

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subc ... 0104000009
PLA's Type 096 submarine can carry 24 missiles

Staff Reporter 2015-01-04 09:10 (GMT+8)

A concept art rendering of China's Tang-class submarine. (Internet photo)

China's new Type 096 Tang-class ballistic missile submarine, thought to be in development, may become a serious threat to the United States in the Western Pacific as it is estimated to be able to carry 24 missiles, according to the Russian Military Analyst based in Moscow.

The article China's Nuclear Potential published on Dec. 30 said that it will still take decades for China to establish sufficient second-strike capability. However, China has taken much less time to develop its nuclear arsenal than most Western observers had previously expected, though the People's Liberation Army Air Force still relies on H-6K bombers and Q-5 attackers for nuclear strike capability.

While Q-5 attackers have been slowly replaced by the more advanced JH-7A, China is unlikely to develop a new stealth bomber to take the H-6K's place in the near future, the article said. However, the H-6K's range had been extended from 1,800 kilometers to 3,000 km and it can now carry six CJ-10A strategic cruise missiles, which would allow the PLA Air Force to hit critical US targets in the Central Pacific.

The article also estimated that the number of China's nuclear warheads is under 2,000. However, only between 250 and 300 nuclear warheads can be transferred on road-mobile systems. At the same time, it also said that China's has less than 459 tactical nuclear warheads. China's nuclear forces are currently under close surveillance by US forces in Central Asia. Even though they do not pose a threat to the US mainland, they may still be a threat to Russia's national security.

The article further said that submarines are strategically important for the PLA. The JL-2 submarine-launched ballistic missiles carried by Type 094 Jin-class ballistic missile submarines cannot reach the continental United States unless fired from the Central Pacific while Jin-class submarines would be detected and countered out by US forces if they attempted to move into the waters around Hawaii.

Until China improves the ability of its subs to withstand US anti-submarine weaponry, the PLA is unlikely to succeed in a conflict against the US. The new Type 096 Tang-class submarines may prove very useful against US forces in the future, however. The number of its ballistic missiles has increased to 24 from the Type 094's 12. With an attack range of at least 11,000 km, it could conceivably attack the United States under the escort of China's surface combat fleet.
PLA, Type 096, ballistic missile submarine, Tang-class, Russian Military Analyst, H-6K, Q-5, JH-7A, JL-2



China to beef up nuclear submarine fleet by 2020: report
2015/01/04 16:32:25

Russian and Chinese vessels dock in Wusong naval port in Shanghai. Photo courtesy of China News AgencyTaipei, Jan. 4 (CNA) China will invest heavily in fielding advanced nuclear-powered attack and ballistic missile submarines during the next six years, according to a Russian report on China's nuclear potential.

In an article published last week by the Russian Military Observer, the media outlet said China's military has at least three operational Type-094 nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines, with each being capable of carrying 12 JL-2 missiles that have a range of 8,000 kilometers.

By 2020, the Chinese military is projected to field at least four Type-094s and two next-generation Type-096 submarines, carrying around 80 sea-based intercontinental ballistic missiles and 250 to 300 nuclear-armed missiles, the report stated.

The Type-096 submarines can carry 24 sea-based ballistic missiles, with an estimated range of at least 11,000 kilometers, the report pointed out.

In addition to the ballistic missile submarines, China is also building the new Type-095 attack submarine as a successor to its current Type-093, the report said.

(By Zep Hu and Jeffrey Wu)
ENDITEM/Shradhha

.

brar_w
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby brar_w » 04 Jan 2015 21:57


member_28756
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby member_28756 » 05 Jan 2015 05:04

Russian media: China considers renting out Chengdu FC-1

(Source: China Military Online) 2015-01-04

  BEIJING, January 4 (ChinaMil) -- China has the ability to export modern warplanes to developing countries and meanwhile upgrade the technological level of its aviation industry, according to the Russian military-industrial complex website on December 31, 2014.

  Chengdu FC-1, "Fierce-Dragon" fighter, is completely capable of performing air defense missions for the air forces of those developing countries that can not afford to buy the fifth-generation warplanes. The China-made planes at reasonable prices are the best choices for these countries. Normally, the air forces of these countries will not be threatened by stealth fighters, nor do they need to launch long-range strikes.

  The advanced composite materials used in Chengdu FC-1 not only reduce the body weight, but also increase the stealth performance. Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) may also use the home-made latest turbojet engine to substitute the RD-93 engine made by Russia. Such extensive upgrading can be conducted so long as there are a sufficient number of potential buyers. In addition, China is also considering renting out Chengdu FC-1 to those countries that can not afford to buy it.

  It is reported that Argentina intends to introduce China's warplanes because they can use anti-ship missiles, including C-802 subsonic and SM-400AKG supersonic anti-ship missiles. China and Argentina already held preliminary negotiations last year. Other potential buyers include Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Malaysia, Nigeria and Sudan.

  To defeat the competitors, a warplane's good combat capability alone is still far from enough, said Yang Wei, chief designer of Chengdu FC-1 in an interview with China Daily. The export of military aircraft, especially fighter planes, is often affected by a number of geopolitical factors.





http://english.chinamil.com.cn/news-cha ... 294421.htm

kit
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby kit » 08 Jan 2015 16:06

http://www.janes.com/article/47662/china-puts-z-18a-heavylift-helo-through-paces

early mission for the Z-18A will be to lift Norinco's new AH4 155 mm lightweight artillery system. Revealed in 2012 and heavily influenced by the BAE Systems M777 155 mm howitzer

The Z-18 family of helicopters is derived from the 13.8-ton, three-engine CAIG AC313. This helicopter can carry up to 27 passengers or up to 5 tons in external payload. In 2012 the AC313 was tested to an altitude of 8,000 m in the Tibetan plateau

vaibhav.n
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby vaibhav.n » 08 Jan 2015 18:54

Rahul M wrote:vaibhav, what's the source of that TOE article on PLA ?


Rahul,

PLA's New Mechanised Infantry Div

His numbers look good and has been confirmed generally. Carlo Kopp did a brief on PLA's AD assets at Div level, those were far higher however. Do read up the same author on their RRF's.

Resurgence of the PLA Light Infantry
Last edited by vaibhav.n on 08 Jan 2015 19:01, edited 1 time in total.

Rahul M
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby Rahul M » 08 Jan 2015 18:59

thx, jamestown's china brief is usually quite good though I seem to have missed this one.

the other top grade analyst for PLA is dennis blasko.

vaibhav.n
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby vaibhav.n » 08 Jan 2015 19:02

Ohh...Thanks


VinodTK
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Re: China Military Watch - August 9, 2014

Postby VinodTK » 19 Jan 2015 03:28

CHINESE PILOTS IN RUSSIA TO TRAIN ON SU-35
The arrival of Chinese pilots at a Russian Air Force training center to train to fly the Su-35 fighter indicates that Russia and China have reached a consensus about when the aircraft will be turned over to the PLA Air Force, reports the state-run Global Times.

Beijing and Moscow are likely to sign the final agreement regarding the sale of 24 Su-35 fighters to China on May. 19, according to a report from Zvezda, a television network run by the Russian military. Turning over possession of the Su-35 fighters will begin in 2016. In addition to the aircraft, the engines and missiles designed for the fighter will be provided to China under another deal. China requested Russia to begin the shipment of the engines and missiles ahead of the aircraft.

Since the year of 2012, China signed two major contracts with Russia to purchase advanced weapon systems. The first contract allows China to spend US$1.3 billion to purchase 52 Mi-171 helicopters and 130 AL-31F engines. Russia then provided 10 used Il-76 cargo planes to China under the second contract. China's purchase of Su-35 from Russia is just another product of close military ties between the two nations, according to the report.


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