Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rohitvats » 09 Nov 2014 03:13

http://thediplomat.com/2014/11/bhutan-the-indian-armys-front-line/

A short (and rather incomplete) article on strategic importance of Bhutan. Good basic information to assess what IA does in Bhutan. Posting in full:

In late October, on the dirt road that winds north from the Bhutanese town of Paro in the direction of the border with Chinese-controlled Tibet, I pass an Indian army base of more than 600 soldiers. They are packing up to return to India for the duration of Bhutan’s harsh winter months. On the same road just after sunrise, I encounter an Indian Army squad of special forces soldiers with Himalayan features running in formation, sandbags roped to their backs, with the squad’s commander shouting “No photos, sir!”

Adjoining the Indian Army base is a camp for approximately 120 Bhutanese soldiers who train with the Indians on joint exercises in the rugged mountains that rise up from the Paro Valley. Just another kilometer or so further up the road is a Bhutanese army camp of 24 soldiers and their families. The camp’s sole purpose is to maintain 80 horses to cart supplies to military units higher still on the trail to the Bhutan-Tibet border region.

One of the horses’ former destinations, the Bhutanese army base at Gunitsawa, 14 kilometers further up the valley, was accessible only by mountain trail until a crude road was carved out in 2012, the year the base first received reliable electric power. Gunitsawa’s regiment of approximately 90 soldiers sends 15-man units on one-month rotations to three checkpoint huts higher in the mountains; supplying these forward checkpoints gives continuing employment to the army’s stable of horses.

The three checkpoint camps, Gyatsa, Soi Thangthangkha and Lingshi, are Bhutan’s only means of keeping an eye on its northwest border with China’s Tibet region. (Bhutan, a Switzerland-sized country of 740,000 inhabitants, famous for its emphasis on “Gross National Happiness,” has no air force; it relies on neighboring India and Nepal even for helicopter support in the event of emergencies in remote districts). The checkpoints are near a region of Bhutan that Beijing says is its territory, in addition to the claims it has made on Bhutan’s northern border. Bhutanese soldiers report that their usual task on the frontier is to intercept smugglers, but that the Chinese military sometimes crosses into Bhutanese territory via roads China has recently built all the way to the western Bhutanese border. “When they come in, it’s with 15 trucks or nothing,” says one Royal Bhutan Army officer.

Bhutan shares a China problem with its neighbor and ally, India. The first foreign state visit by India’s newly elected Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, was to Bhutan, underscoring the importance of Bhutan’s frontier with China, and the strategic vulnerability it represents if China and India were to go to war. From the disputed western China-Bhutan border, China could easily strike India’s geographic “chicken neck” – a narrow band of land, the Siliguri Corridor, that connects the main body of India with its northeastern states, home to 45 million people.

Modi’s June visit to Bhutan came one month before scheduled China-Bhutan border talks, an annual ritual for the past 22 years that has signally failed to resolve the territorial disputes. In the face of increasing Chinese pressure on Bhutan to open relations with Beijing, Modi announced a 50 percent increase in Indian aid to Bhutan, to approximately $970 million annually.

Bhutan was also the first international destination for India’s new army chief. From November 1 to 3, General Dalbir Singh Suhag visited senior officials in Bhutan on what was billed a “routine” visit. But coming on the heels of September’s large military incursion by China into the Ladakh border region controlled by India, even as Chinese President Xi Jinping was on a state visit to India, Singh’s Bhutan meetings are unlikely to have been routine, especially since he brings unusually relevant experience to the Himalayan brinksmanship that China is displaying: he has previously headed India’s Special Frontier Force, a covert “China-centric” unit of highly trained ethnic Tibetan soldiers.

Delhi’s full-court press for Bhutan’s allegiance will continue on November 7, with a two-day state visit to Bhutan by India’s President Pranab Mukherjee, accompanied by a large delegation – the first trip to Bhutan by an Indian president in 26 years.

China, with its increasingly aggressive moves along its Himalayan borders, seems to be employing the same methodology it has used in its ongoing takeover of the near-entirety of the South China Sea. This gives the Indian government good reason to worry that Beijing might also muscle its way into its lands, just as it has annexed territory over the objections of South China Sea claimants Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, and, most recently, Indonesia.

This probably explains why the road leading up from the Indian and Bhutanese military bases in the picturesque Paro Valley is rapidly being widened and paved, almost entirely by imported Indian laborers, often working by hand. Residents say the Indian government, for decades a protector of sorts for a deeply Buddhist Bhutan that sympathizes with Tibet, is paying for the road-building out of its worries about China. Locals expect that the road will soon be paved all the way to the rudimentary base at Gunitsawa, far up the valley. It is conceivable that next year the Indian army will also provide heavy-lift helicopters to supply the Bhutanese checkpoints high in the Himalayas, allowing the Bhutanese army to put its hard-working horses out to pasture, while increasing its vigilance on the border with China.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 09 Nov 2014 05:45

A New Balance of Power in Asia: Japan and U.S.; China and Russia; India and ASEAN
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chen-xian ... 16198.html

BEIJING -- As the Beijing summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Forum convenes, there have appeared some new developments in the Asia-Pacific strategic landscape as were mirrored in the international situation and China's peaceful development this year. And China seems to have gained greater strategic initiative.The new developments are seen in four aspects.First, the Asia-Pacific "rebalance" pursued by the United States is off balance.When he initiated the Asia-Pacific rebalance, U.S. President Barack Obama staked all his international strategic capital on that cast of dice. The move, however, only ended up in the birth of more imbalances in the world, which forced the U.S. to scurry between one hotspot after another.
The Obama administration is trying to maintain the Asia-Pacific rebalance strategy as that is the country's long-term strategic consideration. Obama and his top aides have avowed commitment to the strategy repeatedly on various occasions, trying to assure their Asia-Pacific allies and, at the same time, warn China. The assurance, however, brought no practical results and the warning proved to be impotent only.In recent months, crises arose in many places in the world, such as the conflicts in Ukraine, the rise of the Islamic State and the outbreak of Ebola in western Africa. In a certain sense, some of these crises were intensified by the U.S. pivot to the Asi-Pacific. With too many irons in the fire, Washington has not been able to concentrate on that strategy. Its foreign policy needs to be readjusted and rebalanced. Its geopolitical center of gravity has to be shifted to the Middle East again and the top priority in its multiple engagements has to be diverted from containing newly rising nations, especially China, to the old anti-terrorism mission, including military strikes on the Islamic State and other armed extremist forces. In all, the Asia-Pacific pivot strategy has waned in momentum as the U.S. is entangled in battles with other crises and new enemies.Second, the U.S. has outsmarted itself by playing with its "smart strength."The "smart strength" refers to the three tactics employed by Washington in carrying out its Asia-Pacific "rebalance" strategy. But they proved to be unsuccessful.The first tactic was to capitalize on contradictions between other countries. The U.S. supported Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam in their moves against China over territorial disputes, only to bring risks to itself. Giving Tokyo a free reign in its right-turn drive will inevitably lead to the growth of a militarized and defiant Japan. And egging on Japan and the Philippines to challenge China will end up with the U.S. having to suffer the consequences of the conflicts thus incurred.

The second tactic was to "walk the tightrope" for its balance strategy. The U.S. tried to strike a balance between China and its Asia-Pacific allies but the growth of China has made it difficult for Washington to achieve this balance. Sandwiched between conflicting interests, it has found itself in a predicament. To make it worse, the U.S. also has trouble balancing between its two contradicting allies -- Japan and South Korea.The third tactic was to "play up advantages and make up for disadvantages." The U.S. has tried to make best use of its military might for deployment, diplomacy and maneuvers in the Asia-Pacific region and strived to make up for the weakening of its economic power. An example of the latter effort was pushing the idea of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But its military strength in the region is constrained by a decreasing budget and distracted by hotspot flare-ups in other regions. It also has to be wary of the "side effect" of flexing its military muscles. And the TTP dream has yet to come true.

Third, the other major forces in the Asia-Pacific are showing signs of new movement.
In Japan, the Abe administration stubbornly clings to the rightist path and tries to become Asia's number one power in politics and military affairs. Under the pretext of "becoming a normal state," Tokyo has been trying to lift the traditional restrictions on collective self defense, revise its pacifist constitution, strengthen its alliance with the U.S. and team up with certain countries to counter China. Japan has become a major destabilizing factor in China's surrounding areas and constituted a direct challenge to China. However, there is also a growing opposition to this trend inside the country.In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's new government is active in international diplomacy and practical in domestic reforms. In its relations with major powers, India tries to gain advantage from all sides. The Sino-Indian relationship features both competition and cooperation.
Au has become a negative variable in the region.

Russia is turning more of its attention to the Asia-Pacific region in a bid to "shine in the east" to make up for what it has suffered in the Ukraine crisis and strained relations with the West. In economy, it tries to offset the effects of Western sanctions by exploring new markets in Asia- Pacific; in political strategy, it hopes to avoid isolation by strengthening cooperation with China, India and some other countries.Fourth, a triangular balance of power has been achieved in Asia-Pacific.
The order and pattern of power in the region have been reshaped amid a complex process of relationship readjusting.In terms of comprehensive strength and influence, the U.S., China, Japan, India, ASEAN and Russia are Asia-Pacific's top six powers in that order. Despite numbering first, the U.S. has never been able to devote its main energy to the Asia-Pacific. On the contrary, China, the number two country, has always applied its main energy to the region.In their mutual relationship, countries in the region generally come in three groups, with the U.S.-Japan alliance as one side and China-Russia cooperation as another side, which are engaged in a game of "competition and cooperation," while India and ASEAN sway in between.In terms of trend of development, the U.S.' "power of dominance" and China's "power of initiative" will co-exist, but the former is waning and the latter is growing.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SaiK » 10 Nov 2014 04:19


SSridhar
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2014 11:07

Stable ties with Japan in interest of both nations: Xi Jinping - Reuters
Chinese President Xi Jinping told Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Monday that stable bilateral ties are in the interest of both nations and that improving relations is the common wish of the international community, China's foreign ministry said.

The meeting between Abe and Xi, which took place in Beijing's Great Hall of the People, came three days after the two countries agreed to work on improving ties and signalled willingness to put their rival claims over disputed islands
on the back burner.


It is the economic scene that is compelling China.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2014 12:19

From NightWatch for the night of Nov. 09, 2014
Japan-China: On 8 November the foreign ministers of China and Japan held their first formal talks in more than two years.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida met on the sidelines of the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum. They agreed to work towards the early resumption of various high level talks.

Japan wants to restart a high level economic dialogue. Other agenda items include foreign policy, regional security and energy.

To facilitate and promote bilateral exchanges, Japan agreed to ease visa requirements for some Chinese travelers. Kishida also requested and the Chinese agreed to a meeting between Prime Minister Abe and Chinese President Xi on the sidelines of the two-day Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum meeting on 10 November. "I believe this meeting served as an important opportunity to change gears to put back Japan-China on the path of normal relations," Kishida told the press.

Comment: Saturday's meeting is the first since September 2012. {A very tepid comment from NightWatch}

China-Japan maritime crisis management. On 7 November, China and Japan announced a four-point agreement for managing their sovereignty dispute over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi called the agreement "a major step" toward the improvement of bilateral relations. "Only by getting to the root of the problem and removing it can the bilateral ties develop in a stable and sustainable manner," Wang said.

The key point is they both acknowledged each other's claim and agreed to disagree about sovereignty, but without letting that interfere with other ties, including political, diplomatic and security.

Comment: This agreement might not reduce tension in the islands because the Chinese Foreign Ministry is not in the chain of command for patrols in the Senkakus and often is unaware of maritime security measures that provoke Japan. The stove piping of national security information is a longstanding practice so that Chinese diplomats can be truthful in denying knowledge about provocations created by other ministries.

However, politically, the two Asian powers have created a way to cooperate on other issues of mutual concern, such as restraining North Korean missile and nuclear programs and seabed research and mineral exploitation.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2014 13:43

China and U.S. set to grapple for regional space during APEC summit - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
World leaders including U.S. President Barack Obama, his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are converging in the Chinese capital for the two-day Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, which is set to witness a collision of two visions — Chinese and American — on the economic and geopolitical future of the region.

Ahead of the summit, host Chinese President Xi Jinping announced that Beijing will fork $40 billion into a Silk Road Fund. The development of the Silk Road encapsulates China’s vision of steering an economically inter-linked South, Central and East Asia, which can co-develop and collectively trade with Europe along a land corridor.

China has also positioned itself at the centre of a 21st century Maritime Silk Road, the conceptual lines of which are still blurred but point to maritime commercial corridor in the Indian Ocean and sections of the Pacific.

The string of Chinese initiatives for regional consolidation follow the U.S.-led Asia Pivot — a doctrine marshalled by the Obama administration to bolster military force levels along China’s periphery in cooperation with top allies, including Japan, South Korea, Australia and the Philippines.

As the U.S. continues to battle the fall-out of the 2008 economic crash, it has accelerated its push for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a regional free trade organisation that includes Japan and Australia, but excludes China. The TPP is widely perceived as an extension of the Asia-Pivot and has been tagged by some China-watchers as an “economic-NATO”.

At the APEC summit, the Chinese hope to log centre-stage a formal endorsement of the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP) — their counter to the TPP.

The contrasting lines of the two economic blue-prints became sharper on Saturday, when China’s Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Trade briefed reporters on their perception of the FTAAP. Simultaneously the U.S. hosted a session on TPP negotiations among the Trade Ministers of 12 partner countries at its embassy in Beijing.

Mr. Obama is expected to hold another meeting of TPP leaders, in the Chinese capital on Monday — the day of the formal launch of the APEC summit.

The battle of the two visions is now resonating in the public domain, with Xinhua, the state-run Chinese news agency, stating in a report on Sunday that the economic potential of the FTAPP is far greater than the TPP and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) — a grouping led by the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN). The write-up, quoting a report from the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council (PECC), said the FTAAP is estimated to add $2.4 trillion to the global economy. The figure stands out in comparison with the TPP’s estimated contribution of the $223 billion and the RCEP’s $644 billion.

As the global leaders start arriving, speculation is rife about three possible big-ticket meetings on the sidelines. Mr. Putin has already landed in the Chinese capital but it is unclear whether he would meet Mr. Obama. Analysts say that following the ascendancy of the Republicans during last week’s mid-term elections, the U.S. President may find it difficult to combine a domestically-driven hardline stance toward Moscow with a softening of attitude that is required to get Russia’s cooperation to strike a nuclear deal with Iran. The possibility of a meeting between Mr. Xi and Mr. Abe is also in focus, following early signs of a thaw in tensions between the two countries.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 07:57

PM to send tough message to China - Suhasini Haider, The Hindu
Prime Minister Narendra Modi will leave on Tuesday for his longest trip abroad yet, travelling to Myanmar, Australia and Fiji, from where he will return on November 20.

Mr. Modi’s packed schedule is both bilateral and multilateral, as he will attend the East Asia Summit and the ASEAN-India Summit in Myanmar, the G-20 in Brisbane as well as a summit of Pacific Nations in Fiji.

The over-riding message of the three-nation tour is clearly Mr. Modi’s “Look East, Act East” policy, as well as India’s assertion of its stakes in the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean.

Maritime rights

After tough messages to China made in Japan and the U.S., along with the naval defence initiative with Vietnam, The Hindu has learnt that Mr. Modi is likely to make a strong statement on maritime rights during discussions with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott.

Meanwhile, officials confirmed that India’s concerns over Chinese dominance in the South China Sea “would be discussed threadbare” at the East Asia Summit in Myanmar, with a “reiteration of those discussions” during talks on the India-Australia strategic partnership. The two Prime Ministers will also discuss enhancing defence cooperation, with the first India-Australia bilateral maritime exercise announced for 2015.

“These are areas where India has legitimate interests, with 55% of its trade going through the South China Sea. China has been trying to push us out of here, even as it makes inroads in the Indian Ocean. So it’s a do-or-die situation for us,” Jawaharlal Nehru University professor Srikanth Kondapalli said.


In a statement, Mr. Modi said, “These meetings are taking place at a time of multiple global challenges. I look forward to seeking a global environment that supports our aspirations for economic development and a peaceful world.”

Briefing reporters on Monday, the Foreign Ministry spokesperson confirmed that Mr. Modi will have a structured dialogue with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Naypyidaw and meet President Xi Jinping at an informal meeting of BRICS leaders in Brisbane.

Next, Mr. Modi will attend the first Indian summit with Pacific Island leaders in Fiji, also seen as a message of India’s stakes in these areas. “We have been participating in the Pacific region for a while with the island-states and we share a warm understanding. They look forward to our leadership role and support for policy, development assistance and capacity building,” Secretary (East) Anil Wadhwa said.

Along with his “outreach East”, Mr. Modi will have several engagements with the Indian diaspora, addressing at least 20,000 Indian-Australians at a Sydney stadium, and meetings with Fijian community leaders in Suva.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Vriksh » 11 Nov 2014 09:26

Is it possible for the Average Zhou to invest in India directly rather than through Chinese government banking system and vice versa? How can we make this possible?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Leonard » 11 Nov 2014 09:38

Amazing -- someone states the obvious plans that the Han robots have and he gets s**canned ..

Senior intel officer removed after controversial comments on China

>>

...

Fanell leaped into the public spotlight earlier this year when the press picked up on remarks he made at the U.S. Naval Institute's WEST 2014 conference, saying naval intelligence believed that China was preparing for a possible war with Japan.

"[We believe] the [People's Liberation Army] has been given the new task to be able to conduct a short, sharp war to destroy Japanese forces in the East China Sea following with what can only be expected [as] a seizure of the Senkakus or even southern Ryukyu [islands]," Fanell was quoted as saying.

Fanell has also stated that China is at the center of virtually every maritime territorial dispute in the Asia-Pacific and that the Chinese were engaging in a blatant land-grab of islands that would enhance their exclusive economic rights to fishing and natural resources.

...
<<


http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/2014/11/10/senior-navy-intel-officer-removed-for-controversial-comments-on-china/18789539/


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Re: Quadrilateral Grouping India-US-Japan-Australia

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 11:35

Australia joining trilateral grouping to feature in Modi-Abbott talks - ET
Australia could join the India-US-Japan grouping, which is certain to set off alarm bells in Beijing. The issue is expected to feature prominently in the conversation between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Australian PM Tony Abbott when PM Modi visits on November 16, said Anil Wadhwa, secretary (east) of MEA.

In 2007, Australia was the first country to develop cold feet when China objected to a quadrilateral grouping of the same four countries. In fact, the grouping disbanded soon after, in deference to China's vociferous demarches. Five years later, the four countries are clearly revisiting the idea, indicating the change in the geopolitical situation in Asia.

On the sidelines of the G-20 summit, Modi is scheduled to meet the heads of government from the UK, France, Canada, Germany and Spain. MEA officials were silent about possible meetings with the US president or Japanese PM. However, Modi will have his first meeting with the Chinese premier in Naypyidaw on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit.

India is hoping for an early conclusion of the administrative arrangements with Australia that will open the way for uranium imports from that country. But while Wadhwa said the negotiations were proceeding "smoothly", Australia's parliamentary reporting requirements might involve commitments that New Delhi is hesitant to make.

Nevertheless, Modi's 10-day tour is supposed to breathe energy into his "Act East" policy, which is believed to be more proactive than the hitherto "Look East". Modi will be the first Indian Prime Minister to visit Australia since Rajiv Gandhi in 1986, and will visit four cities in that country. He is also expected to address the Australian parliament, an honour he will share with Xi Jinping and David Cameron.

He will also be the first Indian PM to visit Fiji in 33 years. He will use his visit to Fiji to hold a mini-summit with all 14 Pacific island leaders. Chinese president Xi Jinping is also expected to visit Fiji for a similar purpose.

The tour will begin in Myanmar capital Naypyidaw, where Modi will attend the ASEAN-India summit and the East Asia Summit on November 12-13. From there, he will go to Brisbane for the G-20 and then proceed to Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne during the course of his bilateral visit from November 16 to 18.

At the G-20, Modi is expected to focus on employment. "Focusing on transforming the quality of life of people, not just on issues like the health of the financial markets, is necessary to create employment-generating economic growth," Modi had said when Abbott telephoned him last Friday.

On Asean, Modi said, before leaving, "Asean is at the core of our Act East Policy and at the centre of our dream of an Asian century, characterized by cooperation and integration.

I am looking forward to discussing with Asean leaders how to take our relationship to a new level, which will supplement our deepening bilateral ties with each member," he said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby JE Menon » 11 Nov 2014 11:47

Expect after the PM's east Asia visit an article from Suhasini Haidar saying how Modi's tough approach did not work, and "tough message" to China is not the right way, etc...

Of course, it is based on a hot air article which she wrote before the visit, where there is no indication that the government is going to send a tough message, just a simple reassertion of geographical and trade realities. Basically she made that "tough message" shite up... typically depending on public's gullibility.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 12:47

Russia signs another mega-gas deal with China - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
Russia pivoted decisively towards the East on Sunday, after signing another mega-energy agreement with China, which could dwarf Europe as the largest consumer of Russian gas once the project is completed.

Fifth Putin-Xi meet

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s fifth meeting in a year with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, on the sidelines of the summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC), yielded an agreement that seemed to rebuff Europe, which had imposed sanctions on Russia following the crisis in Ukraine.

China would receive 30 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas per year along the so-called “western” or “Altay” route, according to the agreement. This would supplement the proposed 38 bcm Russian gas to China that would flow through the “Power of Siberia” pipeline, passing along the “eastern route”. The “eastern route” deal, worth $400 billion, was signed in May, and work on the project has already commenced.

Sunday’s agreement is meant to lay the groundwork for a full-fledged contract later. “We have reached an understanding in principle concerning the opening of the western route,” said Mr. Putin, before he flew into Beijing for the APEC summit. “We have already agreed on many technical and commercial aspects of this project, laying a good basis for reaching final arrangements,” he observed.

Aleksey Miller, a senior member of Mr. Putin’s inner circle and head of the energy giant Gazprom, announced that once it materialises, the deal would hedge Moscow’s dependence on the European energy markets.


The Ukraine crisis has come very handy for China to grab more resources from Russia. The Panda-hug is overpowering the helpless bear. The 'Western nations' have pushed the Russians and the Chinese together for a new Cold War.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 13:44

Japan maintains there is no territorial row over Senkakus: Kishida - Kyodo, Japan Times
Japan’s position that there is no territorial dispute over the Senkaku Islands remains unchanged, Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said Tuesday.

Asked if the government’s position remains unchanged that the sovereignty of the islet group in the East China Sea is not in question, despite Beijing’s claims to the contrary, Kishida said at a news conference, “Certainly.”

His response is expected to draw criticism from Beijing, just days after Japan and China simultaneously released a statement saying they recognize different views concerning the situation surrounding the Senkakus, called Diaoyu in China, and that they will try to improve soured relations.

There has been a growing view in China that Japan made a major concession on the issue of the islets, seen as strategically important in terms of maritime navigation and natural resources, with the aim of repairing bilateral ties.

Also at the news conference, Kishida cited China’s declaration in November 2013 of an air defense identification zone over the East China Sea as one of the different views between the two countries, saying, “Tensions remain over issues like that.”


“There is also the issue of drilling undersea resources,” he added in an indirect reference to China’s development of a gas field in the East China Sea.

Meeting last Saturday, Kishida and his Chinese counterpart, Wang Yi, agreed in Beijing to boost bilateral cooperation by working toward the early resumption of “various” high-level talks.

Two days later, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Xi Jinping held their first meeting ever, in a much-heralded summit before the opening of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby JE Menon » 11 Nov 2014 14:13

Body language at least in the broadcast parts of the Abe-Xi meeting was horrendous, with the Chinese leader showing complete lack of enthusiasm, and total disregard for Abe. In fact, it appeared Xi didn't even want to look Abe in the eye.

I don't know if I'm mistaken and that, in fact, there was bonhomie and better optics - but the part that BBC broadcasted was not good at all.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 15:10

JEM, you are right. Xi was very stiff.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 11 Nov 2014 15:57

My 2 naya paisa: I do think Abe wasn't sure he was in the right lace either. He seemed out of place. So qn: why did he even accept that there were different opinions about Senkaku if they were not planning to even look at the other in the eye?

In the meanwhile: http://www.forbes.com/sites/alyssaayres ... t-at-apec/

I still think it was a sensible thing to skip APEC and meet heads of Myanmar, Australia etc.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 11 Nov 2014 16:09

Sure enough, http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/201 ... in_beijing

talks about the same topic.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 18:08

vijaykarthik wrote:In the meanwhile: http://www.forbes.com/sites/alyssaayres ... t-at-apec/

Though this thread may not be the right place to have an extended discussion on this issue of PRC's invitation to India for the APEC meet and India's absence there, the following statement caught my eye
As I wrote at the time, it was always possible in the past to say that India upholds its multilateral commitments, but its decision to walk away from the Bali agreement rendered that statement false.

So be it. India has begun to do things which it deems are in its national interests. India does not need to endure pain to get a false prestige or praise from utterly self-centered nations that "India upholds multilateral commitments". Some commentator's disagreement on Indian stance in Bali is immaterial. How many hundred times have we seen the country of this commentator flout international commitments, conventions etc? What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. The gander can no longer be neglected or disdainfully dismissed.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rgsrini » 11 Nov 2014 18:37

^^I agree SS. So be it. But it is not true.
Even in this case there was supposed to be an agreement on food stockpiling along with the Trade facilitation agreement. The so called "developed" countries thought they can pull a fast one on India, by just focusing on one part of the deal (Trade facilitation) but doing nothing on the stock piling.

India said "balls" to them and rightfully so. The Forbes opinion piece by Alyssa Ayres is a dishonest hit job, as expected, which just highlights one side of the issue, while remaining silent on their own fraudulent behavior.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 18:42

rgsrini, yes, I agree. That's what I meant by saying 'our national interests'. You are right about their fraudulent behaviour too.

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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 11 Nov 2014 18:43

China targets 'wild imams' in mass public sentencing

BEIJING: China has jailed almost two dozen people including “wild imams” who preach illegally in the western region of Xinjiang where the government says Islamists are waging a violent campaign for a separate state, Chinese media reported on Tuesday.

The 22 suspects were sentenced to prison terms ranging from five to 16 years at a mass public sentencing in Xinjiang on Monday, the state-controlled China News Service reported.

As well as the imams, or Muslim religious leaders, those sentenced included religious leaders who engaged in religious activities after being sacked, as well as those who broke the law while at their posts, it said.

Others were accused of inciting ethnic hatred, using superstition to destroy the law, and picking quarrels and provoking trouble, it said.

Xinjiang is home to a mostly Muslim minority group known as Uighurs.

China has vowed to crack down on religious extremism, which it blames for a string of violent attacks this year in Xinjiang and elsewhere.

Exiles and activists say Chinese controls on the religion and culture of the Uighur people is more a cause of the violence than well-organised militant groups.

The exiled World Uyghur Congress condemned the sentencing in a statement, saying it was religious repression that trampled on the rights of the Uighur people.

“The so-called distinction between legal and illegal religion is determined based on China's political needs,” said Dilxat Raxit, a spokesman for the group. “Uighurs basically have no rights to faith.”

Mass public sentencings have become common in Xinjiang, with state television often showing them taking place in packed outdoor auditoriums.

Rights groups have said mass trials and sentencings deny the accused the right to due process.

A court in September jailed for life the country's most prominent advocate for Uighur rights in a case that provoked an outcry in the West and among rights groups.

China is worried that militants in Xinjiang can get support from Islamists in nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan.

US President Barack Obama, in an interview with the official Xinhua news agency that ran late on Monday, said terrorist groups should not be allowed to establish a safe haven along China's periphery. How about Ombaba making a similar statement about the Land of the Pure and Home of the Terrorists in RESPECT IF INDIA

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 11 Nov 2014 19:07

Now, these 'wild imams' would be carted off to jails in the far east to deprive them of contacts with their families for the duration of their jail terms. This has been a standard practice. It is the China Islamic Association, a Chinese governmental body, that appoints imams in Uyghur mosques. Children cannot go to mosques. Koran cannot be taught in schools. Uyghurs, working for the government, cannot grow beards or observe fast.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 11 Nov 2014 19:45

SSridhar wrote:Now, these 'wild imams' would be carted off to jails in the far east to deprive them of contacts with their families for the duration of their jail terms. This has been a standard practice. It is the China Islamic Association, a Chinese governmental body, that appoints imams in Uyghur mosques. Children cannot go to mosques. Koran cannot be taught in schools. Uyghurs, working for the government, cannot grow beards or observe fast.


SSridhar Ji :

To add to your above comment :

Thus, Masood Khan, Pakistan's Ambassador to China enthused "the Pakistan-China friendship is deeper than oceans; higher than mountains; stronger than steel; sweeter than honey and more precious than eyes," he added effusively. "Pakistan and China are good friends, good neighbours, good brothers and good partners."

Pakistani National Day Celebrated in Beijing organized by the Pakistani Embassy was held in Beijing on March 23 2010

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 12 Nov 2014 01:04

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2 ... 011%202014

Just as President Barack Obama landed in China to try to salvage his vision of an American-led trading order in Asia, Russia and China took a giant step toward closer economic and political ties with an agreement on another massive energy deal that promises to tighten the bear hug between Moscow and Beijing for decades to come. The preliminary accord, which comes just months after China and Russia inked a landmark, $400 billion natural gas deal, is a reflection of the shifting balance of power in Asia. It's a marriage based on needs: Russia's to break out of the isolation imposed by the West in the wake of its annexation of Crimea and China's for reliable and affordable sources of energy. Coupled with China's economic offensive in Asia -- which includes everything from new trade pacts with U.S. partners such as Australia and South Korea, to a push for Chinese-led development banks that can wrest financing muscle from the West -- the latest gas deal shows what kind of challenges await the U.S. economic and diplomatic pivot to Asia. "Whatever changes occur on the world arena, we will consider enhancing our cooperation as a priority area in our foreign policy," Chinese President Xi Jinping said in announcing the deal. Russian President Vladimir Putin said that the two countries acting in concert helps make the world "more stable and predictable."
At a time when the United States is pushing back against China on a host of fronts, "China would like to show openly that Sino-Russian energy cooperation is no longer driven by necessity but forms a core part of strengthened, strategic-level cooperation between the two countries," said Keun-Wook Paik, an associate fellow at Chatham House and an expert on China-Russia energy dealings. On Sunday, Nov. 9, Russia and China signed a memorandum of understanding on a second gas-export route from western Siberia to China's western provinces. The 30-year accord, if consummated, would see Russia ship 30 billion cubic meters of gas to China starting in 2018 and would see Russia gain a big new customer right as it is feeling the squeeze from Western financial sanctions. Together with the deal signed in May, Russia could supply at least 68 billion cubic meters of gas annually to China, or about one-fifth of that country's expected gas demand in 2020. This time, Moscow fears it will have to make even more concessions. Crude oil prices are falling; the Chinese gas contracts are linked to the price of oil, meaning they're already worth less to Russia than just a few months ago. The prices paid under oil-linked contracts vary as crude oil's value fluctuates: As oil gets cheaper, so too will Russia's gas. Of course the inverse is also true. Chinese leaders have never been comfortable with the country's growing dependence on seaborne energy imports, especially crude oil, because it exposes a critical vulnerability in a world still dominated by the might and reach of the U.S. Navy. Piped gas from Russia also dovetails with Moscow's desire to edge out the prospects of American liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports to Asia. "Well before the arrival of U.S. LNG to the Chinese market, Russia needs to carve out its pipeline gas market against U.S. LNG," Paik, of Chatham House, said. "China will be the battleground for the U.S. and Russian pivots to Asia policy." More broadly, China's push into Central Asia, including existing energy deals and the latest "Silk Road" economic drive, has raised tensions with Russia, which historically has viewed Central Asia as its stomping grounds. Signing another major contract with Moscow is a way to mollify it. "Obviously Russia is going to occupy a fairly prominent position in any transcontinental infrastructure plans Beijing may have, so it makes sense to keep the Russians onside as much as possible," Mankoff said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 11:54

Chinese couple on trial for selling India-made drugs - PTI, The Hindu
A Chinese couple has been put on trial for allegedly selling low cost India-made cancer drugs, highlighting persistent calls for opening China’s pharma sector to cheaper Indian drugs.

The couple are from China’s Nanjing city in Jiangsu Province.

Zhou Rongqiang, Judge of the local court, told state-run Global Times that the couple, Zhao Hongjiang and his wife, Ma Yalin, were accused of purchasing medicines from India, transporting them to China, and selling them online.

Indian-made generic cancer drugs, often containing the same active ingredients as the patented medicines they are based on, sell at enormous discount compared with their patented counterparts, the report said. The vast majority of these drugs are not approved for sale in China. "Selling medicines produced overseas requires a certification by China’s drug watchdog. If not, the drugs are seen as fake,” Zhou said.


In the court, Zhao said that he was trying to save people’s lives, and that most of the drugs were brought for his friends instead for sale, local daily Modern Express reported.

The case highlights India’s persistent calls for China to open up its markets for Indian pharma products which have been widely approved for use in various countries to make them available for its citizens as well as to address the trade imbalance between the two countries

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 12:01

China’s economic blueprint wins over APEC - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
The members of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) members have agreed to initiate the formation of a free trade area in the Asia-Pacific — a vision steered by China, which competes with the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) initiative of the United States.

Summit host Chinese President Xi Jinping praised the in principle endorsement of the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP) as a decision that “will be written into history books”. He said backing for the initiative “demonstrated the confidence and determination of the APEC in advancing regional economic integration”.


In his closing address on Tuesday, Mr. Xi said the business community wanted the FTAAP, which is expected to include Russia, Beijing’s geostrategic partner. Russian President Vladimir Putin has praised the Chinese initiative, a day after Beijing and Moscow signed a preliminary agreement on a new route to transfer copious quantities of Russian natural gas into China.

U.S. President Barack Obama has lauded the Chinese move, but after announcing the imminence of the Washington-led TPP deal that pointedly excludes China but includes Japan and Australia in its 12-member star-cast.

China accelerated its push for the FTAAP after it began to view the TPP as the economic extension of the “Asia Pivot” of the U.S., meant to contain Beijing’s rise through an amassing of forces around China’s periphery.


Aware of the concerns over its rise, China has been emphatic in stating that its growing economic heft is a win-win situation that would reinvigorate the flagging global economy. “We have reached consensus that regional economic integration is the driving force behind sustained strong growth in the Asia-Pacific, and APEC should continue to play a leading and coordinating role in pushing forward this process,” observed President Xi during a closing media conference.

His point has been reinforced by a study conducted by the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council (PECC) that says the FTAAP will add an estimated $2.4 trillion to the global economy. In comparison, the TPP is estimated to contribute $223 billion. The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) — a grouping led by the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) is expected to pitch in with $644 billion.

During the summit, China emerged as the leading advocate for developing new trade routes that radiate from the country by pledging to pump billions of dollars for infrastructure projects that would open up new centres of growth. It is also leading efforts to form the $50-billion Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), which could compete for projects with the World Bank.

China has been the chief advocate for reviving the ancient Silk Road as a trade corridor that would link Asia with Europe, as well as the 21st century Maritime Silk Road for global trade along sections of the Pacific and the Indian Ocean.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 12:18

The creeping Chinese influence . . .

Friction between New Delhi, Male over China's Maritime Silk Road Project - Devirupa Mitra, New Indian Express
A diplomatic row has erupted after Maldives Foreign Minister Dunya Maumoon disputed New Delhi’s statement that the Maritime Silk Road Project was not raised during Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the country.

The issue surfaced when Maumoon was questioned in Maldives Parliament by opposition members on November 5 over participating in China’s Maritime Silk Road Project. She had, as per local media reports, said that India had discussed the project when Xi met Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Ministry of External Affairs spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin denied the claim. “It (Maritime Silk Road Project) was neither raised, nor discussed on the visit of President Xi Jinping to India,” he said. On Tuesday morning, Maumoon issued a combative statement. “My answers were based on the most accurate information available. The data shows that the Maritime Silk Road Project was in fact discussed during the Chinese President’s recent visit to India,” she said.

The link she was referring to was a press release on the Chinese Foreign Ministry’s website, dated 18 September. The press release, which is not a bilateral document, mentions the project in a list of frameworks for cooperation that the Chinese President had apparently discussed with Modi.Indian High Commissioner Rajeev Shahare tweeted a link of the original joint statement issued during the Chinese President’s state visit. The 28-paragraph document had no mention of the maritime silk route.

Incidentally, Maumoon’s feisty retort on Tuesday comes after a conciliatory statement on November 9. “The Minister had used this example to highlight the excellent relation between India and China,” Maldives Foreign Ministry said.

Maumoon reiterated that President Abdulla Yameen’s foreign policy is aimed at “promoting the national interests of the Maldives, not the interests of any other country”.

Not just Maumoon, even the Maldives President is advocated a turn towards China on Monday in his Republic Day speech.

Maumoon slams Mdp’s pro-india stand


Taking a potshot at the opposition, Dunya Maumoon said, “The Maldivian public is concerned that the opposition MDP and its media instruments are actively involved in promoting the objectives and interests of another country in the Maldives, to the detriment of our country’s independence and sovereignty.” MDP leader and former President Mohamed Nasheed had demaned that President Yameen reverse his decision on Maldives being party to the silk route.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 14:19

U.S. and China Reach Climate Deal After Months of Talks - Mark Landler, NY Times

Weren't India and China supposed to be be cooperating and coordinating their climate concerns? Where does this leave India now?
China and the United States made common cause on Wednesday against the threat of climate change, staking out an ambitious joint plan to curb carbon emissions as a way to spur nations around the world to make their own cuts in greenhouse gases.

The landmark agreement, jointly announced here by President Obama and President Xi Jinping, includes new targets for carbon emissions reductions by the United States and a first-ever commitment by China to stop its emissions from growing by 2030.

Administration officials said the agreement, which was worked out quietly between the United States and China over nine months and included a letter from Mr. Obama to Mr. Xi proposing a joint approach, could galvanize efforts to negotiate a new global climate agreement by 2015.

It was the signature achievement of an unexpectedly productive two days of meetings between the leaders. Mr. Obama and Mr. Xi also agreed to a military accord designed to avert clashes between Chinese and American planes and warships in the tense waters off the Chinese coast, as well as an understanding to cut tariffs for technology products.

A climate deal between China and the United States, the world’s No. 1 and No. 2 carbon polluters, is viewed as essential to concluding a new global accord. Unless Beijing and Washington can resolve their differences, climate experts say, few other countries will agree to mandatory cuts in emissions, and any meaningful worldwide pact will be likely to founder.

“The United States and China have often been seen as antagonists,” said a senior official, speaking in advance of Mr. Obama’s remarks. “We hope that this announcement can usher in a new day in which China and the U.S. can act much more as partners.”

As part of the agreement, Mr. Obama announced that the United States would emit 26 percent to 28 percent less carbon in 2025 than it did in 2005. That is double the pace of reduction it targeted for the period from 2005 to 2020.

China’s pledge to reach peak carbon emissions by 2030, if not sooner, is even more remarkable. To reach that goal, Mr. Xi pledged that so-called clean energy sources, like solar power and windmills, would account for 20 percent of China’s total energy production by 2030.

Administration officials acknowledged that Mr. Obama could face opposition to his plans from a Republican-controlled Congress. While the agreement with China needs no congressional ratification, lawmakers could try to roll back Mr. Obama’s initiatives, undermining the United States’ ability to meet the new reduction targets.

Still, Mr. Obama’s visit, which came days after a setback in the midterm elections, allowed him to reclaim some of the momentum he lost at home. As the campaign was turning against the Democrats last month, Mr. Obama quietly dispatched John Podesta, a senior adviser who oversees climate policy, to Beijing to try to finalize a deal.

For all the talk of collaboration, the United States and China also displayed why they are still fierce rivals for global economic primacy, promoting competing free-trade blocs for the Asian region even as they reached climate and security deals.

The maneuvering came during a conference of Pacific Rim economies held in Beijing that has showcased China’s growing dominance in Asia, but also the determination of the United States, riding a resurgent economy, to reclaim its historical role as a Pacific power.

Adding to the historic nature of the visit, Mr. Obama and Mr. Xi were scheduled to give a joint news conference on Wednesday that will include questions from reporters — a rare concession by the Chinese leader to a visiting American president.

On Tuesday evening, Mr. Xi invited Mr. Obama to dinner at his official residence, telling his guest he hoped they had laid the foundation for a collaborative relationship — or, as he more metaphorically put it, “A pool begins with many drops of water.”

Greeting Mr. Obama at the gate of the walled leadership compound next to the Forbidden City, Mr. Xi squired him across a brightly lighted stone bridge and into the residence. Mr. Obama told the Chinese president that he wanted to take the relationship “to a new level.”

“When the U.S. and China are able to work together effectively,” he added, “the whole world benefits.”


But as the world witnessed this week, it is more complicated than that. Mr. Xi won approval Tuesday from the 21 countries of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum to study the creation of a China-led free-trade zone that would be an alternative to Mr. Obama’s Trans-Pacific Partnership, a 12-nation trading bloc that excludes China.

On Monday, Mr. Obama met with members of that group here and claimed progress in negotiating the partnership, a centerpiece of his strategic shift to Asia.

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership are much further along than those for the nascent Chinese plan, known as the Free Trade Area of Asia Pacific, and some analysts said the approval by the Pacific Rim nations of a two-year study was mainly a gesture to the Chinese hosts to give them something to announce at the meeting.

For all the jockeying, the biggest trade headline was a breakthrough in negotiations with China to eliminate tariffs on information technology products, from video-game consoles and computer software to medical equipment and semiconductors.

The understanding, American officials said, opens the door to expanding a World Trade Organization agreement on these products, assuming other countries can be persuaded to accept the same terms. With China on board, officials predicted a broader deal would be reached swiftly.

“We’re going to take what’s been achieved here in Beijing back to Geneva to work with our W.T.O. partners,” said Michael B. Froman, the United States trade representative. “While we don’t take anything for granted, we’re hopeful that we’ll be able to work quickly” to conclude an expansion of the agreement, known as the Information Technology Agreement.

On Wednesday morning, Mr. Xi formally welcomed Mr. Obama at a ceremony in the Great Hall of the People; they later toasted each other at a state banquet.

Administration officials said Mr. Obama had pressed Mr. Xi to resume a United States-China working group on cybersecurity issues, which abruptly stopped its discussions after the United States charged several Chinese military officers with hacking.

“We did see a chill in the cyber dialogue,” said Benjamin J. Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser. “We do believe it’s better if there’s a mechanism for dialogue.”

On Tuesday, Mr. Obama credited APEC with originating the work on reducing tariffs, saying, “The United States and China have reached an understanding that we hope will contribute to a rapid conclusion of the broader negotiations in Geneva.”

Talks with China over expanding the 1997 accord on information technology broke down last year over the scope of the products covered by the agreement. But after intensive negotiations leading up to Mr. Obama’s visit, Mr. Froman said, the Americans and the Chinese agreed Monday evening to eliminate more than 200 categories of tariffs.

While the United States still exports many high-technology goods, China is the world’s dominant exporter of electronics and has much to gain from an elimination of tariffs. Taiwan, South Korea and Japan increasingly find themselves supplying China’s huge electronics industry, deepening their dependence on decisions made in Beijing.

The administration estimated that expanding the Information Technology Agreement would create up to 60,000 jobs in the United States by eliminating tariffs on goods that generate $1 trillion in sales a year. About $100 billion of those products are American-made. The administration faces a longer path on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, including whether Mr. Obama will obtain fast-track trade authority from Congress. That could make it easier for the United States to extract concessions from other countries, since they would have more confidence that the treaty would be ratified by Congress.

While Mr. Froman conceded that sticking points remained, he said, “It’s become clearer and clearer what the landing zones are.” He said that Mr. Obama would seek fast-track authority, but that the best way for him to win congressional passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership would be to negotiate the best deal.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 12 Nov 2014 15:26

The Chinese jokers have agreed to a peak carbon emission by "around 2030" and its touted as a historic deal by the US. WOW, Does the US state dept / persons concerned ever learn?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 12 Nov 2014 15:28

^^haha, I had it typed and kept for atleast 4 hours. Good that SS took the lead.

Where does it leave India? If I were the negotiator, I will say we tgt to achieve peak yr in 2065 and keep mum. Period. End of story. Wink
A peak yr in 2030. And its touted as a deal. I am falling off my chair laughing.
Obama, I reckon, is getting desperate for a FP victory.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Ashok Sarraff » 12 Nov 2014 16:12

Year-wise Population Pyramid of China.

http://populationpyramid.net/china/2015/

Looks relevant to understanding pulls and pressures on the Chinese decision-making in years to come.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 18:18

vijaykarthik wrote:The Chinese jokers have agreed to a peak carbon emission by "around 2030" and its touted as a historic deal by the US. WOW, Does the US state dept / persons concerned ever learn?

Be that as it may, I feel that India is being pressurized to fall in line. This is the NPT redux. The UPA government never failed to publicize the close cooperation between us & China on the climate issue whenever the border incursion happened. How Jairam Ramesh used to drumbeat on this ! Now, all of a sudden, we find that behind our backs, China had gone off tangentially and agreed to something else. Whether the Chinese would be able to, or even willing to, meet the deadline is another matter. This will be used as a stick to beat India with. I am tempted to say something else about the US but will hold them back for better clarity to evolve.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Raghz » 12 Nov 2014 18:20

This is hilarious. Even a small gesture is seen as loss of face!

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/441012/china-sees-red-over-putin039s.html

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby RajeshA » 12 Nov 2014 19:21

Raghz wrote:This is hilarious. Even a small gesture is seen as loss of face!

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/441012/china-sees-red-over-putin039s.html


This is an American googly! Western media has been successful in projecting a gentleman's gesture to his hostess as an attempt by Putin to hit on her. When somebody makes the case that your friend is trying to hit on your wife and then ridicules you for letting it happen, there aren't many options left for a proud man even if you know you are being set up.

Very much under the belt!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2014 20:08

Modi calls for respect for global maritime norms - PTI

More details on Modi's speech and it has gone beyond usual earlier mumbo-jumbo. Modi is raising the issue in a very calibrated manner.
Against the backdrop of China’s raging maritime disputes with some southeast Asian countries, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday said all nations have a responsibility to follow international law and norms on maritime issues and hoped for an early conclusion of a code of conduct to resolve the matter.

After making a passing reference to maritime disputes in general and the need for following international norms in his opening remarks at the 12th India-ASEAN summit, Mr. Modi delved on the South China Sea dispute in a little more detail in his closing statement.

“For peace and stability in South China Sea, everyone should follow international norms and law. This includes the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. We also hope that you will be able to successfully implement the Guidelines to the 2002 Declaration on Conduct and that the Code of Conduct on South China Sea can be concluded soon on the basis of consensus,” he said at the end of the summit deliberations.


“We (India and ASEAN) are both keen to enhance our cooperation in advancing balance, peace and stability in the region,” Mr. Modi said.

“And, in this world, maritime trade and passage, and therefore, maritime security has become even more important.

We all have the responsibility that we all follow international law and norms on maritime issues, as we do in the realm of air passage. In future, we will also need this in space,” he added.

Though Mr. Modi did not name any country but the comments may be seen as targeting China which is engaged in maritime territorial disputes with a number of its neighbours, including Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines.

During his recent U.S. visit, Mr. Modi and President Barack Obama had pledged to intensify cooperation in maritime security to ensure freedom of navigation in comments that came against the backdrop of China’s expanding maritime ambitions.

They had stressed the importance of safeguarding maritime security and ensuring freedom of navigation and over flight throughout the region especially in the South China Sea.

During his Japan visit as well, Mr. Modi had deplored the “expansionist” tendency among some countries which “encroach” upon seas of others, in oblique comments against China which also has a maritime dispute with Japan over islands in the East China Sea.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 13 Nov 2014 11:43

India faces climate pincer - Meena Menon, The Hindu
While the Union Minister of State for Environment Prakash Javadekar refused to comment on record on the U.S.-China climate deal, highly placed sources said the government has decided to adopt a wait-and-watch approach. The new deal puts pressure on India to decide on whether it wants to toe this line or create a new target for itself and also pressure the world to adopt stringent emission cuts.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nawabs » 13 Nov 2014 11:58

A different viewpoint : US-China climate deal lowers expectations of strong global climate deal in 2015

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 412_1.html
The US and China announced a historic and sub-par bilateral pact on climate change ahead of the UN negotiations that will lead to a new global agreement in 2015 in Paris. The US announced it would reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 24-26 per cent below 2005 levels by 2025, and China announced it would ensure its emissions peak by around 2030.

Together, historically the largest emitter of GHG gases and the current biggest emitter China set an extremely low benchmark for other countries to follow under the Paris agreement. The move drained out hope of a 2015 climate agreement and consequent commitments from countries at Paris that could keep the global temperature rise below 2 degree Celsius.

But, on the flip side, it eased the pressure on India, a far smaller emitter than the US and China, to take on any onerous new commitments in the short run. While India is expected to also put up a domestically decided target soon, it will now have the example of the two countries to also commit to a low-range target. The target could be in terms of only a slower rate of growth of emission intensity or accompanied by a long-off target year for peaking when India’s emissions would peak — a year much beyond that China has announced.

For the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government, still mulling the ideas advocated by its newly appointed minister, Suresh Prabhu to distance India from China and bring it closer to the West, fell apart with the announcement. The joint declaration showed that there were several major issues in the climate negotiations where China, India and the US actually saw eye to eye in aiming to protect their short-term economic interests though not necessarily fighting a robust fight to slow down climate change.

The higher end of the US target of cutting emissions by 26 cent cut by 2025 below 2005 levels is so low that it already has environmentalists up in arms. It translates to a mere 13.88 cent cut reduction below 1990 levels by 2025. The ball for a low-hanging fruit had been set in place earlier by EU announcing that it would only take a 40 per cent cut to its emissions below 1990 levels by 2030, of which it has already achieved around 20 per cent reduction. The US target fell even lower on relative terms to the EU targets. Its new target is less than half of that the EU has promised to take by 2030. Both the EU and the US promised targets are far below the upper range for emission cuts that the UN climate panel had set at 40 per cent four years ago and has now revised upwards.

THE GREEN ROUTE
ANNOUNCED TARGETS

US: 24-25% cut below 2005 levels by 2025
China: Peak its total emissions by 2030 and then go below
EU: 30-40% 1990 levels by 2030

EMISSION LEVELS IN 2012

US: 16.4 tonne CO2 per capita emissions
China: 7.1 tonne CO2 per capita emissions
India: 1.6 tonne CO2 per capita emissions
EU: 7.4 tonne CO2 per capita emissions

WHERE THEY STAND IN 2030

US: 12 tonne*CO2 per capita emissions with new target
China: 12 tonne*CO2 per capita emissions with new target
India: 4-7.5 tonne CO2 per capita emissions with business as usual

*Approximate figures
Source: UNFCCC, Centre for Science and Environment and Government of India

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)’s Sunita Narain lambasted the US-China announcement, saying it was neither “historic” nor ambitious, but just a self-serving agreement between the world’s two biggest polluters. Extrapolating the numbers, CSE said the two countries would converge at 12 tonne per capita of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) by 2030, leaving the world on a trajectory that would take global temperature rise beyond 3 degree by the end of the century.

CSE’s Chandra Bhushan said, “In fact, if India were to follow the principals of this (US-China) deal, then we need not do anything till 2040 and beyond. Our per capita emissions in 2030 will be less than 4 tonne per capita CO2e compared to 12 tonne per capita of the US and China,” he adds.


The Indian government’s earlier compendium of five modelling studies done by different institutions showed that India’s emissions remained between 4-7.5 tonne per capita by 2030. These studies were conducted before the climate change action plans were put in place and India took a target to cut emission intensity of its economy by 20-25 per cent by 2020.

Countries are required to formally volunteer their targets to fight climate change by March 2015 which will form part of the new global agreement to be signed in December 2015. This new agreement is to operate from 2020 onwards. For all practical purposes, the developed countries have already locked down the targets for the pre-2020 period and have steadfastly refused to up them. The US has a 17 per cent below 2005 level target which equals to less than 1 per cent reduction below 1990 levels. The EU has taken a 20 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020 target.

The US and China have announced that they will formally submit these new numbers as part of their voluntary targets for the 2015 agreement. While some countries have asked that such voluntary targets be assessed for their adequacy and equitable burden sharing between countries, and have objected to the move for different reasons. The joint announcement has revived memories of the 2009 Copenhagen deal that brought the BASIC countries (China, India, Brazil and South Africa) together with US, snubbing EU and its allies. The joint US-China decision along with the low EU target promises to now turn Paris 2015 agreement in to a low-ambition deal with the promise of review of the adequacy of such numbers still uncertain.

svinayak
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby svinayak » 14 Nov 2014 03:51

SSridhar wrote:India faces climate pincer - Meena Menon, The Hindu
While the Union Minister of State for Environment Prakash Javadekar refused to comment on record on the U.S.-China climate deal, highly placed sources said the government has decided to adopt a wait-and-watch approach. The new deal puts pressure on India to decide on whether it wants to toe this line or create a new target for itself and also pressure the world to adopt stringent emission cuts.

India has to make a deal with China and come up with Asia Climate norm.

India is in Asia and has most of its trading links with Asia

If India become a global trading and exporter then it can consider the global norm

SSridhar
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Location: Chennai

Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 14 Nov 2014 16:21

Japan PM wants more defence ties with US, Australia - AFP, ToI
BRISBANE : Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday he wanted deeper defence ties with the United States and Australia to ensure peace throughout the Asia-Pacific region, in remarks likely to irk Beijing.

Abe outlined his vision for expanded military cooperation ahead of this weekend's Group of 20 leaders' summit, which is being hosted in Brisbane by Japan's "best friend" Australia.

"As the United States is the most important ally for Japan and Australia, I am determined to expand trilateral cooperation between the three countries, to realise a peaceful, secure and prosperous future for the Asia-Pacific region," he said in an op-ed article for the Australian Financial Review.

"I also hope that our countries will work closely together to support the resolution of global issues."


Abe is expected to take part in a three-way meeting with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott and US President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 summit.

The prospect of a stronger tripartite alliance could stoke fears in Beijing that Japan, the United States and Australia are ganging up to limit China's increasingly assertive expansion in the region.

China claims rights over Tokyo-administered islands in the East China Sea, with several other countries in the region also at loggerheads with Beijing over territorial disputes.

Beijing has repeatedly warned of what it says is the danger of Japan "remilitarising" under Abe, and regularly lambasts Tokyo for its apparent lack of repentance for past misdeeds.

Abe visited Australia in July and became the first Japanese leader to address the national parliament in Canberra, also sealing a deal on the sharing of defence technology during the trip.

Abbott has denied closer defence ties with Japan will damage relations with China, his country's biggest trading partner.

Chinese President Xi Jinping told the Financial Review that Beijing was also ready to increase defence cooperation with Australia,

"The Chinese side stands ready to work with the Australian side to strengthen communication and coordination in international and regional mechanisms and deal with traditional and non-traditional security issues of all kinds to jointly safeguard and promote peace and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific and beyond," he wrote.



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