Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Sep 2014 08:37

In U.N. speech criticizing Japan, China says history should not be falsified - Japan Times
In a speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Saturday, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi repeated an assertion that history should not be distorted and aggression should not be denied — an apparent reference to Japan.

Next year will mark the 70th anniversary of “the victory of the Chinese people’s war against Japanese aggression,” Beijing’s top diplomat said.

“In China alone, the aggression committed by Japanese militarists left more than 35 million Chinese soldiers and civilians dead or injured,” he said.

“History is not to be falsified, and truth is not to be distorted.”

Last year, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, which honors convicted Class-A World War II war criminals along with other war dead, drawing sharp reactions by China and South Korea as well as the United States.

Earlier this year, Abe’s government also re-examined the process of compiling a formal apology issued in 1993 to women, mostly Asian, who were forced to serve in wartime military brothels.

China and South Korea viewed the move as an attempt to rewrite history by questioning the legitimacy of the apology.

People who attempt to deny aggression and distort history “will have nowhere to hide,” said Wang, who formerly served as ambassador to Japan.

On territorial issues, Wang’s speech was less confrontational than one made at the U.N. in 2012 by his predecessor, Yang Jiechi, who said Japan “stole” the Senkaku Islands from China. Japan and China later traded barbs during the general debate at the U.N. assembly about sovereignty claims over the islets in the East China Sea.

Wang said, “The principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity must be upheld.” This apparently was a bid to defend China’s claim to the disputed islands, which the Chinese call Diaoyu, but Wang refrained from openly pressing China’s case for maritime sovereignty claims in the South China Sea and East China Sea, which have raised tensions with Japan and other countries in the region.

On North Korea, the pressing task is to restart the six-nation talks on Pyongyang’s nuclear programs “as soon as possible,” Wang said.

China hosted all rounds of the talks, which also involve Japan, South and North Korea, Russia and the United States, until the last session in 2008.

“The (North) Korean nuclear issue should be dealt with by a sustainable, irreversible and effective dialogue process,” Wang said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Sep 2014 09:13

Why it's wise for China's President Xi Jinping to hold his tongue about regional war - Humphrey Hawksley, Economic Times
China's president Xi Jinping is leader of the world's most populous country and the second biggest economy. He presides over the building of roads, railways, airports and infrastructure at an astonishing rate. He and his colleagues are the architects of a system that has pulled hundreds of millions out of poverty, structured robust institutions and created world-class transnational corporations.

Earlier this month, Alibaba,the Chinese online retailer, made a record $25 billion launch on the New York stock market. The rags-to-riches story of its founder resonates with the dreams, ideas, success and money of modern China whose economic achievements have been the envy of India, indeed of much of the developing world. Yet for all of that Xi appears to have an itch on his face. Time and again he makes public statements instructing his military to prepare for war.

He did this in April and December last year. Then earlier this week he did it again, telling his generals to "improve their combat readiness and sharpen their ability to win a regional war in the age of information technology." The latest emphasis is on the region and technology and the question raised is what does it mean for India.

First, technology. For more than a decade a once top secret agency within the People's Liberation Army (PLA), known as the Advanced Persistent Threat Unit 61398, has been honing its hacking skills. Among its targets is the Indian government. Intelligence officials believe the core Chinese teams operate from a drab, 12-storey building in Pudong, an industrial suburb of Shanghai.

Tech Wars

The next major war, whether regional or global, will be fought as much with electronic weapons that jam systems and crash stock markets as with missile strikes and boots on the ground. China is beefing up this part of its military. India must do the same. With home-grown hi-tech skills that stretch from California to Bangalore to the Defence Intelligence Agency, Indian tech geeks are more than capable of taking on China, but they do need the budget.

Second, the region. After years of ham-fisted diplomacy, China finds itself bereft of strategic allies and its record in choosing them has been dreadful. Cambodia's Khmer Rouge, Myanmar's military junta and North Korea's dynastic dictatorship have hardly been partnerships of strength and reliability. Its key ally, Pakistan, is pitifully unstable.

So, China finds itself more strategically isolated in Asia than it was a generation ago while the world's two biggest democracies, India and the US, have forged a flawed but active alliance which arose from one of America's post 9/11 foreign initiatives. It is not difficult, therefore, to guess the war-gaming taking place in Chinese military academies.

Potential enemies include Japan because of history and the disputed East China Sea islands; South Korea over a possible mishandled collapse of North Korea; the Philippines or Vietnam over Beijing making a push too far into the South China Sea; America in any flashpoint in the Asia-Pacific; and of course India where Chinese and Indian troops continue to face each other on the disputed Chumar area of Ladakh.

All these governments, bar one, have some kind of strategic or military arrangement with the US. Therefore any flare up into a hot war would put China into direct hostility with America. The exception is Vietnam with whom China fought a war in 1979. Battle hardened from defeating both France and the US, Vietnamese troops ran rings around the Chinese who through sheer numbers reached their objectives and then rapidly fled.

Against this spectre of war comes talk of trade and the peace dividend of entwined economies. Xi has pledged $20 billion to India over the next five years and India has invited Chinese involvement in infrastructure projects — a far cry from the thorny relationship 10 years ago when China was banned from such projects because of security concerns.

Chinese Checkers

There is, of course, no reason for conflict. Every country in Asia — apart from North Korea — is steadily getting wealthier and more secure. But lessons over the past century — from World War I to the present crisis in Ukraine — tell us that if politicians have the fire of war in their bellies, booming economies count for nothing. China's behaviour in recent years indicates that this might be the case — however illogical and absurd it might seem.

India, though, is well placed to face it down. Its weakness is that China has more of just about everything in military hardware.

Its annual defence budget of $131 billion is nearly three times that of India's $46 billion. But its strengths are the creative hi-tech geeks who, given a chance, will give the PLA's unit 61938 a run for its money in electronic combat. India also now has a strongly mandated leader who appears to know his mind and, for the first time, is not beholden to a parliamentary coalition or a dynastic legacy. Prime minister Modi, an Indian nationalist, can do what he wants.

It might be wise, therefore, for Xi to hold his tongue about regional war, not the least because it shows a reckless immaturity of global leadership. Supposing every world leader routinely rallied his armies to prepare for war. Then, surely, sooner or later, war would happen. And, in Asia, up against the nuclear weapons, computer geeks and foot soldiers of India, America, Japan, South Korea and probably Vietnam, China might well lose. It's time for Jinping to scratch that war itch off his face.

(The writer is a BBC correspondent and author of Dragon Fire)


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 28 Sep 2014 13:49

I was pretty happy that the Indian side didn't get cowed and stood their ground while the Chinese asked for the tin huts to be removed. However, the newspaper says that the tin huts were agreed to be removed from the Indian side. Any reasons why? That's a tad disappointing.
5 brigadier plus lvl meetings and finally the tin huts have been accepted to be removed.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby chaanakya » 28 Sep 2014 14:52

Looks like Army will be deployed at LAC instead of ITBP.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 28 Sep 2014 17:17

How did we miss this? Chinese ambassador to Iceland arrested for espionage

Chinese Ambassador to Iceland Ma Jisheng and his wife Zhong Yue were arrested early this year by Chinese authorities for allegedly spying for Japan
On the website of the Chinese Embassy in Reykjavik, Iceland's capital, the ambassador's name and photo are now missing from the welcome page

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 28 Sep 2014 17:19

Rich Chinese fleeing to greener foreign pastures

Wealthy Chinese are leaving their country in large numbers. Some are keen to have their children educated in advanced countries, while others want to protect their wealth from a frugality campaign led by President Xi Jinping. Many simply want to escape the country's worsening air pollution.
According to U.S. consultancy Bain & Co., 27% of Chinese entrepreneurs with assets of at least 100 million yuan ($16.2 million) have already emigrated, and another 47% are considering doing so.
the richest 1% of Chinese households hold one-third of the country's wealth

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Sep 2014 19:25

chaanakya wrote:Looks like Army will be deployed at LAC instead of ITBP.

So, the CBMs like BDCA have not worked and indeed increased the tension !

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anchal » 28 Sep 2014 22:55

With Chinese balls getting squeezed in HK, India should maintain high alert on IB. The dude 11 Jinping could be looking out for pressure release. The HK protests also show Chinese system is inherently stable and when it tries to reach equilibrium; the pendulum can swing either way

One more reason to keep Tibet open-ended

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby girish.r » 28 Sep 2014 23:27

anchal wrote:With Chinese balls getting squeezed in HK, India should maintain high alert on IB. The dude 11 Jinping could be looking out for pressure release. The HK protests also show Chinese system is inherently stable and when it tries to reach equilibrium; the pendulum can swing either way

One more reason to keep Tibet open-ended


Very valid point. This is one area where Xi and lizard army will try to build up nationalistic feeling by another border issue. HK is a serious issue and diverting attention is coming.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby RoyG » 29 Sep 2014 05:18

I think the HK riots are going to get out of hand. If they don't quash it, it will spread to the mainland.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 29 Sep 2014 05:37

From the "Weegher" slashers,Tibetan monks to the Hong Kong protestors,not to mention little mutinies one never hears of in China's heartlands which have never benefited from its version of crony party capitalism,China is in trouble.The simple fact is that China is too large for mass control.The entire population cannot be converted into mindless zombies,esp. now that the market is the icon and ideology and not Mao and Marx.
Yet this is when China is most dangerous.Lurking in vry Chinaman is that superiority complex,the "Middle Kingdom" suspended between heaven and earth,the rest all inferior barbarian nations.Chinese nationalism which has emerged strongly thanks to its eco success,is showing signs of being similar to Nazi fascism.Thus any Chinese warmongering gets grandstand applause from the Chines people.China must have its international devils to point its guns at,and India has always been on the hit list.Even more caution and care required today to plug the military gaps asap.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 29 Sep 2014 08:40

^^ this is where I think we should have stuck to our initial posn on NOT removing the huts. I still cant fathom why they actually agreed to the removal of huts. Our line on that bit should've been non-negotiable. Now, it looks as if we came across as curt initially but finally melted under the Chinese glare.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Kashi » 29 Sep 2014 09:31

vijaykarthik wrote:^^ this is where I think we should have stuck to our initial posn on NOT removing the huts. I still cant fathom why they actually agreed to the removal of huts. Our line on that bit should've been non-negotiable. Now, it looks as if we came across as curt initially but finally melted under the Chinese glare.


When did we remove the huts? Any links ?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby svinayak » 29 Sep 2014 12:12

Image

Image

They know good english

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 29 Sep 2014 14:04

I originally read it in Indian Express. This is from TOIlet.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 467644.cms

Atleast 2 papers. This link (above) seems more exhaustive though

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Sep 2014 20:04

PLA Asserts as Modi-Xi Jinping Talk - Gurmeet Kanwal, IDSA Comment
Even as President Xi Jinping was being hosted to a Gujarati dinner by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on the bank of the Sabarmati River in Ahmedabad, Chinese and Indian troops were once again engaged in a tense face-off at Chumar and Demchok in Ladakh. Despite the Chinese President’s message to the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to back off, the stand-off continued. The intruders had to be confronted with show of force by an Indian infantry battalion. So far this year there have been an unprecedented 335 transgressions across the Line of Actual Control (LAC) by the PLA.

It was no wonder then that in the press statement after his meeting with the Chinese President, PM Modi expressed ‘serious concern over repeated incidents along the border’. He pointed out that ‘clarification’ – or demarcation – of the LAC would enhance ‘efforts to maintain peace and tranquillity’. And, he sought an ‘early settlement’ of the territorial dispute. In turn, President Xi Jinping said China is determined to ‘work with India through friendly consultations to settle the boundary question at an early date,’ and to ‘maintain peace and tranquillity in the border areas’ till the dispute is resolved. No Indian Prime Minister has used such strong language in a summit meeting with a Chinese President before, but given the rather aggressive border management policies of the PLA, the Chinese had it coming.

Relations between India and China have been fairly stable at the strategic level since then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi’s summit meeting with Deng Xiaoping in 1988. Mutual economic dependence is growing rapidly. Bilateral trade is now worth US$ 65 billion and is expected to cross US$ 80 billion by 2017 – even though the balance of trade is heavily skewed in China’s favour. India and China have been cooperating in international fora like the WTO and climate change negotiations. Limited cooperation has taken place in energy security. However, China’s political, diplomatic and military aggressiveness at the tactical level is acting as a dampener for the further normalisation of the relationship.

Prolonged negotiations have been conducted at the political level to resolve the long-standing territorial and boundary dispute. The Special Representatives of the two Prime Ministers have met seventeen times. However, there has been little progress on this sensitive issue. The fragile security relationship has the potential to act as a spoiler and will ultimately determine whether the two Asian giants will clash or cooperate for mutual gains.

In recent years, China has raised the ante by way of frequent transgressions across the LAC and unprecedented cyber-attacks on Indian networks. China either denies Visas to the residents of Arunachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir or issues stapled Visas to them on the grounds that these are disputed territories.

China’s behaviour is in keeping with its recent military assertiveness in the disputed island territories of the East China Sea and the South China Sea. Clearly, the current Chinese leadership has discarded Deng Xiaoping’s 24-Character Strategy: "Observe calmly; secure our position; cope with affairs calmly; hide our capacities and bide our time; be good at maintaining a low profile; and never claim leadership."

China continues to be in physical occupation of large areas of Indian territory. On the Aksai Chin plateau in Ladakh, China is in physical possession of approximately 38,000 sq km of Indian territory since the mid-1950s. In addition, Pakistan illegally ceded 5,180 sq km of territory in the Gilgit-Baltistan area of Jammu and Kashmir to China in 1963 in the Shaksgam Valley, north of the Siachen Glacier, under a bilateral boundary agreement. China continues to stake its claim to about 96,000 sq km of Indian territory in Arunachal Pradesh, which it calls Southern Tibet. Chinese interlocutors claim that the Tawang Tract, in particular, is part of Tibet and that the merger of this area with Tibet is non-negotiable. China’s official position is that the reunification of Chinese territories is a sacred duty for the PLA.

The LAC between India and China, implying de facto control after the 1962 war, is yet to be physically demarcated on the ground and delineated on military maps. This is a major destabilising factor as it leads to frequent transgressions. Both sides send their patrols up to their ‘perception’ of the LAC. Patrol face-offs are common and have an element of tension built into them though both sides usually exercise restraint. Major incidents in the recent past include those at Depsang near Daulat Beg Oldie in April-May 2013; and, Chumar and Demchok in September 2014. There was an armed clash at Nathu La in 1967 and a prolonged standoff at Wang Dung in 1986. Hence, though the probability of conflict is low, its possibility cannot be ruled out.

Early demarcation of the LAC without prejudice to each other’s position on the territorial dispute would be an excellent confidence building measure. China’s intransigence in exchanging maps showing the alignment of the LAC in the western and the eastern sectors is neither understandable nor condonable. Perhaps it is part of China’s strategy to leave the dispute “for future generations to resolve”, as Deng Xiaoping had famously told Rajiv Gandhi. Under the circumstances, Prime Minister Modi did well by asking President Xi Jinping to resume the stalled process of demarcation of the LAC.

The military gap between Indian and China is growing steadily as the PLA is modernising at a rapid pace and India’s military modernisation plans remain mired in red tape. China is also steadily upgrading the military infrastructure in Tibet to enable rapid deployment. China will stall resolution of the territorial dispute till it is in a much stronger position in terms of comprehensive national strength so as to be able to dictate terms. It is in India’s interest to strive for early resolution of the territorial dispute so that there is only one military adversary to contend with. It is in this direction that the Government of India must firmly nudge the Chinese leadership during future meetings of the political interlocutors.

(The author is a Delhi-based strategic analyst.)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Sep 2014 20:13

Xi’s visit and the boundary issues - R.S.Kalha, IDSA Comment
Whenever a high level visit takes place between India and China expectations are raised that with a Midas like touch the two leaders would resolve the boundary question and that the two billion plus people of India and China would together shape a new Asia. Such hyperbole remains constant, since few are aware of what Chinese policies actually are. President Xi Jinping reportedly issued a five point directive at the conclusion of a high level Work Forum in October 2013 on China’s policies towards peripheral countries; that while enhancing political ‘goodwill’ and deepening economic integration with them, the peripheral countries would have to respect China’s ‘core’ interests and ‘validate’ China’s efforts to enforce sovereignty and territorial claims.1. If this is indeed the theoretical line that President Xi is pursuing, then there is little chance of any forward movement in settling Sino-Indian boundary issues.

The Chinese, generally speaking, are aware of the Indian fascination for concluding high sounding declarations, statements, principles etc. and therefore have little hesitation in indulging them; knowing full well that if the situation so demands these can easily be flouted. The 1954 Five Principles of Peaceful Co-Existence [Panchsheel] Agreement and the 2005 Political Parameters and Guiding Principles Agreement, particularly Article VII, are prime such examples. The first was easily overturned in the conflict in 1962 and the second in May 2007 when the Chinese Foreign Minister [Yang Jiechi] told the Indian Foreign Minister [Mukerjee] in Hamburg that their understanding of Article VII [‘in reaching a border settlement the two sides shall safeguard due interests of their settled populations in border areas’] did not mean that Chinese claims [Southern Tibet] were affected!

There is no other state in the world that has longer contiguous land frontiers than China; a total of about 22,000 kilometers of which about nearly 19,000 kilometers traverse China’s minority areas.2. At present China has a land border with 14 states. Of the 14 states, 12 have conclusively settled their border disputes with the People’s Republic. 3. India and Bhutan remain the only states that have continuing land border disputes with China [emphasis added]. As regards Bhutan, China alleges that it is still under India’s ‘firm control’ and that India will not allow it to ‘…solve the border issue.’4.

It is indeed an anomaly as to why there is no settlement with India when all other similar boundary disputes with other states have been settled. While assessing the prevailing reality along the Sino-Indian border three factors need to be kept in mind. First, in the western sector the Chinese are in possession of the ‘disputed’ territory. Second, India is in no position to evict them physically. Third, although India is in possession of territory in the middle and eastern sectors, yet the Chinese have never given up their claims. Maybe these are negotiating tactics, but the Chinese even prevaricate on the demarcation of a mutually determined ‘line of actual control’ all along the Sino-Indian border, primarily to keep India off-balance.

In the Chinese mind the settlement of the border issue with India cannot be divorced from regional, political and larger strategic issues. In fact if the regional, political and strategic issues with India were amicably resolved; a boundary settlement would inevitably follow. The position taken by India on the boundary issue has steadily come closer to the stated Chinese position. In the early fifties, Nehru took the position that there was no boundary dispute and all that was needed were small rectifications of the line. This position was overturned by the 1962 conflict and thereafter India took the line that till the boundary issue is settled; no further normalization of relations could take place. This line too was abandoned when PM Rajiv Gandhi visited China in 1988 and the new position was that while negotiations on the boundary issue continued, normalization in all other areas could take place. Finally PM Vajpayee further agreed to conduct boundary negotiations based on ‘political parameters’ and conceded to the Chinese position to settle the boundary in a ‘package.’

The question therefore is why do the Chinese not settle on the basis of a ‘package’ as they had insisted all along? The answer lies in the fact that ever since the boundary issue came to the fore and even at present; this dispute is utilized by China for trying to coerce foreign policy changes by India that often have nothing to do with the dispute itself [emphasis added]. China has used the threat of intrusions across the LAC, as a part of its coercive diplomacy. It is too valuable a coercive diplomatic asset to give up.

From the Chinese point of view the issue of Tibet remains the most significant factor. Although India has officially accepted that Tibet is an autonomous region of China, yet doubts about India’s intentions linger. Even the Chinese military action in 1962 was attributed not to the legality or otherwise of the McMahon Line, but as Mao Zedung told a Nepalese delegation in 1964 that ‘in the opinion of the Indian government, Tibet is theirs.’ The decision by the Indian Army to raise a new strike corps has done nothing to lessen Chinese apprehensions.

Despite enormous efforts, China has still not been able to subdue Tibetan aspirations. China has tried everything from brutal crackdowns to economic sops. Yet the Tibetan yearning for independence just does not die down to China’s utter exasperation {as in East Turkestan} . China faces a crisis of credibility in Tibet even after a half century of so-called ‘democratic reforms.’5. Sometimes even Chinese officials, in candid moments, admit that although their economic strategies have been a success, yet their political strategy for ensuring stability has been a dismal failure.6.

China has played a central role in helping Pakistan become a nuclear weapons state. China is helping Pakistan to fuel the fastest growing nuclear arsenal in the world.7. China is also the main military weapons supplier to the Pakistan Army. According to SIPRI nearly 55 per cent of China’s arms exports go to Pakistan. China’s arms exports world- wide rose by an unprecedented 162 per cent for the period 2008-2012.8. The aim is to ensure that India remains occupied in South Asia.

Strategic analysts sitting in Beijing realize that in any Sino-Indian stand-off, the role of the US would be crucial. China watched with some anxiety the US urge India to play a greater role in the Indo-Pacific region. As US Deputy Secretary of State, Burns put it ‘India’s strong presence in the Indian and Pacific Oceans is a source of comfort and affirms its potential as a net security provider in the maritime domain.’9. Therefore, the way Indo-US relations develop is of great strategic significance for China.

The Chinese are aware that PM Modi is visiting Washington shortly. In the Modi-Obama talks, like Banquo’s ghost, the shadow of China will be ever present. The central message therefore is that should India gravitate too closely towards the US inspired ‘rebalance’ to Asia, or move closer to Japan, Australia and Vietnam; it would have to contend with renewed pressure on the boundary. The Chumar standoff is the physical demonstration of the Chinese message.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Sep 2014 20:21

New Gambles in Ladakh - P.Stbdan, IDSA Comment
Given the high degree of national mandate Xi and Modi carried, people had expected statesmanship from the two leaders to break the ice on the India-China standoff. The opportunity seems missed and instead mistrust has grown. One reads the familiar media overtone ‘we told you so’, ‘China can’t be trusted’, ‘India takes tough stance’, ‘Chinese troops back down’, so on and so forth. These sound apologetic. Sign of a failure?

To begin with both leaders exuded self-confidence, despite misgivings, they seemed serious and upbeat about forging a win-win partnership, deepening trade and investment links. Xi saw opportunities to build upon on Modi’s economic agendas, sought reciprocities and India-China congruence to build a “multipolar” world.

Until they walked the Sabarmati bank things looked fine. But, when media suddenly stirred up Chumur and Demchok crises, enthusiasm started to wane. One is not clear whether Modi and Xi even anticipated the flare up but both came out with foul mood after their press briefings – they were clearly being trapped into a narrative that is neither Chinese nor Indian.

To be sure, while President Xi came with the aim to focus on economics but sensing the Indian toughness, he would have come prepared with a Plan B. This is where things started to drift. It appeared the visit was fixed; it was a game of nerve. Xi had inkling into India’s new perspective on China. A number of Chinese experts visited New Delhi and tested the waters in advance through their interface with think-tanks like VIF, ORF and India Foundation.

Beijing may have taken Modi’s Bhutan and Nepal visits into its strategic calculations, but also carefully observed a series of other actions – Arunachal leader Kiren Rijiju’s entry into Cabinet; appointing former Army Chief to oversee border infrastructure; inviting Tibetan leader Lobzang to Modi’s oath taking function; Prakash Javadekar, the environment minister, giving clearances to building roads within 100-km of the LAC; decision to install a radar station at Narcondam Island; decision to set up additional 54 ITBP posts along borders; Modi’s "expansionist mind-set" swipe in Tokyo; Sushma’s “One-India” thought and finally Pranab Mukherjee’s Vietnam visit close on the heels of Xi’s visit.

Modi’s assertive style, his ability to spring surprises through duality of friendship and toughness, like he did on Pakistan, may have gone into the making of Xi’s India strategy. But most critically, Beijing would have certainly calculated on India’s shift in thinking on the ground in Ladakh, where the Army adopted “assertive posturing” to “interdict” Chinese troops along LAC. Daily border patrolling since the last two months led to increased face-offs, frequencies going up from once or twice a month to almost daily. The transgressions figure is over 400 already this year.


But the crisis at Tibli (Chumur) began on September 8, 2014 when the Indian army erected a storage hut near the zero-border on the Indian side of the International Border (IB). No official statement came from the government though the media reported extensively about the PLA incursions since September 10. Xi’s order to pull back PLA troops did not work and since September 21, the Chinese workers have entered at 31-R point to build a road up to Tible Mane (a mini Stupa) located inside the IB.

Another flash point in Demchok erupted simultaneously after the J&K authorities suddenly ordered on August 18 to construct a small irrigation canal at Nilung Nalla under the NREGA scheme that had been a sour point with the Chinese. Surprisingly, the PLA this time mobilized villagers from Tashigong to pitch Rebos (tents) at Charding-Ninglung Nallah (CNN) Track Junction to protest Indian action.

It all appears that the Indian army this time got clear orders to hold the ground and undo what the previous UPA government did – dismantled huts, bunkers and observation posts in exchange of PLA moving back from the Indian territory. The Depsang crisis last year triggered off after 77 Brigade constructed a fortified post in Chumar. The stand-off was resolved after the structure in Chumur was removed.

The Chumur crisis relates to China’s strong objection to the erection of a hut at Tible. But the NDA government is unwilling to repeat UPA’s ambiguity in dealing with repeated Chinese intrusions. All these years, China drew the red-line but this time India upped the ante by sending a tough message that it would not dismantle its fortified positions. Having been used to browbeat the Indian army in the past, the PLA may have been surprised by India's swift counter build-up and firmness at the commander’s flag meetings.

Modi through his talks with Xi made it clear that India can no longer have uncertainty along borders. China though is more focused on the Scottish referendum and gives no attention on border face-offs in Ladakh. However, Chinese experts accused India of "instigating" and using "offensive" approach to gain leverage on the border. It viewed India’s toughness “superficial” and “symbolic”. So far, the flag meetings at Spanguur has failed, diplomacy has not worked either. Escalation is likely and the Indian forces seem well prepared.

China has long moved to make economics central to its foreign policy, but showed unwillingness to compromise on territorial claims and does not fear danger of a confrontation in the South China Sea with the US, Japan and others. It is a game of nerves and for India dealing with the Chinese demands adroit thinking. Phraseologies and nice acronyms will not suffice. Surely, the handling so far portends less strategy but more tactics, it reflects less diplomacy but more operation.

(Author is a former Ambassador and honorary President of Ladakh International Centre)


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rsingh » 29 Sep 2014 20:53

I wonder if HK protests are covered by mainland chini media? Who knows it may be start of great Chinese winter.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 29 Sep 2014 22:01

^^ the jokers are also warning against external foreign influence. What a bunch of suckers. They can externally influence any country / region but anyone doing the same is met with a stern warning and clucking of tongues. hypocrites.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 30 Sep 2014 05:32

The "Umbrella revolution" has started.However don't expect any softening or sympathy from the Beijing barbarians.China's track record is the global bleakest when it comes to human rights and true democratic freedom.When push comes to shove,China knows only one medicine,the bullet to the body.

But what is astonishing in its hypocrisy is the feeble squeaks from the great defenders of democracy,Britain and the US.Britain,which surrendered Hong Kong to the Chinese on an supposed solemn agreement to allow HK's way of life to continue for 50 years,has shamefully abdicated upon its responsibility and has abandoned the HK Chinese to their fate.Martin Lee,charismatic HK political leader,has stressed upon this point.Where are the great politicos of NATO,the West and the EU rushing to HK to show solidarity with the protestors as they did in Kiev? Duplicity and double standards galore.The West is too scared of the eco benefits from cohabiting with China.India too should raise its voice in support of "democracy" in HK as well as using the two "T" cards.China only understands and respects only confident strong nations who crack the whip.

Mr.Modi should during his US visit highlight the differences between China and India,one nation a true free democracy-the world's largest,and the other,the world's largest dictatorship, when he meets US bigwigs and politicos and use the opportunity presented by the crass Beijing quacks to ram home the point that the US/West are better off dealing with India as an equal than pandering to the Chinese jackboot.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/s ... al-holiday
Hong Kong: more join protests as crowds are urged to keep going
Occupy Central leader asks people to stay on until national holiday as tens of thousands pack into heart of city

Fresh waves of pro-democracy protesters have swept into the heart of Hong Kong, as a leader of the civil disobedience movement urged them to keep the momentum going until Wednesday’s national holiday.

Crowds blocked one of the city’s main roads on Monday from the financial area of Central to the bar district of Wanchai in what appeared to be the largest demonstration yet. Tens of thousands were packed so tightly into Admiralty, around the government headquarters, that it was hard to move through the masses gathered beneath the skyscrapers.

Some have dubbed it “the umbrella revolution” in reference to the umbrellas carried by protesters to ward off teargas and pepper spray attacks, and which also served to shelter them from the fierce sun earlier in the day.

With no sign of police force on Monday evening, the mood was festive rather than angry. Participants held up their smartphones to create a glittering sea of lights and joined in a mass rendition of Do You Hear The People Sing – the revolutionaries’ song from the musical Les Misérables. Many in the overwhelmingly young crowd wore black and sported yellow ribbons. Others had come straight from their offices in smart shirts; two teenage convent girls were still in their starched white uniforms.
Pro-democracy protesters wet cloths to distribute among people in case of teargas attacks. Pro-democracy protesters wet cloths to distribute among people in case of teargas attacks. Photograph: Alex Hofford/EPA

“We hope it will continue until at least 1 October. Then we will announce new actions. It is not realistic for people to occupy Central forever,” Chan Kinman, one of the founders of Occupy Central with Peace and Love, told the Guardian.

“We have to be careful not to invite a backlash. Any civil disobedience has to be proportionate and at a certain time we have got to stop.”

But students have threatened to step up their protests if the government does not respond to their demands by Wednesday.
Advertisement

Hong Kong enjoys considerable autonomy under the “one country, two systems” framework and has long been promised universal suffrage for the election of the next chief executive in 2017. Protesters are furious at Beijing’s announcement of tight restrictions on candidates and see the decision as part of a broader attempt to erode the region’s freedoms and culture.

On Monday, both Britain and the US urged Hong Kong’s leaders to show restraint and adhere to the promise of universal suffrage. A Foreign Office spokesman said: “It is Britain’s long-standing position, as a co-signatory of the Sino-British Joint Declaration, that Hong Kong’s prosperity and security are underpinned by its fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to demonstrate.”Precipitated by a student strike and expanding dramatically when police used teargas to try to clear the streets on Sunday, the protest movement has taken on a life of its own.

Many of those present on Monday did not identify themselves as supporters of Occupy Central, or even as protesters at all, and said only the police tactics had spurred them into action.

A cluster of young women in smart office clothes, clutching bulging plastic bags, appeared to be on a post-work shopping spree. But they stopped at a hardware store to buy goggles in case of a teargas attack. They were not the only ones. The hardware store sold dozens of pairs of goggles in just 15 minutes.
A protester hits a cutout of Hong Kong chief executive CY Leung, which had been given fangs. A protester hits a cutout of Hong Kong chief executive CY Leung, which had been given fangs. Photograph: Tyrone Siu/Reuters

The marketing employees, who had bags full of crackers, plastic ponchos and water for protesters, had not planned to become involved, but said they felt they had to support them after seeing the scenes of billowing teargas on television. “Not everyone goes to the frontline. They need people to support them with resources,” said Helen Ng.

But she voiced some concern about the potential implications of the campaign: “We want to maintain the good image of Hong Kong. It’s a world city and we want to maintain the image and not, because of the protests, make people think the quality of the people is deteriorating.”

Chan said that while the movement was “not top-down, but bottom-up”, he believed the months that Occupy spent educating people in non-violent protest had been crucial in shaping events. Protesters had shown restraint even in the face of an unreasonable crackdown. “We can’t control it at the operational level, but the spiritual level, and I’m quite confident Hong Kong people have changed in their views of struggle and resistance,” he said.

“We imagined there would be a great crowd of people as spectators, and only thousands would sit in. But look: they are not afraid to sit in, not afraid of teargas. It is beyond my imagination how tough people are in fighting for democracy.”

The government stepped back earlier in the day, announcing that riot police had been taken off the streets as citizens “have mostly calmed down” and urging people to unblock roads and disperse. Police said they had used what they believed to be a minimal level of force overnight.

Barricades block a crossroad controlled by activists in Mongkok in Kowloon. Photograph: Alex Hofford/EPA

But new protests broke out in Causeway Bay and Mongkok in Kowloon, which continued into Monday. Banks, shops and offices were closed in protest areas, bus lines were suspended and civil servants sent home early. Coca-Cola transport workers went on strike in support of the protests, as did some social workers. More schools have joined the class boycott that began last week and the government has ordered schools in three districts to close for a second day on Tuesday. It has also cancelled plans for the annual firework display to celebrate China’s national holiday on Wednesday, when a surge in mainland visitors is expected.

Officials say 41 people, including police, have been injured since the protests began and 78 arrested for offences including forcible entry into government premises, unlawful assembly and obstructing police.

But in Central, business continued as usual during the day and in Causeway Bay, tourists and shoppers made their way around the protests.

The demonstrators have been remarkably orderly; one sign apologised for any inconvenience caused. On Sunday, protesters held their hands in the air each time they confronted police. On Monday, they handed out fresh fruit and crackers, collected rubbish and even fanned passers-by to keep them cool.

Even so, organisers and participants know that Hong Kong remains a politically conservative society where many are concerned that protests could upset the economic stability of the financial hub. The Hong Kong dollar and Hong Kong shares slipped on Monday.

Retired civil servant Rose Ha, 58, said there was a clear generation gap. She had come to support the students, but few people of her age sympathised.
High-school students still in their uniforms hold signs during a protest outside the headquarters of the legislative council in Hong Kong. High-school students still in their uniforms hold signs during a protest outside the headquarters of the legislative council in Hong Kong. Photograph: Xaume Olleros/AFP/Getty Images

“We are the odd ones out in our group. [The others] enjoy what they have and don’t want things to be chaotic,” she said.

“Our friends, who are maybe rich or in power, just denounce the actions and think the students have been misled,” added her friend Ben Ho, 60.

“People who are older lose touch with younger generations. They sit in restaurants and just criticise … They think in Hong Kong you can enjoy freedom and a peaceful life; why destroy it? What they ignore is that they are a privileged group and people are suffering from injustice and unfairness and the lack of opportunities.”

While the movement appears to be largely middle class to date, many of those involved say daily life is increasingly tough for ordinary people in the city, citing issues such as rising property prices.

Such concerns have been developing over recent years, along with unhappiness about large-scale migration from the mainland.But the movement sparked by all these factors has been a shock to a city which sees itself as conservative and law-abiding. Even the keenest supporters of the protests are taken aback by their scale and self-confidence.

This is a watershed,” said Hung Ho-fung, of Johns Hopkins University. “This time people are using civil disobedience and setting up barricades. There’s also the disruptive aspect; in the past, they emphasised that demonstrations would not affect everyday life. This time they really don’t care. I really haven’t seen anything like this in Hong Kong history.”

But, he warned: “Beijing has put itself in a corner and I don’t think it can back down.”

Protestors gather in Admiralty district alongside students during a protest outside the headquarters of the legislative council in Hong Kong.

In previous cases where mass protests against Chinese government plans led to them being dropped the decisions had formally been made by the Hong Kong leadership. This time, the framework for reforms was announced by the standing committee for Beijing’s National People’s Congress; Beijing is explicitly tied to it and cannot portray a shift as a decision by the Hong Kong government.

Occupy Central and others have prioritised the demand to oust CY Leung, the highly unpopular chief executive.

“It will be quite difficult for Beijing to withdraw its decision,” said Chan. “But if we ask the chief executive to step down, and a new government replaces him, it opens a window for us to start the constitutional reform process over again. That’s a more realistic tactic.”

Beijing is concerned not just by its inability to rule Hong Kong with a firm hand but by the risk of contagion - with censors working hard on Monday to keep independent reports of the protests from the mainland.

Several newly arrived mainland tourists had no idea why the protests were happening, although they seemed intrigued. Others disapproved.

“It’s very inconvenient. We are tourists; we came here to shop,” said Emily Liu, visiting from Shanghai.

“People are angry because of the teargas,” added her friend Kari Xu. “But if they didn’t use teargas, there would be too many people – if they didn’t use that, how could the government handle things?”


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SaiK » 30 Sep 2014 06:31

strength renewed by flames
democracy spreads her wide fiery wings
a phoenix rises for
#HongKong #Tibet #4PakiProvinces

http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2 ... 80-600.jpg

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby RoyG » 30 Sep 2014 06:34

I agree. The revolution has started within China. This is going to be a strategic boon for us. We should make sure that Xing Xiang and Tibet slowly drift out of Han orbit.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby RoyG » 30 Sep 2014 06:42



This things is getting massive. If China doesn't act fast it is going to spread to the mainland. Don't expect Russia to sit by either. We have to make sure to keep the Chinese out at all costs.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 30 Sep 2014 14:12

No outside arbitration to resolve Sino-India border row: PM Narendra Modi - PTI, Economic Times
Prime Minister Narendra Modi today rejected any need for outside arbitration to resolve the vexed issue of India's boundary dispute with China, saying the two countries are competent to find a solution through talks.

"India and China are capable of resolving issues through talks. There is no need for any arbitration," Modi said at the Council on Foreign Relations here in response to a question.

Asked if India would accept outside arbitration or adjudication to resolve the Sino-India border issue, the Prime Minister said, "there was no need for it as the two countries are talking to each other directly."

Modi said India wants to build friendly relations with all its neighbours.

His remarks came in the backdrop of a recent standoff in Ladakh region, where Chinese Army had made a fresh incursion.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby member_28714 » 30 Sep 2014 18:29

Tienanmen Square in Hong Kong soon?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 30 Sep 2014 18:50

The Zhongnanhai clique will be very careful not to repeat a TAM Sq. massacre.The HK democracy supporters are leaderless.It is a spontaneous mass uprising against the imposition of a Beijing puppet as HK boss,but with little idea how to proceed further.Civil disobedience Gandhian style is the manner in which they should continue the protests on a daily basis.They should paralyse different parts of HK keeping Beijing guessing.Beijing has already warned outside powers not to interfere.The same way we should also ask it to stop interfering in our backyard as this post indicates that it is looking for naval bases in the IOR.

PLA wants naval bases in Indian Ocean: Yomiuri Shimbun
Staff Reporter 2014-09-30
http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subc ... 0930000108

The 039 Song-class diesel-electric submarine anchors at Colombo port. (Internet photo)

After a Chinese submarine and warships visited Sri Lanka, Iran and Pakistan, the Tokyo-based Yomiuri Shimbun on Sept. 27 reported that the People's Liberation Army Navy is seeking to construct naval ports in the Indian Ocean to monitor the movements of the Indian Navy.

Between Sept. 7-14, a Type 039 Song-class diesel-electric submarine anchored at Colombo in Sri Lanka to take on supplies. It is the first time a Chinese submarine has been sent publicly to a port near the Indian Ocean. The visit of Chinese president Xi Jinping to Sri Lanka after the submarine appeared also indicated that Beijing is strengthening its partnership with Sri Lanka. After its stay at Colmbo, the submarine moved on to the Gulf of Aden, according to the PLA Navy.

The Changchun, a Type 052C guided-missile destroyer, and the Changzhou, a Type 054A guided-missile frigate, also launched joint naval exercises with the Iranian and Pakistan navies during their visit to Bandar Abbas and Karachi. Those drills indicated that China is trying to expand its influence into the region through transforming the PLA Navy into a genuine blue-water navy.

The paper said that China is discussing maritime cooperation with the Seychelles, Mauritius, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Cambodia.
Admiral Robin K Dhowan, India's chief of naval staff, said China is apparently seeking allies to encircle India. Dhowan said that the Indian navy will pay close attention to Chinese expansion in the region. If China begins to increase its naval activities in the Indian Ocean, it is likely to become a serious challenge to India, Dhowan said.


India should accelerate its naval cooperation with Vietnam asap,deliver BMos missiles and other missiles and mil. eqpt. in its arsenal to the Vietnamese.We can build a number of naval /CG vessels for the Vietnamese using out pvt. yards which can build to the designs of the IN,thereby ensuring prompt delivery! It can also engage the Phillipines too in similar fashion apart from other threatened ASEAN nations.

It is most unfortunate but China has et a course of confrontation with India which in all probability result in a military conflict at some time in the future unless the GOI shores up India's defence and strike capability,both nuclear and non-nuclear ,which would make it exceptionally difficult and painful for China to embark upon.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Oct 2014 06:24

^^ my prescription: start setting up naval bases in SCS and also improve cooperation between Indian navy and Japan, Vietnam.. .even Philippines [second Thomas shoal, fiery reef, scarlborough reef mischief reef etc]. While we are at it, we can consider aid and dev for Brunei, Malaysia and Indonesia too?

Time for fine navel gazing and making China go a bit wet in their pants. we have also been using an aircraft carrier for a while. they just started recently. perhaps put the experience to good use NOW than regret later.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 01 Oct 2014 10:22

Vijay,"Indo-China Sea" not SCS please!!!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Oct 2014 10:48

^ =)). Agree, we should consider renaming it too.

And oh, while we are at it, this kind of news is what perturbs and worries me: http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2014/ ... e-air-zone

MANILA, Philippines - China’s reclamation and development of disputed reefs in the West Philippine Sea is apparently part of Beijing’s plan to establish an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the region, a senior security official said yesterday.

The source, citing military studies and continuous territorial monitoring, warned that China is very close to establishing full control of the region from other claimant countries – the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei and Taiwan.

“China is just waiting for the completion of its naval and air facility development projects over Cuarteron Reef, Chigua Reef, Mabini Reef and Burgos Reef before declaring the ADIZ similar to what it did in the East China Sea,” the official said.

Aerial survey by the Western Command (Wescom) over these reefs showed that the area is now teeming with construction activities.

The reclaimed reefs are located well within the Philippines 200-nautical mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and are under the territorial jurisdiction of Kalayaan Island, a municipality of Palawan.

The island-town is located right in the middle of the hotly contested Spratlys archipelago.
Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

Aside from air and naval facilities, Beijing is also putting up tourism facilities on these artificial islets, including swimming pools and hotels to accommodate tourists from China.

In November last year, China was widely criticized by Japan and the United States when it established the ADIZ covering most of the East China Sea, including the Japanese controlled Senkaku Islands or Diaoyu Islands to the Chinese.

Japan and China have claims over the Senkakus or Diaoyus, a dispute that has resulted in maritime actions and near air confrontation.

Local aviation official John Andrews had warned that China might attempt to establish another ADIZ in the South China Sea, as it aggressively pursues its encompassing maritime claim over the disputed region.

“Once ADIZ is established in the region, it will not only affect our air and naval movements in our Kalayaan Island Group (KIG) but also other claimant countries,” said another security official.

He said China is rushing reclamation developments in the region because it intends to position its fighter jets and warships to enforce the ADIZ.

At present, only Kalayaan town in Pag-asa Island has an airport while the remaining eight islets and reefs occupied by Filipino troops could be reached by Navy or civilian boats.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Oct 2014 13:16

vijaykarthik wrote:China’s reclamation and development of disputed reefs in the West Philippine Sea is apparently part of Beijing’s plan to establish an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the region, a senior security official said yesterday.

It is just not for setting up an ADIZ, which I think it can set up without even acquiring (or even 'building new') islands. It is plainly to stake its logical claim under UNCLOS. It is refusing to be a party in UNCLOS in a case filed by the Philippines because it currently has no proof for its claims. Its case will fall flat in the UNCLOS hearing. So, it is postponing appearing before the committee while feverishly building up 'evidence'.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby amritk » 01 Oct 2014 14:06

rsingh wrote:I wonder if HK protests are covered by mainland chini media? Who knows it may be start of great Chinese winter.


Not a whisper. The media and internet control is nearly complete. Even google does not work there. Too few Chinese know English well enough to be interested in VPNing out to see what's happening in the world. First time I was there many years ago I didn't know about VPN and was BR deprived for weeks :cry:

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Oct 2014 17:55

'India would not join anti-China coalition led by U.S.' - Chinese Hope - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
Taking stock of the “big picture,” following Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s high-profile visit to the United States, China has arrived at the conclusion that India would not join Japan, Australia and the Philippines in an anti-Beijing coalition led by Washington.

An article that appeared in the People’s Daily, the official newspaper of the Chinese government, cited three reasons to conclude why New Delhi would not partner a U.S-led “rebalancing” strategy in the Asia-Pacific that targets China.

Also called the Washington’s “Pivot to Asia”— a coinage first detailed by former U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton - the mantra anchors a decision to expand Washington’s military profile in the Asia-Pacific, including swathes of the Indian Ocean, by beefing up military capabilities of countries on the periphery of China, including Japan, Australia and the Philippines.

The daily pointed out that rooted in its non-aligned culture, India will not develop its ties with the U.S. at China’s expense. “India adheres to an all-round foreign policy strategy. Not only does India give priority to the India-U.S. relationship, it also attaches great importance to Sino-India relationships,” the daily observed.

Besides, both countries have vowed to forge a “closer development partnership” during President Xi’s visit to India. The article reiterated that the “unsolved territorial disputes will not affect the development of Sino-India relations”. The comment coincides with an agreement on the pull back by forces of both sides to their original position, thus ending the recent flare up in Ladakh.

From a Chinese perspective, the core of the “rebalancing” doctrine would unfold in Japan, where 40,000 U.S. troops would be positioned and in South Korea, where 28, 500 American servicemen were to be stationed. A U.S. Congressional Research Service report had earlier stated that Washington would post 2,500 troops in Darwin, Australia, and discussions were underway to allow U.S. Navy greater access in Perth.

Referring to the economic aspect of the “rebalancing” doctrine, the newspaper pointed out that India was not even in the frame in the formation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which was at the heart of the approach to restrain China’s economic rise. The countries participating in the TPP include Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

On the contrary, India was focused inwards, seeking foreign investments to bolster its domestic economy. “India has established an economic and financial partnership with America. One of (Mr.) Modi's tasks during his visit is to promote an Indian economic recovery plan. The Indian government has therefore arranged a set of joint activities with American business elite for their Prime Minister Modi in order to attract more American investment,” the newspaper observed.


Well, whether we covertly join the so-called alliance or not, it helps if we lead the Chinese down the garden path. OTOH, the Chinese may be clever too and want us to believe that they don't suspect us even when their internal thinking is diametrically opposite. Neither us nor China trusts each other.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 01 Oct 2014 18:08

Nervous Chinese officials search pigeon anuses for bombs

Officials in China this week examined the anuses of 10,000 pigeons that were set to be released today in celebration of National Day, amid government fears of a possible terrorist attack.


:shock:

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Oct 2014 18:28

^ LOL. The 'extremes' to which the Chinese stoop to. To be saved for posteriority... posterity, I mean

Do they learn these fetishes from their Pakistan friends?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sanjaykumar » 01 Oct 2014 21:57

Cloaca.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sanjaykumar » 01 Oct 2014 21:57


schinnas
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby schinnas » 01 Oct 2014 22:41



Well researched perspective indeed. Thanks for sharing.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 02 Oct 2014 10:49

China props up the puppet with a severe warning while the demos expand.It looks like the entire people of HK will soon fill the streets,a mass uprising something that china has never experienced before since the days of the civil war and KMT .
We know how it is all going to end...in a bloodbath.
Local piggies say that one can expect a massive movement of troops from the mainland,of the type experienced in battering Tibetans and Uighars.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/o ... ceo-resign
Hong Kong protests: China hardens stance as students demand CEO resign
People’s Daily gives full backing to embattled Leung Chun-ying while foreign minister sends warning to the west

Beijing hardened its line on pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong on Thursday, as students sat in front of government offices in the region demanding the chief executive’s resignation by the end of the day.

The official People’s Daily newspaper, the voice of the Communist party, said that China was “very satisfied” with Leung Chun-ying and had full confidence in his leadership – dashing the hopes of demonstrators that Beijing would be willing to sacrifice the chief executive to calm the situation.

Its front page commentary also supported the police handling of the “illegal activities”, attacking the protestors for violating the rule of law, disrupting order and damaging peace and prosperity.

It accused protesters of threatening to drag the region into chaos. The prominent display of the article emphasised its importance.

While some have dubbed the movement the “umbrella revolution”, participants have been at pains to stress they do not seek independence from China nor the overthrow of the Communist party – simply the right to a real choice of the next chief executive.

As protests gained pace – galvanised by the use of teargas in failed attempts to disperse them – they also demanded the resignation of the current incumbent.

China has promised Hong Kong universal suffrage for the 2017 election, reflecting the greater freedoms the region enjoys under the “one country, two systems” framework.

While Hong Kong residents knew that limits would be imposed on their choice, many were angered by the toughness of the restrictions announced – which effectively rule out any prospect of a democrat standing.

Only two or three candidates will be permitted and they will have to win the backing of a committee full of Beijing loyalists.

China’s foreign minister Wang Yi warned foreign governments not to intervene as he visited Washington for scheduled talks with secretary of state John Kerry.

wang yi
US secretary of state John Kerry with Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi in Washington on Wednesday. Photograph: Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images
“Hong Kong affairs are China’s internal affairs ... All countries should respect China’s sovereignty and this is a basic principle of governing international relations,” Wang said.

“I believe for any country, for any society, no one would allow those illegal acts that violate public order. That’s the situation in the United States and that’s the same situation in Hong Kong.”

Speaking alongside Wang at a press briefing, Kerry told reporters: “As China knows, we support universal suffrage in Hong Kong, accordant with the Basic Law [the mini-constitution of Hong Kong].

“We believe an open society with the highest possible degree of autonomy and governed by rule of law is essential for Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity ... And we have high hopes that the Hong Kong authorities will exercise restraint and respect the protestors’ right to express their views peacefully.”

Unusually, US officials said the two men would meet for a second time later on Wednesday at the Chinese delegation’s request.

State department spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters: “It’s clear that we want the people of Hong Kong to have a broad choice of candidates.”

Supporters of the Hong Kong demonstrators protested outside the Chinese embassy in London on Wednesday night, and gathered at sites across the US.

Mainland authorities have been working overtime to tightly control references to the protests and the South China Morning Post reported that they have suspended visits by tour groups to Hong Kong.

The China National Tourism Administration told operators not to organise group visits to the city, though people who had booked before Wednesday will not be affected. Mainland tourists account for the vast bulk of visitors to Hong Kong – around 75% – but most come as individuals.


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