Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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pankajs
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 01 Aug 2017 13:22

Apologies if this sounds harsh to some but look at it from the Chinese pov. The Chinese do/understand psyops better than most. I read/heard a podcast [long back so I can't be sure] about what the Chinese did to the American POW's to turn them around and make them denounce America. No force or direct coercion was used. They were using some techniques that was *discovered* much later by the bestern psychology world.

All the Chinese have to do is send *a* guy across the disputed LAC at say Niti pass [I hope I have that right] for an hour's foray and for Indians that simple act makes them believe that the whole border is up for grabs.

Think about it. Can it get any better? If I was a Chinese planner I would NEVER settle the border if that is all it takes to induce a collective dhoti shiver in India. I mean ONE guy doing this thing, hopping from pass to pass, could tie up half of IA at the border and keep Indians in perpetual fear of the *mythical* dlagon.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby chola » 01 Aug 2017 13:57

pankajs wrote:Apologies if this might sound harsh to some but look at it from the Chinese pov. The Chinese do/understand psyops better than most.


Yup. Unless we fvcking kick their arses and physically change the border in no uncertain terms (like retaking Aksai Chin) then any moral victory based on winning "face" or applauds from the world community will be overwhelmed by propaganda (and money) in time.

They do good propaganda. Lookie here, after watching that you'd think Cheen is second only to US as carrier superpower:


You think the GOI or IN can release a Vikramaditya vid to match?

In war, theirs is nothing more than training carrier while ours is fully combat capable.

But in peace? They have the bigger and better funded propaganda department, so they will always win.

Don't let them choose if there is war or not. We should choose. Let's choose to kick arse.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby DrRatnadip » 01 Aug 2017 14:50

shiv wrote:
DrRatnadip wrote:I hope we are ready with detailed plan to liberate Tibet.. It seems that NK is soon going to get some zapad from US/ japnese.. This will be the time chinese would like to concentrate their best on east coast.. We can use this opportunity to settle all border disputes permenently..
Honestly speaking these temporary incursions are not going to help lizard in long run.. I am not too concerned about it.. It's repeated chinese haramigiri like protecting paki pigs/blocking us in NSG / misusing veto against us makes my blood boil.. Taming lizard is a must if we want permenent seat in security council.. :evil:

I worry about nations who try to "liberate" other nations. Liberty is an American masturbatory term that is overused and undefined. I would like to recall how many nations have been successfully liberated in the past 75 years. Bangladesh was liberated. I think France and Poland were liberated. The Philippines was "liiberated" in a sense. Vietnam, Korea, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan have resisted attempts at liberation.

India and the US actually collaborated to liberate Tibet in the same way that the US tried to liberate Afghanistan. But that petered out. There are, even now "countries waiting to be liberated" - like Kashmir and Palestine for or PoK for India.

Tibet is a very hostile land in terns of climate and resources. It is also huge. The Tibetans as a free people were not kowtowing to India and being friendly in the stupid way Indians seem to get friendly with moronic hostile peoples. It may be better to keep China busy by forcing them to deal with Tibetans fighting for "liberty" rather than Indians going and poking our noses to "liberate" Tibet

Sir I would like to know your views on possible options we have if creating buffer zone between chin and India is not viable option..I am pretty sure in present condition china will obstruct our path to become world power wherever possible..

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Aug 2017 15:22

Singha wrote:major loss of face for cheen if that happens though they will still try to salvage something by offering to go in with a 'stabilization force', occupy and pacify noko and set the stage for transition to their next chosen tyrant. infact being a clever reptile they might have gamed this as better for long term and goading Kim into escalation after escalation hoping that DT will blow his fuse ... they will earn both brownie points for cleaning up the rubble, catching any kim loyalists and a new foothold on land they will never want to leave. south korea will be eternally grateful too.


They sure do have an alternate regime that they can put up in a jiffy if they want to do a decap move.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Aug 2017 15:32

Singha wrote:Kim is but a stepping stone which Cheen will use to become Shogun of east asia. a means to an end, not the end. I think he realizes this and has plans to go feral at the due time. while kim and bashar assad may not look like much vs their ruthless and cunning fathers, they have the same blood and dna and are a lot more cunning than they project.


This is also corroborated by the happenings of past 12+ months. NK isn't v happy with China and isn't on v friendly terms. Ever since the uncle of KJU got killed, China hasn't been happy and KJU has still not been invited to meet Xi (I can't imagine that happening earlier, at all).

XI doesn't like KJU too much and there isn't much love lost between them. The only time when KJU perhaps listened to China was when NK wanted to let off the new n-toy and China objected and positioned troops close to NK border. (In April sometime during the Mil Foundation day or the Day of the Sun)

In balance, NK will love to get a chance to poke China in the eye and where it hurts the most.
Last edited by vijaykarthik on 01 Aug 2017 21:39, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 01 Aug 2017 15:46

So in this Barahoti region, reading from Shiv's comments, it is quite an in-hospitable region. So why would chinese keep intruding this place, indirectly causing a counter build up from the Indian side?

I have a theory that the Chinese feel, India might launch an offensive in this area. Is it because it is closer to Mansarovar?

There is a proper airport as well, fundamentally in the middle of nowhere.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ryogi » 01 Aug 2017 15:54

** Deleted **

This has been reported. Don't post such political posts here.

Also please change your userhandle to comply with forum guidelines before August 4.
Last edited by SSridhar on 01 Aug 2017 18:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Paul » 01 Aug 2017 15:56

In 1950 Tibet had asked India to return Tawang back to them. A touch of reality for those who want to go to war with China for Tibet's sake.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 01 Aug 2017 15:59

All based on the little info on this forum. I may be wrong but my guess based on limited info is ...

The LAC is not defined/Not agreed upon/disputed at that point. So expect the Chinese to send an occasional patrol to keep the disputed status alive. I am sure India too send patrol into that area. Now from the Chinese pov India too is doing what we are accusing the Chinese of doing.

Just like at Dolam plateau, I am sure that each party to the dispute sends in regular patrol to keep its claim active. I am sure that IA does not roll down from its perch at Doka La pass each time to intercept the normal Chinese patrol on the plateau. We accept it as a disputed area between Bhutan and China.

The really serious issue will arise when one of the following happens.
1. Change the status in the disputed areas by either sending a BIG contingent to preventing the other party from asserting its claim.
2. Change the status in the disputed areas by creating new facts on the ground e.g. Bunkers, Roads, etc.
3. Incursion across agreed upon/un disputed LAC.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Aug 2017 16:24

Doklam effect? India said to block Fosun's $1.3 billion Gland purchase - Economic Times
India is poised to reject Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Group Co’s proposed $1.3 billion takeover of an Indian drugmaker, according to people familiar with the matter, scuppering the biggest-ever Chinese acquisition in the country.

The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has decided to block the Chinese firm’s purchase of an 86 per cent stake in Gland Pharma, said the people.

The companies haven’t been formally notified yet of the move, the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private.

Tensions between India and China -- the South Asian nation’s biggest trading partner -- have escalated amid a renewed spat over territory in a remote area of the Himalayas, one of the most serious flareups since a border war in 1962. A collapse of the acquisition would be a setback for Fosun Pharma, which had sought Gland Pharma’s stable of generic injectable medicines and facilities approved to manufacture products for sale in the U.S.

“This is almost like a sanction,” said Abhijit Joshi, a mergers and acquisitions lawyer and managing partner at Veritas Legal in Mumbai, who isn’t involved in the deal. “Rejecting a deal like this is almost like sending a signal to say, ‘no Chinese business,’ which means there could be a retaliatory action, trade wise, by China.”

Diplomatic engagement

Fosun Pharma, backed by Chinese billionaire Guo Guangchang, said in an exchange filing Tuesday that Gland Pharma hasn’t received notice on the result of the acquisition review from the Indian government.

The arm of Chinese conglomerate Fosun International Ltd. agreed in July last year to acquire control of Gland Pharma from an investor group including KKR & Co. The setback highlights the difficulties faced by China’s once-prolific acquirers, which are facing mounting pressure at home and abroad. HNA Group Co. recently scrapped the purchase of an in-flight entertainment provider, while Dalian Wanda Group Co. agreed to sell most of its theme-park assets amid scrutiny from regulators.

The Gland Pharma purchase had already completed Indian antitrust filings and been reviewed by the country’s Foreign Investment Promotion Board. Jagdish Thakkar, a spokesman in the Indian Prime Minister’s Office, didn’t return phone calls, while an email sent to Cabinet Secretary Pradeep Kumar Sinha wasn’t answered. Representatives for Gland Pharma and KKR didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

“India’s engagement with China is multifaceted. In areas where we have commonality of views, engagement has expanded and upgraded in recent years,” India’s junior Foreign Minister V.K. Singh told lawmakers on Thursday, adding that both sides should be guided by previously agreed principles. “India and China, in their relationship, must not allow differences to become disputes.”

Biggest market

Fosun Pharma said in a July 27 filing to the Hong Kong bourse that it had obtained relevant approvals from Chinese authorities. The acquisition is still subject to the review and approval of India’s Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, so the termination date has been further extended to Sept. 26, the filing shows.

Chinese drugmakers have grown more ambitious in seeking deals that will give them access to the U.S., the world’s biggest pharmaceutical market. Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. this year sold its Dendreon Pharmaceuticals unit to Chinese conglomerate Sanpower Group Co. for $820 million. Humanwell Healthcare Group Co., a Chinese maker of anesthetics and contraceptives, is part of a consortium that agreed in June to buy U.S.-based RiteDose for about $605 million.

Chinese companies such as Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., Tencent Holdings Ltd. and Xiaomi Corp. have been investing in India. Alibaba’s finance unit is on the board of Paytm, India’s largest digital payments startup, while Tencent owns a stake in Flipkart Online Services Pvt. Xiaomi, which has invested $500 million in the subcontinent, plans another investment of the size over the next three to five years. India’s trade with China was at $72.3 billion last year, with Chinese exports accounting for 84 percent of the volume.

“From Chinese investment into India for M&A, yes there’s going to be an impact,” Veritas’ Joshi said. “They’re going to be increasingly nervous about investing in India. That capital that was available from China is not going to be available, at least in the short term, which means doing a deal is going to be that much more difficult.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby g.sarkar » 01 Aug 2017 17:00

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 861613.cms
India created 'Chinese threat' to cover up internal failings, claims Beijing daily
IANS|Aug 01, 2017, 02.54 PM IST
India is making up an imaginary "China threat" because of growing threats to its own national unity, a leading Chinese newspaper said on Tuesday.
"It is hard to understand India's groundless 'China threat' theory," said a report in the state-run Global Times by Long Xingchun, a research fellow at The Charhar Institute and director of the Centre for Indian Studies at China West Normal University.
"India probably just needs an enemy, even an imagined one. With multiple nationalities, religions and languages, plus intense internal conflicts and a strong centrifugal force pushing against national unity, India needs an external enemy as distraction.
"The previous arch-enemy Pakistan will no longer suffice as India grows into a big power. China, with large border areas in dispute and the memory of the 1962 war, naturally fills that place," the report said. The report questioned India's decision to send troops into Doklam, which China says is its territory, leading to a dragging stand-off between the two armies. China has repeatedly told India to pull back its troops.
The report asked: "Is China really a strategic threat to India?" It said the Siliguri Corridor on India's northeast was on a plain rather than a plateau. "It only resembles a 'chicken's neck' on a map, rather than a 'neck' in a geographical or military sense.
"Even if Chinese troops seize the 27-km wide corridor, this could in no way stop the movement of the Indian troops between the main bulk of Indian territory and its northeast. India knows this well enough and dwells on the 'chicken's neck' to find an excuse for its intrusion into Doklam." < ..
...

I am impressed, very creative.
Gautam

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sommuk » 01 Aug 2017 17:03

What next ..... Holy Republic Tibet ? :D

“The Chinese people love peace … but we have the confidence to defeat all invasions. We will never allow any people, organisation or political party to split any part of Chinese territory out of the country at any time, in any form”


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... gn-respect


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 01 Aug 2017 17:10



Idea must have to get indirect access to American market. get the know how, Produce in China, import in to India, label it Gland and sell it off to US.

If something goes wrong, the "Indian company" gets the blame.

This is how fake medicines are send to Africa using India brands. And India constantly gets the blame.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby BharataTalwar » 01 Aug 2017 17:24

DrRatnadip wrote: Sir I would like to know your views on possible options we have if creating buffer zone between chin and India is not viable option..I am pretty sure in present condition china will obstruct our path to become world power wherever possible..


Buffer zone imo is a flawed British concept. All you are doing is creating a third party stakeholder that can be manipulated and used against you (Doklam, for instance). We are stuck with China as neighbors through misfortune, but placing a Tibetan state between would be a strategic nightmare. The only viable strategic solution would be to capture a significant part of Tibet, if not all of it, especially the high grounds and gain the upper hand. Preferable surround Nepal and Bhutan with Indian controlled territory and capture the source of the Indus rivers and Mt Kailash. Possibly also cut off TSP.

Put emotions aside and think about it. Tibetans are nobody. The region is even less densely populated than Baluchistan and when dealing with someone as ferocious as the Cheens, I don't believe Tibetans stand a snowball's chance, now or ever. Tibetan independence is out of the question and completely unviable. I feel bad for their situation but we can no longer allow their territory to be used against Indian interests.

India needs to capture strategic areas. Cheens took Tibet and Turkestan. TSP took POK and Baluchistan. Now both enjoy royalties. Nehrus mistakes have to be undone.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Aug 2017 17:48

Protectionism against Chinese products will boomerang on India: China daily - Economic Times
India's attempts to protect domestic industries from overseas competition may offer short-term benefits but will eventually hinder New Delhi's industrial development, a Chinese daily said on Tuesday.

"The list of Chinese products covered by India's trade remedy investigations is getting ever longer, expanding from garments, glass, minerals and other low-end items to advanced products such as new materials and machinery," a Global Times report said.

It said that on July 21, India announced that it would launch an anti-dumping investigation into photovoltaic (PV) cells and units from China, Taiwan and Malaysia.

The investigation was the latest of a series of probes launched by India against Chinese goods this year, it said.

Amid a rise in bilateral trade, India initiated 12 investigations against Chinese products in the first half of this year, becoming the country with the most trade remedy probes against China, the daily said.

Wang Hejun, head of China's Ministry of Commerce's trade remedy and investigation bureau, has urged India to avoid abusing trade remedy measures and said bilateral trade disputes should be settled through consultation.

"There are other explanations behind the intensified trade conflicts between India and China. After years of development, India's industries have made progress, and many companies in India now produce items that could compete with those from China," the Global Times said.

"Chinese producers still have the upper hand but it seems understandable for the Indian government to be eager to protect local industries.

"But it is wrong to resort to trade remedy measures to drive Chinese products out of the local market."

The daily said that without outside competitive pressure, local industries would be less motivated to invest in technical innovation to reduce costs and improve quality. That won't be conducive to the long-term development of the industry.

"India should also open up to foreign competition to facilitate the development of domestic manufacturing," it said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 01 Aug 2017 17:50

rsingh wrote:He does't like Modi. And that is his problem.

Brites, may I request to NOT TO POST SUCH STUPID farts on BR. There are millions of people with different mind set , back ground or history. Some time these accounts are fake.

I reported the post to admins requesting deletion of a political post which has no place here

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Karthik S » 01 Aug 2017 17:51

They already sensed the mood and started dhoti shivering.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Ashokk » 01 Aug 2017 18:07


What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander, no? :D

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Suresh S » 01 Aug 2017 18:30

clearly what is going on in north korea and chinese shananigans have political and strategic value from chinese viewpoint but wanted to point out something which is never discussed by any international news channels are the following facts.

North Korea is on of the richest places on earth areawise in mineral wealth. Plenty of gold, iron ore, zinc, coal and few other things to go round worth trillions of dollars. Yes Trillions with a T.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Aug 2017 18:33

Ashokk wrote:

What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander, no? :D

The Chinese arrogance and their sense of entitlement are phenomenal. They need to be beaten back to senses at every opportunity.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Singha » 01 Aug 2017 18:35

North Korea is on of the richest places on earth areawise in mineral wealth. Plenty of gold, iron ore, zinc, coal and few other things to go round worth trillions of dollars. Yes Trillions with a T.

that is usually a cue for the west to export peace and democracy to free the oppressed people of such lands...

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Aug 2017 18:46

Bhutan may be key to resolving Doklam crisis, Chinese scholar - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
National Security Adviser Ajit Doval’s departure from Beijing, after a crucial meeting with China’s state councilor Yang Jiechi, has triggered an energetic debate on finding a formula for defusing the crisis in the remote Doklam plateau, where Indian and Chinese troops are engaged in a lengthy stand-off.

The finer details of Mr. Doval’s exact conversation are being kept under wraps, but The Hindu can now confirm, based on interviews with multiple sources, that resolving the Doklam crisis was the focal area of discussions between the two officials.

The specifics of a mutual pullback formula from the exact location of the standoff were flagged, but final convergence on the precise distances of the withdrawal by either side was yet to be achieved. Mr. Doval’s visit was, therefore, “directional,”
focused on finding a diplomatic solution to the crisis, and avoiding war, a highly placed source said.

In a conversation with The Hindu, Long Xingchun, Director of Centre of India Studies, China West Normal University, advocated that Bhutan could become a key player in ending the face-off in Doklam, as part of a two-step formula of finding a solution. He pointed out that Bhutan could request India for a swap between Indian and Bhutanese troops at the location of the crisis. {The Chinese are trying to be clever-by-half here. This place is too strategic for India to merely leave it in the hands of the Royal Bhutanese Army, for the Chinese could easily swarm & overwhelm them and achieve their strategic objective. In fact, it is their intention in making a this suggestion. Secondly, they are trying to drive a wedge between India & Bhutan and eliminate India from the scene altogether. They will then use it as a precedent to order the Bhtuanese to remove any Indian army presence in the future. This is the thin-end of the wedge to remove security-related agreement between India & Bhutan, a long-term objective of China. As I posted about ten days back, China has multiple objectives in this stand-off.}

“Indian troops can be replaced by Bhutanese troops. That would be the first step towards easing tensions,” he proposed. Professor Long underscored that once Indian troops were out of the line of sight, it would be much easier for China to exercise “flexibility”. In the absence of Indian forces, China would be seen as dealing “bilaterally” with Bhutan, paving the way for a final disengagement between these two countries, without compromising India’s interests. {That's a clever argument but will be thrown out by India}

Chinese media reports suggest that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to the United States, military hardware purchases from Washington, including drones, and India’s participation with the U.S. and Japan in the recent round of Malabar naval exercise in the Bay of Bengal, were influencing the dialogue between China and India on ending the Doklam crisis.

“It is becoming clear that India is ready to serve as an ally of the U.S rather than a swing power that honours independent, non-aligned diplomacy, wrote Lin Minwang, an academic in the Shanghai-based Fudan University in an op-ed in China Daily. {psyops}

Amid the crisis, those with increasing economic stakes in India appear to be pulling their weight behind the scenes in containing military tensions in Doklam, suggesting that a Chinese “business lobby” may be quietly at work. “Chinese businessmen who have invested in India, are very worried about the prospects of a military clash,” says Professor Long.

On Monday, an article in the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post (SCMP), owned by the e-commerce giant Alibaba group, with growing stakes in India, highlighted that the “protracted border row between China and India has not only raised tensions between the two Asian giants but could also threaten Beijing’s ambitious trade and infrastructure outreach plan, the Belt and Road Initiative.

It quoted Macau-based Antony Wong Dong as saying: “India is strategically located at the heart of China’s energy lifeline and the Belt and Road Initiative, and offending India will only push it into the rival camp, which [Beijing believes] is scheming to contain China by blocking the Malacca Strait and the Indian Ocean.”


Separately an earlier online blog on WeChat, owned by Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings, denounced war as an option to resolve the Doklam crisis. The article argued that China must avoid war, but insist on Indian troop withdrawal from Doklam by other means.

Some influential Chinese academics see the Doklam face-off as an opportunity to finally resolve the China-India border row. {But, the ball has been in the Chinese court for ages. They do not even want to exchange maps as to where they think their idea of the border is. Their thinking had been that with increasing Chinese clout, they could force India into a surrender as time is on their side and therefore they should drag the settlement} Lu Yang, a researcher from the international department of China’s Tsinghua University argues that the psychological impact of a war with India triggered by the Doklam crisis, feeding into the memories of the 1962 conflict, will sow lasting bitterness among the two peoples. It “will have an emotional overflow that will seriously affect the overall relationship, with serious implications on the belt and road construction”.

“If we can build mutual trust with India, the key is to resolve the border problem,” she observed.

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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 01 Aug 2017 19:07

Commerce Minister Nirmala Sitharaman holds 'candid' talks with Chinese counterpart on growing trade deficit

BEIJING: Commerce Minister Nirmala Sitharaman has held "candid" talks with her Chinese counterpart Zhong Shan over the ballooning trade deficit in favour of China which has crossed over $52 billion and sought a level playing field for Indian IT and agro products.

India's trade deficit with China in 2015-16 swelled to $52.68 billion, which Indian officials say has become unsustainable. Besides pressing for access to IT and pharma products, the main stay of India's global exports, India has been insisting that China should compensate by stepping up investments.

"The two ministers exchanged views, in a candid manner, on further development of a strong, balanced and sustainable trade and investment partnership between India and China," Indian Consulate in Shanghai said in a statement on Tuesday.

"In particular, Minister Sitharaman sought the assistance of Chinese ministry of commerce in reducing the trade deficit, facilitating greater market access and for providing a level playing field for Indian IT, pharmaceuticals and agro products in China," it said.

The meeting between the minister of state for commerce and industry and Zhong was the second after their meeting on the sidelines of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) Ministerial meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam in May 2017.

The ministers also agreed to further intensify India-China cooperation in the multilateral frameworks such as WTO, BRICS and Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the statement said.

They decided to hold the 11th Joint Economic Group (JEG) in New Delhi at the earliest.

A host of BRICS ministerial and officials meeting on various fields were being held in China ahead of the five-nation grouping's summit to be held in September this year in the Chinese city of Xiamen.

The meetings were taking place as per schedule despite the India-China tensions over the standoff at Doklam in the Sikkim section.

Ahead of Sitharaman's visit, China's commerce ministry said India should avoid abusing trade remedy measures and called for settling trade disputes through consultation.

Reacting to India's move to launch an anti-dumping investigation over photovoltaic cells and units imported from China, Taiwan and Malaysia, Wang Hejun, head of the commerce ministry's trade remedy and investigation bureau said China was paying close attention to the probe and hopes India will conduct it in a prudent manner and as per relevant rules.

Wang said adopting restrictive measures for the trade of photovoltaic products would not only harm photovoltaic sector development in India, but also dampen the sector's long-term development worldwide as well as economic and trade cooperation between China and India.

Meanwhile, coinciding with Sitharamans's visit, an article in today's state-run 'Global Times' said protectionism against Chinese manufactured products will only boomerang on the Indian industry.

The list of Chinese products covered by India's trade remedy investigations is getting ever longer, expanding from garments, glass, minerals and other low-end items to advanced products such as new materials and machinery, it said.

It seems that the Indian government is trying to protect domestic industries from overseas competition through trade remedy measures, but although this strategy offers certain short-term benefits, it will eventually hinder India's industrial development, the article said.

India has initiated 12 investigations against Chinese products in the first half of this year, becoming the country with the most trade remedy probes against China, it said.

During the period, 11 investigations were launched by the US, it said, quoting China's ministry of commerce (MOFCOM).
"There are other explanations behind the intensified trade conflicts between India and China. After years of development, India's industries have made progress, and many companies in India now produce items that could compete with those from China," it said.

"Chinese producers still have the upper hand, but it seems understandable for the Indian government to be eager to protect local industries," the write-up claimed.

But it is wrong to resort to trade remedy measures to drive Chinese products out of the local market, it added.

"At the same time that it is making great efforts in liberalising foreign investment rules, India should also open up to foreign competition to facilitate the development of domestic manufacturing," it said.

Cheers Image

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 01 Aug 2017 19:08

Forgetting the obvious psyops element, the Chinese are coming around to the views expressed on the forum e.g one/two generational enmity and thus loss of the only large single market, oblique reference to the centrality of India in the BRI plans, India's capacity to disrupt well laid out plans, etc.

BUT yes the initiative has to rest with the Chinese side. They took the initiative to change status quo so they should withdraw first. At max simultaneous withdrawal can be accepted. They can start by withdrawing their construction equipment not just out of the area but back to their base for India to budge.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 01 Aug 2017 19:32

Paul wrote:In 1950 Tibet had asked India to return Tawang back to them. A touch of reality for those who want to go to war with China for Tibet's sake.

There are lots of good reasons for India to not get into a shooting war with India.

But somehow, a supposed 1950 demand by Tibet for Tawang (we only have your word for it) in a totally different world, a demand which you insinuate will be reiterated by a hypothetical Tibet hypothetically freed by India in a hypothetical war with China, is the reason you choose to warn against even discussing the freeing of Tibet.

If this isn't a classic case study of dhoti shiver, I don't know what is.
Last edited by KLNMurthy on 01 Aug 2017 19:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 01 Aug 2017 19:38

Karthik S wrote:They already sensed the mood and started dhoti shivering.

These Chenin articles all sound desperate and pathetic. Paper-tigergiri so to speak.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 01 Aug 2017 19:42

SSridhar wrote:...
The Chinese arrogance and their sense of entitlement are phenomenal. They need to be beaten back to senses at every opportunity.

Or we can just laugh at the sight of China (!) preaching free market economics to India. Or gently remind them that Gurkhas taught Chinese the importance of "freely" allowing Import of Indian pharmaceuticals in the 19th century.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Singha » 01 Aug 2017 20:06

after two generations of living under chinese boots, I am sure the arrogance of tibetans has vanished.

they will cling to whatever raft floats by ....

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Karthik S » 01 Aug 2017 20:16

Saw few short videos, looks like pakis are now hoping their new father will intervene in cashmere the way we intervened in Bhutan China matter.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 01 Aug 2017 20:25

I am close to finishing yet another video about border points at which conflict can take place. I had earlier listed them on this thread (heck too much staring at Google earth has made me fairly familiar with satellite imagery all across the border and LAC :shock: )

But while recording my own comments for the video it occurred to me that in this day and age China cannot get away with conflict at 2-3 points like they did in 1962. There is a 2500 (?) km long "frontline" and there are points for conflict from teh eastern tip of Arunachal to the Northern tip of Ladakh.

In 1962 the Chinese messed with the Tawang area and as regards Walong they had forces coming in even before the conflict. They could have been stopped in their tracks in Ladakh by the air force but Nehru failed there.

But now the Chinese cannot simply push into Tawang to take pressure of Doklam. India will not only hit Doklam but looking at the geography Indian forces can thunder down a flat plain that from the Sindhu (Indus) river valley in an armoured thrust cutting off the G 219. the Chinese will have to employ a very large proportion of their armed forces to even stop Indian gains in some places. There is a reverse side to 55 years of dhoti shivering - and that is an urge to make sure that the Chinese are hurt and hurt bad if they try anything again. I am not going to use this post to make the usual cliched suggestion that there should not be war. All I am saying is that if war comes it will come and when it comes it is not going to be a happy ending for China. We don't underestimate them. They are welcome to deride, mock and underestimate India and Indian resolve.

Just my thoughts..

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 01 Aug 2017 20:50

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-new ... nyFfO.html

China steps up activities along Himachal Pradesh border in Kinnaur

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 01 Aug 2017 20:55

Shiv:

I hope you will become the first sdre to pay attention to the REAL story of 1962. It is true that the PLA scored very impressive victories against a completely unprepared Indian Army who wanted no conflict with Chinese people. But in the end what happened? The Chinese Army ran back to Tibet as fast as their Mao pajamas would let them - JUST LIKE NAPOLEON'S ARMY and the NAZIS from Russia. They were terrified of the Indian Air Force, and of the US bombers that had already arrived. As air operations started, they would have suffered essentially 100% loss of the entire invasion force, strafed and bombed to oblivion. If the roads and bridges in Assam and Tawang had been damaged by air attack, that would have been that. Winter was already upon them and they would all have frozen to death. Yes, they did end up holding a few square miles of desert plateau that India wanted no part of.

The only deep shame from 1962 is the utter failure of Indian historians/commentators to reflect upon this very simple fact of war: The Chinese gained nothing. Next: At what cost? IMO, the Chinese suffered HUGE losses, conducting human wave attacks against sparsely-manned outposts. Something like 200:1 in some passes. And what of the retreat? Today we hear of Oxygen Chambers and Space Age clothing and equipment, but in those days they sent the conscripts over the Himalays with a packet of rice and dried rat-snake, and that was about it. These were soldiers coming off WW2 Japanes occupation and then the Long March of Mao, and were already at the end of their endurance. I am quite sure that the PLA suffered 50% casualties during their headlong retreat through the frozen passes of December in the Hilalays and Tibet. Most probably, 90% of their artillery pieces and vehicles were also kaput.

I have never even seen a single estimate of Chinese losses in that conflict. PLEASE include the above in your next creation. May your goats always find the Thoughts of Mao and Eleven to chew on.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Karthik S » 01 Aug 2017 21:00

Looks like pakis and cheenis have entered into nuke agreement. I don't know how US will react to this.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 01 Aug 2017 21:12

https://mobile.twitter.com/chellaney/st ... 7183646721
China, Asia's supposed hegemon, is losing face over its Doklam standoff with India, which has defiantly stood up to it and refused to budge.
10:12 AM · Aug 1, 2017

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Paul » 01 Aug 2017 21:37

KLNM, If India goes to war with China, it should be to secure Indian interests in Tibet like securing water rights over the Tsangpo, not for Tibetians sake. This is not Dhoti Shivering.

I read this in a SAAG article many years ago. Hope you know what SAAG is. If you do not, go figure it out. Indulging in keyboard Cowboygiri does not help things. Read some more before putting your thoughts on paper.
Last edited by Paul on 01 Aug 2017 21:48, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 01 Aug 2017 21:42

Karthik S wrote:Looks like pakis and cheenis have entered into nuke agreement. I don't know how US will react to this.

US does not care and can't help

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Aug 2017 21:42

India is making up an imaginary "China threat" because of growing threats to its own national unity, a leading Chinese newspaper said on Tuesday.
"It is hard to understand India's groundless 'China threat' theory," said a report in the state-run Global Times by Long Xingchun, a research fellow at The Charhar Institute and director of the Centre for Indian Studies at China West Normal University.
"India probably just needs an enemy, even an imagined one. With multiple nationalities, religions and languages, plus intense internal conflicts and a strong centrifugal force pushing against national unity, India needs an external enemy as distraction.


LOL - All the while I thought it was the commies who wanted an imaginary enemy. Next, they will go to the point of mentioning that even China is imaginary construct and its the Indians who are to blame for anything China.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 01 Aug 2017 21:45

Seen at 1962 thread from someone whose relatives died in 1962:

Reading this thread is hilarious, pardon me. The Chinese communist propaganda is tragic in reality. To invade India, communist Red Chinese government send over 400,000 poor, emaciated, ill-trained conscripts from the Yangtse low-land plains, and also some prisoners dragged there in cattle trains from Mongolia. My relatives among them. They had hardly any weapons except for a “Burp Gun” which jammed 70% of the time, and often blew up, destroying the thumb, fingers and even forearms of the soldier. They had little food - just a small satchel of uncooked rice and a few scraps of dog-meat. With this they were force-marched (gasoline was also in short supply) several hundred miles, climbing into the Tibetan plateau. About 8 out of even 10 soldiers fell victim to high-altitude sickness. About 3 out of 10 either died or (because of powerful relatives) were evacuated. So now this 400,000 had become 280,000, most on the verge of collapse. Then they were asked to charge uphill against Indian positions. True, they captured many positions because India only had a few policemen with .303 rifles and sticks posted there to scare away wild animals. But every post captured, cost the attacker 10 to 20 soldier for every defender killed. Then the remainder of the Chinese aremy (now about 120,000) were ordered to march down into Tawang, all the way down to outskirts of Tezpur, Assam. This was in a desperate search for food. Then they heard that Indian Air Force and US Air Force bombers were getting ready to attack - and PLA leaders panicked. If the bridges and roads had been destroyed, entire 120,000 would have been killed. So they ordered these near-death soldiers to climb the mountains BACK into Tibet!! In December winter in the Himalayas! By the time they reached Tibet, only 40,000 were left, and most were near death. My relatives perished in this cruel atrocity by the Communist Party. 722 killed? Those must have been the Party Leaders’ relatives, who died while being brought back to Beijing! China suffered a HORRIBLE defeat, had to run all the way back and are now stuck in the frozen wastes of DokLa. Chinese leaders are criminals.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Karthik S » 01 Aug 2017 21:48

shiv wrote:
Karthik S wrote:Looks like pakis and cheenis have entered into nuke agreement. I don't know how US will react to this.

US does not care and can't help


The reason I mentioned US is that they know about pakis having terrorist infra, I was assuming that paki nukes were in some control of the US lest it falls into any terrorist hands. But now with China coming into the fray, I doubt if US will ignore it now even though we all know Cheen had its hand in pak nuke program in the past. China can leverage their control over paki nukes now pushing aside any american control.


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