Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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shiv
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 07:46

UlanBatori wrote:The thing I am really worried about, is Aug. 22. There is a total solar eclipse predicted (maybe it will be night in India, I don't know). But if there is an eclipse, Indian troops will have to lay down weapons. Those are the rules of DharmaYudh, no deviations possible. Do these Godless commies respect anything of the sort, hain?

I think Chinese also will be saying prayers in Chinese no?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 07:48

SSridhar wrote: much to the agony of the armed forces.

Reporters add this masala to provoke angry emotions, and we oblige.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Aug 2017 07:53

Last edited by UlanBatori on 02 Aug 2017 07:58, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby dsreedhar » 02 Aug 2017 07:56

What is the Chinese capability in electronic warfare like jamming signals and disrupting communication links? How much of this can have an impact?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 08:01

dsreedhar wrote:What is the Chinese capability in electronic warfare like jamming signals and disrupting communication links? How much of this can have an impact?

Depends on whom you want to listen to.

If you ask the Chinese it is the best in the world. BRF believes that. Pakis believe that

If you ask Americans, they don't agree

Russians say nothing

Indians crap in their pants

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 08:07


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Aug 2017 08:13

dsreedhar wrote:What is the Chinese capability in electronic warfare like jamming signals and disrupting communication links? How much of this can have an impact?

Was viewing a discussion in CCTV (for the first time ever) yesterday on the 90th anniversary of the PLA. The same Senior Colonel who took on Maj. Gen. Asok Mehta in another discussion reported here in BRf, was also participating. There was casual mention of ASAT capabilities and the suggestion that none can dare attack China.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Aug 2017 08:17

shiv wrote:
SSridhar wrote: much to the agony of the armed forces.

Reporters add this masala to provoke angry emotions, and we oblige.

They always do this. It is for us to take the grains from the chaff.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Aug 2017 08:57

SSridhar wrote:
dsreedhar wrote:What is the Chinese capability in electronic warfare like jamming signals and disrupting communication links? How much of this can have an impact?

Was viewing a discussion in CCTV (for the first time ever) yesterday on the 90th anniversary of the PLA. The same Senior Colonel who took on Maj. Gen. Asok Mehta in another discussion reported here in BRf, was also participating. There was casual mention of ASAT capabilities and the suggestion that none can dare attack China.


All phones made in China have bugs in them. Dump the Dragon.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 02 Aug 2017 08:58

UlanBatori wrote:Plus, friendly SeeAyYeh will seen unprecedented opportunity to start Color Revolutions in Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, North Dharmasala etc.


North Dharamshala? You wanted to mean N Tibet instead? What will See I Yaay get by owning the HP cricket association ground and some other bits of property there? Have they got a cricket fetish too, lately?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby manju » 02 Aug 2017 09:02

Got msg on whatsapp that there is a symposium on Indo-China stand off

12 August 2017
Satuarday
10-30 to 1 pm

Venue

Mythic society
2nd Florr, Nrupathunga Road
Bengaluru

Speakers
N Parthasarathi, Veteran Diplomat
Sandeep Unnitha, Executive Editor with India Today
LT Gen V M Patil

--
I am unable to post the whatsapp fwd

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Aug 2017 09:06

"Tibet" is a name given by Oiropeans. Dharmasala is more modern.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Aug 2017 09:11

‘India and Bhutan are questioning the new normal’ - Interview with former Indian Ambasador to China, Ashok Kantha, The Hindu
Q:Does the Doklam stand-off indicate the dominance of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA)over the Politburo of the Communist Party of China?

A:I don’t think that is the case. I don’t see what’s happening in Doklam being a case of the party versus the PLA. The Chinese system of domestic politics is very opaque. It’s very difficult for us to say with certainty how certain things are decided. However, what we can fathom is that the party has asserted its control over the PLA. Under Hu Jintao, the military had become powerful, but Xi Jinping is in control of the PLA and has taken action against several dozen senior PLA personnel under the anti-corruption campaign. Secondly, restructuring and reform of Chinese military establishment has led to the party reasserting its control over the PLA. The present trend is towards greater control of the party over the PLA.

China’s behaviour in Doklam is part of a larger pattern wherein China is pursuing contested territorial claims, most importantly in the South China Sea. Reports from China suggest that the Chinese policy on the South China Sea is personally driven by Xi Jinping. China is asserting its territorial claim by the so-called Nine-Dash Line. They have gone ahead with setting up civil and military facilities and built artificial islands in the South China Sea. What is happening in Doklam is part of that trend. In the case of Doklam, just like in the case of the South China Sea, China says that its claim in Doklam is indisputable and that is why it has gone ahead with building activities in the region.

Q:Does that mean there will be ‘20 and half front’ territorial disputes around China?

A:China has, in fact, settled most of the land boundary issues with most neighbouring countries. It has outstanding issues with India and Bhutan. It has serious issues in the South China Sea and East China Sea. On the remaining territorial issues, it is adopting an assertive posture in which it is changing facts on the ground. In the South China Sea, other claimants are adjusting to the new normal. Others are unable to do anything meaningful to change the ‘new normal’ that is emerging. China reclaimed 3,200 acres of artificial islands in the South China Sea. Other claimants and the U.S. do not have any effective strategy to counter this. India and Bhutan did not follow the script. We are questioning this new normal. Bhutan on June 29 questioned the construction of the mountain road in Doklam region and asked Beijing to restore the status quo as before June 16, 2017. We also came out with a clear statement on June 30.

Q:Was China surprised by India’s action?

A:We can only speculate, as it is very difficult to understand how China decides. China did not anticipate that both Bhutan and India would come out strongly. What China was doing earlier can be described as ‘creeping intrusion’. But [with] construction of a motorable road, a new set of facts were being built in Doklam. This would have had a negative impact on India’s security atmosphere. Doklam is south of the tri-junction, which is near Batang La. According to Indian and Bhutanese maps, Doklam is Bhutanese territory.

Q:What are the chances of escalation under the present circumstances?

A:If you compare the present scenario with what happened in 2013-2014 — that is the Depsang, Demchok and Chumar cases — we managed to sort out the issue in four weeks time. In the case of Doklam, pronouncements are belligerent from Chinese officials and the official media — almost warlike. This is one difference: that the rhetoric emanating from China is very heated, and that apart, China has placed a precondition for withdrawal for any meaningful talks. Also, this is getting protracted and no one knows how long it can go on.

Q:How long can this stand-off go on?

A:It can go on for years. In 1986, Chinese troops set up a post in the Sumdorong Chu valley, south of Thag La ridge. Then there was action taken by both sides and sharp escalation followed. There was action taken by both sides and sharp escalation followed. That was the last time that the India-China border became ‘live’. This situation of heightened tension continued till 1987. In August 1995 finally disengagement took place. De-escalation in tension took place by the end of 1987.At that time also China was very vituperative. They had given a precondition for pull-back by India.

Q:The biggest difference now is the introduction of Bhutan.

A:Yes, the introduction of Bhutan is the difference. But both sides have maintained sobriety on the ground, though the language coming from the Chinese side is rather strong. In contrast, India has maintained a measured posture.

Q:But has India intruded into Chinese territory?

A:Look at the facts. Bhutan maintains that Doklam is Bhutanese territory, which they said in the June 29 statement which was echoed in the Indian statement. But China claims the territory. However, China is committed through the bilateral agreements of 1988 and 1998 with Bhutan to respect the status quo and not to change the status quo unilaterally. Its actions are in direct violation of agreements with Bhutan and India.

But China is changing the tri-junction unilaterally in violation of such agreements. In mountainous areas, defences are along ridge lines. The Chinese are trying to bring down the tri-junction point to Geymochen, which is the last major ridge line between the Siliguri corridor and the Chumbi Valley, which would have hit security.

Q:But how long will Bhutan stay with India in this stand-off?

A:There have been 24 rounds of border negotiations between Bhutan and China. As far as the Bhutanese position [goes], the Doklam area belongs to Bhutan. On June 29 also, Bhutan requested China to restore the status quo as of June 16, 2017, and Bhutan has not weakened its position. Please remember, any change in the status quo will hurt Bhutan first as it will lose a very strategic territory and it will lose access to India through the Siliguri corridor. For Bhutan too there are vital strategic interests involved in any compromise.

Q:Is China erring by taking on Bhutan?

A:China is changing the status quo unilaterally with a relatively small neighbour, Bhutan. It is a clear case of browbeating both Bhutan and India. Through this action, China was trying to drive a wedge between Bhutan and India. But China perhaps thought that Bhutan would not protest. But Bhutan came out with a public protest like India. China has also landed in a situation that it did not anticipate.

Q:What is the solution? Mutual withdrawal?

A:The provocation for India was that the Chinese construction party was building a road unilaterally. If China pulls back from the area, listening to the very sensible suggestion from Bhutan, there would be no need for India to have military personnel. For India, any unilateral withdrawal will be impossible as there will be serious consequences. There can only be reciprocal withdrawal.

Q:So differences remain in Indian and Chinese positions.

A:The response of the Indian government has been measured and effective so far. We have clearly eschewed temptations to respond through tit for tat polemics. We have not risen to China’s bait. We need to question the narrative emanating from China. The narrative is that the boundary of the Sikkim sector is all settled and demarcated. That is not the case as the alignment of the boundary in the Sikkim sector is basically agreed on but there are well-known differences as far as the tri-junction points of India, China and Bhutan are concerned.

There are also differences on interpretations of the watershed boundary in northern and eastern Sikkim. In fact, post-1962, the most serious armed skirmish was at Nathu La in eastern Sikkim in 1967 because of differences in the interpretation of the watershed boundary.

Q:Has India violated international law through the Doklam venture?

A:It is China that has violated agreements with Bhutan and India. Bhutan pointed out that China violated the 1988 and 1998 agreements. China is also violating agreements with India.

Q:Can China hit India in some other area of the border?

A:The present situation is under control as no major troop mobilisation has taken place. The border has not become ‘live’ so far, like 1987. But we cannot preclude the possibility of China probing our defences in the Indian border. But hopefully that will not happen because any expansion of the differences will lead to damaging peace and tranquillity in the border areas. One needs to ensure that differences do not expand and are contained. At the same time, we need to take preventive measures. Second, the move towards de-escalation. For that China needs to scale down its comments.

Q:Have the NSA-level talks helped?

A:The Chinese rhetoric has slowed down a bit, but it’s too early to come to a conclusion. I would not interpret Xi Jinping’s speech on the occassion of the 90th anniversary of the Chinese PLA as something in the context of what’s going on in Doklam.

Q:Can India and Bhutan try the International Court of Justice as an option?

A:That is not quite the policy of India and China as we are very clear that our bilateral boundary disputes will be dealt with through bilateral consultations. That is the track we adopt for India-China border differences. Likewise, no indication has come from Bhutan that it will approach the international court. You know the PCA (Permanent Court of Arbitration) gave a verdict on the South China Sea but China completely rubbished the PCA award and went ahead with activities for military and civil facilities.

Q:Should appeasement be the policy to deal with China’s territorial claims?

A:When it comes to the India-China border, we have to rely on ourselves. We need to persist with the present approach that the border areas remain peaceful and we need to ensure that there is requisite deterrence available on the ground to discourage China.

Deterrence has to be in terms of military capability and infrastructure on the ground. Our posture should be defensive and sometimes a mix of offensive and defensive capabilities.

Q:In this context, can the BRICS summit be successful?

A:I do not want to prejudge. Even if the Doklam stand-off continues, we can still have a fairly successful BRICS summit in China. In this context, we can compare with the 1987 situation when the border went ‘live’. However, that is not the case today. Tension had gone up in 1987 and we prepared Rajiv Gandhi’s visit to China in 1988, which was a turning point in India-China ties. But the situation continued till 1995. The Doklam issue can continue minus the tension and noise, and we can approach the difference in a businesslike manner. Though ideally we should terminate the military stand-off as early as possible. Frankly, talks are taking place between India and China, India and Bhutan, and between Bhutan and China. There is no communication breakdown.

Q:What does the Doklam issue indicate for bilateral ties between China and India?

A:The narrative of the relationship has been affected, but there is something more structural that is going on. China is becoming increasingly assertive in pursuit of its global and regional goals. The Belt and Road project is one such example, which is above all a major geopolitical project. It is aimed at China trying to put together a continental and maritime domain where China is the lead player. This is apart from the fact that the project affects Indian sovereignty as it passes through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. But the rise of China is also taking place simultaneously with the rise of India. China wants to be the pre-eminent power. But India would like to see a multipolar world. That is the contradiction. Our preference is for a bipolar Asia. India-China ties also have positive aspect and there will be an uncertain mix of cooperation and competition and how we manage the relationship will be a big challenge. It is possible but will be a challenging position.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 09:19

One more: Points of confrontation between India and China
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNqlLSUg5p8

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby JE Menon » 02 Aug 2017 11:39

Your latest video is absolutely glorious stuff Doc.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 11:49

Thanks Doc. It is difficult to get a picture of the LAC.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Narad » 02 Aug 2017 12:26

JE Menon wrote:Your latest video is absolutely glorious stuff Doc.

+108

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 02 Aug 2017 14:11

Was very tempted to paste the Chinese foreign ministry 15 page official document. Now they are sending reams of threats.
Should we just waive it off and have a wishful thinking as the Lutyens elite think or should we be prepared. I am sure the Indian army is prepared.
I have been so addicted to the India china standoff articles that in todays article I note one point
40 Indian soldiers and 1 bulldozer is in Chinese territory which in fact is Bhutan's. Weren't there supposed to be 150 Indian soldiers??

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 14:55

JE Menon wrote:Your latest video is absolutely glorious stuff Doc.

Hey thanks JEM. Unless I get some great inspiration this will be my last about Cheen for now. I was wondering how it would come out but it occurs to me that this is the only one of my 9 videos which says something about the entire border/LAC from end to end.

I only have one more coming up showing all the landslides blocking the Karakoram highway on which the CPEC is dependent :D

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 02 Aug 2017 15:00

One topic to tryout is finding out Chinese storage areas within mountains. Given the place is devoid of civilisation, they must be dumping fuels and ammo somewhere in the mountains tunnels.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shiv » 02 Aug 2017 15:04

nam wrote:One topic to tryout is finding out Chinese storage areas within mountains. Given the place is devoid of civilisation, they must be dumping fuels and ammo somewhere in the mountains tunnels.

As Gagan pointed out, look for good roads. The Chinese ALWAYS have great roads leading up to any site that has anything of significance. And those roads can be seen from way way up in sat images.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 16:11

Infrastructure on the Indian side of Doka La pass. The Chinese road end at the top right corner. The Chinese road seems better than the one on the Indian side. From Bing maps. BTW, the border on the map is not aligned properly.

The distance to the Chinese road end to our position seems about 200-250 feet. And there seems to be a helipad backing our position.
Image

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby chola » 02 Aug 2017 16:20

When are we going to see some fighting? Very irritating.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 02 Aug 2017 16:24

shiv wrote:
nam wrote:One topic to tryout is finding out Chinese storage areas within mountains. Given the place is devoid of civilisation, they must be dumping fuels and ammo somewhere in the mountains tunnels.

As Gagan pointed out, look for good roads. The Chinese ALWAYS have great roads leading up to any site that has anything of significance. And those roads can be seen from way way up in sat images.


Will give that a try.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ryogi » 02 Aug 2017 16:25

Done sir!

schinnas wrote:


May your Yaks find mates.

Time to WhatsApp and FB this gem far and wide. Cheeni rags will soon eat crow Manchurian along with humble pie.
Last edited by SSridhar on 02 Aug 2017 17:13, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Thanks

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Narad » 02 Aug 2017 16:56

Iyersan wrote:40 Indian soldiers and 1 bulldozer is in Chinese territory which in fact is Bhutan's. Weren't there supposed to be 150 Indian soldiers??

No troop withdrawal at Doklam, says India as it rejects China's claims

http://m.ndtv.com/india-news/no-troop-r ... ai-rum=off

As per the report around 350-400 personnel still remain deployed.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 02 Aug 2017 17:04

Narad wrote:
Iyersan wrote:40 Indian soldiers and 1 bulldozer is in Chinese territory which in fact is Bhutan's. Weren't there supposed to be 150 Indian soldiers??

No troop withdrawal at Doklam, says India as it rejects China's claims

http://m.ndtv.com/india-news/no-troop-r ... ai-rum=off

As per the report around 350-400 personnel still remain deployed.

Why isn't the MEA responding about the status quo? If the MEA does not respond it means we pulled back

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 17:16

The Chinese seem to have gone completely bonkers in order to *save face*. Now they have started circulating fake stories of partial Indian withdraw. The lizard is yellow.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 17:17

http://www.firstpost.com/india/doka-la- ... 85579.html
Sikkim standoff: Indian troops trespassed 80 metres into Chinese territory, claims Beijing in official statement
The Chinese foreign ministry in the statement also said that it had informed India in advance about its road-building activity in Doka La on the border.


Image
Image
Last edited by pankajs on 02 Aug 2017 17:38, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 02 Aug 2017 17:24

A question: When would the weather conditions on the India china border be conducive for limited conflict?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby fanne » 02 Aug 2017 17:25

Mongolian Sir that link is almost china pasand (unless it is the truth and then it is neutral) or I am missing something and there is another article?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby fanne » 02 Aug 2017 17:25

Now till october

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 02 Aug 2017 17:33

fanne wrote:Now till october

Would appreciate PoV on what would be the possible Indian response and how the psyops will play out leading to a conflict. There has to be a tipping point beyond which war will be inevitable. I want to be in the flow to catch that tipping point to understand how we move to war and how did we reach that particular eventuality.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby VinodTK » 02 Aug 2017 17:34

shiv wrote:One more: Points of confrontation between India and China


Shiv, thanks for the video very informative, appreciate you putting the time and effort to create it.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby fanne » 02 Aug 2017 17:36

Tipping point - PLAA attacks india's position. We are sitting pretty, thank you!!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 17:43

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomac ... ng-concern
China’s tough stance on India dispute raising concern across Southeast Asia, analysts say

Beijing’s handling of protracted conflict in Himalayas has had a spillover effect in the region and fuelled suspicion
The protracted border dispute between China and India in the Himalayas has created a “spillover effect” as China’s neighbours become unsettled by its tough handling of the escalating conflict between the two Asian giants, foreign policy experts have said.

China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi and his Indian counterpart Smt. Sushma Swaraj are scheduled to attend the Asean foreign ministers’ meeting in Manila later this week. And while the North Korean nuclear crisis and South China Sea disputes are expected to dominate the meeting, analysts will also be keeping a close eye on how members of the 10-nation group interact with China and India.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations generally regards a robust Indian presence in the region as a useful deterrent against China, which has been increasingly assertive in its approach to handling territorial issues, as has been the case in the Himalayas.

China and India last week held their first substantial talks since the dispute broke out more than a month ago in the Dolklam region, where the pair shares a border with Bhutan. Chinese State Councillor Yang Jiechi met Indian National Security Adviser Ajit Doval in Beijing, though neither showed any signs of backing down and tensions remain high.

Also last week, China’s defence ministry issued its strongest warning yet to India, with a spokesman saying Beijing had stepped up its deployment along the unmarked border and would protect its sovereignty “at all costs”.

Richard Javad Heydarian, a political scientist at the Manila-based De La Salle University, said the stand-off in Doklam had had a “spillover effect” by fuelling suspicion among countries that are caught in separate territorial disputes with China.

“People are asking, if China is really peaceful, why are there so many countries having disputes with China?” he said.

Such sentiment may create fertile ground for Southeast Asian countries to leverage China’s influence with engagement with India.

Vietnam’s foreign minister and deputy prime minister, Pham Binh Minh, has called on India to play a greater role in the region and to partner with Southeast Asian countries on strategic security and promoting freedom of navigation in South China Sea.

A few days after Minh spoke, Vietnam granted Indian Oil firm ONGC Videsh a two-year extension on its plan to explore a Vietnamese oil block in an area of the South China Sea contested by China and Vietnam.

Analysts said recent developments have wide strategic implications – pointing to how Asia is increasingly defined by the China-India rivalry and the renewed tensions between the two Asian giants.

Nisha Desai Biswal, former US assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia, was quoted by Indian media PTI as saying that China needs to acknowledge that “there is growing strategic and security capability across Asia” and that “India is a force to be reckoned with”.

Wang Yi on Tuesday backed Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s idea of forming joint energy ventures in the disputed South China Sea, warning that unilateral action could cause problems and damage both sides.

Duterte on Monday said a partner had been found to develop oil fields and exploration, and exploitation would restart this year.

However, analysts warn that India’s strong position in the standoff has strengthened the hawkish voices in the Philippines who seize opportunities to criticise Duterte’s détente policy towards China and “push forward the narrative that the Philippines needs to be careful on how to approach China and its territorial expansion”, Heydarian said.

Under Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy, India in recent years has formed strategic partnerships with Southeast Asian countries including Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, and Northeast Asian countries including Japan and South Korea.

During the “India-Asean Delhi Dialogue IX” early this month, Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj said New Delhi remained committed to enhancing maritime cooperation with Asean as well as upholding freedom of navigation and respect for international law in the region.

Heydarian suggests that India’s upgrading of its strategic partnership with Asean and increasing its strategic presence in the South China Sea could be a way of pushing back against China.

Even a non-claimant Southeast Asian state such as Thailand “would see the benefit of China being challenged in the South Asia theatre”, said Thitinan Pongsudhirak, an international relations scholar at Bangkok-based Chulalongkorn University.

“India’s standing up to China can only be a boon for Southeast Asian countries even when they don’t say so openly,” he said, “Any major power keeping China in check can only yield geopolitical benefits to Southeast Asia as the region is wary of China’s growing assertiveness.”

But Pongsudhirak also said that India, a “latecomer to Southeast Asia’s geopolitics”, still lacks strategic depth in terms of military reach and economic wherewithal. “But in combination with other middle powers like Japan, India can have a significant impact in Southeast Asia’s power dynamics,” he said.

Despite Southeast Asian countries’ welcoming attitude, India has remained cautious towards more strongly engaging with the region, observers said.

“Southeast Asia is a natural extension of India’s security horizons in light of its growth as a regional power,” said Rajesh Manohar Basrur, a South Asia specialist with Nanyang Technological University.

Basrur said that while competition with China is a major driver of India’s engagement with Southeast Asia, India’s commitment to the region remains limited with measures amounting to no more than “symbolic acts such as military exercises, [to] generate a strategic environment aimed at building up political-psychological pressure on [China].”

Sourabh Gupta, a senior specialist at the Institute for China-America Studies in Washington, said that as India tries to limit fallout from its Doklam intervention, it will not want to expand the theatre of conflict or widen the geography of competition in the short term.

“But I can foresee India making a qualitatively greater effort, albeit quietly, to build up Vietnam’s naval and law enforcement capacity to confront and deter Chinese assertiveness,” he said.

Gupta also warned that the situation in the South China Sea could lapse into even further conflict.

“India and China have a fairly rich menu of boundary management protocols which effectively translate into engagements between very lightly armed personnel from either side when a standoff breaks out,” he said.

“That is different from the situation in the South and East China Sea where engagement protocols are still very rudimentary and could see sharp escalatory spirals.”
Last edited by pankajs on 02 Aug 2017 17:49, edited 1 time in total.

UlanBatori
BRF Oldie
Posts: 14045
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Aug 2017 17:46

fanne wrote:Mongolian Sir that link is almost china pasand (unless it is the truth and then it is neutral) or I am missing something and there is another article?

Yes. (Yes, the basic link is c-p and any desis there are also either goats or outright c-p, and no, I don't think there is any truth there, it is all propaganda, and yes, u r missing something :D )
Have to go a bit deeper than the superficial link...
Wonderful place to post history of Cultural Revolution, Led Gualds, Tian An Men, Falun Gong, Tibetan Freedom Movement, Xinjiang Freedom Movement, Mongolian Freedom Movement, Splittist Formosan plopaganda, Misadeventure of Wrong Way Wong Wei, Chinese funding of Paki terrorism inside China, Chinese funding of Paki and Saudi nukes to be used inside China. Vietnamese plopaganda etc etc. Badly need some EXPERIENCED BRF e-combat vets there

pankajs
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Posts: 14182
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby pankajs » 02 Aug 2017 17:58

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 914_1.html
Doklam crisis begins winding down as both sides reduce troops - Shooklow [One needs to be careful about this gent's farts]
The 45-day confrontation in Doklam has begun de-escalating. Top army sources tell Business Standard that the number of Chinese border guards at the contested border tri-junction between India, China and Bhutan is now down to just 40, from a peak of over 300 at the end of June. Meanwhile, many Indian troops have also been pulled back. From a peak of almost 400 at the height of the crisis, there are now just 150 Indian soldiers in the contested Doklam bowl. In addition, a full Indian Army brigade, consisting of almost 3,000 troops, stands poised in Indian territory near the ...

Rest behind paywall

Bishwa
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Posts: 306
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bishwa » 02 Aug 2017 18:02

NDTV sources indicate, no thinning of forces has taken place

http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/no-troop ... eststories

The thinning of forces story was put out by China and fits their narrative and it is possible Indian journalists have picked it up

Iyersan
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Posts: 450
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Iyersan » 02 Aug 2017 18:10

pankajs wrote:http://www.business-standard.com/article/current-affairs/doklam-crisis-begins-winding-down-as-both-sides-reduce-troops-117080200914_1.html
Doklam crisis begins winding down as both sides reduce troops - Shooklow [One needs to be careful about this gent's farts]
The 45-day confrontation in Doklam has begun de-escalating. Top army sources tell Business Standard that the number of Chinese border guards at the contested border tri-junction between India, China and Bhutan is now down to just 40, from a peak of over 300 at the end of June. Meanwhile, many Indian troops have also been pulled back. From a peak of almost 400 at the height of the crisis, there are now just 150 Indian soldiers in the contested Doklam bowl. In addition, a full Indian Army brigade, consisting of almost 3,000 troops, stands poised in Indian territory near the ...

Rest behind paywall


This guy is a rabid Modi Hater. He will sell India if required to prove it


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