Indian Navy News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 13 Jan 2016 18:35

A second juicy target for the IN after Karachi should the Pakis keep on sending jihadis into India!Requires more subs,assets for the IN to strike simultaneously at all 4 major bases.

http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2016/01 ... sian-gulf/
Jinnah Naval Base – Navy expands strategic outreach to West Coast, Persian Gulf
19 hours ago BY Mian Abrar

While China and Pakistan endeavour to develop Gwadar Port as a commercial hub for the entire region, Pakistan Navy is gearing up to new face challenges and threats which might come its way after the port become functional; the navy has fully operationalised its strategic Jinnah Naval Base near Gwadar Port at Ormara, Balochistan.

India has increased its naval strength in recent years and aims at transforming itself into a ‘blue-water navy’ within the next 10 to 15 years. By 2022, the Indian Navy will have 50 warships including three aircraft carriers, five nuclear submarines, 22 conventional submarines and a number of long range maritime patrol aircraft.

India acquired a nuclear submarine (Akula-II) from Russia in April, 2012. A second nuclear submarine of the same class will be inducted soon. Moreover, the sea trials of its indigenous nuclear submarines are also in progress. Pakistani defence establishment is looking at this induction of nuclear submarines in Indian fleet as a cause of great concern.

With minimal budgetary allocations, Pakistan Navy is quietly relying on minimum deterrence to counter any external threat. Jinnah base may just be the answer to Pakistan’s prayers.

The base is situated 350 km west of Karachi and 285 km east of the Gwadar Port, and has been connected with China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

“With the development of this base, Pakistan has acquired the capacity to secure naval trade in these waters. Moreover, we have expanded Pakistan naval forces’ outreach towards the west coast into the Strait of Hormuz where all the oil traffic flows in and out,” an officer at the base told Pakistan Today during a recent visit to the base at Ormara which is otherwise restricted for media.

“Karachi would remain our focus for the foreseeable future. However, Jinnah base would reduce reaction time of Pakistan Navy to six to 8 hours in case of any adversity,” the officer said, adding that the base had a berthing facility “for anything from warships to submarines and from heavy ships to warplanes”.

Asked whether or not Gwadar would also act as a naval base for Pakistan, the officer said that Gwadar would act purely as a commercial base.

“Though Pakistan Navy has a small base at Gwadar, its main focus would be security of Gwadar. Jinnah base, on the other hand, would be a purely naval base which would help maritime forces monitor the entire coastal area from Ormara to the Gulf waters,” the officer said.

Rear Admiral (r) Pervez Asghar, an expert on naval defence, told Pakistan Today that Pakistan Navy had developed four bases along the coastal areas of Balochistan including Ormara, Pasni, Jewani and Gwadar which had helped expand its ‘strategic outreach’ towards the west coast.

“In the past, we only had one [naval] base at Karachi and our military installations were vulnerable to any Indian adventure. However, with the development of these new bases towards the west coast, not only do we have alternative options to defend our positions, our reaction time has also decreased significantly in case of any attack,” the retired naval admiral said.

He said that the navy now also had a submarine base at Ormara. “We have developed Pakistan marine corps to thwart enemy designs of amphibious landing around the coastal areas,”
he added.

“Pakistan Navy is now well placed to secure all sea lines of communications (SLOCs) emanating from the Persian gulf towards Pakistan. Moreover, the naval infrastructure including Radars and communication gadgets, have now been able to overlap each other – a capability we had severely missed in the past,” he added.

He said that the new bases had also helped secure Gwadar Port as there was no military presence on the port due to its being commercial in nature.

“Now, navy’s special forces are better placed in Ormara to secure Gwadar Port and nearby sea routes. Moreover, Ormara base would also help neutralise the enemy’s narrative that they would be able to block Karachi’s harbour in case of a showdown,” he added.

Asghar said that Pakistan had also developed a jump-off base for Pakistan’s maritime aircraft at Pasni.

He said that Pakistan Navy had recently raised another naval station at Turbat, namely PNS Siddiq for P-3c Orion aircraft.

“These P-3cs are capable of flying over 14 hours nonstop without refueling. They have stealth technology and can fly below the radar and strike India’s Eastern coast. Pakistan Navy has also developed Naval Base Jewani, about 60 km from Iran to help expand its outreach into the Gulf waters,” he added.

Jinnah base would act as an alternative option for Pakistan Navy to Karachi where all the logistic and technical support for berthing navy’s ships and even submarines were available.

“We have developed the required facilities for technical repair of ships and submarines at the base. It is an alternative arrangement to the Karachi base and can easily meet our defence requirements. However, Karachi dockyard would still be the center for major overhaul or repair,” the Jinnah base officer said.

The officer said that during the next five years, navy plans to develop huge workshops at Ormara, which would also have the ability to overhaul submarines and warships.

He said that the Jinnah base’s positioning provided cover against natural calamities and enemy’s advances as it was covered by sea on two sides and a 2 km wide hill stood on the third.

On the top of the hill, called `Hammer Mountain’ due to its shape, Navy’s surveillance unit RDS-Mianwali is stationed to help the officers keep an eye on movements taking place in and around the area.

Since the Karachi coast has become a hub of commercial activity, making it difficult for the Navy to perform its tasks and the industrial waste in Karachi’s waters has been damaging the Navy’s assets :rotfl: and reducing the life of the ships, Ormara is a better option for future Naval operations.

The law and order situation in the entire coastal belt is far better than other parts of the restive Balochistan province as well as Karachi where Rangers along with other paramilitary forces is involved in a clean-up operation.

Jewani, with a population of around 100,000 people and approximately 90 km away from Gwadar Port City, serves as a main surveillance point for Pakistan Navy to keep an eye on all the maritime traffic in the Arabian Sea.

Due to proximity of the area with Iran, many inhabitants of the area are duel nationals and can freely visit Iran on a mere permit from the deputy commissioner.

But navy has also has reached out to the locals in the area to win hearts and minds of the Baloch people. It has set up educational and health facilities, many of which provide free of cost services to the local people. Under Chief of Naval Staff’s scheme ‘Adopt A Child’, navy officers are paying educational and other expenses of 100 children in the area. The navy also provides jobs to locals in their facilities.

The navy operates a PN Hospital in Ormara which contains facilities like emergency department, trauma center, intensive care unit, labour room, operation theatre and a pharmacy.

A Navy Cadet College has also been set up the area, where 50 per cent of the admissions are offered to candidates from within Balochistan under a district-quota system. The other 50 per cent seats are offered to candidates from other provinces of the country.

A Bahria Model School is also working in the area to impart education to Baloch children. The school runs on donations and financial support of the provincial government.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Samay » 13 Jan 2016 18:43

If the likes of cloth merchantani are allowed to setup defense co's without JV with GoI (like Brahmos) then we are witnessing a huge curve in the our democratic history. On one hand they will suck money by MARCs and costly spare parts and on other hand we are officially introducing corruption in MI complex .
There will be more F35 like projects and continuous hammering of Gov defence production cos.
No wonder HAL, OFB etc would be divested.
More dangerous would be their role in creating regional conflicts within or outside the country. A lot that can be said on this dangerous issue or things that would happen, which itself kills all the lures of introducing defence related production by private sector.
Khan like production model will introduce constant wars with no ends.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby hnair » 13 Jan 2016 20:51

NRao wrote:I would not use China as a standard (to decide what the IN needs). China will only go that far, stealing and buying expertise cannot get you too far.

Chinese have yet to master many areas in large ship building. So, India has time to make proper and good decisions.


The standard you are talking about is a technological standard and is kind of irrelevant in a Fleet-in-being situation that a CATOBAR CV raises. I am talking about the recent PLA policy on toning down their CV build plans, based off Ulyanovsk design.

The fleet-in-being situation has passed on from a Tirpitz-type battleship to to CVs. A Chinese CATOBAR would cause multiple times the current spending by its neighbours. India would have had to neutralize that carrier, due to its latent land-attack threats.

If they decide to build a CATOBAR, rest of the world will have to compensate, however inferior their tech is.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 15 Jan 2016 11:52

Important news. This will come as no small comfort to the Navy and CO of the frigates involved!

http://www.mumbaimirror.com/mumbai/othe ... 584640.cms
2011 Mumbai port collision: London HC holds Cyprus vessel culpable
By Danish Khan, Mumbai Mirror | Jan 15, 2016,
Assigns most of the blame for the accident to the foreign ship, divides the blame between the three other ships that were also present.

Five years after a collision at the Mumbai port between an Indian Navy warship and a Cyprus vessel, the London High Court has ruled that the foreign ship bore a majority of responsibility for the accident. Legal proceedings are still ongoing in India, but this judgement will come as a relief for the Navy, who could now use this ruling to bolster their case.

The MV Nordlake collided with the INS Vindhyagiri on 30 January, 2011, after which the Indian warship caught fire and sank. Two other Indian navy vessels, the INS Godavari and another 'lead warship' and Seaeagle (now MV Elbella), a ship from Malta were nearby. The judgement by Justice Teare, noted that, "The degree of Nordlake's fault was at least three times as great as that of Vindhyagiri and the degree of Vindhyagiri's fault was significantly greater than of each Godavari and Seaeagle." Nordlake was held 60% responsible, Vindhyagiri 20% liable and Godavari and Seaeagle were each only 10% to blame.

The London High Court found that Nordlake was guilty of three faults pertaining to the narrow channel rule, safe speed and look out. Nordlake was exiting the harbour, while Vindhyagiri and Seaeagle were inward bound. In January 2013, both Nordlake and Seaeagle had approached the London High Court seeking damages against each other (and the Indian vessels). However, the Government of India was held not to be a party to the proceedings and hence it was held that "faults" and "apportionment of liability" would not be binding to India. No evidence was recorded from those on-board the three Indian warships.

The court had before it the voyage data recorder, video film of electronic radar record, and the engine movement records of the vessels, along with expert opinions.

On the day of collision, Vindhyagiri had taken a group of officers and their families for a picnic at sea. While nobody was injured, the collision meant that the warship deteriorated until the Bombay high court gave the Navy permission to destroy it in May 2012. There was also ammunition on board which was a potential hazard, considering that merchant vessels and warships were in the vicinity.
.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 15 Jan 2016 20:43

Let the Ind Army decide.It seems quite happy with the so-called "tincans",but the only certified tincsns getting pastrd these days are US M-1s!
Back to IN matters.If the IAF have dumped the Mk-2,then the NLCA with the more powerful engine is a non-starter.Carrier trials on the VikA should be conducted with the existing prototypes to see how the underpowered bird fares.If it does well then there may not be an immediate need for the Mk-2 based version.NLCA proto.and 29K synergy could also be ascertained. The NLCA mockup could've been also sent to the Bahrain show.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby NRao » 15 Jan 2016 21:10

hnair wrote:
NRao wrote:I would not use China as a standard (to decide what the IN needs). China will only go that far, stealing and buying expertise cannot get you too far.

Chinese have yet to master many areas in large ship building. So, India has time to make proper and good decisions.


The standard you are talking about is a technological standard and is kind of irrelevant in a Fleet-in-being situation that a CATOBAR CV raises. I am talking about the recent PLA policy on toning down their CV build plans, based off Ulyanovsk design.

The fleet-in-being situation has passed on from a Tirpitz-type battleship to to CVs. A Chinese CATOBAR would cause multiple times the current spending by its neighbours. India would have had to neutralize that carrier, due to its latent land-attack threats.

If they decide to build a CATOBAR, rest of the world will have to compensate, however inferior their tech is.


My point was that Chinese "toning down" is due to their lack of knowledge on how to go to the next rung. IF they had figured out (highly unlikely IMHO) or better still bought/stole it, then there would be no toning down. Which is why I would not wait for China to take this next step - which is what I meant by "China as a std"..

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Paul » 16 Jan 2016 00:16

With a $3B annual capital budget they is no way Navy can spend $10B-$12B on a Nuke powered EM Catapult AC. I am not even counting the JSF/Rafale costs.

To put it in perspective, the cost of the most ambitious Navy project to date for Six SSNs is about INR 90K crores or $15 Billion

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 16 Jan 2016 08:35

Goode news on the SK refit/trials.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Vis ... 109474.ece
Sindhukirti submarine completes deep diver trials

A file picture of INS Sindhukirti before undertaking sea trials after completion of retrofitting at Hindustan Shipyard Limited in Visakhapatnam.
The vessel was delivered to the Navy in June after modernisation at HSL

Soviet-made seventh Sindhughosh submarine of Indian Navy INS Sindhukirti, which underwent retrofitting at Hindustan Shipyard Limited, has successfully completed its maiden deep dive trials without any major defects. The vessel was delivered to the Navy in June after medium repairs and modernisation at HSL.

The development is of great significance as it certifies the high quality of repairs carried on the hull and associated systems by trained and experienced workmen of HSL adhering to stringent quality norms.

Though the yard took more time for refit than stipulated, it is worth mentioning that the retrofitting of INS Sindhukirti was the first of its kind undertaken by an Indian Shipyard with support from Indian Navy.

Prime contender

HSL Chairman and Managing Director Rear Admiral L.V.S. Babu appreciated the HSL team for their commitment and quality work which resulted in defect-free first sortie and full power trials followed by clearance of ‘check dive’ and deep dive’ in the first attempt.

He said this had placed the yard as a prime contender for undertaking Medium Refit Life Certification (MRLC) of EKM submarines, as well as for construction of Project P-75(I) submarines.

Despite major devastation caused by Cyclone Hudhud, HSL had timely undocked the submarine on November 4, 2014 and completed harbour acceptance trials in record period of seven months due to synergised efforts between the yard and Naval Dockyard-Visakhapatnam) and other Naval agencies.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Vivek K » 16 Jan 2016 09:02

If IAF can throw away $10B on Rafales, then the Navy can buy shiny new toys too!

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby NRao » 16 Jan 2016 09:11

Paul wrote:With a $3B annual capital budget they is no way Navy can spend $10B-$12B on a Nuke powered EM Catapult AC. I am not even counting the JSF/Rafale costs.

To put it in perspective, the cost of the most ambitious Navy project to date for Six SSNs is about INR 90K crores or $15 Billion


Errr...........

$12 billion over 15 years can certainly survive due to political pressures. IF *at all) it comes into being, it will be because of strategic reasons. And, they wil have o find ways to fund it.

Having said that I think India will get help.

Not easy for sure, but doable and a necessity IMHO.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby nash » 16 Jan 2016 11:10

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 599012.cms

The Navy's proposal to acquire next generation missiles vessels (NGMV) - six of the missile boats are needed for the fleet - is likely to get a go ahead from the high powered defence acquisition council (DAC) shortly, with private shipyards L&T and Pipavav in the fray, besides defence ministry owned yards.

NGMV?

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Yagnasri » 16 Jan 2016 11:25

The requirement comes with an ambitious weapons complement requirement
As per reports:
includes, eight SSMs, a point defence missile system (the Barak is currently the only PDMS in Indian Navy service), an MR Gun system ("with stealth features having range not less than 15 km and capability to carry out Surface to surface, surface to air and Anti Missile Defence (AMD) engagements should be fitted. It should have the facility to be remoted using Fire Control Radars (FCR) as well as EO (Electro-Optical) sight."), and a CIWS.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby member_29294 » 16 Jan 2016 12:16

Vivek K wrote:If IAF can throw away $10B on Rafales, then the Navy can buy shiny new toys too!


At least these shiny toys are MII, with money going back into Indian economy and Indian workers being hired.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Paul » 16 Jan 2016 14:06

As if this was not expensive enough, a land based EM catapult may have to be built train the pilots like the ski ramp in Goa. Also one AC will not suffice, 3 of this class will have to be built. All this will lead to money drained away from Submarine and Surface combatant warships.

In short, unless the Rupee becomes a reserve currency or world economy or something like that, it will not happen. TFIW

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Aditya G » 16 Jan 2016 18:37

NGMV: nice to see movement on this. We also have clarity that the Navy expects these to replace Koras and Khukris, and not Veer class.

Thanks to IN efforts, the weapon suite seems to be the least complicated aspect of the program:

- 8 SSMs: Brahmos with L&T UVLS
- PDMS: Maitri
- Medium range gun: BHEL Oto Melara 76 mm
- FCS: BEL Lynx U2
- Search Radar: Revathi

35 knots - this rules out Project 28 hull. Will require a new design possibly with GTs.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Singha » 16 Jan 2016 19:05

the israeli saar 5 is the only one around that does all that - SSM + heli deck.
our ships all need a heli deck for utility and manpower movement incl casualties.
so a slightly enlarged design of saar5 could work.

other design samples
DCN https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gowind-class_corvette
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigma-class_corvette
turkey MILGEM ships

but all these are kind of intruding into what the P28 class does......a small austere heavily armed short endurance missile boat design is anathema to the west with their long deployment ranges and time-on-station needed.

it can only come out india itself, israel, south korea or russia.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Eric Leiderman » 17 Jan 2016 10:19

http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /78733284/


Talks on Taiwan getting Harrier jump jets fm US Marines as the F35 Vertial take off jets arrive.
We should be looking into getting a few and possibly keepin the Virat going with her full air wing till IAC (Vikrant) is operational

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 17 Jan 2016 19:46

Eric,when the Brits asininely pensioned off their 70+harriers a few years ago,I screamed "buy.buy ,buy!" We could've picked up 24+ for a song,plus a huge amt. of spares,engines,etc.We did b*gger all and the USMC quickly snapped up the entire lot and are to use them until 2027! They would've been perfect for our 4 planned amphibs offering close support as the RN has used them both in the Gulf wars and Afghanistan.

The Swedish Visby class corvette appears to have a helo deck if I'm not mistaken.The new missile craft that we need should be able to accommodate at least 16 SSMs.They could be Klubs/Nirbhays. If the planned BMos-M arrives,it may be poss to accommodate 8 BMos-Ms. The Buyan corvettes of approx. 1000t were able to fire their 2500km range cruise missiles into Syria from the Caspian Sea. However,such a class would be at least twice as large as our Tarantulas. The IN needs more numbers of small missile craft for the islands and for advance naval bases on the west coast too which the IN needs to deal with Pak's new naval bases. The CG could operate most of the smaller patrol craft with the IN correspondingly increasing its number of missile craft.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby arshyam » 17 Jan 2016 20:17

Philip sir, but isn't the Viraat hull already 50 years old? Can it continue to soldier on so as to house these additional Harriers? Perhaps that was why IN did not express interest in these Harriers. And the amphibs are at least 10 years away from full operations, what will these Harriers do? Finally, these amphibs are meant to be heli carriers, can they host jets (even STOVL) without modification? (thinking in terms of the hangars, elevators, etc.)

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Philip » 17 Jan 2016 20:28

These Harriers could've been used aboard the Vik-A and new Vikrant as well in the late arrival of the NLCA,now perhaps another casualty as the IAF appears to have dumped the LCA MK-2 upon which the NLCA was based. They would be splendid in the A&N islands from dispersed land sites as the RAF operated them in Germany from woods and forest clearings,heavily camouflaged which were very difficult to detect even when the coordinates were given to aircraft during exercises.

In fact,a couple of the small RN Illustrious carriers being pensioned off could've been used as interim amphibs until our desi built ones arrived. If we could buy the ancient mariner,the USN Trenton,far older,we could've got the Harrier-carriers for the proverbial song.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby John » 17 Jan 2016 20:39

nash wrote:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/defence-ministrys-rs-13500-crore-warship-order-will-throw-up-a-major-opportunity-for-private-sector/articleshow/50599012.cms

The Navy's proposal to acquire next generation missiles vessels (NGMV) - six of the missile boats are needed for the fleet - is likely to get a go ahead from the high powered defence acquisition council (DAC) shortly, with private shipyards L&T and Pipavav in the fray, besides defence ministry owned yards.

NGMV?


The 35 knot speed requirement indicates these will be modification of Tarantul class, another possibility is L&T has 45 meter long FPV that is capable of doing 33+ knots so latter could very well submit a modified variant of that for this tender.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby NRao » 17 Jan 2016 21:04

India is negotiating the possible purchase of eight ex-RN FA2s, having voiced interest in the type around six months ago. If delivered, the fighters will bolster the Indian navy’s fleet of 16 Pegasus 104-powered Sea Harrier FRS51s, with the service having lost six in accidents over the past 24 years.

Eight of the RN's retired Sea Harriers could be heading to India

India’s FRS51s will by late 2007 complete a Hindustan Aeronautics-conducted upgrade, which will equip them with Elta’s EL/M-2032 fire-control radar and Rafael’s Derby beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile.

A UK MoD source close to the negotiations says an Indian delegation has already inspected the FA2s at Yeovilton, but that the agreement of a “meaningful” long-term support package with original equipment manufacturers BAE and R-R will be vital to concluding an aircraft transfer “within the next few months”. The potential sale will not include the FA2’s Blue Vixen radar, AMRAAM air-to-air missiles or radar-warning receiver equipment, while some US-sourced software will also have to be removed from the 10-year-old aircraft.


IIRC, there were multiple reasons for the IN not being able to get the Harriers - support and cost of upgrades just did not work out. There were other dimensions too - of course beyond the comprehension of a few. Less noise does lead to better/more understanding.

The USMC's harriers are far closer - in make/model - to those sold by the UK and therefore was a better fit.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Singha » 17 Jan 2016 21:25

the usmc av8b harrier2 are very different beasts from the fa2 I think...but your point is valid. support costs for a small fleet not in common with our original sea harriers would be heavy.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Vipul » 18 Jan 2016 05:21

Sindhukirti submarine completes deep diver trials.

Soviet-made seventh Sindhughosh submarine of Indian Navy INS Sindhukirti, which underwent retrofitting at Hindustan Shipyard Limited, has successfully completed its maiden deep dive trials without any major defects. The vessel was delivered to the Navy in June after medium repairs and modernisation at HSL.

The development is of great significance as it certifies the high quality of repairs carried on the hull and associated systems by trained and experienced workmen of HSL adhering to stringent quality norms.

Though the yard took more time for refit than stipulated, it is worth mentioning that the retrofitting of INS Sindhukirti was the first of its kind undertaken by an Indian Shipyard with support from Indian Navy.

HSL Chairman and Managing Director Rear Admiral L.V.S. Babu appreciated the HSL team for their commitment and quality work which resulted in defect-free first sortie and full power trials followed by clearance of ‘check dive’ and deep dive’ in the first attempt.

He said this had placed the yard as a prime contender for undertaking Medium Refit Life Certification (MRLC) of EKM submarines, as well as for construction of Project P-75(I) submarines.

Despite major devastation caused by Cyclone Hudhud, HSL had timely undocked the submarine on November 4, 2014 and completed harbour acceptance trials in record period of seven months due to synergised efforts between the yard and Naval Dockyard-Visakhapatnam) and other Naval agencies.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Austin » 18 Jan 2016 09:58

AIP Equipped Scorpene in the pipeline

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 618413.cms

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Nick_S » 18 Jan 2016 17:21


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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby maz » 19 Jan 2016 05:49

The NGMV are most likely replacements for the 1241 RE Molniya aka Tarantul class FACMs. Therefore, they have to be around 60m in length or longer.
GRSE has a new stealthy 60+m IPV project which could possibly serve as a basis for the NGMV.

An expensive choice would be the all composite Swedish Visby class FACM whereas new Russian FACM designs are also a viable choice.

But the better approach would be an indigenous design. There is no reason why the DGND could not design a world class FACM on their own now that they have acquired experience of mating composite superstructures onto steel hulls (with the P-28s). This choice would be a reasonable cost compromise between the all steel, steel + aluminium, and all composite options.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby tsarkar » 20 Jan 2016 01:02

^^ There is a DND design using a single GE LM2500 & a single Pielstick diesel that can do the trick. The Type 1241 is all gas turbine and lacks the range. Gas & Diesel combination can give the required speed & range combination.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby wig » 20 Jan 2016 10:14

Chinese sub lurks close to India
http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation ... 85724.html
A Chinese submarine is reportedly lurking in waters around India and the security establishment has been informed about the development.
The vessel is in international waters and India has conducted specific sorties over the Bay of Bengal using aircraft capable of spotting submarines lurking under the waters.
The submarine accompanied by three warships was part of the anti-piracy task force on duty off the coast of Africa which is now returning to China after a four month deployment. On its return journey, the flotilla is at present docked in Colombo, Sri Lanka, from January 17 to January 21. It was in Pakistan earlier and even did a day-long drill with the Pakistan Navy frigate PNS Zulfiqar.
A Chinese flotilla comprises guided-missile frigates Liuzhou and Sanya and a comprehensive supply ship, Qinghaihu. Indian authorities are tight-lipped about the nature of the submarine — nuclear powered or conventional diesel-electric. The nuclear powered one has greater endurance to remain submerged hence remain undetected.
The Chinese anti-piracy escort force departed from the Gulf of Aden on January 3 on its way back to China. Colombo is its second stop which will be followed by a stop-over at Chittagong, Bangladesh. Two of these warships (not the submarine) will then arrive in India for the international fleet review on February 6-7 at Vishakapatnam on the east coast.
Submarines are the favoured platforms of naval commanders when tasked to launch attacks, deter enemies or for securing the vital sea lines of communication (SLOCs) — used by merchant ships carrying goods, crude oil, equipment and produce for trillion dollar economies like China or India. Technology still does not effectively track or locate undersea vessels, more so in waters around India which have high suspended particle or salt content. A submarine is capable of “pinning down” six-seven warships of the enemy just by installing the fear of the unknown.
The US has been vocal about the “lack of transparency and intent” on the part of China and the very fact that a submarine is deployed for anti-piracy operations. US Pacific Fleet Commander, Admiral Scott Swift, who was in India on January 9, had told mediapersons: “It’s hard for me as a maritime commander to understand how can a submarine support anti-piracy operations.”
New Delhi is equally concerned. Just yesterday, Indian Navy’s anti-submarine warfare capable Boeing P-8I aircraft ended a special week-long deployment to snoop around in the Bay of Bengal and be stationed at the Andaman and Nicobar Command (ANC).
A report to the US Congress presented on December 21, 2015, and titled “China Naval Modernisation: Implications for US Navy” says: “As China’s global footprint and international interests grow, its military modernisation programme has become progressively more focused on investments for a range of missions beyond China’s periphery, including power projection, sea lane security, counter-piracy, peacekeeping, and humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HADR).”

SivaVijay
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby SivaVijay » 20 Jan 2016 15:57

^^^
Saurav Jha ‏@SJha1618 16h16 hours ago New Delhi, Delhi
Be prepared to hear that a Chinese submarine slipped through bcoz the P-8Is lack critical US eqpt on account of CISMOA not being signed.

member_22539
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby member_22539 » 20 Jan 2016 16:00

^Yep, that man has a real finger on the pulse of these presstitutes.

Cybaru
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Cybaru » 20 Jan 2016 23:15

I think we need our own config based on a C295 MPA. Can't rely on anyone. Faster we get that going better it is for us. It has a reasonable 10 hour loiter time. 6 hours on station at 200 NM.

Ankit Desai
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Ankit Desai » 21 Jan 2016 08:26

Are yards (17.706400, 83.264288) across submarine shades part of HSL at Vishakhapatnam ?

-Ankit

arshyam
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby arshyam » 21 Jan 2016 11:00

Some hitherto unseen visuals of the Vikramaditya. Lots of close up shots of the 29K landing and taking off, some visuals of the hangars, flight deck activity, good perspective of the arrestor wires, night take off, etc. Even a nice close up of the venerable Harriers taking off and landing on the Viraat. Perhaps the most detailed video of the Vikramaditya so far. Enjoy.


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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby JTull » 21 Jan 2016 13:08

Thanks arshyam

Singha
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Singha » 21 Jan 2016 13:12

viraat has sailed out now for her last deployment for retirement. with 6 harriers, 6 sea king and 4 chetaks. she will be in vizag until the fleet review and then return home to a retired life, perhaps scrapping soon as they remove any usable.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Nick_S » 21 Jan 2016 14:44

Rajat Pandit ‏@rajatpTOI 4m4 minutes ago New Delhi, Delhi
Aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya & destroyer INS Mysore on a visit to Colombo

Image

Aditya G
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Aditya G » 21 Jan 2016 14:47

Singha wrote:viraat has sailed out now for her last deployment for retirement. with 6 harriers, 6 sea king and 4 chetaks. she will be in vizag until the fleet review and then return home to a retired life, perhaps scrapping soon as they remove any usable.


In the interim it will also reduce pressure on rotary naval aviation.

Most likely SHARs will be disbanded along with Viraat - though I hope they complete a deployment aboard Vikramaditya.

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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby Nick_S » 21 Jan 2016 15:49

Image

manjgu
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Re: Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015

Postby manjgu » 21 Jan 2016 19:02

engine fire in a fast patrol boat of IN...sinks off chennai... 6 sailors safe


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