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Possible Indian Military Scenarios - Part VII

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Postby Malay » 22 Mar 2007 00:30

Ok vivek, i must say mate, you have a penchant for story writing. Its like my dose of morphine here. Keep posting and FAST mate. Time is of the essence in military affairs!

BTW question on the storyline
Why did you earlier post the line that the world would consider it an act of war if India attacked China and then China would be able to plead innocence that India attacked first, etc, etc when China had attacked the Indian radar locations in Indian soil first?

Sorry to have to make you explain the thing mate :lol: :oops:

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 22 Mar 2007 01:14

BTW question on the storyline
Why did you earlier post the line that the world would consider it an act of war if India attacked China and then China would be able to plead innocence that India attacked first, etc, etc when China had attacked the Indian radar locations in Indian soil first?


malay,
look, the attack made on indian radars was done as retribution for the chinese J-8IIs shot down by the bisons earlier in the day. that's where both sides could and should back down and deescalate the war. if after that the indians respond again, that's an escalation from the global point of view. it then appears as if the indians are escalating the war when it doesn't need to. imagine the whole world falling on you diplomatically to hold back, and if then you don't, well... then the good guys turn into the bad ones as far as the world is concerned.

in any case, nobody is talking about innocence as much as as
deescalation of the conflict, and that's much more complicated and requires decisions not driven by emotions. at the same time you can't let the other side take advantage of you, and hence the dilemma. you decide. :)

also, as you say, the attack was on indian soil, so the concept of deescalation that would have existed in case of proxy attacks got thrown out of the window, and led to the execution of op NORTH-SWIPE.

bear with the political complications for a while. they will be cleared up soon :wink:

Sorry to have to make you explain the thing mate


no sorry required. glad to see your involvement with the scenario. :D

Time is of the essence in military affairs!

:)

that's the issue here, isn't it? i will do my best to try and post daily. thanks for the review

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Postby Rahul M » 22 Mar 2007 13:08

oops, a typing error there in my post :Embarassed:
can anyone tell me how to edit the posts here?


log in and you will see the edit button on the top right corner of your post, alongside the quote button . click it, changewhatever you want to change and post again. that's it !

keep up the good work !!

:D

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Postby Hari Sud » 23 Mar 2007 04:55

vivek_ahuja

Can I give you advice my friend.

Never reply back the critics after you made your post. There is no need to explain your thought process. If somebody points an error in your post, then remember it for future. Otherwise you will spend needless time duelling with the readers. This BR site has very aggressive and sometime a bit short tempered readership.

Hari Sud
Toronto.

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Shankar's Dissapeared!!!

Postby nikhil_p » 23 Mar 2007 07:00

Hey Shankar where are you???? Missing your posts
Vivek Keep up the good work...

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Postby Kiran.Rao » 25 Mar 2007 15:11

Next part kub ayega ?
Aaj Sunday hain.
Aaj to humko disappoint mut karo.

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Postby Malay » 25 Mar 2007 23:16

Hari Sud wrote:vivek_ahuja

Can I give you advice my friend.

Never reply back the critics after you made your post. There is no need to explain your thought process. If somebody points an error in your post, then remember it for future. Otherwise you will spend needless time duelling with the readers. This BR site has very aggressive and sometime a bit short tempered readership.

Hari Sud
Toronto.


Hari, i am only asking some questin to clear some doubts, the author knows enough as to when not to respond when some one is being aggressive.

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 26 Mar 2007 07:37

PLAAF ADVANCED STAGING AREA
81ST AIRBORNE DIVISION, 15TH ARMY
NORTH EAST OF LHASA, NORTH OF ARUNACHAL PRADESH
1328 HRS THURSDAY


The airfield was extremely busy as PLA troops milled about in preparation fro the main attack about to take place in a few hours. Their pilot comrades were at the airfield too. The PLAAF heavy transport fleet was showing its massive presence at the airfield in support of the Chinese airborne divisions. Fully a dozen IL-76s were present at the airfield, along with five Y-9 medium transports. Also present were a dozen of the SU-27 aircrafts designated as the close escorts for the lumbering transports as they made their way towards India. In addition, one Y-8 AWACS had landed half an hour ago to refuel and was present at the far end of the runway where it was being supported by several fuel trucks and security personnel.

The ATC was one very busy building, more so after receiving a warning from one of the mobile observation posts near the border about several intermittent contacts close to the border. But that was several minutes ago, and they hadn’t received anything further after the initial warning. Still, the base commander was no fool. As soon as he had heard the details of the warning, he had ordered the Y-8 AWACS to take to the air immediately, and that aircraft had started to turn its propellers at the end of the runway. The PLAAF commander had then thought about sounding the alarm when one of the lookouts inside the ATC shouted a warning. Heads turned to face the direction into which the lookout was pointing. Several binoculars were pointed from the ATC towards the hills. For several crucial seconds nobody saw anything…and then twelve black spots emerged against the bright blue sky. That was when the panicked shouts and warnings began.

The Chinese ATC officers detected the Brahmos missiles from their posts at the very last minute as the missiles came over the hills and into the plains surrounding the airfield against the blue sky. But by then it was far too late. Before the first officer could signal any sort of warning the first Brahmos dived into the ATC building and hit it with such tremendous kinetic energy that the building was literally blown to smithereens, throwing the massive amounts of dust, smoke and debris all around the airfield even as everybody present nearby were thrown off their feet by the explosions.

Seconds later the second missile bore down on the airfield, this time aiming towards one of the hangers being used as a barracks for the Chinese airborne troops. The speed of the missile was such that by the time the warhead explosion began to have any effect, the missile had already penetrated through the weak roof of the hanger and entered the interiors where the massive explosion of the missile warhead destroyed the hanger inside out, amidst another massive ball of fire that mushroomed into the sky.

Then things started moving very quickly. The third and the fourth missiles dove into the parked IL-76s that had already skidded while stationary due to the massive force of the explosions nearby. One Il-76 took a direct hit from the missile that destroyed that aircraft and severely damaged two others on each side, and threw several Chinese ZBD03 AFVs that were parked nearby, flying into the air and falling upside down. Another missile exploded above the other end of the tarmac using a fuel air explosive warhead that released enough pressure to literally flatten several Il-76s in a crushing blast as well as leaving several hangers on fire.

Two of the remaining missiles were programmed to hit some specific coordinates that were incidentally, the centre of the main runway and the accompanying taxiway with direct hit warheads, and the explosion there was not so much fire and smoke as much as dust and huge chunks of concrete being thrown into the air. The final two missiles flew through the massive cloud of dust and thick black smoke covering the entire space of the airfield and hit the radar station on top of a hill nearby and the PLAAF base-ops centre building that was also left shattered. It was all over in one extremely long minute.

Overall, as the massive dust cloud over the airfield cleared, the damage became clear. The ATC building was burning furiously with massive flames reaching for the sky with a deafening roar. The two main hangers that were being used by the Chinese airborne troops as a barracks was totally destroyed, with the burning pieces of wreckage strewn around the airfield. The main runway intersection was cratered with a massive hole in the center, and the cracks in the runway concrete around the crater meant that those tiles would have to be replaced as well, making the job of repairing the airfield more than just a fill-up operation. One IL-76 front section was thirty meters away from where the rest of the aircraft was, and five other aircrafts were burning on the tarmac. Three others had whole wings missing and the undercarriage collapsed. Several AFVs were upside down on their turrets while a dozen others were burning furiously. The Y-8 AWACS had one engine hit by shrapnel and was burning even as the crew was jumping out of the cockpit as fire-fighting vehicles moved in to douse the flame with foam. The ILS equipment was dozens of meters away from where it should have been, covered in debris and the main hilltop that housed the mobile radar vehicles was covered in a massive black pillar of smoke.

The only aircrafts totally untouched by the attack were the SU-27s parked at the extreme end of the tarmac and in their HASs, and the Y-9s, who miraculously escaped severe damage despite being parked next to the doomed IL-76s. The pilots of the SU-27s watched in horror as the aircrafts they were supposed to escort and protect lay broken and burning on the airfield in front of them. There was no way of knowing the casualties of the attack, but it was soon obvious to the survivors that there were a lot fewer people running around with their shiny new rifles and equipment than there were only minutes ago. The two main hangers that were hit housed several whole companies of infantry, none of whom were anywhere to be seen anymore, and that didn’t count the massive number of casualties taken by the Chinese when the fuel air explosion had hit the tarmac.

Overall the damage was significantly extensive. And it only got worse. The SU-27s were unharmed but could no longer take off. No more aircrafts could come in, and most of the equipment for repair was destroyed. The PLAAF had lost a large number of their IL-76s and could not afford to stage them close to the area of operations anymore. Without the transport capability, the Chinese airborne assault threat disappeared in the span of under two minutes.

Ten minutes later an Indian Satellite moved over the area and its cameras took high-resolution photographs of the airfield that was easy to make out thanks to the smoke and dust clouds nearby. The photographs showed the orange-yellow flames in great detail and colour and also showed the two big holes on the runway. Before long the imagery was sent to DIPAC where it was processed and analysed. The DIA officers were very pleased with what they saw.

NORTH-SWIPE Phase-I was over within half an hour. Phase-II missile launchers were moving into their final positions in the Himalayan foothills and the first Iron-hand defence suppression designated Jaguars were being loaded with their tools of the trade. The Chinese would not be allowed to gain a foothold or even a modicum of air-superiority in the region as far as the Indian armed forces were concerned. the objective was to disable all PLAAF facilities in the region to prevent them from using them for any air operations. This included hitting radars; SAMs, airfields and C3I facilities before the full might of the PLAAF could be brought to bear on the IAF. The mission was simple: hit hard, hit fast. Find, attack and eliminate the enemy.

The bottom line was clear: this was not 1962.

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Postby Kiran.Rao » 26 Mar 2007 11:31

vivek_ahuja wrote:[b] The mission was simple: hit hard, hit fast. Find, attack and eliminate the enemy.

The bottom line was clear: this was not 1962.


Fantastic................

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Postby nits » 26 Mar 2007 11:51

vivek_ahuja wrote:The bottom line was clear: this was not 1962.


Vivek... The way you write your last line of post makes us wanting for more... It just act as Punch Line for the entire post and keep us guessing... whats stored next in this dynamic Scenarios.... Good Work men...

Shankar - Where have you disappeared... As we need Lunch and Dinner both in a Day.., We also need Your and Vivek's Post regularly in a day... Dont make us waiting for long...

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Postby Hari Sud » 26 Mar 2007 20:18

Hello guys

Vivek_Ahuja is dealing with a new angle i.e. China scenario. He is doing a good job. I like it.

Shankar deals with Pakistan scenarios. He has in last two years enthralled the readers. I am his fan.

If both of them post one after the other, it will be confusing.

So in my opinion if Vivek continues with posting (with shorter gaps) then Shankar should take a well deserved break. It will allow him to think of better and more interesting scenarios.

Are you in agreement Shankar? Well done.


Thank you


Hari Sud

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Postby Shankar » 26 Mar 2007 21:07

Hi guys sorry for the intended break .Vivek is doing a super duper job of keeping the thread alive and his writing style is so very different .After many years just enjoying his scenarios and the way he is building up and feel nly fair he should have a clear field atleast for the time being .

And of course being the end of financial year and the mass of sales tax,income tax excise returns ,meeting the years production deadlines ,firts two LNG stations in the country have got me totally bogged down and of course the Mig 35 vs rest debate in MRCA thread

Some times just get the urge to post a few clancyish sceens ot viveks scenario -but not sure whether he or you guys will like it

All the best Vivek - your style is good and so are the details in the scenario ,in fact I was in Digboi during 62 (very young )but still do remember the panic and chaos of those weeks when demo chrges were placed in digboi oil refinery and in the open playing ground s the first of the radar controlled guns were set up and we used watch in awe the long barreled guns pointing sky wards . The old shermans making dent on the narrow roads as they sped towards the front and military police with red arm band and sten guns directing the convoys .We used to leave school and cheer the troops and every evening listened to the total collapse of indian resistance ,that historic speech of Nehru and finally we were evacuated by RAF aircraft from chabua and the unilateral cease fire was declared when we were over east pakistan

Arunachal was called NEFA then and it was a regualr thing for us to in our old vaux haul to jairampur (burma/mynamar border ) catch fish as elders threw dynamite into mountain streams ,go down the shafts of ledo coal fields a place of spectacular natural beauty .

I was about 5 yrs old then but the china conflict left deep impression I dont know why -only much later came to know the reasons but then it was too late .

You have to catch the beauty of the conflict region ,the wild elephants on the road (a usal sight) pythons on the parking space of only cinema hall
with a full grown deer inside and the two horns sticking out of the stomach,the leopard mother biting her self to death inside a small wooden cage ,the black bear jumping down from a tree and tearing up a village lady and my mom repaired the damage and she lived many years,the trampled body of an young drunk who went into the path of a rogue elephant ,the snakes everywhere and after some times we even stopped mentioning them in dinner table so common,the leaches up all your holes in the body as we used to go for a swim in local ponds and streams ,the sweet root of a particular tree (forget the name )which is dried and used as pan massala .the heavy rains and the forests of thre oil fields where you cannot see the sun even in noon and so much more .The mother and baby rhino by the road side,the elephant herd trying to move a tiger attacked cub into deeper forest,the slow speed meter guage train from dibrugarh to ledo thru the oil fields and tree plantations of assam and nefa.catching fish in the paddy fields and the ever present leeches ,playing foot ball with Batabi lebu and so much more a decade of living in the most beautiful and exotic part of our nation.Kashmir is nothing in comparison

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 27 Mar 2007 00:11

THE MINISTRY OF DEFENCE BUILDING
NEW DELHI, INDIA
1410 HRS THURSDAY


The Defence minister was staring outside his office windows deep in his thoughts. The two other people in the room were the CAS and COAS who had the good sense to keep silence. It anyway wasn’t the time fro talking. All the talking had just finished and the COAS took the time to put the imagery shots and the analysis report back into his case while the CAS shared the defence minister’s passion for quiet thought. It was time for a quiet reflection and a mental clarification of what needed to be done further.

NORTH-SWIPE phase-I had just been completed and the first BDA had already been done by DIPAC. The Chinese had been dealt a massive blow, and their plans for an airborne assault into Myanmar or India had been postponed indefinitely. But that had been just a secondary objective for the Defence Minister. The political objective of retribution had been achieved. The lives of the hundred odd Indian airmen killed in the missile attack on the hills of Kohima had been avenged. At a rate of nine to one, according to the first reports by the intelligence sources who had been intercepting the Chinese communications from the ARC aircrafts flying near the border, and even over the border in some of the more clandestine operations since early in the morning. It should have been a time to celebrate, but there was hardly a time for that now.

The country was officially at war now, and the Chinese had been dealt their first blow. The initiative had been stolen from the PLAAF and the IAF had no intention of giving it back. NORTH-SWIPE Phase-II was ready to go, and several strike packages of the IAF Iron-hand missions were waiting. There was a slight change in plans for those missions, as the CAS had discussed earlier in the meeting and got the approval for. As both the CAS and the COAS mulled over the jobs they had to do, they looked over to the Defence minister in the first sign of impatience for the two men.

Where has this day gone to? The defence minister thought. We started the day with the intention of helping the loyalists in Myanmar, and here we are looking over how many Chinese we killed within china by our missile strikes. God, it was this very morning when I had given those orders, and its just lunchtime now. It has happened in half a day, or half a century, depending on your view.

History is repeating itself. We were here before. Both India and china. That was half a century before in 62. What had started then is making its mark today. Fifty years! And we are again fighting on the same battlefields but for very different purposes. Regional Dominance my ass!
As if we can’t all live together! But now that this is happening today it is my responsibility just as it was Krishna Menon’s to ensure that our future generations do not have to deal with the same problems in their lifetime.
He must have sat in this same office back then. Interfering with all affairs military…bungling decisions and leading IV Corps to lose thousands of its men along with its honour and prestige…an entire nation and it’s military humiliated because of one man’s ego and his boss’s incompetence in all things military. Of course he wasn’t alone in making the decisions during that fiasco, but the responsibility stopped cold at Menon and Nehru’s footsteps. I wonder what he was thinking after it was all over, and when he must have left this office for the last time. Sorrow? Grief? Or a conviction that it wasn’t his fault?

In any case, what had started in that cold winter in 1962 was an animosity towards China that would last generations, and that was the root cause behind today’s events. Fifty years of animosity had led to this day, at the end of which both countries were threatening the very existence of their citizens.
Krishna Menon failed his responsibility, and so here we are today.
I must not fail mine.


The defence minister came out of his reverie and turned to look at the two men staring at him and awaiting his instructions.

“Gentlemen, I have to tell you that this war is now officially on, and that after a final meeting with the Chinese ambassador and our PM, if no solution is reached between the two countries, we are to begin full combat operations against the People’s republic of China. That meeting began ten minutes ago. Plan your moves, gentlemen, because I am drawing from all my experience with the Chinese when I tell you that there will be no solution reached. So within a call from the PM that the meeting is closed, I want to unleash our might against the Chinese. General, NORTH-SWIPE Phase-II through V will commence immediately after my call to you within the hour. ACM Bhosale, put your aircrafts in the air. I want them across the border five minutes after the final handshake between the Chinese ambassador and the PM.â€

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Postby Sudhanshu » 27 Mar 2007 03:23

[quote]..I want them across the border five minutes after the final handshake between the Chinese ambassador and the PM.â€

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Postby saumitra_j » 27 Mar 2007 04:55

Krishna Menon failed his responsibility, and so here we are today.
I must not fail mine.[/i]


To me this is the best part :twisted: Vivek, you are doing an awsome job mate, keep it up.

Waiting eagerly for your next tranche.....

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Postby Sudhanshu » 27 Mar 2007 12:15

I have a question:

I have read somewhere that Chinese have the psychology of "fighting at the gate" (not in home).
Will not they start an immediate offensive in Kashmir or Uttranchal sector with their already positioned forces there instead of acting defensive in NE.

Perhaps, similar, like India did by advancing towards Lahor in 65 by understanding its weakness in Kashmir, which forced Pakistan to pull it troops from Kashmir to defend its plane area. And hence India manage to dis-organize them and won on both fronts. Why not Chinese would do the same.


I may be wrong but my curiousity made me ask it. Hope someone can enlighten me on this.

Thanks

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Postby nits » 27 Mar 2007 13:22

vivek_ahuja wrote:Ten minutes later an Indian Satellite moved over the area and its cameras took high-resolution photographs of the airfield that was easy to make out thanks to the smoke and dust clouds nearby.


Vivek just one thought which you can use in your next Scenarios if you term it fine as per your storyline...

We all read in Newspapers some time back that China got the capability to shoot down Satelites in Space... :) Well India may also have it...

Rest is up to you... :D

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Postby KiranM » 27 Mar 2007 14:24

Sudhanshu wrote:I have a question:

I have read somewhere that Chinese have the psychology of "fighting at the gate" (not in home).
Will not they start an immediate offensive in Kashmir or Uttranchal sector with their already positioned forces there instead of acting defensive in NE.



Offensive operations by China in the Northern sector is not possible for the simple reason that the strength of troops in Aksai Chin is just sufficient to hold and defend the highways connecting Sinkiang and Tibet. For any offensive operations, there are very few passes that can be used to infiltrate land forces into Indian territory. As such these passes form critical choke points that will be well defended by India. In this case, the thought occurs for inserting airborne and heli-borne land forces in the rear areas. However, the altitude and weather in Tibet(where the airbases are located) makes it difficult, if not impossible, to launch air operations. The only option available is to do a "Red Ant Swarm" or "Human Wave Attack" at those passes in the Northern sector.
Last edited by KiranM on 27 Mar 2007 15:25, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby nits » 27 Mar 2007 14:59

KiranM wrote:
Sudhanshu wrote:I have a question:

I have read somewhere that Chinese have the psychology of "fighting at the gate" (not in home).
Will not they start an immediate offensive in Kashmir or Uttranchal sector with their already positioned forces there instead of acting defensive in NE.



Offensive operations by China in the Northern sector is not possible for the simple reason that the strength of troops in Aksai Chin is just sufficient to hold and defend the highways connecting Sinkiang and Tibet. For any offensive operations, there are very few passes that can be used to infiltrate land forces into Indian territory. As such these passes form critical choke points that will be well defended by India. In this case, the thought occurs for inserting airborne and heli-borne land forces in the rear ares. However, the altitude and weather in Tibet(where the airbases are located) makes it difficult, if not impossible, to launch air operations. The only option available is to do a "Red Ant Swarm" or "Human Wave Attack" at those passes in the Northern sector.


Why are we all forgeting the Chinese Navy... ? :roll: China can use its Navy to turn the balance of War on his side...

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Postby KiranM » 27 Mar 2007 15:48

Well, in the case of PLAN again another choke point for them is the Malacca Straits. FORTAN is very much capable of blocking it using land-based aircrafts. If PLAN does breakthrough Malacca, they still have the Eastern fleet to contend with.

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Immediate Chinese retaliation

Postby HarshS » 27 Mar 2007 17:05

After North Swipe 1, the Chinese will be mad. I'm not sure a) whether their ambassador will meet the PM; b) they won't retaliate massively. A huge loss of face for them.

Of course, I don't know what the next scenario unfolds, but India is in for some big retaliation--everything short of nuclear attack. Fuel air explosives, sub-launched cruise missiles at refineries, massed missile attacks at our airfields--with their superior infrastructure, they can do a "South" Swipe at us.

But then, I'm sure our scenario writer can do an "out" swipe and take back the initiative. Bravo. Great writing. Great writing about places. Great writing about action. And great writing about thinking.

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Postby Sudhanshu » 27 Mar 2007 17:24

nits wrote:
KiranM wrote:
Sudhanshu wrote:I have a question:

I have read somewhere that Chinese have the psychology of "fighting at the gate" (not in home).
Will not they start an immediate offensive in Kashmir or Uttranchal sector with their already positioned forces there instead of acting defensive in NE.



Offensive operations by China in the Northern sector is not possible for the simple reason that the strength of troops in Aksai Chin is just sufficient to hold and defend the highways connecting Sinkiang and Tibet. For any offensive operations, there are very few passes that can be used to infiltrate land forces into Indian territory. As such these passes form critical choke points that will be well defended by India. In this case, the thought occurs for inserting airborne and heli-borne land forces in the rear ares. However, the altitude and weather in Tibet(where the airbases are located) makes it difficult, if not impossible, to launch air operations. The only option available is to do a "Red Ant Swarm" or "Human Wave Attack" at those passes in the Northern sector.


Why are we all forgeting the Chinese Navy... ? :roll: China can use its Navy to turn the balance of War on his side...


Scenario wise speaking:

For that they have to step into Indian ocean first. Which Indian Navy has already secured. And I believe the defense minister is quite convinced by Indian Navy in tackling it; to do this gamble at ease. And that is not a big risk.. given war is a risky game, where probablities instead of favoring the quantitative values favor more on sophastication, timing and strategy in this modern world.
Last edited by Sudhanshu on 27 Mar 2007 18:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby kmc_chacko » 27 Mar 2007 18:32

first India should build powerful blue water navy, massive & sophisticated land army and modern & superior air force which can deal Chinese & Pakis forces simultaneously. Then we can think of war, otherwise we cann't fight at two fronts at a time as Pakis will take advantage of war between India & China.

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Postby nits » 27 Mar 2007 19:26

kmc_chacko wrote:first India should build powerful blue water navy, massive & sophisticated land army and modern & superior air force which can deal Chinese & Pakis forces simultaneously. Then we can think of war, otherwise we cann't fight at two fronts at a time as Pakis will take advantage of war between India & China.


Though its too far fetched Idea :idea: and difficult to implement... but how about this that both Vivek;s and Shankar;s Scenario continue at there phase but at a point they can be merged and we can see action on both front at a same time... :?:

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 27 Mar 2007 23:32

DEFENCE IMAGERY PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS CENTRE (DIPAC)
ADJUNCT TO THE DEFENCE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY (DIA)
INDIA
1415 HRS THURSDAY


The military people at DIPAC had been working around the clock since this crisis had begun several days back, and more imagery of the surrounding region had been taken in the last few days than had been taken in the last year. There were several task forces organized around the various specialities and the regions involved. For example, there was an air force team of officers tasked with the analysis of the imagery of PLAAF airfields and bases. Another team from the army artillery Corps was doing a similar job on the PLA artillery positions and so on for other tasking.

One of the main tasks at the moment was the monitoring of the PLAAF assets in the Xizang province in accordance with the threat of an alpha strike expected at any time now. Further north and east the Qinghai and the Yunnan provinces respectively were also under the scanner. The main priorities at this time were the massive numbers of H-6 bombers parked on the tarmac of at least two dozen airfields around the Chinese mainland. The secondary tasking was the monitoring of the SU-27s and the SU-30MKK aircrafts that were now flowing into the region in ever-greater numbers. DIPAC was simply being overwhelmed with the amount of data coming in and there was simply not enough time to analyse everything.

Therefore while the air force team was involved with the sorting of the technical details of the critical bases and equipment, another secondary team was involved with just the numbers. They checked for example the number of bombers seen on the tarmac and compared those numbers with existing and previous known numbers to evaluate the influx or dispersal of the main bomber threat aligned against India. Only when they saw something out of the ordinary or something special did they forward that to the primary team.

For example, the Chinese Y-8 AWACS that had been damaged and left afire during the attacks of NORTH-SWIPE Phase-I could be seen being repaired on the ground and that imagery was sent to the primary team to evaluate the time before that aircraft was repaired. Another aspect was the movement of the Chinese S-300 systems into the region that was also being followed closely in anticipation of the IAF Iron-Hand missions about to be launched. In addition, the targets for NORTH-SWIPE Phase-II were being finalized. Phase-II would hit the PLA and PLAAF C3I centres and radar facilities throughout Xizang province. EAST-SWIPE had been cancelled and the missiles allocated for those operations had been redirected to the newly added phase-III, IV and V for NORTH-SWIPE. The targets for those had been located on the maps via this imagery as well.

During the final of the photographs during this pass of the satellite would be of the PLAAF bomber fleet based at the Golmud airbase in the Qinghai province. The satellite’s cameras zoomed in to the base and the real-time imagery being downloaded to DIPAC was of high resolution and colour. Cloud cover was moderate and it was the most frustrating thing to force yourself to look through the holes in those clouds to try and find your objective even when you knew it was there. The massive 16000 feet runway could be easily spotted as a reference mark when trying to locate the runway, along with it’s main tarmac. The main tarmac was a huge one in comparison to the other bases in the region and along with the infrastructure at the base was the reason why the base had been selected for housing a third of the PLAAF H-6 bomber fleet.

For the last two days the H-6s had been neatly lined up on the main tarmac as they were prepared for war. Several smaller delta wing aircrafts had also been located here since yesterday. That was of course when the clouds had been non-existent and the imagery had been clear and revealing. That was not the case today, but the experience gained for this base from the last two days meant that the analysts knew exactly what to look for.

At the moment several officers were sitting in the main operations centre for DIPAC where all the action was. It was here that the real-time imagery was being downloaded on a giant screen in front of the consoles. In effect it was similar to a movie theatre, except the video on the screen was live and in colour. The Major General in charge of DIPAC was standing alongside a Group Captain of the IAF as the junior officers sat at the controls in front of them.

“Okay sir, the clouds are giving way. We are starting to see the base now…â€

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Postby Hari Sud » 28 Mar 2007 02:51

Good work Vivek

What is your background on the subject matter.

You seemed to be well aware of latest technical details of a number of miliatry assets on both side of the border.

If you are still serving in the armed forces, then you need not disclose it.

Thanks


Hari Sud
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 28 Mar 2007 23:40

B-707 COMINT AIRCRAFT OF THE ARC
CHARBATIA, ORISSA, INDIA
1415 HRS THURSDAY


The grey painted B-707 took off from the main runway at Charbatia and gently turned northwards as it gained altitude and retracted its undercarriage. A dozen different radars were tracking the aircraft, and none knew who it was other its identification call sign on the radar, and the friendly IFF, of course. They weren’t supposed to know either, but had been informed of a flight from Charbatia lest they call in fighters to shoot it down. As the B-707 started gaining altitude, several long-range radars in the north started tracking the aircraft as it came over the horizon for the radar beams. Only one other aircraft crew knew of this aircraft’s flight and mission, and they would be the ones coordinating its move through the airspace. They were also the ones who would come to its rescue if it got into trouble.

This aircraft was a COMINT version of the standard Boeing airliner, acquired by the ARC decades ago. The airframe was nearing the end of its life but the electronics packed inside was not. All of the equipment was Indian, and that meant that upgrading those was never a problem. The same could not be said for the airframe. The aircraft being American in origin, the logistics for the aircraft had always been dependent on the status of diplomatic relations with the United States and that had caused a lot of headaches for the ARC maintenance crews over the years. That had led to a search for different spare part source. The search had ended with a clandestine deal with Iran over a decade ago. Iran had been in a similar situation for enough time after the Shah was removed from power to be able to overcome the maintenance problems of its American purchased aerial refuelling tanker fleet based on the same aircraft body as the ARC aircrafts, and the deal had seen the first production of components for the Indian B-707s within India itself, and that had led to the B-707 fleet coming back to flying status long before the Indo-American diplomatic relationships had taken a turn for the better in the new century, so that the aircraft had avoided obsolescence far longer than most had predicted, and all the money and effort spent on the aircrafts had proven their worth time and again during the last decade, with countless clandestine intelligence gathering missions being flown inside Chinese airspace.

This time was a first, however, as none of the previous missions had taken place during wartime. Now the risks were higher, but so were the rewards. The aircraft was full of passive and active electronic equipment and there were a dozen crewmen sitting in the rear of the aircraft in front of their consoles trying to garner the entire EW picture in the region even as the pilots were making a transit to the north. In order to conduct a practice run of sorts, the aircraft took a small change in bearing to the east and turned towards the Bangladeshi border. Soon enough the computer screens in front of the operators lighted up to reveal large amounts of information about the Bangladeshi picket fence radars at the border with India. It wasn’t much of a drill for the crew but it did wake the sleepy ones among them and set the mood for the mission.

Further north, the pilot diverted towards the west when over northern parts of West-Bengal. That took the aircraft towards Bareilly. The snow capped brown mountain peaks of the Himalayas were visible to the pilots from the cockpit even from this distance. That first line of the mountains north of the plains of northern India was the rough border for Nepal and east of it the Indian Territory continued northwards into Sikkim. More radars were detected now, all of them Indian, but showing different IFF requirements. These were the Indian donated radars given to the Nepalese to monitor their borders, and they were doing the job properly.

The B-707 was still a couple hundred kilometres short of the border, and the Nepalese radars were still a good deal inside their borders so that the coverage on their radars was at best intermittent and in worst cases, blind. Soon the aircraft was flying over Bareilly where the local Base Defence Zone began tracking the unmarked aircraft and started locking on it for practice. It was especially unnerving fro the crew on board since at the level of secrecy they were operating, that BDZ commander might not know their allegiance. It was time to take another diversion.
This one took the aircraft north again, this time towards Tibet. They were now entering the aerial battlefield. They were also entering the aerial coverage of the Phalcon AWACS ‘Victor Three’, who was flying over New Delhi and whose responsibility was the air defence of the northern Indian plains. Victor three didn’t bother hailing the aircraft until it was fifty kilometres south of the Tibet. Then the predetermined call was made to the aircraft. The call was the final transmission given to the aircraft before it started its mission and was essentially a final ‘Go’ order for which the B-707 pilot didn’t have to respond. After that the B-707 was on its own, and although it would receive all available intelligence on the aerial situation from Victor three, it would be flying alone and without cover. It was no surprise that the entire crew was composed of volunteers from the ARC. That did not preclude the fact most of this crew was highly experienced in these operations and had been doing it for years. Most had retired from active duty simply to join the ARC and make a difference. For all the insults directed at the ARC over the years for not delivering, it was still doing one of the most dangerous operations in the country. The only good news was that it was wartime now, and so they were now active parts of the air force, and therefore “legitâ€

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Postby Rahul M » 29 Mar 2007 00:53

I don't know what to say, your intense portrayal of the geo political situation, background knowledge coupled with the restraint shown in choice of words ; it is great !

noone except dilip had me this much hooked to the scenarios !

carry on !!

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Postby pradeepe » 29 Mar 2007 02:08

Awesome stuff!!

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 29 Mar 2007 21:29

THE TIBETAN MOUNTAINS
XIZANG PROVINCE, CHINA
1445 HRS THURSDAY


The B-707 passed over the massive Himalayan peaks and entered the Tibetan mountains near the location of Lama Chorten. The cloud cover that had been in the north some hours before had now shifted south, much to the relief of the pilots flying the aircraft. They were over china now, what was once called Tibet and now referred to as the Xizang province. Forty kilometres east of the aircraft was the huge Manasarowar Lake stretching twenty kilometres in rough diameter. It wasn’t visible now but the Rakas Lake, to its west, was visible, and it was nearly as big as the former. Beauty was all over the place, and so was the enemy, and it was time to get PIVOT-HEEL in motion.

Directly north of the two lakes was a major highway that roughly went east to west parallel to the Indian border and roughly at a separation of eighty kilometres from the border. It was the main highway that connected all Chinese border locations from Lhasa in the east all the way to the Chinese border posts near Laddakh. For the past few days’ traffic had been moving north from Lhasa to this region as the Chinese were establishing their bases in the region. It had to be done this way because Lhasa had the biggest cluster of airfields around for accepting large number of military transport flights, and had become the de-facto hub of Chinese air operations. The situation was further complicated for the Chinese by the absence of major airfields in the region west of Lhasa. So the spoke in the hub-and-spoke system was made up of PLA trucks and armoured vehicles plying this highway in huge convoys. Most of them being soft skinned vehicles, and ideal targets for cluster munitions.

The situation wasn’t totally against the Chinese of course. One major advantage was that there was a total absence of steep gradients in the mountain peaks around the region, and while the Himalayan peaks to the south was like a towering wall through which the Chinese anti-air systems could not see, once any aircraft passed over that wall and reached about ten kilometres south of the highway, it would present itself to the Chinese triple-A systems and have no cover in sight. As a result of this, the PLA had deployed large numbers of AAA systems around the highway all the way from Lhasa. All in all, it was a powerful wall of defences for any aircraft trying to penetrate it. But with all defences, it had weaknesses.

The biggest one being the vulnerability of the choke points on the highway, one of the biggest one being the near the Tibetan town of Khaleb, north of the Rakas lake. The town being mostly Tibetan, the Chinese had no problems clearing the local population out of their homes and streets to clear the way for the massive convoys to pass through the streets of the town before they began moving northwest. In fact, Khaleb was the pivoting point for the highway from where it pivoted from an easterly heading to a northwesterly heading. The destruction of this pivot to shut down the flow of enemy forces to the north was the objective of this operation. At least it had to appear that way for the Chinese to transfer any fighters to this region at all. They had to take the bait.

The B-707 was by now fully fifty kilometres inside Tibet and was near enough to the highway that the first communications intercepts made in the very high frequency range started off. These would be the LOS based communications used by the Chinese to communicate locally. That was the objective of PIVOT-CALLER, the call sign of the ARC B-707. They had to confirm the presence of the Chinese SAM systems near Khaleb using their passive ELINT gear as well as to listen in on not only the local units communicating with each other, but also on the longer ranged Army-level communications that were being made using low frequency communications in the Tibetan mountains.

Their job was complex, and the threats large. While the interception of communications was relatively easy, the type of communications made the job difficult. For example, communications via LOS radios was easy to listen in on, if you were within the LOS. That was the reason PIVOT-CALLER was beyond the Himalayan peaks into Tibet. There was no way you could listen in on LOS based communications south of the Himalayas. As a result of which the IAF had asked the ARC to do this job because of their proficiency with the job at hand as well as the region where they were flying.

If the enemy was using SATCOM systems with burst transmission of encrypted data, or simply using phones or fibre-optic cables, things got difficult for the Indian COMINT crew. Things got further complex if there were no voice communications, the classic COMINT intelligence source for the last century. For example, if the enemy used direct data transmission and zero voice transmission, garnering of data could take several hours, assuming you knew what to look for in the first place!

Then there was the airborne threat to the aircraft itself. Being a lumbering airliner based aircraft, any radar sweeping the region with electronic signals would be able to detect the aircraft in a heartbeat, and then it was all over. Fortunately, the region being mountainous, didn’t allow for efficient use of ground based radars, and the few that the PLAAF had deployed in this sector were old and mapped by the ARC for decades. Hence they knew the loopholes in their deployments and the flight path for the B-707 had been decided to allow it to go through these regions, with minimum threat. Instead, the Chinese had deployed a Y-8 AWACS aircraft to the region.

Another piece of luck for the ARC crew was the confirmed destruction of one of the Y-8 AWACS on the ground during Operation NORTH-SWIPE. That aircraft had been left burning at the tarmac earlier in the day and the Chinese had shifted the AWACS meant for this region to the east to cover the NE against possible threats from there. Obviously they expected the threat axis aligned along that region. It was one of the lesser-realized successes of NORTH-SWIPE strikes: the Chinese didn’t know where the threat now lay and where from it would strike.

As a result, the skies were clear for the B-707 when it penetrated Tibet, although the radar signature of the PLAAF Y-8 AWACS was detected at extremely long range from the east, and far beyond what would register a return. Another problem was the possibility of visual acquisition from the ground. The Chinese were sure to have observers at the border hills with powerful binoculars scanning the sky. Had this been the southern plain, the observers could not have seen the aircraft from the altitude it was flying. But that was not the case here, and hills were nearly as high as the aircraft altitude.

Moreover, the sound of the engines echoed here, and the four powerful turbines of the aircraft would alert even a deaf man to the proximity of the aircraft. And visual acquisition wasn’t required either. A simple phone call to the local PLAAF HQ informing of unrecognised engine noises would send a squadron of SU-27s to look for the aircraft and acquire it visually, and then it would all be over for the Indian aircrew. Even if they could jam the radars of the Chinese fighters using the electronic warfare equipment and jamming systems on board, it only took two small bursts of gunfire to bring the lumbering aircraft down in flames and there could be no manoeuvring.

Maybe they will give us a medal or something, like that Canberra reconnaissance pilot during the 1962 war…belonging to that unit based in agra, I think. At least he was flying a more warlike aircraft instead of this bus…and in a less lethal environment. On the other hand we do have the most sophisticated electronics known to man…all he had was a RWR to tell him when he was about to die. I guess that evens it out… the pilot thought as he scanned the blue sky in front of him for enemy aircraft while his co-pilot aimed the aircraft from one cloud to another.

In the back of the aircraft the enemy situation near the town of Khaleb was now becoming clear, and the first SAM system locations had been plotted already. Another twenty minutes and PIVOT-CALLER would change jobs from being a snooper to a FOC and a stand off jammer for the Jaguars who had now been told to move northwards and cross the border to join up with PIVOT-CALLER and then commence their attacks around the town of Khaleb.

During the Vietnam War, the Chinese assistance program for the North Vietnamese had allowed them to see the effects and hear the details about the American ‘Wild weasel’ strike packages. They had never felt it themselves. That was about to change.

The four jaguars soon thundered over the border into Tibet under the guidance of PIVOT-CALLER and headed towards the town of Khaleb. Time-on-Target was now seventeen minutes…

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Postby JCage » 30 Mar 2007 00:01

Vivek,

Just skimmed through the last couple of posts- nice work. Some additional stuff.., the PRC will not rely on the Y-8 etc, the Il-76 based KJ-2000 is their prime AWACS. Also they have three types-

-A Kj-2000 (Il-76)
- A balance beam / Erieye type
- A rotating antenna type

So which are you using? They're definitely bound to have quite a few...

Also, SAMs? The PRC has four battalions worth of S-300s (PMU/PMU1/PMU2), plus quite a few Tors and their own Crotales etc...any conflict with India would be SAM heavy..

Four Jags wont cut it against such a threat scenario..

Cheers

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Postby Rahul M » 30 Mar 2007 00:13

UAV's like harpy would also play a role in such situations IMHO.

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 01 Apr 2007 02:03

INDIA-MYANMAR BORDER CROSSING
10 KM NORTHWEST OF KAMTONG
NAGALAND, INDIA
1455 HRS THURSDAY


The Indian army IV Corps was now feeling much more secure after the Chinese airborne infantry assault threat had been neutralized. The Chinese 15th army had been stranded at the PLAAF bases along with their IL-76 Transports after Operation NORTH-SWIPE had destroyed the main runways at their airfields. In addition, the loss of several heavy transport aircrafts, equipment and hundreds of men had at the very least put a dent and a delay in the timetable for the attack. The Chinese Bombers were assembling over Tibet now, but their attacks would be directed against the IAF for the moment, and the missile threat to IV Corps units was not nearly as bad as having Chinese paratroopers falling out of the sky all over the region. The elimination of that threat had secured IV and III Corps logistical routes and the way was now clear for the Indian army’s advance into Myanmar.

The 57TH Mountain Division was now ready to move. The SOCOM troopers had established contact with the Myanmar loyalists at Singkaling Hkamti and had secured the routes for the 57TH to move through all the way to the Chindwin River west bank via many crossing points on the Indian-Myanmar border. The terrain necessitated the use of infantry assisted by armour and they had to move quickly to reach their destinations. Therefore, long mechanized convoys would be needed, led by tanks and APCs followed by infantry in trucks and other vehicles and the whole convoy being supported by an organic helicopter detachments consisting of attack, observation and logistical helicopters at the Battalion level. At the front of the convoys would be the FAC helicopters conducting Reconnaissance and surveys. The artillery would stay at the border areas on the Indian side and not cross in the initial stages. In any case, the first drive to the Chindwin was about forty to about fifty kilometres at the maximum and barely twenty kilometres at a minimum, and therefore was within range of Indian artillery systems stationed just at the border. The airborne component would hop along with the convoys as the convoys themselves established FARP or Forward Area Rearming Points as they went along. The IAF had attached several Mi-17 flights with the 57TH MD and these would help transport the logistics and equipment for setting up the FARP as they shadowed the convoy.

The nature of the mechanized convoys and their equipment was decided on the basis of the routes and the region they were to take. In all there were to be a total of seven Mechanized Convoys crossing the border at seven different points, followed by holding formations. In addition, there were three other smaller convoys and two SHBO lined up for places that could not be accessed by roads. Moving from north to south, the first convoys would cross the border near Hill 2999 where the Indian aircrafts had intruded into Myanmar earlier in the day. The road was mostly theoretical, and was basically a dirt track, and was also at high altitude. As a result, the troops crossing here would be mostly truck bound with a smaller contingent of BMP-II ICVs and no tanks. They would be crossing the hills east of Kohima and their job would be to secure the way from the top of these hills all the way to the bottom of the foothills and then mate up with the loyalist troops and the Indian Para commandoes waiting at Singkaling Hkamti, then cross the Chindwin to the eastern side ad secure the road checkpoint on that side of the river and then wait for the tanks.

This point was crucial for the Indian army’s advance east of the Chindwin. That road junction had to be held. It was the only one in the north that had relatively decent road coming to it and moving away from it. But the troops allocated fro convoy one were not sufficiently equipped with mechanized firepower. As a result, another convoy that was heavy in tanks would be moving north on a road parallel to the Chindwin on the eastern side of the river once they had secured their crossing point south, and while they would then move north to assist the troops at this road junction by providing armoured support and then await further orders.
The Convoy two and three would cross the border near hills 3826 and 3088 respectively and move towards the small town of Layshi, occupy it, and then convoy three, which was the southern element, would move further east along the road parallel to a small river by the name of Namtaleik and reach the town of Tamanthi, which was right on the western bank of the Chindwin.

All contact with that town had been lost ten hours ago so nobody was sure as to who was occupying the town, but Nishant UAVs of III Corps had located a large number of T-55 tanks on the streets and DIA was not sure who they belonged to, and neither, surprisingly, were the loyalists. In any case, the town was to be taken and then convoy three would force a crossing to the east side and then move north towards Singkaling Hkamti via the dirt road on the eastern bank of the Chindwin, secure the villages along the way and then mate up with Convoy one at the road junction. This was by far the most dangerous mission among all the convoys of the Indian army crossing later today, and was equipped accordingly.

The convoy had one whole regiment of tanks attached to it, attached to the 57TH MD by the 1ST Armoured Division on an ad-hoc basis for the duration of this war. Considering that the tanks would have to fight their way along narrow roads and dirt paths flanked by heavy vegetation, the 1ST Armoured had seen it fit to equip the 57TH with heavy Arjun tanks as against the initial thoughts of putting T-90s in the region. Hit survivability was the issue here, and not speed and agility, for which there was no space in any case. Moving along narrow roads, the tanks were expected to be targeted by anti-tank weaponry. The Arjun with its composite armour was better suited for the job of taking hits and still moving than the Russian built tanks. It was also a fine opportunity of testing the Arjun tanks in a real live war, albeit of low intensity and learn the shortcomings and the advantages under live fire conditions. The GOC of 1ST Armoured had visited the region on Monday and it had taken him less than two hours to see the region before deciding to use the Arjun MBT here.

Two whole Battalions of Arjun MBTs was attached to Convoy three while Convoy two was mainly equipped with BMP-II ICVs as they would not even reach the Chindwin and were mostly tasked with occupying the foothills all the way from the border to the western bank of the Chindwin as a holding force between Convoy one in the north and three to the south. Later on, of course, they would be used as reserves should the need arise.

Further south, convoys four, five and six would cross the border near hills 1026 and 1097 and would move to the Chindwin which was barely at twenty Kilometres. Once there, they would follow the well developed roads in the region on the eastern side of the Chindwin and probe eastwards towards the next set of hills at around fifty kilometres east of the Chindwin known as the Zibyutaungdan in Myanmar. As such, these hills restricted the scopes of these mechanized convoys because of their impassibility, and any movement across them would have to loop around it to the north, covering far more ground than what the 57TH MD could hold on to and take up too much time by which time the war may have shifted its centre of gravity towards the north if the PLA piled into Myanmar. There was no point in stretching the 57TH MD out into the jungles when they might serve a better purpose up north if the need arose. One Battalion of Arjun tanks was attached in smaller Company level or Squadron level segments along with each of the convoys because of the low threat perception in the region. Mostly they were heavy in infantry and ICVs, including some experimental Abhay ICVs that were also to be tested in combat in this region.

In any case, the job was not to capture as much of Myanmar territory as possible. It was simply to make sure that the rebels survived as a political entity during the crisis and had hold over some portion of Myanmar. That would be accomplished and then the Indian army would stop, lest the Chinese start calling them as invaders in front of the world stage.
The two smaller convoys and the SHBO were lined up for moving southwards from Ledo to Changlang, then to Khonsa which was still inside India and then cross the border near hill 2271 and then secure the North-south road running parallel to the Sangpang Bum hill range inside Myanmar.

This would be the northern element and was unique because of the fact that it was the only Indian army unit moving across the border that wasn’t attached to III Corps, but rather to IV Corps. As a result, to avoid command overlap situations, they had been given the job of securing that road which was essentially unconnected to 57TH MD movements to the south, but still important enough that IV Corps units had to be diverted from facing China to this job. This road was important because if the rebels got on this road, they could theoretically move south and then behind Singkaling Hkamti and the Indian logistical trains and cut off Convoy One positions in Myanmar. Although it was unlikely that the rebels did indeed pose a threat to this road, it was making III Corps staff officers very uneasy and thus the decision to include IV Corps into the equation had been taken despite protests from the GOC, IV Corps.
This Far East, the sun was already starting to set. The units that would make up the convoys were in their final jump off positions and their vehicles were laagered in large grounds adjacent to the road that they would be taking when moving to the border crossings.

All soldiers of the Indian army were wearing the new Disruptive type camouflage uniforms and the tanks crews of the 1ST AD who had been sent here had also been issued green overalls as against their normal black uniforms on the advice of the GOC, 57TH MD. They were near their tanks now, and were walking nearby, watching other vehicles move east past them towards the border. Some of these were the BMP based AERVs or engineer reconnaissance vehicles that were moving out before the tanks to survey the first stretch of the road after the border. The crews were sitting with the hatches open and enjoying the cool wind in these hills before they buttoned up near the border. The border crossings itself were somewhat crowded with Myanmar citizens trying to gain permission to come into India to escape the air attacks being done on them by the PLAAF and the rebels. The Indian army soldiers had been asked to close the border when reports had started coming in the morning of infiltrators and spies coming in with the refugees to spy on Indian army deployments near the border. After the missile attacks had taken place on the Indian radars that was witnessed by everybody nearby, most refugees had turned back, deciding that India wasn’t safe anymore either, and by the afternoon the crossings were deserted on the Myanmar side.

The Indian army had seized this opportunity to move several recon teams across the border and secure the first leg of the roads to be taken by the convoys from any threats. Although the steel gate at the border were still closed, there were Indian soldiers on both sides now, and when the first AERVs started to reach the gate, it was smashed open by the engineer vehicles as they moved across to conduct their survey full one hour before the main units piled across.

Back at III Corps HQ at Dimapur, some had debated the decision to move so late in the afternoon as against early next day morning, but the fact was that the Indian army had far better war fighting capabilities than the rebels for night-time operations, and the situation being fluid across the border, it was also safer to move during the night. If all things worked, as they should, the convoys would reach the Chindwin before the night was over, and preferably before either the Chinese or the rebels realized what was happening.

As the AERVs started moving cautiously across the border, the tanks crews started to gather around their officers and commanders for the final briefing before it all began. They were told that the movement to the final jump-off points was at 1800 Hours. The Jump-off itself was set for 1900 Hours.

That was when the unreal war would turn real.

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Postby Shankar » 01 Apr 2007 12:14

Chindwin River

The Chindwin River is a river in Myanmar and the major tributary of the Ayeyarwaddy River. The river flows 840 kilometres to join the Ayeyarwaddy.

The Chindwin river is 750 miles from north to south. However, she is the biggest tributary of the mighty Ayeyarwaddy and spills her strength into the longer river at a place not far from Mandalay, an old city that is the heart of Myanmar. It runs through misty-blue mountains and charming towns and villages, proudly running through a region of abundant natural resources and fertile meadows.

The Chindwin Valley is a place of deep jungles and lofty mountains. The cultures of the inhabitants are more unspoilt, and the towns and villages lining the river bank. The marvellous Thanboddhay Pagoda of Monywa and the cave pagodas of Hpowintaung and Shwebataung, are in the Chindwin valley.

Another natural wonder is an extinct volcano crater producing natural Spirulina. It is grown in many parts of the world but this is a rare natural find, the blue-green algae growing organically in a nature-made lake. Spirulina is rich in protein, minerals, amino acids, iron, beta-carotene, vitamins B and E. International researchers have found that it probably stimulates the immune system, and may have antiviral and anticancer effects. It is widely consumed in Myanmar. No organisms can survive to pollute the waters in which this algae grows, so Spirulina is one of the cleanest, most naturally sterile foods found in nature.

Along the Chindwin river bank are Kyaukkar village, producing lacquer ware products, Kani town which has been known as the birthplace of learned nobles and wealthy merchants of the ancient times, Kalewa town, the point where the Myit Thar River joins the Chindwin River.

There are also Allaungdaw Katthapa Wild Life Sanctuary, and Pyingago and Padauk wood, and Thanakha wood, forest products.


Also to go to Naga New Year festival, one has to travel up the Chindwin river reaching the Homemalin Town.

Settlements along the Chindwin River include Shwebo, which was the royal capital from 1760-1764.

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 01 Apr 2007 12:32


FLASH BACK TO HISTORY


Officially established March 3, 1942, the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations (CBI) is often referred to as the Forgotten Theater of World War II. Of the 12,300,000 Americans under arms at the height of World War II mobilization, only about 250,000 (two percent) were assigned to the CBI Theater. Relatively few Americans were in combat in the theater. Except for a few stories, CBI did not often make headlines in the newspapers back home. The 12,000 mile supply line, longest of the war, was often last in line for supplies from the United States.
Not forgotten to Allied war planners, CBI was important to the overall war strategy. Occupation of Burma in 1942 by Japanese forces cut the last supply line of communication between China and the outside world. A military airlift was begun as it was important to keep China supplied and in the war. It was generally agreed that this would not be enough and a land supply route would be needed. A road from Ledo, Assam, India was begun in late 1942. Ledo was chosen because it was close to the northern terminus of a rail line from the ports of Calcutta and Karachi. Construction of the Ledo Road was completed in early 1945.
Allied forces in CBI, mostly British, Chinese, and Indian, engaged large numbers of Japanese troops that might have otherwise been used elsewhere. America's role in CBI was to support China by providing war materials and the manpower to get it to where it was needed. The Flying Tigers fought the Japanese in the air over China and Burma. Army Air Forces flew supplies Over The Hump from India to China. Merrill's Marauders and the Mars Task Force fought through the jungles of Burma. Army Engineers built the Ledo Road to open up the land supply route.

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 03 Apr 2007 19:15

THE TIBETAN MOUNTAINS
XIZANG PROVINCE, CHINA
1500 HRS THURSDAY


The four Jaguars passed the to the north of Peak 5288 and reached the southern edge of Rakas Lake. From there they turned north, above the surface of the lake and moved all the way to the northern tip of the lake, about twenty five kilometres away. They were now less than fifteen kilometres away from the town of Khaleb, and their mission objective. Although two of the Jaguars carried ‘Dumb’ bombs, all carried cluster munitions. The nature of the mission would define the need for the weapons at hand, which were being carried for attacking targets of opportunity rather than any specific target.

The vector in which they were moving now would take them over the town whereon after minor course corrections based on visual acquisition of the target they would drop their bombs and then continue on a high speed dash to the north, thus in effect cutting across the main Highway and thus also the main line of Triple-A defences. In doing so, they would enter the next set of large peaks to the north of the Highway that would shield their backs from the anti-aircraft fire and allow them to maneuver freely while deiding the safest way south. Because the enemy would be aware of the direction from where they had ingressed, they would egress from another vector, this time easterly and attack a mobile radar deployment near Men-shih on the way. Then they would continue eastwards, fooling the enemy into thinking that that was the exit route towards Himachal Pradesh and then loop south towards Peak 5614, towards Lama Chorten and then across the Himalayan peaks via the Nanda Devi range and back into India.

Two minutes out, PIVOT-CALLER activated the EW equipment started sending jamming signals towards all the radars they had been plotting for half an hour. All locations and frequency ranges were known and so were the power output ranges. The massive active jamming signals sent out of the B-707 were far higher in terms of power than the sensitive return signals of the aerial environment around the Chinese radars. This caused the radar screens in front of the Chinese operators to wipe themselves out. All they could see was the massive returns coming from the direction in which the B-707 was flying in addition to the massive radar reflections off the mountain peaks.

As a result, the Chinese radar operators could not distinguish the difference between the reflections and the main source of the signals at their current power settings. They had to decrease sensitivity in order to differentiate between a source and a reflection, and even at their minimum sensitivity settings; the inbound signal spikes were large enough so that no differentiating was possible. The power of the B-707 Stand-off Jammer was just too high. Only a single radar unit at Khaleb itself had the operating ranges to select minimum sensitivity and differentiate between the signals and they did this effectively, finally locating the Indian B-707 aircraft flying over their country.

They had made several mistakes. By keeping their settings on high sensitivity to try and locate inbound fighters, they had also had to reduce their power output; else the reflections from the environment nearby would clutter their screens. Reducing the power meant reduced range, and that meant that they had failed to locate the Indian B-707 flying over Tibet. In any case, in the mountain battlefield, high power is somewhat useless in terms of ranges, as relatively few locations offer the LOS for the ranges that the system is capable of, and the main issue is sensitivity in reduced ranges. High sensitivity is obviously better, but that can be made to work against it in case of electronic warfare.

The Chinese had now decreased sensitivity to burn through the Indian jamming, and had increased power to locate the source of the jamming. This they had successfully done, and the Indian aircraft was now in their sights. But at reduced sensitivity, they had no hope of picking up the Indian Jaguars flying low and inbound towards them. Moreover, they now tried calling for SU-27s to shoot down the jammer aircraft and that’s when they discovered another art of modern warfare.

The main speakers and data links were being scrambled. Knowing the various parameters of wave propagation type communications had limited the effectiveness of such communications in a high EW intensity environment long ago, and here, all VHF communications between local units were being scrambled by inbound signals on the same frequency and power but having phase differences. The Chinese weren’t fools either. They had frequency hopping systems, but even these systems had a certain range in which they ‘hopped’ and if you were present within the LOS and could send opposing signals in the entire frequency range, then anywhere the radio ‘hopped’, the carrier signal was destroyed by destructive interference of the two propagating waves and the data signal had no carrier to move it and so the communications gets ‘jammed’. Being on the same LOS offers the enactment of COMINT gathering and the same location offers ‘Signal Scramble’ opportunities to deny the enemy the use of his communications.

Only the use of old-fashioned telephone cables and the newer fibre-optics networks allows one to evade these jamming procedures, and these are subjected to environmental limitations during layout as well as being vulnerable to attacks at the main nodes by Special forces or aerial attacks.

It’s always a losing game when you try to adapt yourself in a passive way rather than in an active one. A single surface-to-air missile could knock the Indian aircraft out of the sky an end all these nightmares for the Chinese, if they could only contact their own SAM operators and transfer missile guidance data to them. The same target aircraft was now restricting this data transfer. In effect, the Indian B-707 crew was fighting for its life in the electronic battle space, and doing so well enough that the main threat went unnoticed by the Chinese operators who were busy trying to fight off the jammer aircraft.

It was too late when the PLA troops around the town of Khaleb heard and saw the four Indian Jaguars tear through the airspace around the town.
That’s when the cluster munitions were ejected from their racks.

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Postby Shankar » 03 Apr 2007 20:16

Code: Select all

For 48 years, China has occupied Tibet. In Tibet's history, there has been over 17 percent of the Tibetan people killed, and 6,000 monasteries ruined. For starters, Tibet was never part of China. During the first few years when China was in control of Tibet, the Chinese declared that Tibet should be part of China, because an Emperor of Tibet once married a Chinese princess. Years later, the Chinese said that Tibet was part of China because of the warrior Genghis Khan. Genghis Khan and the Mongolians were in control of Tibet, but they never made Tibet belong to China. Secondly, the Tibetan people and the Chinese are totally different, culturally and socially speaking. Both peoples have their own culture, way of life, and religion. Of course the language is very diverse, too. Tibet had their own government before the Chinese took over. It was led by His Royal Highness, the Dalai Lama. Before the Chinese came in and took over Tibet, Tibet had nothing to do with China. The Chinese invaded Tibet in July of 1949. They caused many disasters and much sadness to the Tibetan people. Today Tibet is nothing but a prison. The Chinese continually spy on the Tibetan people. Seventeen percent of the Tibetan population was killed. Many Chinese forcibly removed Tibetans out of their homes at any time, day or night, and sometimes these people were thrown into prison. These people also were often killed for no reason. Ever since the Chinese have taken over the Tibetan people, there have been over 1 millon people killed. There were 6 million Tibetans living in Tibet before the Chinese came and took over the country. In the capital of Tibet, Lhasa, the natives of Tibet are being rid of by the Chinese; the Chinese are filling up Lhasa with Chinese people and the Chinese want to make Tibet throughly Chinese. Today, the Tibetan people are a minority in their own country! All the better jobs go to the Chinese people living in Tibet. The Tibetan people cannot find jobs for themselves, the best job sometimes they can get is to become a truck driver.


What the Chinese are really doing is committing against the Tibetan people, a cultural and religious genocide. The culture of Tibet is based on Bon's ancient beliefs, and also on Buddhism from India. The Tibetans take the best of the two religions, and their entire culture is based on that. But now the Chinese have gotten rid of the beautiful Tibetan artifacts, and turned them into museums, for tourists only.

The Dalai Lama is always trying to make contact with the Chinese, but they keep the door to peace talks closed. Some time ago, the Dalai Lama said: "All the 6 million Tibetans should be on the list of endangered species. This struggle is my first responsibility." (Dalai Lama: http://www.meaus.com/Tibet_-Give_Us_Liberty.html)


There are people all over the world who feel sincere solidarity with the courageous people of Tibet, and wish them success in their long, truly heroic struggle for liberty and peace.

http://www.fatherryan.org/holocaust/Tibet/history.htm

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Postby Shankar » 03 Apr 2007 20:23

* India - Tibet Survivors Recall Border Shootings : Tibetan Survivors of Chinese Shooting Despair for Those Left Behind

(Monday 23 October 2006 7:32:48 pm by NIRMALA GEORGE )

NEW DELHI Oct 23, 2006 (AP)— They waded through Himalayan snowdrifts and climbed ice-covered rocky terrain for 17 days, cold, hungry and exhausted.

Then came the shooting.

As 75 Tibetan refugees were making a secret trek across the border into Nepal, moving in single file across a mountain slope near the 19,000-foot-high Nanpa La Pass, Chinese border guards opened fire.

One woman a 25-year-old Buddhist nun was killed immediately in the Sept. 30 shooting, group members said. Chinese officials, in a statement, have said a second person also died.

"There was no warning of any kind. The bullets were so close I could hear them whizzing past," Thubten Tsering, a Tibetan monk, told journalists in New Delhi on Monday. "We scattered and ran."

Thubten is among 41 refugees who managed to reach India after the shooting. The refugees said 32 others, including nine children, were taken into custody by the guards and they don't what happened to them.

"We don't know where they are or what happened to them," said Thubten, his chapped cheeks and exhausted face still bearing the scars of the ordeal.

Thousands of Tibetans flee Chinese rule in Tibet every year. Unable to get passports, many trek over Himalayan passes to reach Nepal and then India, where the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, lives in exile. Reports of arrests and ill-treatment by Chinese authorities are common.

What separates the Sept. 30 shooting is that international mountaineers, on an expedition, saw the gunfire and filmed it.

Footage of the incident, shot by a Romanian cameraman, has sparked an international outcry.

The video, released by Romania's Pro TV, shows a distant figure that its narrator says is a Chinese border guard firing a rifle and a separate scene of a person in a line of figures walking through the snow then falling to the ground. An unidentified man near the camera can be heard saying in English, "They are shooting them like, like dogs."

The Chinese government, in a report released two weeks ago by the official Xinhua News Agency, said the border guards fired in self-defense after clashing with about 70 people trying to leave the country illegally. It said one person died in the shooting and another died later. The statement didn't say whether those involved were Tibetans.

The activist group International Campaign for Tibet, in a written statement, said the video proves the Chinese troops opened fire on unarmed Tibetans and not in self-defense.

The pass is a common escape route for fleeing Tibetans. Thousands have left for Nepal since communist forces occupied their Himalayan homeland in 1951. Many make their way to the north Indian town of Dharmsala, the home of the Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

Every year more than 2,500 Tibetan refugees attempt the arduous trek, said Tenzing Norgay of the Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy, which arranged the news conference Monday.

Asked about his life in a monastery in Tibet where the monks are under the constant watch of Chinese security forces and under pressure to denounce the Dalai Lama, Thubten said simply: "It was stifling."

"Being a monk who has taken a vow to live by the faith, we were always under threat from the Chinese political authorities," he said.

Dolma Palkyid, a 15-year-old novice nun, was a close friend of Kelsang Nortso, the nun who was killed.

"I had walked ahead and we got separated. Then the shooting took place and we fled. It was four days later that I heard Kelsang was the one who was shot," she said, speaking haltingly and tearfully, through an interpreter.

Once in India, the friends were hoping to join another Buddhist nunnery together, said the teenager, dressed in a traditional ankle-length gown.

The group of Tibetan refugees had each paid $625 to a guide to arrange the trip. They set off in mid-September, assured that the 10-day trek would deliver them to Nepal.

There have been instances of refugees being shot at by border guards in the past, but this was the first time in recent years that troops killed any, said Tenzing of the human rights group.

"This is the first time that the world has seen evidence of what Tibetans are subjected to by the Chinese," he said.

"Kelsang's death cannot go in vain. We will use this incident and the video footage to bring international pressure on China and press for Tibetan freedom."

On the Net:

Pro TV, http://www.protv.ro

International Campaign for Tibet, http://www.savetibet.org

Source:
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... SFeeds0312
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Hari Sud
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Postby Hari Sud » 04 Apr 2007 03:13

Hello Shankar

A good history lessen on Tibet occupation.

I am missing the point in your post.


Hari Sud

(Note:-
I know about Tibeteans streaming across the border in Lahul & Spiti in 1962. I was one of the NCC cadet from Chandigrah sent to Rohtang to escort supply trains (mules to be precise) and seen the refugees streaming to reach safety of Indian plains via Rohtang. Khampas (Tibeteans) who were passing thru Rohtang were well armed and did manage to take a bit of revenge for the killings you describe. Over all the Tibet population practice passive religion, hence it was not in their nature to fight back. They just wished to escape)

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Postby Shankar » 04 Apr 2007 11:38

the root of sino -indian conflict lies in history of Tibet -so thougth when Vivek is doing a conflict scenario the back ground history will make it more full bodied thats all .There are many here who were not even born in 62 so the disaster is not concieved in real terms and easier to link it to the root cause.

Actually I was waiting for a feed back on these quote posts -whether the BR ites like to have them or not -if no surely wil stop doing the add on

- Can we have some feed back in this area please

Actually Vivek has opened up an window of discussion on sino-indian relations past and present and a possible analysis on what went wrong -it is upto us to decide if that chance is used or not

What I was planning on was get our attention back on 62 bring out details which are now available and refocus attention to the mose serious potential threat that we face


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