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Possible Indian Military Scenarios - Part VIII

Kiran.Rao
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Postby Kiran.Rao » 03 May 2007 23:19

vivek_ahuja wrote:[b]3 TACTICAL AIR CENTRE (TAC)
If the battle for 3 TAC had been difficult for the Chinese, the one in the west was about to become a slaughter.


Dude...That was hair-raising stuff..

Excellent ......three cheers to u..

Hip Hip Hurray ,Hip Hip Hurray ,Hip Hip Hurray .

rsingh
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Postby rsingh » 04 May 2007 01:52

One suggestion guys........why not give serial numbers to the different scenarios posted. It will be easy to quote,classify and refer. JMT

deovratsingh
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Indian Military Scenario- Chinese in East

Postby deovratsingh » 04 May 2007 02:22

Vivek excellent Scenario and description of IAF war with PLAF. I think IAF should consider hiring you as a consultant and make their cadets play war games, to see how realistice these counter- counter moves will hold up in real fights.
With good sensors and BVR missiles LCA with TVC and AESA could accomplish same results to invaders as do MKI. Although on paper LCA looks pretty good( which every fighter does). The only one who will be able to judge is IAF after IOC & FOC or perhaps after using against PAKI's and kicking their butt/ war games with Israeli's Soufa.

Regards,

DSingh.

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Postby Sudhanshu » 04 May 2007 03:55

vivek_ahuja wrote:...With whole fleets of SU-30MKIs now entering the region, the life expectancy for the two dozen SU-27s in the west was already being measured in minutes....


:) I can hear the aderline pumping background music.

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 05 May 2007 19:59

IAF EASTERN AIR COMMAND C3I
TEMPORARILY RELOCATED TO KALAIKUNDA, INDIA
2035 HRS THURSDAY


The air battle over the Indian Northeast was being run from this command centre at Kalaikunda airbase in West-Bengal. It was the temporary headquarters for the IAF eastern air command (EAC), shifted after the threat of missile attacks had increased tremendously on its permanent facility at Shillong in Meghalaya since morning. This temporary facility had been recently built as one of three redundant command centres for the EAC in case of nuclear attacks. As such, it had all the command and control capability already embedded within it so that the staff here could take over control in case something happened to the primary facility in times of war without much delay, if any.

Now, the EAC commander, Air Marshal Sunil Shankar had taken a pre-emptive decision and moved his command staff with him to this base after the late morning missile strikes by the Chinese had taken out the main radar sites in the hills east of Kohima. With that done, the base had come up to speed almost as soon as the main staff officers had dismounted from the IAF AN-32s that had brought them here from Shillong. A caretaker crew had been left back at Shillong to run the local sector from there and await further orders from the new ‘primary’ at Kalaikunda. That had been hours ago. And by now the centre was running at full speed, managing the brutal war for air supremacy that was being fought over the Indian northeastern states.

The staffs were well organized, and the system allowed flexibility. As a result, the main EAC command staff at Kalaikunda did not interfere with how the Phalcon radar operators arranged the IAF assets during tactical combat scenarios unless more assets were to be needed or included or when a strategic decision had to be made. The Phalcon operators in turn did not interfere with how the flight commanders of the fighter groups engaged the enemy once they had followed the general directions of the Phalcon crew. As a result, the final call rested with the flight commanders on how and when to take the enemy that he had been vectored to.

The end result of all this was that the burden reduced on the different teams. The Kalaikunda command team, therefore, concentrated in getting as many assets as they could into the theatre and then handed them off to the Phalcon. This gave time and released mental energy Air Marshal Sunil Shankar to take some important strategic decisions. One of these was being made now in a separate briefing room within the main bunker. Outside the room, the staff officers, all of the rank of Squadron leader and above, were scrambling to get the situation under control, and the atmosphere was chaotic. Inside the room, however, the atmosphere was quiet. There were only four men in the room, including the Air Marshal.

The briefing officer was Wing Commander (W/C) B. Karia, recently transferred to this staff from Hashimara where he used to fly Mig-27s. A freak accident had ended his flying career, and so now he was here. Also in the room was Air Marshal K. R. Reddy, from Air Headquarters, and a representative of ACM Bhosale. He had been sent here to ensure the smooth cooperation between CAC and EAC operations for the battles ahead. The fourth and last person in the room was Group Captain (G/C) V. Naidu, the Flight operations commander at Kalaikunda. The AOC for Kalaikunda should have been present for this meeting but he had met with an accident the day before and so G/C Naidu was taking his place in the room.

The room itself was relatively large, and consisted of a big conference desk on which a complete battle staff could sit and manage the air war for EAC. At the moment most of the chairs were empty. The only person standing was W/C Karia, and he was standing next to the large digital map showing the ongoing air war. The lighting was kept a little low and the room itself was air-conditioned. The surrounding walls were filled with television screens for video conferencing that had been switched off at the moment. A single wall on the far end of the table held the digital clocks showing the times at various places in India and China. The meeting began in earnest as soon as Air Marshal S. Shankar put down the Ops Order in front of him and looked up at Air Marshal Reddy and spoke about what had been sent to him from Air Headquarters.

“I just got this from Bhosale. He wants us to look at the possibility of defeating the Chinese EW/ ECM H-6 aircrafts that have crippled our ground defences in 1 TAC and 2 TAC. What do you think?â€

Hari Sud
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Postby Hari Sud » 05 May 2007 21:11

Still waiting for operation Pivot Hammer & Chinese ground attack at Twang.

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Postby ksmahesh » 05 May 2007 21:53

bale-bale exposed chini underbelly in the form of EC H6 must be kicked hard. God speed for Jorhat Mig21s. Whosoever says Mig21 is flying coffin is absolutely right. It is flying coffin for ENEMIES. :twisted: :twisted:

You know Vivek, the best thing about your narration is that one feels as if the battle is going on real close, as if one can see these things happening. Keep it up. :)

Excellent job. I have only a very small request with which a lot of other BRFites shall agree. Please reduce the wait time between your posts. It is really killing. May be you have some understanding with pharma companies for the increased sale of BP drugs, eh. :wink:

saty
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Postby saty » 05 May 2007 22:51

Where is that goddamned bottle of Rum....

This is stuff of the first order, one of the best I have ever read anywhere; including western bestsellers (and I don't mean Clancy)

ksmahesh
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Postby ksmahesh » 05 May 2007 23:47

Saty saar, Don't drink yet. You may have to fly one of the Migs to kick enemy butt. :wink:

Let the battle be over and then we will have a daru bash.

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Postby menon » 06 May 2007 00:01

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Last edited by menon on 06 May 2007 11:46, edited 1 time in total.

Rahul M
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Postby Rahul M » 06 May 2007 11:11

deleted.
Last edited by Rahul M on 07 May 2007 13:57, edited 1 time in total.

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REWARD

Postby ksmahesh » 07 May 2007 13:22

MISSING PERSON
Vivek Ahuja.

One who shall find him shall be rewarded a bottle of "Lanson Black Lable"

An appeal to Vivek: You are being unfair to your fan club by starving us of the scenario development. UNFAIR UNFAIR...... :twisted: :((

Please post soon. :((

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 May 2007 13:35

Ksmahesh sir,

i am working on this as we speak. i will post shortly. there was some work trouble yesterday that needed sortng out.

anyway,

NEWS: people, check out the TV. it says on TIMES NOW that china has advanced twenty kilometres into Arunachal Pradesh near Tawang Region. :eek: :evil:

no fiction guys..this one was in the headlines this afternoon. don't know how much is true since i just watched it myself recently...but check it out anyway...

life imitates fiction... :!:

god help us if some chinese general has been reading the posts here. :wink:

saty
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Postby saty » 07 May 2007 13:54

Good god!!

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Postby ksmahesh » 07 May 2007 15:32

deleted
Last edited by ksmahesh on 07 May 2007 15:40, edited 1 time in total.

ksmahesh
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Postby ksmahesh » 07 May 2007 15:33

Hehehehe.... now that no one found Vivek so I reward myself with the prize :lol:
Last edited by ksmahesh on 07 May 2007 15:41, edited 1 time in total.

ksmahesh
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Postby ksmahesh » 07 May 2007 15:40

Strange: Chinese have occupied Indian Army's posts and all this time media was sleeping. What can we say.... Such developments underline the trouble India is moving towards. Some glaring lapses:
1. Media was deafening silent.
2. No Kargil like response.
3. Ulta-Pulta-Alliance and all **Pees were busy playing dirty politics and have till now ignored the situation.
I cannot help myself in such situation from remembering.......

Khakh-e-gulshan karne ko, sirf ek hi ulloo kafi tha;
Anjam-e-gulistan kya hoga, har shakh pe ulloo baitha hai.
:( :(

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 May 2007 18:08

IAF AIR FORCE STATION JORHAT
NORTHEASTERN INDIA
2045 HRS THURSDAY


The six pilots and the base commander were standing next to the front fuselage of one of the parked Mig-21s inside one of the shelters. Outside, the base was blacked out. There were no lights except for the moonlight that was being interrupted by the clouds in the sky. Around the base were the dark silhouettes of the hills against a partially star studded sky. The work of loading the six aircrafts had already been done within the hardened aircraft shelters and now all six Mig-21s had been loaded with a compliment of two R-77s and two R-73s each. The base commander was listening quietly as Squadron leader Prasad outlined his plans for the mission at hand.

The job required these six aircrafts to move northwest of their current location after take-off. They also had to stay low order to avoid any confrontation with the SU-27s that were now actually to the southwest of the base, much to the irritation of the base commander who had hoped to send these six aircraft to deal with them and end this long night. Now he had been ordered to send these aircraft and pilots on a mission that might or might-nor yield results.

In any case, he really didn’t have much choice in the matter and so he kept his peace while he listened to Sqn. Ldr. Prasad as he outlined details like the tactical formation they would be using and the mission flight profile. The Base commander was also worried that the mission commander in front of him might not really be up to the task at hand, and again that was something he could not argue on. There were no other senior pilots left to command.

The savage war with the SU-27 eastern barrier force an hour ago had claimed the lives of most of his senior officers. The only senior pilot left alive was now in hospital undergoing surgery after he had sustained severe injuries prior and during take-off. He had been found hanging from a tree under his parachute only fifteen minutes ago, and it was a measure of the speed with which the Search and Rescue teams had done their job so that fifteen minutes after being located by a Dhruv helicopter the pilot was already in the operating room. Whether he would survive the night or not was another matter, but they had done all they could for him. The other four pilots who had been shot down had been killed outright, and there were sufficient eyewitnesses for their crashes.

A young Flight Lieutenant from the base was leading a small team and visiting the local villages near the place of the air battle to ascertain the locations of the crashes, but all that was secondary. Seven aircrafts had survived the battle, including one that had suffered severe structural damage and was now lying near the end of the main runway in pile of aluminium and metal. It would never fly again, according to the Base engineer.

And neither would the pilot, who had succumbed to his wounds only several minutes ago. The remaining six pilots were again going on yet another mission, and the base commander was now wondering whether he was witnessing the results of a successful outcome to this air battle or the decimation of his aerial fighting force. So far it certainly looked as though they were winning this battle, but at what cost? Will the Mig-21 force at 3 TAC survive to see the morning or will this night see the last of their war effort?

The base commander shook his head and woke from his reverie and realised that Prasad was just completing the mission details with his pilots. Then he shook hands with the base commander and saluted before the pilots dispersed to head towards their own aircrafts in other shelters nearby. The pilots quickly ran up the ladder and stepped into the cockpit to begin the procedures for take off. There were no preliminaries as there was not time for them. Time was of the essence for this mission, and every minute they wasted on the ground the chances were that the Chinese ECM H-6s would slip away back into Chinese airspace and safety of their own ground defence systems.

The base came alive with the sound of jet engines starting up with all their power one after another, until the noise became high pitched enough in the confined space so that the ground crewmen put on their ear protectors once again. There was no requirement for any authorization from the base operations centre for permission to take off. There were no other missions being flown from the base or anywhere around. The only job that needed to be done by them was to make sure that the six aircrafts took off without hitting each other.

After what they had gone though during the night, the six pilots were actually fully enthusiastic for this mission. If all went well, it would be a battle on their terms. It would also be an opportunity for them to hit the Chinese strike capability hard. That would make the lives lost from this squadron mean something as far as the remaining pilots were concerned, although they all knew that they had saved 3 TAC from annihilation. But this was more than that. This was personal.

With these thoughts in mind, the pilots released the brakes. The pointed nose of the deadly Mig-21s came out of the darkness inside the shelters and under the moonlight outside.

Kiran.Rao
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Postby Kiran.Rao » 07 May 2007 18:19

vivek_ahuja wrote:With these thoughts in mind, the pilots released the brakes. The pointed nose of the deadly Mig-21s came out of the darkness inside the shelters and under the moonlight outside.


Next part quickly Vivek, plsssssssssssss..........

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Postby Bala_R » 07 May 2007 20:33

SOUTHERN NAVAL COMMAND
COCHIN
22:50 HRS


Two Mig 29Ks from the ADS air wing, which had been at the base for some minor repairs, were now ready. These were loaded with 2 R27RE, 2 R27TE & 4 R73’s each. Both the Migs were loaded fully with fuel, since they had to make it to the ADS on their own, without any refuelling support. They were to join the ADS, which was patrolling the Indian Ocean to prevent misadventures of PN & PAF. The RD-33M’s suddenly came alive with a roar & one by one both Migs rolled out of their hanger & moved to the end of runway for take-off. One by one both Migs took off & immediately banked left & gained altitude & headed towards west.


INDIAN OCEAN
80 MILES SOUTH OF KANYAKUMARI
23:00 HRS


The entire formation of Su-33’s dropped down to 150 ft ASL. First group of Su-33’s now banked left & were heading for their target, Cochin Refineries. Second group of Su-33’s followed them immediately & were heading for their target, Southern Naval Command. Third group of Su-33’s proceeded straight towards their target, ISRO complexes at Thiruvananthapuram. Fourth group of Su-33’s closely followed them towards their target, Indian Aerospace command, Thiruvananthapuram.

Third group of Su-33’s reached their final waypoint & immediately switched on their radars. The Su-33 with runway denial bomb banked left towards the Thiruvananthapuram International airport & dropped two off its deadly weapons on the runway, immediately creating large craters & rendering the runway useless. It again turned back & dropped one more of the deadly cargo on the ATC building. While the air-to-air Su-33’s were not having any trouble, they broke off the formation & gained altitude to provide air cover & jamming support to jam whatever air defence radars around had to throw at them. Of the remaining Su-33’s, 2 broke off & aimed at the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre of ISRO, while the other 2 aimed at Vikram Sarbhai Space Centre. Their deadly Sh-59’s had no difficulty in recognizing the stored images of their targets. Within few seconds, the heart of Indian space programme had been devastated. The sole SA-6 unit station at the Thiruvananthapuram air command was down due to some minor radar repair & before any action could be taken, the Third group regrouped & were on their way back.

Fourth group of Su-33’s climbed upto an altitude of 1000 ft & dropped their respective bombs. First to go was the THD-1955 radar, followed by the Command building. One by one all the nearby buildings were grounded, the dream to form an Aerospace Command was now fully crushed. One Su-33 still remained fully loaded as its weapons were not required to finish the job at hand. The Fourth group regrouped & headed back to join the Third group on their way to the carrier. Only the 2 air-to-air armed Su-33’s from the Fourth group banked left & proceeded towards joining the First & Second group.

First & Second group of Su-33’s were now flying over the land & trying to reach their targets from the east. They were rightly doing so, since the radars at the Naval command was so positioned to look for threats from the sea. Only the radar for monitoring civilian air traffic was functional, which was easily jammed by the Su-33’s. The first group split from the second & headed towards their target, Cochin Refineries. The Su-33’s this time did not climb very high, instead stayed at around 1000 ft. & dropped their weapons one by one. The first Kh-59 hit the fuel tank farm, creating a huge explosion & fire, The second one hit the Crude unit creating a huge explosion. This caused a chain reaction & the entire refinery was in fire. Only very few operating personnel, who were at the administrative office survived the initial blasts. The fire officers just ran for their life, since they knew nothing could stop the fire right now.

Second group of Su-33’s launched their Kh-59’s at the Naval Command from 40 kms. Immediately anti aircraft guns from the base started blazing around. First to go was the radar, next to go was the command Head quarters. Two runway denial bombs found their target & created huge craters at the centre & one end of the runway making it unusable. Two Dorniers were also destroyed in the attack. Luckily enough the newly built Indra III radar which was brought to the command for testing purposes survived. The ATC became very busy with attempts being made to call back the Migs. The Su-33’s grouped & were heading south west. They were now taking a round about path, to avoid any fighters that may come from the mainland & also to avoid giving the probable location of the carrier. Unaware to the Su-33 pilots, this decision would prove them costly. Today luck was not with the Su-33 pilots, as they were not aware of the presence of neither the Indra radar nor the Mig-29’s, which were just not what they had anticipated. The presence of these two elements would help the IN to avenge the Chinese attack.

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Postby niran » 08 May 2007 12:14

Dear Bala_r Sir,
Since your scenario have chinni a\c carrier which they do not have at the moment, therefore me presume that this scenario is in the future, way far away in the future. Sir me think you should include Tejas in it. see sir first production a\c already out, IAF is already preparing Sulur as the Tejas first user base.and sulur is on TN Kerela border. The rest you can imagine. just my two cents.

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 08 May 2007 14:46

THE BORDER CROSSING AT BUM-LA
NORTH OF TAWANG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH, INDIA
2046 HRS THURSDAY


Both sides in the conflict had abandoned the border crossing at Bum-La since Monday afternoon in order to keep ‘accidental’ incidents from taking place. There were only dirt strips leading up to the crossing from the Indian side while the ones on the Chinese side had seen some tar roads being built recently. Both sides had built up guard shacks on their sides, and it was one of the few places along the entire border with Arunachal Pradesh where both sides were properly placed along the international border and not encroaching on each others territories.

Both sides had pulled into the hills on either sides of the crossing and had been eyeing each other for the past two days. That had changed a few hours ago when the Indian troops on the southern hills at Bum-La had been ordered to move further south and join the defences at Tawang. The Indians were abandoning the border crossing, as it was far too vulnerable to protect effectively. It was also easily within the range of the Chinese artillery systems, right from mortars to heavy guns.

It was a much better tactic to let the Chinese stretch themselves out and go further than the range of their support units. And while they made this movement, they could be subjected to continuous attacks from the Indian artillery batteries around Tawang. There was no need to be doctrinally rigid. Tactical flexibility was the order of the day in IV Corps. And there was no need for keeping troops nearby to maintain eye contact with the Chinese forces when they arrive, for that was already being done from the air by a Searcher-II unmanned air vehicle from the Bomdila UAV base.

The small guard posts and small guard buildings at the crossing were extremely quiet and the cold and darkness of the night was all around. The only noise was from the cold winds and snow. And the only man made light was from the orange glow on the horizon to the east where the Chinese artillery continued to fall through the night, with the occasional thundering sound being heard above the noise of the winds.

Then there was another sound, those of a high speed whipping noise and then the wind driven snow changed directions as man made winds came closer. All of a sudden a Chinese Z-9WZ Recon helicopter came through the air from the north and flew over the abandoned buildings at the crossing. It flew in a circle around the crossing before heading south and disappearing into the southern hills into India. As the first sounds of the helicopter started to drown out, more sounds were heard as four other similar helicopters flew in a tactical formation from the south.

While one of the helicopters was a Z-10 attack helicopter that continued to hover around the base to provide suppressing fire from half a kilometre away, the other three helicopters were the standard Z-9B troop transport helicopters and they landed in a small snow covered clearing near the crossing. Each carried eight heavily armed Recon-troops who were dressed in white camouflage gear and all wearing NVG systems and they piled out quickly as they headed towards the abandoned buildings and towers with their weapons armed and pointed forward. The three teams of eight had no trouble clearing the buildings because it was soon found out that there were no Indian troops around.

Then there was a huge yellow flash in one of the buildings along with a powerful thundering noise before all went quiet again. The Chinese soldiers had taken cover when the explosion had ripped through the building and now they headed towards the burning fires to find that three of their comrades lay dead on the floor in front of them and the rooms nearby was on fire. The building had been booby-trapped by the withdrawing Indian troops. The Chinese Recon-platoon commander let out a curse before ordering all his men to carefully remove the three bodies and then exit the building and demolish it from the outside using explosive charges. This building had no use fro them anyway since it was too vulnerable for them to use it for anything like a command post or a logistics centre. And he had no intention to search it carefully for each little booby-trap left by the accursed Indians.

Three kilometres away and thousands of feet above them, a Searcher-II bird was flying with its oblique pointing cameras taking an intimate look at the events unfolding at the crossing. The closeness allowed them to zoom in and see on IR as the Chinese soldiers piled out of the buildings carrying three bodies with them as also the large glare coming on the camera from the burning building. The suddenness of the explosion had caught the UAV operators at Bomdila by surprise as well, only difference being that instead of curses, smiles had followed on the Indian faces in the C2 trailer.

Further south, the first Chinese Z-9WZ Recon chopper was flying ever deeper into Indian Territory. It was doing so in leaps and bounds as it used the powerful nighttime scanners to locate the first defensive positions of the Indian army. The main problems for the Chinese pilots were the hilly and vegetated terrain that was proving difficult to scan properly. For example, since they were coming south, all northern slopes of the hills in front of them were clearly visible, but the southern slopes were not. The only way to avoid this was to loop left and right of the hill, but that was not possible because of the continuous ridgelines from east to west. So they had no choice. Even so, they were moving very slowly in leaps to make sure that their safety was not compromised. As the moved past the first ridgeline to the south of the Bum-La crossing, they failed to notice an Indian reinforced company of rearguard troops hiding on the southern slope.

In addition, the indian troops on the ground were waiting for the Chinese helicopter as it flew over them because the Searcher-II hade issued a warning via their Tawang based regimental headquarters. As a result, when the Chinese helicopter flew over, an Igla missile streaked from within the bushes on the southern slope in a white trail and headed for the Chinese Z-9WZ from the rear and below. It took barely two seconds to reach its target as the target itself failed to conduct evasive manoeuvres because the Chinese pilots lacked any and all warning. The massive explosion hit the hot engine exhaust section and destroyed the turbo shaft engines. The helicopter was slashed to one side because of the force of the explosion and the lack of power forced it to go in a downward spiral path to its doom on the valley floor below.

The explosion was visible as a large flash to the Chinese Recon Troops at the Bum-La crossing in the north, and all heads turned to face the source of the explosion. The Chinese commander was soon contacted and informed of the situation. Needless to say he was not very impressed with the loss of three soldiers and two pilots and one helicopter in return for capturing an abandoned border crossing, but he still accepted the victory for what it was: they had just captured the first piece of land that the Indians had occupied for more than half a century. The first step towards Tawang had been taken.

The border crossing at Bum-La was now in Chinese hands.

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Postby nits » 08 May 2007 15:35

vivek_ahuja wrote: they had just captured the first piece of land that the Indians had occupied for more than half a century. The first step towards Tawang had been taken.

The border crossing at Bum-La was now in Chinese hands.


I hope Indians will feel same once they sit in Tibet....

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Postby rkhanna » 08 May 2007 21:57

Vivek.. I think its high time to make use of a 10,000 strong , well equipped and well trained Special Frontier Force. Behind Enemy lines for Hit and run ops against chinese art and logistics positions .

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Postby Sudhanshu » 09 May 2007 02:19

nits wrote:
vivek_ahuja wrote: they had just captured the first piece of land that the Indians had occupied for more than half a century. The first step towards Tawang had been taken.

The border crossing at Bum-La was now in Chinese hands.


I hope Indians will feel same once they sit in Tibet....


Don't worry.. this was just a calculated loss.
As they say "war is fought with brain, not with heart".

:) We shall prevail.

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 09 May 2007 22:26

INDIAN ARTILLERY BATTERIES AROUND TAWANG
ARUNACHAL PRADESH, INDIA
2050 HRS THURSDAY


The battle for Tawang had begun at the same time when the first Smerch launchers had gone into action. With the air war being fought above them and the massive artillery shelling taking place along the entire border with Arunachal Pradesh against Indian forces, this battle had become just one more in a series of engagements along the border. But the local commanders knew that it was more than just a ‘combat engagement’. The fate of hundreds of Indian citizens in Tawang hung in the balance. Despite the situation in the air and the temporary loss of local air superiority, the defenders in this battle were about to go on the offensive. Every advantage that could be brought to bear on the Chinese was needed. It was a question of what the Indian army had that the Chinese didn’t have or to which they could not respond to effectively.

That meant only one thing: the Indian artillery batteries. The Indians had their guns. The Chinese had lost theirs. It was that simple. The Indian artillery advantage in the sector was crucial. And both sides knew this. The Indian army planned to use the four surviving batteries of 155mm tube artillery deployed around Tawang to eliminate the Chinese armour threat. The entire region’s geography was not suited in any way to tank warfare, and if the defender had the means, the main armour threat could be eliminated along several chokepoints before they even entered India. One of these chokepoints was at the Bum-La crossing.

The crossing was the only major point of crossing for vehicles in the region due to the blocking walls in the form of the Great Himalayan range to the east and Bhutan in the west. Southwards from this point was Tawang. North of it were the Chinese forces. But the Chinese infrastructure development that had developed the roads in the Tibetan mountains had only been able to build the roads as far as the crossing. From that point on it was a dirt track into India. Also, the geography dictated that the main vehicular bound force could also move only to as much as Tawang. After that using armoured vehicles was too insane for anybody to consider.

That didn’t mean that they couldn’t move there, just that doing a movement along narrow roads in peacetime is a whole lot different from doing it at wartime. If the lead vehicle got hit, the path is blocked, the force comes to a stop and the defenders can take easy pot shots at the attackers. Therefore, the main reasoning behind using the tanks was only to get as far as the town of Tawang so that the urban fighting could be influenced in the attackers favour with this support. Assuming that they got there in the first place.

The Chinese artillery had been supposed to suppress the Indian counterparts, but the use of the Searcher-II UAVs from Bomdila with the Indian artillery command at Tawang had effectively negated that little surprise and turned the tables around. The Indian army batteries had used this intelligence-gathering platform to take out the Chinese self-propelled artillery systems north of the Great Himalayan range in china.

So now the Chinese had tanks moving along chokepoint-ridden paths, with their artillery taken out, and the only side having the artillery now was Indian. And that was very bad news for the Chinese commanders.
With the TACIT-RED searcher-II unmanned vehicle now being supported by another such vehicle from Bomdila, the call signs had changed to TACIT-ONE and TACIT-TWO. The former was still flying over Chinese territory and keeping an eye on other interesting developments while the latter was taking station just south of Bum-La to cover the next phase of the Indian artillery strikes.

It had already covered the Chinese takeover of the Bum-La crossing. A third Searcher-II was on the ground at the Bomdila ramp and was being prepped up to take position should either one of the two flying vehicles get knocked out by the Chinese. The Indian attack was once more to be led by the Smerch Launcher battery near Tawang. This time, however, the launches were to be at night, and that was a very spectacular sight to see. It was incidentally, also the first Indian counter-counterstroke to the Chinese invasion from Bum-La and the artillery attacks that had been going on for a couple of hours now along the rest of the border with China.

The first launcher started it off for the entire battery. One orange cone of flame after another left the elevated barrels of the launcher and turned the darkness of the night into daylight and it came and went as each 300mm rocket left the launcher and vanished behind the hills. Their target was the abandoned border checkpoint at Bum-La, and so this battery was taking the data from TACIT-TWO. The gun batteries were to target the rear sections of the columns, and those were still inside China, so these battery commanders were taking the data from TACIT-ONE. Within seconds the first salvo was on its way north. Behind them the gun crews were elevating the guns and inserting the shells inside the tubes.

The first rocket salvo fell on the Bum-La border crossing which the Indian soldiers had abandoned since the last two days and which the first recon teams of the advancing Chinese infantry had captured within the last few minutes. Also at the crossing were several light Chinese helicopters that were bringing in supporting troops to free up the recon teams to do their main job of scouting. That was essential and needed to be done before the leading elements of the main attacking force came down south. The rockets that hit this location were a mix of delayed action mine types and cluster munitions. The first few rockets were the standard cluster munitions based ones and their job was to take out these units of the Chinese forces that had occupied the Indian positions at the crossing. All subsequent rockets were the delayed action types.

With little warning available, the former Indian positions at Bum-La that were in Chinese hands for the last few minutes turned into a small mass of fireballs within seconds. The three Chinese helicopters that were still unloading their troops were hit while on the ground and vanished within the flames. Except for the Chinese troops who were securing the outer perimeters of the landing area, most others had been caught in the open. The entire area was cluttered with hundreds of small explosions and dust clouds. Within seconds the crossing vanished into a big cloud of smoke that was of high temperature and so visible on the IR cameras of the Searcher-II aircraft as such, even in the darkness. The remaining rockets that hit the location did not raise smoke clouds but simply scattered their lethal mines around the entire area. Then all went quiet again.

There was no movement for the first few seconds, and as the smoke cleared out, giant flames could be seen leaping into the air from the remains of the guard shacks and the three Chinese Z-9 helicopters. There was little human activity, except for the few Chinese wounded who were writhing on the ground. Then others who had been on perimeter securing duty, and thus away from the point of attack, came running to the aid of the wounded. The one helicopter pilot who turned his Z-9 around to perform a Medievac pickup was told to back off, with the threat of the Indian artillery attacks still high.

Behind the crossing the dark night sky lit up with dozens of orange explosions as the rest of the Indian gun batteries piled in, using the Searcher-II data to pinpoint their targets. With all the hell that the Indian gunners were handing out to the Chinese troops, the Chinese response was now in the skies above Tawang. After what had seemed an eternity to the Chinese commanders, the J-10 force finally arrived to take care of the Indian artillery. As a warning ran out to all Indian artillerymen to take cover and for the Smerch Launchers to scoot the hell out of the area and get into cover, the Indian air defence system at Tawang swung into action.

Even though the Indian guns had been forced to abort their attacks to escape the air threat, one essential job had been completed before they shut down. And for the local infantry commanders, it was the one thing that might allow the Indian flag to fly over Tawang till morning…

Bum-La was now closed to any and all movement.

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Postby niran » 10 May 2007 06:33

entire chinni recc.& foward element taken out in one swoosh! wallah! keep it up. Sir. good heart warming work. thanks you made my day.

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Postby ksmahesh » 10 May 2007 07:44

I am sitting on the edge. Needless to say it is because of your narration quality. Excellent job Vivek. Hope I get more dose of the soon ( :greedy:)...........

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Postby amol.p » 10 May 2007 14:03

I am thinking if india does not have air superiority over border areas or entire northeast....how come the chinese airforce didnt bomb our artillery positions..????
Any airforce will 1st take out artillery positions once they gain air superiority.

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Postby saty » 10 May 2007 14:16

amol.p wrote:I am thinking if india does not have air superiority over border areas or entire northeast....how come the chinese airforce didnt bomb our artillery positions..????
Any airforce will 1st take out artillery positions once they gain air superiority.


Bhy theenk? the answers are theere in thee storee :-?

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 11 May 2007 14:29

SKIES OVER THE NORTHEAST
2 TACTICAL AIR CENTRE (TAC)
ARUNACHAL PRADESH, INDIA
2100 HRS THURSDAY


The Chinese central SU-27 force was now almost within range of its target: the Phalcon. They had been heading towards this particular target ever since they had crossed the border and as soon as the active radiations from this Phalcon were detected, all twelve SU-27s altered had their bearings to bring the AWACS directly in front of them. But they were not alone in the skies around them. To their west was the western barrier force of twelve SU-27s that was still flying. To their east had been the twelve SU-27s of the eastern barrier force that no longer existed. The two survivors of that group were now across the border into china after being overwhelmed by superior numbers of Indian Mig-21 Bisons coupled with better tactics.

This had created a wide left flank open for the centre group and there were still some Indian aircraft left to make use of that open flank. To close it, would require this group to part with some aircraft to patrol that flank. That meant that they would be losing some of their numerical superiority against the SU-30MKIs to the south. But it had to be done, and despite the second thoughts of the Chinese mission commander in the centre force, he ordered three of the twelve aircraft to head northeast and fill up the open left flank. The concerned aircraft increased power and pulled up from the main formation and turned to the required bearing. Within seconds they were gone into the dark night, leaving nine aircraft to go after the Phalcon and its escorts.

It was a situational awareness game. Always. The Chinese commander may not have dispatched the three aircraft to patrol their left flank if he had had a complete picture of what was in front and to the west. As such, he was under the impression that there were four escorts in front of him. And there were. The only difference was that there were now more Indian aircraft to the west that he didn’t know of. In addition to the four close escorts for the Phalcon, there were now four more SU-30MKIs of the BLUE force coming from the west. The only reason the Indians had retreated to the south in the face of the Chinese SU-27s was to allow these reinforcements to come through before they began the engagement. So now there were two Indian fighter groups in the local skies. One the Chinese knew about and still retreating in front of them. The other was to their west and which they had no idea about.

That wasn’t all. The Indian mission commander aboard the Phalcon was taking a step further. In ordering the southern force of four SU-30MKIs to continue heading south, and thus pulling the SU-27s with them, he was also making sure that the western force would be the first to engage the twelve SU-27s of the centre force from their right flank. This was something that the Chinese weren’t expecting at all, and so was designed to confuse them. When that engagement began, the southern force would engage and finish off things.

The game had been set. The Chinese had reduced themselves to nine. They knew about four SU-30MKIs. But there were four more that they didn’t know about. Their numerical superiority had eroded and they didn’t know it. They had lost initiative and they didn’t know that either. They had also stepped into a trap, and that too was unknown to them. All of this was because they were operating outside the range of their KJ-2000 aircraft. The Indians had that one luxury in the form of the Phalcon. All in all, it had been a losing game from the start, and it was about to come to an end.

The first engagement to take place started as planned, with each of the four western SU-30MKIs releasing two Astra BVR missiles in quick succession. They had been taking the radar data from the Phalcon and their own radars had been on standby mode for all the time until now. All of a sudden the Chinese threat picture lighted up as four active radars and eight missiles were in the air from their right.

The Chinese pilots looked at the threat data in front of them and their heads turned instinctively to the right to see a threat that was still beyond visual range. They still had time, and the aircrafts released large amounts of chaff as all nine aircrafts dived towards the earth to evade the missiles while their onboard EW systems went to work. By breaking separately in 3D space in a frenzy to lose the missiles heading towards them, they had also, unfortunately, lost their strike package coherence, and that was the final nail in the coffin as far as their mission was concerned.

As soon as the radar display showed the Chinese breaking formation, the southern force of four SU-30MKIs terminated their southern ‘retreat’ and turned by 180 degrees to come in front of the Chinese who were diving to low altitude in front of them. This pair immediately acquired individual targets in the melee and launched a single Astra missile each. There were now twelve Indian missiles in the air. And so far there was no Chinese response. But that didn’t last long.

Four of the SU-27s that were to the extreme left of their force figured that they were sufficiently safe and came back on station heading south. In front of them were four SU-30MKIs. They launched two missiles each, out of which only one was being guided, in a tactic that they had repeated against the Mig-21s as well. Now the situation turned hectic and chaotic, as there were twenty missiles in the air. Now everybody except the four western SU-30MKIs was diving to escape the threat. That’s when the first missiles reached close to their targets and detonated.

The first missiles to hit were from the eight originally launched by the western group of Indian fighters, and they claimed the lives of three SU-27s among them that were disintegrated in mid air after receiving multiple hits from missiles. The low number of hits was due to the fact that several missiles were locked on each aircraft while a couple others failed to guide using the radar data. They simply went straight and ran out of fuel. Then more fireballs erupted in the night sky. As the missiles of the southern SU-30MKI force found their targets, three more SU-27s were blotted out of the sky at low altitude with their burning airframes exploding in the dense forests below in huge fireballs. The Phalcon radar showed multiple ejections so far from the Chinese aircrafts. The battle exactly wasn’t a washout for the Chinese and of the eight missiles they had launched, three found their mark. Tow claimed a single SU-30MKI of the southern force and another hit, but failed to destroy another SU-30MKI, although it crippled it completely and killed the WSO sitting behind the pilot.

There were now three SU-27s remaining, and they decided to cut their losses and switched on engine reheat to make their escape towards the northeast. This was a bad move in the face of advancing SU-30MKIs, and another massive salvo of six missiles knocked them down from behind in large fireballs one after another until there were no more aircraft left. The battle had lasted no longer than two minutes from initiation to completion, and had resulted in the complete destruction of nine SU-27s for the loss of one SU-30MKI and another crippled.

Another Chinese SU-27 force had now been defeated, barring the three patrolling towards the north. The three of the four SU-30MKIs of the west force began to move northeastwards to take care of these bandits once and for all. The crippled aircraft headed northeast towards Jorhat to make an emergency landing and was escorted there by the fourth aircraft of the wets group. Two remaining SU-30MKIs continued to escort the Phalcon and this group now began to head north to re-establish airspace surveillance and control.

The eastern skies had been cleared by the Mig-21s from 3 TAC. 2 TAC had now almost cleared off the central skies. Only the skies above 1 TAC remained contested by the last remaining SU-27 group, the western barrier force. Also, the Chinese had succeeded in making sure that their J-10 force could hit Tawang without interference and make their escape in time. That would unfortunately happen as planned, but as far as the Air Marshal Shankar was concerned, the Chinese SU-27s were not going home.

In all this chaos, only a few operators aboard the Phalcon continued to remain detached from the battle while their comrades coordinated with the fighters. These two operators were responsible for another mission. As the battle for 2 TAC came to a swift end, these operators ordered the flight of six Mig-21s from Jorhat to move in a northwesterly heading. The dynamics for Operation SUPPORT-SWIPE swung into action against the Chinese EW H-6s before they made their escape north.

Before that happened, however, a single message went out to all concerned command centres and battle groups from the Phalcon bird in the area.

“This is Victor-one. We are back on-line.â€

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Postby ksmahesh » 11 May 2007 16:32

"We are back.........."

sounds like TERMINATOR for chinese has finally arrived 8). Lets kick some chini @$$ :twisted: . They should lose Su27 force along with the EW support planes also J-10. Ah that will be sweet.........

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Postby sum » 11 May 2007 17:16

Ummm...sorry for butting into the great story but what are the "friendly" pakis doin all this while??
surely,wont they be waitin for such a diversion to open a front themselves??
If it is taken care of in the story,pls do point out where.... :oops:

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Postby ksmahesh » 11 May 2007 17:33

Na-Paki @$$ have been kicked already by Shankar et al. So worry not and lets concentrate on kicking chini butt.
:D :D

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Postby sum » 11 May 2007 17:43

So this story doesnt factor in pak at all??
Wouldnt the chinis themselves get pakis involved to help getting a diversion(GHQ being run by retards, would surely oblige to be the bali ka bakra !!!)??
my 2 paisa worth......

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Postby ksmahesh » 11 May 2007 17:49

The scenarios are a complex ensemble of stories written by a number of authors. Some of them foused on specific theaters of war. Pakistani army was comprehensively defeated in scenario by Shankar and others. Now Vivek wanted to focus on chinese part so the story currently has only china as its target.

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Postby sum » 11 May 2007 17:54

Oh ok....
didnt notice that Shankars and viveks stories are running in parallel.....
My last doubt abt this:
Atleast if Paki direct involvement is not shown,wont there be many "pin pricks" in assam where im sure many ISI agents are waiting to run amok at the slightest signal from ISI/DGFI....atleast that could be factored.....
Pls make no mistake that im thoroughly enjoyin the stories but felt these factors may also come into play!!!!!! :x
Just my suggestion to bring in or reflect the ground realities to the superb stories :D

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Postby ksmahesh » 11 May 2007 18:04

Of course you are right these enemy jasoos could try to create some trouble. It is indeed a possibility. I request you to seriously consider writing about such events.
Lets have more authors writing parallel stories. What does the rest of fan club say about it?

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Postby saty » 11 May 2007 18:28

Vivek has used the roles of jasooses early on already; and given a army in full deployment the active subversives cant do much anyway

at this moment I would personally like this thread to be independent; so far the other authors havent made many positive contributions :P

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Postby Bala_R » 11 May 2007 20:11

GROUP OF 2 Mig-29K
150 KMS SOUTH-WEST OF SOUTHERN NAVAL COMMAND
23:05 HRS

Mig Pilots were immediately alerted by the ATC regarding the attack by Su-33s & were directed further south to attack the Su-33’s. The Indra III radar was a further development of the Indra radar with a radar range of more than 200kms. The Mig pilots were being provided with the location of Su-33’s continuously from the Indra III radar via the ATC. The Migs were on full afterburner so as to spot the Su-33’s before they went out of the Indra III radar coverage. When the Migs were 50kms behind the Su-33’s, the tracking feedback from the ATC went blank. Now the Migs were on their own, only positive aspect for them was that they will be able to spot the huge IR signature from the Su-3’s using the IRST. Unaware of the Migs behind them, the Su-33s were cruising along south west, to avoid Sri Lanka. As soon as the IRST tracked all the ten Su-33s, they reduced their afterburners & went to cruising speed. Each Mig pilot selected two Su-33s & assigned them to the R27TE. The huge IR signature from the Su-33s, their distance from the Migs & they being unaware of the Migs all were going to make this a sure kill. Both the Mig pilots immediately launched the R27ET’s, they waited for a minute, before switching on the radar in order to not alert the RWR of the Su-33s. As the missiles were in the striking range, both the Migs switched on their radars together, as the radars clearly identified the threat scenario, they immediately launched two R27ERs each targeting four more Su-33s. All the four R27ET’s found their target without difficulty & the Su-33 pilots died immediately without even knowing what had happened. The RWR’s from the rest of the Su-33s started bleeping & they broke formation, but then it was too late for 4 more Su-33s, the four R27ERs had no difficulty in finding their targets. Now only two more Su-33s were left & now it was a one is to one fight between the Migs-29Ks & Su-33s. Both the Migs immediately followed their targets, they were at an advantage & immediately tracked the Su-33 using the helmet mounted sight & launched one R73. The Su-33 started pulling up & immediately banked left in a 6G turn & thus broke off the missile lock, but the Mig pilot was still behind him & this time he again launched another R73, which hit the left engine & exploded. The Su-33 was now flying straight into the ocean below, while the other Mig pilot also succeeded in shooting down his target after launching 3 missiles. It was a very stressful flight for the Mig pilots. Now they have finished their task & headed back. Since the runway at Naval command was hit, they were diverted to the Kozhikode airport.

IAF personnel at the airforce command near the airport were dumbstruck by the huge explosion they heard & it took them some time to find out what had happened, which meant some precious time was lost. They immediately tried to contact the Southern Naval Head Quarters to warn them & also the Southern Air Command, Chennai. By then it was too late & the Southern Naval head quarters was hit. Airforce command at Thambaram responded immediately passing on the message to Naval command at Vizag. The Mig-29’s at Thambaram were scrambled & they were now heading towards Thiruvananthapuram in search of the Su-33’s, but they were too late & the Su-33’s had long gone. IN was now desparate to find out the Chinese carrier group. The Naval command at Vizag immediately took steps to launch two Tu-142 Bears along with four Mig-29K escorts in search of the carrier group & also send a warning to the Andaman naval command. One IL-78MKI of the IN was also launched to provide refuelling support to the Mig-29K’s on CAP. The Bears were upgraded in 2012 to carry 4 air launched Brahmos each.

In had elected to purchase 40 additional Mig-29K’s from Russia as per the provisions in the contract for Admiral Gorskhov. Of these additional 40, 20 nos. were allocated for ADS & the remaining 20 were split into 2 groups of 10 each. One group was based at Goa & the other based at Vizag. IN also ordered 2 IL-78MKI to provide refuelling support to the land based aircrafts.


INDIAN OCEAN
150 MILES EAST OF SRI LANKA
01:00 HRS, FRIDAY


An LTTE Boat was waiting around with only 3 personnel. All the three of them knew that this was a suicidal mission & they will never be able to see the next days light. But this was an important job, which would help their organisation to get more funds in the coming years. The boat looked like an ordinary fishing trawler, but had two barrels at the back loaded full of fuel. It had a tin roof at some height & beneath the roof, there stood three huge tubes fixed with rigid supports to the boat. The tubes were inclined at an angle of 80 deg & were pointing towards the front of the boat. The tin sheets & the side wooden covers hid these three tubes to the outer word. This was the new launcher for the long range manpad (if you can call it so, since it was too heavy for any one person to carry) developed by China, which had a range of 30 kms & was having an infrared seeker. This was just one boat, there were three more similar boats spread out in the Indian ocean on the expected path of the Indian aircrafts.

This group was waiting for the Indian maritime patrol aircrafts to show up. Their aim was to knockout one or if possible more patrol aircrafts, so that they will not be a hindrance to Chinese escape. One or two patrol aircrafts were not much of a threat to the carrier force at present any way.

After half an hour, one of the LTTE men spotted an Tu-142 along with 2 Mig 29K flying at a sufficiently long distance from the Bear, through his long range IR binoculars supplied by Chinese in the afternoon. Immediately they started their boat & started cruising slowly, once the aircrafts flew over them, they immediately turned around & oriented their boats so that the tube pointed towards the Tu-142. One person immediately removed the tin cover & ran for safety towards the cabin. The other person immediately gave the launch command & the missile leapt from the launcher with a huge plume of smoke. The missile seeker could easily identify the hot engine exhaust from the Tu-142 against the dark cool sky. The crew of the Tu-142 had misjudged the LTTE boat as a fishing trawler & had ignored it. Once alerted by the missile launch, the Tu-142 pilot went in for hard dive, but the missile had clearly identified its target & was rushing towards the portside engine. The missile hit the portside engine & exploded a large part of the wing was damaged & the Tu-142 was now flying uncontrollably towards the sea. Mean while the LTTE men again loaded one more missile & were now trying to orient their boat so as to target the Mig-29K. But it was not that simple, the Mig-29’s were fast & agile, it was not so easy to aquire them, they were diving down on the boat with their only weapon for the present job, the 30mm gun. The frantic LTTE men launched the missile even before they could orient it towards the Mig as a distraction. The Mig pilots were not distracted by the launch, the pilot from the first Mig aimed at the boat & pressed the trigger, the 30mm rounds from the gun teared the boat & immeadiately sink it. Only two LTTE men were lucky not to be hit by the bullets, they were hanging on to the life jackets, but they knew that their end was nearing as there was no way they could get back from the shark infested ocean. To aid to the misery the blood from their colleagues body was gushing out into the cold ocean. But they were successful in achieving their objective. With the loss of one Tu-142, the mission for the second one was more difficult. Both the Mig’s assigned to the lost Tu-142’s joined the other two Migs to provide cap for the lone Bear.

IAF STATION
THAMBARAM
00:00 HRS, FRIDAY

An emergency meeting was convened by the Air Marshal. IAF wanted to avenge the strike at the Aerospace command centre. After intense discussions for about 20 minutes, a decision was taken to launch a squadron of Su-30MKI’s from Pune in search of the Chinese carrier. In- flight refuelling was to be provided by 2 IL-78MKI’s. Only instruction for the MKI pilots was that not a single Su-33 should survive. The Carrier & its other support ships will be dealt with by the Navy. Eastern Naval command was immediately informed about the planned IAF action. This was going to be the first ever operation of an Air force & Navy combined to search & destroy a Carrier.


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