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Possible Indian Military Scenarios - Part IX

Hari Sud
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Postby Hari Sud » 01 Sep 2007 05:59

Guys

read the scenario posted by Narmad


url=http://www.chowk.com/site/articles/index.php?id=5329
]Somewhere over the Arabian Sea[/url]

Pakistani Attack on Gorshkov.

Also other scenarios in it.

This is Pakistani version of Shankar & Vivek


Cheers

Hari

Kiran.Rao
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Postby Kiran.Rao » 01 Sep 2007 07:17

Hari Sud wrote:Guys

read the scenario posted by Narmad


url=http://www.chowk.com/site/articles/index.php?id=5329
]Somewhere over the Arabian Sea[/url]

Pakistani Attack on Gorshkov.

Also other scenarios in it.

This is Pakistani version of Shankar & Vivek


Cheers

Hari


Can one of our jingo's analyze the scenario to point out why it can't be a reality ?

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 01 Sep 2007 08:38

okay guys...

pivot-hammer has resumed. all those trying to remember what the details were when it got left off, please refer to the respective scenes posted earlier. i had to do the same in order to remember the details... :wink:

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 01 Sep 2007 08:40

INDIAN CENTRAL AIR COMMAND (CAC)
CAC C3I AND PIVOT-HAMMER CONTROL
INDIA
0105 HRS FRIDAY


The four Indian aircraft over the Manasarowar and Rakas lakes were now forming up back into formation even as the flight of eight SU-27s was bearing down upon them from the direction of east-by-north. The ARC bird was inching slowly towards the south and the three SU-30MKIs were flying to the northeast of it to make sure nobody began messing with it. The idea here was to get the Chinese to commit their entire force of eight SU-27s from the east for PIVOT-HAMMER to work. That meant that they couldn’t just leave the area immediately and move to the safe zones to the south. They had to stay here and wait for the reinforcements to catch up. Eight SU-30MKIs that were flying south of the Himalayan peaks were now to be sent north as soon as the confirmation was received from the ARC crews that the Chinese had taken the bait.

The Chinese were smart too. They knew that the four Indian aircraft on their radar screens could not be alone. So, something was wrong. as a result, they were staying just out of reach of the missiles of the three Indian SU-30MKIs and were refusing to commit entirely. Before they did that they wanted to be sure that this was not some diversionary trick, that it was not designed to pull them away from some other sector where the main attacks would come. In doing this, they had deliberately handed over the air superiority over the twin lakes sector to the Indians. They were playing their cards very carefully. They knew that the three Indian SU-30MKIs could not undertake heavy handed OCA missions and still be able to take heavy ground strikes in the same mission. And the Chinese had no such crucial target in the sector that could be taken out and leave the Chinese forces crippled…except maybe that highway that ran east to west and connected the capital of western Tibet with Lhasa…

To the Indian CAC Staff officers, viewing the data coming in, the indecision at the Chinese command level regarding the allocation of the eight fighters to this sector was clear as sunlight. The Chinese weren’t able to make up their mind. That was when the Indian CAC Commander decided to make up the mind for them. He picked up a phone and gave the order for the Jaguar flights to move north from their orbiting positions north of the Indian airfield codenamed Jolly-Grant, just south of the Himalayan peaks and head towards their targets along a large section of the Chinese National highway in the region that was host to the massive PLA logistical movements towards the Aksai Chin region for the past two days.

If the Chinese didn’t think that that was a crucial enough target to hold on to or challenge for, then they might as well just tell the PLA in the region to put white flags over their vehicles and trucks moving along that road, because the Jaguar pilots weren’t going to show any mercy once they were over their targets. Not after having lost one of their own to Chinese ground-fire over Khaleb the day before.



INDIAN PHALCON AWACS AIRCRAFT
CALL SIGN: HAMMERHEAD ONE
AIRSPACE SOUTH OF THE INDO-TIBETAN BORDER
0115 HRS FRIDAY


“GROUND-HAMMER-ONE through THREE, weapons free! I say again, you are weapons free! All flights: Head to targets. Switch to HAMMER-CALL for airborne control. Confirm Order. Over.â€

gauravjkale
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Postby gauravjkale » 01 Sep 2007 10:33

welcome back vivek.

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 01 Sep 2007 12:41

INS DELHI – 210 KM SOUTH WEST OF COCOS ISLAND

Commander Rawat checked the green blue displays of the advanced panoramic hull mounted sonar and the next console showing the readings from variable depth sonar .Nothing in the display was cause of concern but Rawat was not a person to trust his instruments blindly and decided to deploy the Thales advanced towed array sonar just to be doubly sure .Captain Rawat was in charge of underwater warfare on board Delhi and numerous exercises with navies equipped with diesel electric submarines have made him extra cautious when in coastal waters particularly near Icelandic structures .
As he picked up the intercom and requested course and speed change,the powerful D 36 E gas turbines whined down to a lower output level and the ship heeled sharply as she came on to the new course almost at right angles to the original track and the fish was reeled in and the towed array began to be deployed .The speed reduced to 5 knots and the sonar screens came alive.
Almost all isolated oceanic islands sit atop ancient volcanoes. The cocos islands are coral atolls which developed on top of old volcanic sea mounts rising from depth of 5000 meters in Indian ocean. The islands foundations are two of a series of undersea feature known as Vening Meinsz sea mounts. This undersea range of mountains also includes Christmas island and extends in a north north easterly direction from a prominent Indian ocean sea floor feature called NietyeasT Ridge. the cocos atolls are two peaks in a section of the range known as cocos rise and connected by a narrow underwater bank at a t a depth of 700-800 meters. Atolls are more or less circular coral reefs enclosing a lagoon bit without any land inside. On large atolls parts of the reef have been built up by wave action and wind to form low island chains connected by the reef. The environmental aspects of atoll islands are unique in some respects. For example there is no rock other than coral lime stone composed of calcium carbonate. This means plants requiring other minerals such as silica cannot be cultivated without use of fertilizers.
The corals made detection of any subsurface contact extremely difficult and positive identification almost impossible unless the sub commander is stupid enough to speed up or surface within the detection zone of a Delhi class destroyer, but still Captain Rawat tried without avail . Once he thought he could detect a faint sonar shadow which appeared very similar to navy kilos from Vizag but then it disappeared once again into background. He picked up the intercom to bridge once again and requested for another change in course and speed and the ship obeyed –the hunt has just began
Charles Darwin visited Cocos in 1836 aboard HMS Beagle and it was during this visit he developed the theory of atoll formation .He spent some time exploring the southern atoll and also visited north Keeling
In his publication on coral reefs in 1842 he was first to propose the theory of reef formation and evolution building on his discovery of coralline fossils in inland areas and in mountains earlier in the journey and his visits to the islands. The theory which is still considered valid explains the dynamics of the three principal categories of coral formation.

About 140 kms north west of Delhi Captain Imtiaz Khan was mildly worried .His batter level was running low and he needed to snorkel at earliest .Night was still few hours away and he did not want to surface as yet. The mass of coral blanketed the presence Indian task force on patrol on the further side of the island chain and as such both were oblivious of others presence. A happy state of affairs for the time being, likely to change soon .

Captain Rawat decided to launch one of the two helos on board for a quick look see around the islands with their dunking sonar before heading off for Darwin and the orders were issued from the bridge immediately.


Captain Imtiaz was now seriously worried .The battery level indicator showed less than 12% available power and the motors were running hot .Most of the on board lights have been already switched off and still the subs response were sluggish He issued the orders
- All station prepare to come to periscope depth –engine room get ready for quick battery charge –make your climb angle 5 degree –get ready to raise ESM gear
- Aye captain sir –making climb angle 5 degree-diesel ready to start –estimated snorkeling time 3hr 45 minutes for full charge

Like a ghost from the dark shadows of the ocean bed the Iranian navy climbed up along the coral reef for a breadth of fresh air

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 01 Sep 2007 14:29

SONAR CONSOLE STATION-INS DELHI


The data link to the helo now in search station 50 km south east was active . The towed array was also behaving normal .Commander Rawat watched the suspect trace on broad band as the ship turned ,the trace moved down the display ,Rawat immediately ordered a course reversal and the unidentified trace moved up the display .Allowing the destroyer to keep on course he had to take a difficult choice whether to use the hull mounted sonar on omni mode or single beam mode ,a few moments hesitation and he decided to use the omni mode as directed by the operating manual for pursuing submerged contact.
He once again checked the adjacent close in weapon system console to confirm the close in weapon system was in “manualâ€

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 02 Sep 2007 05:37

THE HIGHWAY WEST OF KHALEB
THE TIBETAN PLAINS
NORTH OF THE INDO-TIBETAN BORDER
0145 HRS FRIDAY


The road was filled with large convoys of trucks moving in a single file throughout the region. The sun had not some as of yet, and yet the convoys were slowly moving in the dark without their headlights on. All sorts of vehicles were on the road. And although most of these were trucks and other soft skinned vehicles of similar types, there were also smaller convoys of tanks moving along the road. The skies above were fully dark, and the stars were not visible. There was also partial cloud cover here, partly blocking out the moonlight but still allowing certain amount of visibility.

The Tibetan plains were teeming with Chinese military vehicles and the sounds of the man made diesel engines were filling the roads. Along this section of the highway, the movement was simple enough, and on both sides of the road were vast flat areas that were giving extremely good coverage to the single Chinese short-range mobile radar van parked half a kilometre away from the road. This van was being accompanied by three trailers that were serving the purpose of command centres for the local section of the air defence network.

Half a kilometre on the other side of the road were the three SAM launchers parked, camouflaged and facing southwards. And on the road between these small outposts were the continuous streams of trucks heading east to west towards the Aksai Chin region. Because of the flat region here, the truck drivers driving their vehicles on the road could see both these posts on either side of the road. At the moment, all the truck drivers going by were getting increasingly nervous about their safety as they saw hectic activity near the radar van and the trailers as men were running around from one vehicle to another. They could see little activity near the camouflaged missile launchers so that they were somewhat certain that they were not under immediate attack.

Their fears were not unjustified. Because of the single length of this highway through the region, nearly all the vehicles that were passing by along this section of the road had at some time passed the section of the road near Khaleb to the east that had come under the heavy Indian air attacks during the previous day. Although the damage to the roads there had been repaired, the burnt out hulks of half a dozen trucks and a couple of armoured vehicles were still littered on the sides of the road, providing a graphic image of war to the Chinese soldiers who passed by. All had heard the details of the events of the previous day, and had heard rumours that their radars had been blinded by the Indians somehow. Fear is contagious, and although no Chinese would ever admit to it to his officer, the hectic scenes at the radar centre were not very positive signs…

They passers by along the road could not have known that the radars they were seeing were indeed being jammed. The ARC B-707 crew flying to the southeast were doing all they could to ensure that the Chinese missiles remained blind for as long as possible. And the result was that the Chinese had no idea what was coming at them. The movements of the trucks along the highway were continuing as fats as was normally possible even as the Chinese commanders were screaming at their phones and trying to get their Air force AEW aircrafts to sort out the Indian aircrafts jamming their ground defence systems. It was a classic case of electronic warfare.

The Chinese commanders on the ground at the radar stations were not aware of the events unfolding in the sky except that Indian fighters were above Tibet. And even this information was based solely on the data available to them before their own systems went down due to the Indian jamming efforts. The Chinese AEW crews were able to see the threat to the ground forces emerging from across the Himalayan peaks but could not guide the missiles from the ground by themselves. That had to be done by the ground radars, and these were being jammed. The only way forward for the Chinese was to eliminate the handful of Indian fighters and that EW bird before they could bring their local ground based defences back online. To do this, they would have to commit their eight SU-27s to the fight, and that was what the Indian CAC commander was expecting the Chinese to do. Unfortunately, the Chinese could not make up their mind in time to change the events on the ground, and the result was immediately made clear to the Chinese soldiers on the ground.

The darkness of the night within the Tibetan plains was shattered as a bright orange flash erupted and announced the death of the Chinese ground radar vans and the trailer vehicles at the hands of a single Anti-radiation missile launched by a SEAD optimized Jaguar. Then there was the shockwave and the noise, sending the thunder across the highway and bringing convoys to a stop as the Chinese soldiers jumped out of their vehicles and began running away from the road. The first explosion had been somewhat small, and some of the trailers, parked a good distance apart from the main centre, were still relatively intact. The worst part of the sudden attack was that the Chinese on the ground had no visual of the attackers. There were no Indian aircraft above them in the dark moonlit sky, and for a second it seemed to all that it was over. The small explosion of the radar van had turned it into a column of thick black smoke heading for the sky, with flames leaping into the air. Everybody on the road was hectically scanning the sky above them for a sight of the attackers.

After a few seconds a dark entity streaked across the sky and headed northwards without making a sound. Before the soldiers on the ground could respond, the area where the remaining trailer vans were parked suddenly shuddered with what seemed like firecrackers going off before a smoke and dust cloud enveloped everything. Then came the sound of the thunder of the aircraft engines. This first pass had been made in a very high speed dash by the Jaguar crew for reasons of safety against the Chinese defences. Then another Jaguar streaked across the sky at somewhat slower speeds and dropped a load of Dumb Bombs on the three SAM launchers while continuing to head northwards.

Then two more aircrafts of the same flight came across from the east and were heading to the wets directly over the road at low level. All the Chinese soldiers realized this for what it was and began to scramble away from their vehicles and the road even as the two aircraft screamed over in low and level profiles and left a whole line of fireballs racing for the sky as the Napalm they had dropped set everything on fire. The number of vehicles carrying ammunition made things worse and sent additional sympathetic explosions ripping the vehicles around and tossing them dozens of feet into the air. By the time the napalm flames were turning into thick smoke, the two SEAD Jaguars that had streaked to the north came from that side heading to the south. They dropped their remaining ordinance of Cluster munitions on a section of the road further to the west in a single pass before dashing to the south, leaving the Chinese to see the effects of their attacks in all their glory.

Even as dozens of vehicles were burning furiously on the road and thick black columns of smoke were filling the sky, the Chinese convoys were beginning to move once again. A Chinese Major was standing a few hundred metres away from the road and organizing his men to get the surviving vehicles of the convoy to bypass the destroyed vehicles and begin moving westwards. He ordered a radioman to set up his equipment and got hold of his commanders to let them know about the attack on the convoys. He was told to stop and wait for further instructions.

The seemed to be total chaos at the Chinese Logistical Coordination centre for this region of Tibet. He knew he couldn’t just stop here and wait for death to come to him, so he attempted to clarify his orders from his superiors. While he shouted into the radio speaker over the noise of the raging fires and the vehicle engines, he felt the tremors beneath his feet and then heard the muffled thunders. He didn’t know where they were coming from but as he looked to the east towards the direction of Khaleb where he could see the horizon was lit up with an orange glow…

The Chinese Major immediately understood why his commanders were in chaos. The main supply route from this region to Lhasa in the east and the Aksai Chin in the west had been severely hit and damaged. He realized that there was no point arguing for any orders at the moment. As he handed the receiver back to his radio operator, he was joined by some junior officers as they all stared in desolation at that orange glow that was coming from the east.

On board PATRIOT-EAGLE, the Defence Minister was handed over the news by the CAS and his reaction, in stark contrast to the Chinese one, was to slam his fist on the table in jubilation.

Sudhanshu
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Postby Sudhanshu » 02 Sep 2007 06:17

Good work shankar and vivek.. please keep it coming.

Well, I really don't know where to post this air force info commercial

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3VjMyp-L4w

How long will it take our armed forces to make such ads to attract youth in our country.

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 02 Sep 2007 23:45

RUB AL KHALI -SAUDI YEMEN BORDER- DAY 1

The old man finished his evening prayers, had his frugal meal of few dates and corn bread sweetened with honey and then called upon his newly recruited assistant with his laptop. The old man did not trust the gadget much but he found it to be useful in getting up to date news and organize the details of a mission under planning. Once the mission was over he will order the expensive machine to be destroyed in front of him .But for the time being it had its usefulness.

The project “kangaroo strikeâ€

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Postby Sanku » 03 Sep 2007 17:34

Vivek Zindabad......

disha
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Postby disha » 04 Sep 2007 00:27

Good job Shankar and Vivek. Double story, double maza :)

gauravjkale
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Postby gauravjkale » 06 Sep 2007 15:34

Vivek and shankar both of you together cant go on leave like this.

Please think about people like us who keep on refreshing the scenario pages everyday,everyhour.

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 06 Sep 2007 22:09

sorry guys -midst of a demanding first type project-coal bed methane extraction and liquification in eastern India -next post today for sure

Sudhanshu
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Postby Sudhanshu » 07 Sep 2007 06:57

For those who getting bored

SAS operation in 2000
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCct7WXwa5Q

{search the rest part, there are 5}

AND

NSA inside story

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-u0_n8wilp8

{again, search the rest part, they all there in related links}

enjoy

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 07 Sep 2007 10:29

AIRSPACE ABOVE THE TIBETAN PLAINS
NORTH OF THE INDO-TIBETAN BORDER
0210 HRS FRIDAY


The small group of Indian Sukhois and the single EW bird had been loitering over the Tibetan plains for a long time now, and so had their Chinese comrades, flying their SU-27s. Each was gazing at the other from long range, waiting for one to flinch. It was beginning to appear as if both sides would soon have to back off to conduct in-flight refueling before resuming their standoff. But the Indian CAC Commander had forced his Chinese counterpart to show his hand and make a move with his order to launch the Jaguar attacks against targets along the strategic highway from Lhasa to western Tibet. As far as the Jaguar pilot’s accounts had been put together, the attack had been a great success. Not a single fighter had been lost to ground fire, except for large numbers of bullet-holes on a couple of aircraft that were now limping back across the border into India to the south.

To balance that out was the complete halt of all convoys attempting to move east from Lhasa, at least for the moment. Dozens of Chinese military vehicles had been left on fire. Most of their radars had been taken out completely, and many of their anti-aircraft missile launchers were now nothing more than twisted pieces of metal. The skies over the region around the Kailas mountain range in the Tibetan plains was now open for high level bombing by Mirages using laser guided weapons. That was planned for later. The battle for air superiority was not yet over. The only Mirages that were flying at the moment were either flying CAP or were being armed for Air defence missions, while the Flankers were taking the brunt of the Penetration missions over Tibet. A single Indian Sukhoi-30 had been lost over the Manasarowar Lake in exchange for a quadruple of Chinese SU-27s. The Chinese commanders simply could not afford to ignore their ground situation in this critical border zone if they had any intentions of winning the war in the region.

And as per the prediction of the Indian CAC commander, the eight Chinese SU-27s were detected spreading out, forming a line east to west and north of the location of the Indian fighters, and then heading south for combat.



ARC B-707 OVER TIBET, CALL-SIGN: HAMMER-CALL
AIRSPACE ABOVE THE TIBETAN PLAINS
0212 HRS FRIDAY


“Inbound…inbound…we have inbound bandits. Heading zero-three-five, relative. Angels thirty. I say again, we have inbound Chinese fighters. All eight of them. They will attain range for extreme missile shot in ten minutes for the forward-most escorts…â€

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Postby ksmahesh » 07 Sep 2007 10:46

Wah wah........ great scenario. Lets have early morning breakfaast of 8 chinese Su27s. I am already hungry.

gauravjkale
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Postby gauravjkale » 07 Sep 2007 16:49

me too , me too..

lets have them for dinner, why wait for breakfast???

Hari Sud
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Postby Hari Sud » 08 Sep 2007 01:06

Vivek


Like the picture of action on the eastern front, could you draw another one for this action.


Hari

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 08 Sep 2007 03:02

Like the picture of action on the eastern front, could you draw another one for this action.


I was actually thinking of doing the very same, but I thought, lets make it more realistic than the previous one, and so I managed to do some work which gives a clearer visual understanding of the battlefield. And here we are:

Image

I guess this should allow the readers to follow the plot more closely. Any suggestions are welcome.

Vivek

rags
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Postby rags » 08 Sep 2007 08:43

Vivek,
You are simply awesome.

regards
Raghu

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 10 Sep 2007 07:48

THE TIBETAN PLAINS
AIRSPACE ABOVE THE PLATEAU
0225 HRS FRIDAY


The four Indian aircraft were now pulling south at full speed. The jaguars had just crossed over into Indian airspace and were now in the clear, being protected by the Mirage-2000s flying Patrols just south of the peaks. The Chinese SU-27s were converging quickly, and the three Indian SU-30s protecting the ARC B-707 were being constrained by the speed of the latter. Even so, this had been planned out beforehand. The distances between these fighters and the ARC bird had been kept so that they would cross the border to the south together, even with the speed difference between the two groups. Even so, the Indian fighter crews were wary of the threat that was now at their six positions.

To make sure that the things were as they were supposed to be, the flight leader of the fighters had his aircrafts do a loop behind to the north after every few minutes to make sure that the Chinese didn’t sneak up on them. In all possibility, the three Indian fighters here could have taken on the Chinese by themselves, but that bore the risk that they would take casualties, or worse, be wiped out and leave the ARC aircraft unprotected to the surviving Chinese aircrafts. Three against eight was not a good number ration in combat, no matter what the quality advantages are. So they were to keep pace with their support bird and leave the hunting to the eight aircraft that were now streaking over the Himalayan ranges around the Nanda Devi Peak and heading north.

To the south, the eight Indian aircrafts were scanning the skies to the north. They were taking the feed from the Phalcon bird and knew what was in front of them. However, all their radars were on standby only. No emissions were to be sent out at this time. Their RWRs were clear all the way from the south up till the time they cleared the Himalayan peaks and entered Tibet. Then everything lighted up on their threat receivers, though not to the extent that they had thought. The Jaguar attacks on the Chinese radars had taken its toll. The threat receivers on board the Indian Sukhois were showing minimal ground radar activity. This was in stark contrast to the air activity. The Chinese AEW aircrafts flying to the north had detected them the moment they had cleared the hills to the south. And this meant that the Chinese SU-27s were aware of this intrusion as well.

Oh, well…they were bound to discover it sometime, might as well be now…the OMEGA Group commander thought. That was when he decided that radio silence was no longer that great a priority.

“HEAD-ONE, this is OMEGA Leader. We are lit up across the board here. The Commie AEW has us. Minimal Chinese ground activity. Give our thanks to the Jag crews. They did a good job here. We detect inbound bandits at twelve. Preparing to engage. Over and out.â€

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Postby Sudhanshu » 11 Sep 2007 07:52

Good work Vivek.. good writers always surprise the reader and keep their writing interesting by making it a bit unpredictable. You just did that!

Well, I was completely satisfied by the thought that those 8 Su30, will just slaughter those Su27, without taking any loss.
But, I had forgotten that the missile fired by those Su27 will be as deadly as those from Su30 or even fired from Mig19.

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Postby ksmahesh » 12 Sep 2007 17:15

Well the breakfast was Ok but price was heavy. May be the time has come for the main course. Lets have their Big bird. :)

Hari Sud
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Postby Hari Sud » 12 Sep 2007 19:20

Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud

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Postby JCage » 12 Sep 2007 21:05

Vivek

One small correction- long detailed instructions wont be given on radio, even if secure. Code phrases and acronyms - long practised for, are used as much as possible. So that if an intercept is made, its gibberish for the opponent. Eg when you are trying to bait the enemy and want it to be a secret..

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Postby vivek_ahuja » 13 Sep 2007 20:40

AIRSPACE OVER SOUTHERN SIKKIM
NEAR THE INDIAN-NEPAL BORDER
0245 HRS FRIDAY


The Chinese ISR network over Western Tibet had lost most of its potent fighter cover with the loss of the six Su-27s. The airspace was now relatively open even though twelve J-8II local Defence fighters were riding shotgun on the five specialized aircrafts and the four H-6 Tankers. But for the number of support aircrafts to be protected, the fighter cover was not extensive even in the most optimistic scenario. But all Chinese aircrafts were not in danger. The situation was being rectified. There was one KJ-200 AWACS aircraft flying that was the main control hub for the Chinese aerial efforts in Tibet. It was the most exposed, as it had been drawn south during the engagement of the SU-27s and now been left naked. With it were a Y-8 ECM aircraft that was now also exposed. The four H-6 Tankers were now exposed as well. The only aircrafts not exposed were a single Y-8 C3I aircraft and another Y-8 ELINT bird that had been far to the north and were mover further north at the moment. The Chinese situation was desperate. The twelve J-8IIs were being organized into proper groups to protect the bigger and pricier aircrafts and crews. More were being scrambled from airbases near Lhasa and from the north. And all of the above aircraft that were over Tibet were flying northwards and away from the Indian Border.

But time was not on their side, as it never is for anyone who has fallen into an ambush. While the Chinese Airborne controllers were desperately shouting out for all the aircrafts they could assemble, the Indians were already in the air and nearby. Then there were other factors. The main frontline with Tibet and India gets broken up in between by a large chunk of border with Nepal. As a result, the frontline consists of an eastern zone, near Sikkim and a western zone, near Uttar Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh and then northwards from there. For the last two days the focus of the air war for Tibet had been inadvertently constrained to the southern parts of this western sector. Until a small time ago, the focus of the two sides had indeed been on this sector. Unknown to the Chinese, however, the Indian focus had now shifted eastwards, where; the second claw of the great trap that was Operation PIVOT-HAMMER was now swinging into action.

In effect, while the Chinese were focussing on getting their immediate, and available, air support between them and the Indian border to the south, they were also unwittingly exposing their east. To counter that fear was the fact that all J-8s scrambling from near Lhasa would eventually plug that gap, and that it was only temporary. Indeed, two J-8s were flying CAP just north of the Sikkim border, albeit without support. Unfortunately for the Chinese efforts, the massive Indian Sukhoi and Mirage force that was waiting near Sikkim under HAMMER-HEAD-TWO was like a big steam roller in the sky. The two J-8s were no match, qualitatively, and for the first time for the Indians, quantitatively, to stop the Indians from going after the PLAAF’s prized assets.

The two unfortunate Chinese J-8II pilots never even knew what hit them. The Indian Phalcon had brought the Indian fighters behind the Chinese when they had been on their western leg of the patrol loop. They had been doing it for far too many times now and had become predictable. The Indian Phalcon crews and hence the fighter crews had thus known where they were, what they were doing and, if technology had permitted, what they were thinking. It was an insult to even define it as a fight. The only indication that one of the two Chinese pilots had that he was about to die was when his wingman’s aircraft blew up in a giant ball of fire as a Matra-Magic Missile slammed into it from the rear hemisphere. Although his wingman never had a chance, this Chinese pilot had enough time for his thought process to take him towards thinking about ejection a full millisecond before a white light consumed his aircraft all around him…

“Splash Two. I say again, Splash two. Way is clear. Good luck HAMMER-WOLF. HAMMER-GOLF signing off. Over and out.â€

vivek_ahuja
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Postby vivek_ahuja » 13 Sep 2007 20:46

[deleted double post]
Last edited by vivek_ahuja on 13 Sep 2007 21:07, edited 1 time in total.

gopal.suri
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Postby gopal.suri » 13 Sep 2007 21:03

Should I sleep or wait for the next episode?

ksmahesh
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Postby ksmahesh » 13 Sep 2007 21:08

:D Now this is called as buildup. Excellento Vivek. Lets have big bird feast ASAP......

Shankar saar where are you? Please do not use stealth. We are eagerly waiting for the Iranian submarine to be made permanent submarine.....

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Viveks Posts in a MS word file

Postby asbchakri » 14 Sep 2007 11:29

Hari Sud wrote:Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud


Hi hari i'm keeping all of viveks posts in a Word file if u want i can post in but not sure where and how

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 14 Sep 2007 13:55

RAAF FLIGHT -KANGAROO ONE –SOMEWHERE NEAR CUCOS ISLAND – INDIAN OCEAN

Squadron leader Scott tapped on the colorful multifunctional display of the acoustic station-arguably the most potent sensor platform on the P3C Orion on a sub hunt in the murky depths of Indian Ocean. The acoustic station deals with the sono buoys . He had the the flexibility of monitoring up to 16 of them in “OMNIâ€

nirav_j

Re: Viveks Posts in a MS word file

Postby nirav_j » 14 Sep 2007 14:30

asbchakri wrote:
Hari Sud wrote:Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud


Hi hari i'm keeping all of viveks posts in a Word file if u want i can post in but not sure where and how


can you please send me the word file @ flankerfreak at gmail ????

TIA.

asbchakri
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Re: Viveks Posts in a MS word file

Postby asbchakri » 14 Sep 2007 14:54

nirav_j wrote:
asbchakri wrote:
Hari Sud wrote:Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud


Hi hari i'm keeping all of viveks posts in a Word file if u want i can post in but not sure where and how


can you please send me the word file @ flankerfreak at gmail ????

TIA.


I have sent the document please check it

asbchakri
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Re: Viveks Posts in a MS word file

Postby asbchakri » 14 Sep 2007 14:57

asbchakri wrote:
nirav_j wrote:
asbchakri wrote:
Hari Sud wrote:Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud


Hi hari i'm keeping all of viveks posts in a Word file if u want i can post in but not sure where and how


can you please send me the word file @ flankerfreak at gmail ????

TIA.


I have sent the document please check it


I also have Shankars Africa and Afganistan Scenarios in a document. if u want i can send them.

Shankar
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Postby Shankar » 14 Sep 2007 17:40

OCEAN BLUE FLIGHT -1 X IL-38 –INDIAN NAVY- 700 KMS SOUTH EAST OF COLOMBO

Commander Dixit eased back on the collective throttle as the lumbering long range maritime patrol aircraft came up to cruise altitude of 29500 ft after taking off from indian naval airbase off the port of Colombo. Behind him Subba Rao anti submarine officer was already busy with his charts of the ocean below and his trusted Texas Instrument graphic scientific calculator( a gift from crew of a USN Hawk eye patrol aircraft during recently concluded Malabar-2014 in the Indian ocean just off the coast of
Sri Lanka and included navies from Australia ,Thailand, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam and Russia.
The weather was clearing up with a spattering of cumulus cloud in the distant horizon .The air speed indicator was steady at 575 km/hr ,attitude indicator stable in level flying position ,distance to search zone 3483 km . The Australian P-3 he was supposed to team up with was expected to reach earlier and will initiate the search according to already agreed upon parameters .Once the contact was boxed in either or both of them will go in for the “KILLâ€

ksmahesh
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Postby ksmahesh » 14 Sep 2007 17:54

I cannot believe my luck today. 2 posts from Shankar. I must have seen mirror in the morning.

Thanks Shankar.

ajay_hk
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Re: Viveks Posts in a MS word file

Postby ajay_hk » 14 Sep 2007 21:25

asbchakri wrote:
Hari Sud wrote:Is anybody keeping Vivek's posts (all of them) in a MS word file?

These can be usefully reposted on BR Monitor or another place.



Hari Sud


Hi hari i'm keeping all of viveks posts in a Word file if u want i can post in but not sure where and how


saar - could you please send it to ajaydothk at gmaildotcom? thanks a lot.

menon
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Postby menon » 15 Sep 2007 01:34

would it not be nice if the administrators removed the comments from between the scenarios, then it will make excellent reading.
I am not saying that comments should not be made. Make them. After they have met their objective they can be removed.

p_saggu
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Postby p_saggu » 15 Sep 2007 01:43

Wow! Vivek Ahuja, you can write.

Send me that file too at omlettebread at yahoo.com


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