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Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Jagan
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Jagan » 19 Jul 2008 22:10

aditp wrote:
Rupesh wrote:Galantry awards Guranteed for SQN LDr Jamwal... :lol: :rotfl:


.....and a promotion to Wg. Cdr too. Shankar da, maybe you can make a special case for Sq. Ldr. Jamwal and have him promoted to Air. Cmde. straight :idea: :wink: :lol: :idea: :



thearmchairgeneral as a forum handle is not allowed. i have chnaged it to aditp. please let me know if you prefer an alternative name. (forum handles have to be human sounding names without nubmers or callsigns)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jamwal » 19 Jul 2008 22:55

aditp wrote:
Rupesh wrote:Galantry awards Guranteed for SQN LDr Jamwal... :lol: :rotfl:


.....and a promotion to Wg. Cdr too. Shankar da, maybe you can make a special case for Sq. Ldr. Jamwal and have him promoted to Air. Cmde. straight :idea: :wink: :lol: :idea: :


Agree completely :) :mrgreen:



Mikem
sir jee, whats that graphic before in your post??
Some questions about that video too...is it some promotional video by french or what?
and that manoeuver at 45 secs. Looks a bit like Cobra done by Sukhois. Is it right or they just gaining altitude??

ChandraS

Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby ChandraS » 20 Jul 2008 05:36

Sdn Ldr Jamwal & WCdr Nitesh - gr8 job..yeh dil maange more..

Now on to Sqn Ldr Deepika :mrgreen:

Here's one for her:



All scenes are from the French movie 'Chevaliers du Ciel' - Heroes of the Sky - set to Bon Jovi's 'It's my life' 8)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby sevoke » 20 Jul 2008 11:26

nice old video set to annoying music.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jahaju » 20 Jul 2008 13:49

link below to female French Air Force pilot who flew mirage 2000's before her tragic death in 2007 [ french version of deepika (padukone?)] .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Aigle

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 20 Jul 2008 17:04

YANGBAJAIN RAILTOAD TUNNEL -80 LN EAST OF LHAS -TIBET - 0400 HRS

Captain Han blinked hard at the flash message on the secured console. He was advised to prepare for a possible imminent Indian air strike at the tunnel complex and also told in no uncertain terms what will be the consequence if he failed to protect the most treasured railroad in the world.

As he picked up the field telephone to his surface to missile and gun commanders the radar screen was clean and black and then suddenly turned all white and grainy.

He knew then the promised raid have just been delivered, the powerful jammers have just managed to make useless all his long range search and track radars and the cold war era soviet copies were no good for the state of the art electronic counter measure equipment the Indians were using now . What he did not know is it was not one but several latest Russian and Israeli and French electronic countermeasure systems were used simultaneously by the incoming Mirage 2000s and the Su 30 MKI s making any kind of radar based target lock and track almost impossible.

The broad band frequency agile jammers first listened passively to the inbound search and track emission and decided on what frequency is best to jam and confuse and what power level and only then the powerful emitters were energized making the search radars loose track and keep on trying to re acquire the target again.

The Mirage flight have come in from the north making a long circle around the heavily defended Tibetan capital region to strike far from the assumed threat axis. While the Sukhois have parked themselves to the south of Lhasa at high altitude drawing any challenger Deepika and her teammates have circled around at very low altitude, flying the valley in a true nape of the earth flying and now activated their own protective jammers .

Captain Han knew his chances against such a well choreographed attack was not much and also he knew his last days in peoples republic will not be full of pleasure as he rushed out of the command bunker and shouted at the gunners to fire over open sight and at will as the the first of the Indian Mirage 2000 dived out of the dawn skies straight at him ,guns blazing ,ripping a twin furrow on the frosted ground .

CHAMBAL FIRE FLIGHT -24 X MIRAGE 2000 – OVER YANGBAJAIN RAILTOAD TUNNEL- 0402 HRS

Wing commander Deepika looked at the frantically running figure through her night vision goggles as she came in to pre weapon release position as per pre decided weapon release profile . Her thumb moved by reflex as she selected GUN and pressed the fire button in a short 2 second burst .She saw the target disintegrate and then it was turn to get into drop profile. As she lit the after burner and activated the digital clock on main MFD ,the Mirage streaked forward and then as she pulled the stick full forward ,it nosed up and bored into the night sky ,17 seconds and she started loosing airspeed ,stick full forward and thumb flicking open the plastic cover of release trigger , the tunnel junction where the inward and outward tunnel is joined by a service tunnel was her aiming point and the cross hair rested on it as the Mirage nosed down at almost zero vertical air speed and started falling out of the sky ,press the release ,push the throttle all the way forward and recover from the near stall . The Heavy bomb dropped true and straight, the twin retarding parachutes deployed at 500 ft over ground level and the four small rocket motors ignited in unison. The 2000 kg torpedo shaped bomb accelerated down wards while the aiming parachutes burnt off in the hot exhaust of the penetration assist motors. The impact was like a small earthquake with a 2000 kg re inforced mass at a speed more than 600 km/hr contacted the reinforced tunnel dome, cracking it into several pieces by sheer kinetic energy of impact, penetrating through the dome and then exploding. The mass of hydroxyl terminated poly butadiene and petroleum jelly within an aluminum powder matrix created a core temperature of nearly 3000 degree centigrade which simply melted the concrete and the explosive power of resulting shock wave tore it apart like a kid’s toy house all in a span of 12 seconds.

Depika managed to tear off her night vision goggles before the bright flash hit her eyes ,put them back on for the secondary target but that was not required . The whole tunnel complex was now burning brightly as the stored diesel within the tunnel for the locos caught fire and much smaller secondary explosions started all over, lighting up the entire tunnel area . The solar power station which powered the complex as well as the surface to air defense units all over the Lhasa division of the Tibetian railway could be easily seen with naked eye ,lit up by the eerie light of the now burning tunnel . She leveled out and in a classic bomb drop profile allowed the target cursor on HUD float over the power station mirror area and dropped the second bomb . This time there was no spectacular secondary explosion but the whole area plunged into darkness, confirming she has found the mark.

-eagle eye –chambal fire –the fire is burning –alpha and delta target destroyed –request further instruction –over
-good work Charlie foxtrot lead – we see six juliets foxtrots on intercept course – turn right heading 170 – make altitude 20k ft – join lima romeo flight quicky –repeat join lima romeo flight –clear area for long range strike – radar on standby please
-copy that eagle eye –bugging out for time being towards lima romeo flight –over

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Nitesh » 20 Jul 2008 17:12

Shankar wrote:YANGBAJAIN RAILTOAD TUNNEL -80 LN EAST OF LHAS -TIBET - 0400 HRS

He knew then the promised raid have just been delivered, the powerful jammers have just managed to make useless all his long range search and track radars and the cold war era soviet copies were no good for the state of the art electronic counter measure equipment the Indians were using now . What he did not know is it was not one but several latest Russian and Israeli and French electronic countermeasure systems were used simultaneously by the incoming Mirage 2000s and the Su 30 MKI s making any kind of radar based target lock and track almost impossible.


The bombing has begun :twisted: :twisted: .

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby PaulJI » 20 Jul 2008 19:06

Shankar wrote:...
Depika managed to tear off her night vision goggles before the bright flash hit her eyes ...

Wouldn't they have a limit on what they'll let through? I thought that was standard nowadays.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby mikem » 20 Jul 2008 22:25

Jamwal, The graphic depicts rank insignia of I.A.F.

Image=Squadron Leader. :lol: :lol:

visit this link:http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/Info/Badges/005.html

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby asbchakri » 21 Jul 2008 10:00

jamwal wrote:Abschakri

Sir jee.instead of mailing the scenarios to everybody one by one, you can upload the files at some file sharing site like rapidshare, mediafire, uploading dot it and many more.(except for megashare)
Whoever wants those files can download them himself .
If you want I can upload them. My id is jjamwal at gmail dot com.


That would be great. I'l email you all the Scenarios today after i add the latest part of Shankar. :D
A question to the BRAdmin guys, cant we do teh same On Br site itself. A place where we can upload these stuff. :?:

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Su 30 Thrust Vectoring

Postby mikem » 21 Jul 2008 11:27

This is a video which has cool close-up footage of the Su-30's Thrust Vectoring nozzles. You can see them operate independently of each other.


..........................

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby parshuram » 21 Jul 2008 12:53

Shankar wrote:YANGBAJAIN RAILTOAD TUNNEL -80 LN EAST OF LHAS -TIBET - 0400 HRS

....heading 170 – make altitude 20k ft – join lima romeo flight quicky –repeat join lima romeo flight –clear area for long range strike – radar on standby please
-copy that eagle eye –bugging out for time being towards lima romeo flight –over


Cruise Missiles ... Shankar Paaji ???

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby asbchakri » 22 Jul 2008 09:43

jamwal wrote:Abschakri

Sir jee.instead of mailing the scenarios to everybody one by one, you can upload the files at some file sharing site like rapidshare, mediafire, uploading dot it and many more.(except for megashare)
Whoever wants those files can download them himself .
If you want I can upload them. My id is jjamwal at gmail dot com.


Jamwal sent them to u'r id check them. :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jamwal » 22 Jul 2008 10:17

Thank you Chakri sahib :)

I've uploaded files on 4 different sites.
You can download from any of the sites you like.
First link in each group is zip file containing old scenarios, 2nd and 3rd are scenarios by Shankar and Vivek respectively. 8)



Code: Select all

http://rapidshare.com/files/131517727/fwrescenarios.zip

http://rapidshare.com/files/131517728/Shankar.doc

http://rapidshare.com/files/131517729/Vivek.doc



Code: Select all

http://www.mediafire.com/?5ytvmhzindg

http://www.mediafire.com/?1zvxxm5cabt

http://www.mediafire.com/?uxeyy9xlb41



Code: Select all

http://www.badongo.com/file/10505299

http://www.badongo.com/file/10505345

http://www.badongo.com/file/10505395



Code: Select all

http://www.filefactory.com/file/e2c09c/n/fwrescenarios_zip

http://www.filefactory.com/file/94f2f8/n/Shankar_doc

http://www.filefactory.com/file/3e6b6c/n/Vivek_doc

jamwal
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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jamwal » 22 Jul 2008 10:22

mikem wrote:Jamwal, The graphic depicts rank insignia of I.A.F.

Image=Squadron Leader. :lol: :lol:

visit this link:http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/Info/Badges/005.html



:oops: oh.Thanks for the information and new videos. Sukhoi video is amazing :shock:

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Mirage-2000 Dogfight

Postby mikem » 23 Jul 2008 09:33

Mirage 2000 video, this time it's a dogfight.

...............................................

ENJOY!!! :D :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 23 Jul 2008 12:29

CHINA OCCUPIED TIBET – LEOPARD REVENGE FLIGHT -6X SU 30 MKI- 0405 HRS

Lima romeo lead –eagle eye - Charlie foxtrot is clear of engagement area- you are cleared to engage bandits – 070 – 130 km and closing –over

- copy that eagle eye –engaging now –over
- lima romeo 4 and 5 –lima romeo led -take them out – now

The two flanker peeled off the formation and lit their afterburners to gain some altitude quickly .At 10000 meters over ground level they leveled out and turned towards the threat axis and switched on their powerful Bars radar on air search mode . The radar echo was small at that distance but quickly increased in size as the distance decreased at a combined closure speed of more than 3000 km per hour.

Squadron leader Ahuja selected the six J7-17 s and launched 6 R-77 ER in a sequential mode with a delay of less than 2 seconds between each missile launch .The heavy missile dropped free of the aircraft into the slipstream and out of it before the onboard accelerometers decide it was safe to ignite the solid motor . He kep his nose pointed at the incoming enemy formation as the half a dozen missiles raced forward at more than twice the speed of sound guided by the radar till about 15 kms from the impact area when the terminal active radar seekers were switched on automatically by the on board microprocessor just behind the high explosive warhead .

A JF 17 is too big a target to miss and the the R-77 s hit the first three bandits almost simultaneously. The Chinese pilots intent on getting close enough to launch their own R-77 copies did not even make an attempt to evade the incoming missiles except mechanically launch endless bundles of chaff .What they did not know is the upgraded R-77 s guidance system was programmed to ignore a typical chaff radar reflection pattern and apart from radar echo also checked the movement profile of the radar echo before finalizing the target. This is something the Russians never told the Chinese and was known only to a handful within Indian Air force.

Still two of the missiles some how lost the target lock and wondered aimlessly before plunging to earth .In all four JF 17 s were down lighting up the dawn sky with bright balls of orange fire .

Squadron leader Manjit waited as the burning debris stopped cluttering up his vision and then executed a classic flanker strike ,two R-77 s and then closing up to finish the Last Chinese aircraft with a short burst of 30 mm cannon .

The PLAAF pilots were good and they fought bravely but hopelessly outclassed, both in aircraft quality and weapons being used . In less than 6 minutes the sky was clear of all enemy aircraft



- eagle eye –lima Romeo 4-claim four Juliet foxtrot kills –can you please confirm –over
- eagle eye –lima Romeo 5 –splash 2 JF 17 s – please confirm over

Air commodore Bhasin smiles at the excited voice of the young flanker pilots first time using their superlative flying machines in combat and amazed at the result

- Lima Romeo 4 and 5 – we confirm your kills – good work – over
- Charlie foxtrot lead – eagle eye -sky clear – finish your task –over
- Eagle eye –Charlie foxtrot lead – copy that –over

The Mirage 2000s of Indian air force fanned out and started the wide area strike .They split up into 8 groups with two striking the ground targets and the third keeping watch for nasty surprises. Over next 8 minutes 12 tunnels , 7 bridges and 26 stations and loco yards were blasted out ,rendering the showpiece rail road of peoples republic useless for next 2 years at least and a financial cost of repair estimated At over 5 billion Yuan .

Al the aircraft were out of Lhasa area within 10 minutes. Strangely this time no more PLAAF aircraft tried to block their exit.

Two mirages were lost in the final stage of battle. Hit by lucky gun fire from ground. Both the pilots ejected successfully and were taken prisoners of war and never heard of again.

The orange sun was just rising in the eastern horizon when the Indian strike fleet crossed back into Indian air space, refueled and landed in respective bases. Except for the losses of the two Mirage 2000 the strike was a stupendous success.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby amitmas » 23 Jul 2008 13:03

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qinghai-Tibet_Railway

There goes the Railroad to Heaven. Shankarda keep it comming we want more. :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 25 Jul 2008 11:39

INDIAN OIL CORPORATION –ASSAM OIL DIVISION –DIGBOI REFINERY – 1000 HRS

J P Mishra, general manager production watched with interest as the (akash) surface to air missile launchers were being positioned and covered with camouflage nettings around the small refinery complex. He was not happy about the missiles so close to the crude tank farm and the atmospheric distillation column of the refinery. Though not much exposed to mechanisms of air defense of a high value targets from low level air strike he still believed the missiles should have been placed some distance away.


He of course knew the vulnerability of his refinery and township to a surprise strike .Located barely 40 km from the Myanmar border less than 200 km from line of actual control the possibility of a strike was very real .Though the air force officials assured him of the nearby air bases and 24x7 combat air patrol by Indian jets he was not assured. The demands of conflict have made obligatory to run all the oil refineries in the country run at 100%+. That included Digboi refinery.

Mishra like any oil man was afraid of fire and being an experienced chemical engineer knew the fire can come from a missile or a burning aircraft –irrespective of the flag painted on it .



Indian Oil Corporation Digboi Refinery in Upper Assam has completed 100 years of operations in December. The centenary was celebrated by releasing a special postal stamp by the Prime Minister. India's oldest refinery and the first in Asia, Digboi Refinery was commissioned in 1901. History was made more than a century ago in a remote corner in Assam in the midst of dense jungles when a group of Italian engineers, commissioned by the Assam Railways and Trading Company to build a railway line from Dibrugarh to Magherita, accidentally discovered oil. The fervent call of the leader of the team "Dig boy, dig" gave the place its name Digboi. The refinery has also the distinction of being the world's second oldest refinery. Originally a part of the Assam Oil Company, it became part of Indian Oil Corporation in 1981.

Oil was struck in Digboi in 1866, just nine years after oil was discovered in Pennsylvania, USA. In 1889, the first commercial well was struck in Digboi at a depth of 662 ft. In 1893, Assam Railways& Trading Company installed a tiny test refinery at Margheritta, about 20 km from Digboi. Crude oil from Digboi was sent there by rail. The products included limited quantities of kerosene, lubricating oil, timber staining and preserving oil, iron coating oil and wax.

Since AR&TC did not have any expertise of its own in drilling and petroleum refining, it set up a new company called Assam Oil Company in 1889 exclusively for taking care of its oil interests. AOC started construction of a full-fledged petroleum refinery in 1900 and commissioned it in 1901 with an annual production of 500 barrels.

In 1981, by an act of Parliament, AOC was merged with IOC and became the Assam Oil Division of IOC in the past two decades. IOC invested around Rs 1,500 crore to turn the Digboi refinery into a modern refinery. After the modernisation programme, the capacity was raised from 0.5 mtpa to 0.65 mtpa. The refinery now produces distillates, heavy ends and excellent quality wax from indigenous crude oil produced at the Assam oil fields. Petroleum products from the refinery are supplied mainly to north-eastern India primarily through road and rail wagons. A new delayed coking unit of 1,70,000 tpa had been commissioned in 1999. The refinery is implementing projects to improve quality of diesel by installing a hydrotreater and new solvent dewaxing for maximizing parafin wax and to produce microcrystalline wax.

Digboi oilfield, now under OIL, is perhaps the only oilfield in the world, which has been producing oil for the past 100 years. The production has substantially dropped over the years, but some of the wells still ooze oil and many of them do so under natural pressure without the help of pumps. Digboi refinery has the distinction of being the first refinery in the country to export products to Australia, Germany and the UK. Parafin wax produced in Digboi is considered one of the best in the world.

The biggest challenge facing the management today is how to rationalise the workforce. For a refinery of the size of Digboi with a capacity of 0.65 mta, a workforce of 2,700 is considered to be on the high side. In today's context, no refinery of this small size can hope to survive, let alone thrive. In fact, a near-doubling of capacity is on the cards but the problems are two-fold-where to get the additional crude and where to sell the increased output.

Indian Oil Corporation has another refinery at Guwahati in Assam. The first public sector refinery in the country, it was commissioned in 1962 with a capacity of 0.75 mtpa which was subsequently increased to one mta through debottlenecking projects. The refinery processes only indigenous crude oil from the Assam oil fields. With its main secondary unit, a coking unit, it produces middle distillates and heavy ends and supplies such products to north-eastern India and Siliguri in West Bengal.


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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rupesh » 25 Jul 2008 13:55

Economic Assets are getting hit...Sensex would have crashed...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 26 Jul 2008 14:41

PLAAF BASE –49 B - NORTH OF LHASA – 1400 HRS

The full regiment of H-6 Bombers was armed up in a hurry. More than military it was political necessity of People’s Republic to show the world and India the price of seriously damaging its iconic infra structure project without notice. While the base commander did not like the order for a massive conventional strike at a refinery without adequate escort with slow moving bombers,he did not surely have the courage to object to such a political directive generating from Beijing .

The long row of nearly 50 Tu 16 copies occupied almost half of the taxi way in the comparatively small forward air base .His plan was to start launching the aircraft at around 1600 hrs ,a 90 minutes flight time to target and a perfect dusk strike on the worldes second oldest refinery .Each of the bombers were loaded with nearly 4000 kg of dumb bombs enough to destroy the primary target and the secondary target (another small refinery 25 km off Digboi- Duliajan) .Before returning under the cover of darkness The escort package he was assigned consisted of 12 JF-17 s and 12 Su-27 s deemed enough by the higher ups .for a low risk “soft target “close to line of actual control

China has constructed 14 major air bases on the Tibetan Plateau, and a score of tactical airstrips. These bases give the Chinese air force control of Tibet's air space, the forward edge of battle in the event of war with India, and the capability to fly sustained combat operations over India's north and strike all India's northern cities, including Delhi, Bombay and Calcutta. Chinese electronic intelligence atop the plateau also confers an important advantage of combat information and battle management in any, air war. The high altitude of the airfields in Tibet is frequently suggested as precluding effective PLAAF air operations against India. The PLAAF may be able to overcome this problem through aerial refuelling, with strike aircraft taking off from lower-altitude airfields further away, and refueling over Tibet for strikes at airfields or other targets in northern India.

The Xian H-6 is a license-built[1] copy of the Soviet Tupolev Tu-16 twin-engine jet bomber, built for the Chinese People's Liberation Army Air Force.
Delivery of the Tu-16 to China began in 1958, and the Xi'an Aircraft Industrial Corporation (XAC) signed a license production agreement with the USSR to build the type in the late 1950s. The first Chinese Tu-16, or "H-6" as it was designated in Chinese service, flew in 1959. Production was performed by the plant at Xian, with at least 150 built into the 1990s. China is estimated to currently operate around 120 of the aircraft
Along with the H-6 free-fall bomber, an "H-6A" nuclear bomber was built, as well as an "H-6B" reconnaissance variant, "H-6C" conventional bomber and "H-6E" nuclear bomber with improved countermeasures, and the "H-6D" ant iship missile carrier. The H-6D was introduced in the early 1980s and carried a C-601 anti shipping missile (NATO codename "Silkworm", an air-launched derivative of the Soviet P-500 Permit / NATO "Styx") under each wing. The H-6D featured various modernized systems and sports an enlarged radome under the nose. The H-6 has also been used as a tanker and drone launcher. Later H-6 production featured extended curved wingtips.[1]
Many H-6A and H-6C aircraft were updated in the 1990s to the "H-6F" configuration, the main improvement being a modern navigation system, with a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite constellation receiver, Doppler navigation radar, and inertial navigation system. New production began in the 1990s as well, with Xian building the "H-6G", which is a director for ground-launched cruise missiles; the "H-6H", which carries two land-attack cruise missiles; and now the "H-6M" cruise missile carrier, which has four pylons for improved cruise missiles and is fitted with a terrain-following system. Apparently these variants have no internal bomb capability, and most or all of their defensive armament has been deleted.

EASTERN AIR COMMAND –SHILLONG –MEGHALAYA

Group captain N eogi studied the just down loaded satellite image of Lhasa region and the massed rows of medium bombers parked on the tarmac .it was obvious a large raid was on way but no Intel on target was still available .He had to decide when and how to intercept the raid and its likely destination
The possible targets were

- road rail bridge over Brahmaputra –likely but you do not need such a large strike fleet for that and fighter bombers were better suited
- the state capital of Guahati-Dishpur –likely
- oil refinery of Noonmati –likely
- oil refinery of Digboi –Duliajaan – likely in fact most likely since closest to line of actual control

He assigned a defense priority to each likely target

Then picked up the secured phone to each of the airbases. The Phalcon was not available for the time being having blown a pair of tires during crosswind landing at Jorhat .

The responsibility of first layer of aerial defense fell on the Mirage 2000 s to take place just north of line of actual control and digboi area defense role was assigned to Mig 27 s and Mig 29 s based at Mohanbari and Chabua .The Su-30 s will be assigned either area defense or point defense role as required .

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 26 Jul 2008 15:50

PLAAF BASE –49 B - NORTH OF LHASA – 1500 HRS

Captain Chen checked the flight plan again and again .He was to fly due south for about 250 km then turn south east to cross the line of actual control somewhere in the indian state of Arunachal and then again turn almost due south till the river Dihing ,a tributary of Brahmaputra before starting his bombing run on Digboi and Duliajan refinery .

PLAAF inteliigence have assured him their is no Indian AWAC in the area and most of the Migs stationed in the nearby air bases" were not very good night fighters "

But that was not his only problem .Firstly his payload have been halved because of high altitude take off restrictions in place
Secondly he was instructed to fly at not more than 1000 ft over ground level at all times making the fuel situation somewhat critical
Thirdly there was no confirmation if the latest Indian surface to air missiles "akash" was deployed in the target area or not .Intel reports have confirmed the Akash missiles were at par with Patriot 3 and capable of bringing down fighter sized targets at a distance of nearly 40 kms with a more than 95% chance of success. The H-6 he will be flying will be much larger.

He was also not sure if the Indian mirages and flankers that took part in the devastating strike on railroad will be ready for an air defense mission so quickly .He hoped not .

The only good news was the absence of Phalcon at least that will allow the H-6 flight to approach the line of actual control without detection if they can manage to fly real low through the Brahmaputra river valley as long as possible

I
n the postwar period, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin began high-priority programs to develop modern jet aircraft, using captured advanced German jet aircraft designs to give Red engineers a leg up on the task. One line of investigation was of course for a high-performance jet fighter, with this work culminating in the excellent Mikoyan MiG-15; the other line of investigation was for a jet bomber.
The experimental design bureau (OKB in its Russian acronym) under Andrei Tupolev started out development of a jet bomber with the "Tu-12", a jet-powered version of their Tu-2 twin-engine piston-powered bomber. It was really nothing but a practice exercise and there was never any serious intent to go into production.
The first attempt to develop a production machine focused initially on the "Tu-73", which was a straight-winged aircraft with a swept tailplane, powered by an imported Rolls-Royce Nene turbojet in a nacelle in each wing and a Rolls-Royce Derwent turbojet in the tail, with the intake at the base of the tailfin. It featured a dorsal remote-controlled dorsal barbette with twin Nudelman-Richter NR-23 23 millimeter cannon behind the cockpit and a similar ventral barbette under the rear fuselage. Initial flight of the Tu-73 was in 1947. A "Tu-78" prototype was also built, being generally similar except for using license-built versions of the Rolls-Royce engines, with RD-45Fs in the wings and an RD-500 in the tail.
Improvements to the RD-45F led to the similar but more powerful "VK-1" turbojet, with 26.5 kN (2,700 kgp / 5,950 lbf) thrust. The VK-1 engines allowed elimination of the clumsy Derwent installation in the tail. Removing the Derwent also meant that a tail turret with twin NR-23s could be fitted. Given good performance, that was seen as adequate defensive armament, and the twin cannon barbettes were eliminated. However, twin fixed forward-firing NR-23s were fitted in the nose. The result was the "Tu-81", which was performed its initial flight in 1949. Prototypes were also flown of Tu-81R reconnaissance and Tu-89 torpedo bomber variants.
The Il-28 did not put the Tupolev OKB out of the jet bomber game. The Soviet Union needed a bigger and more advanced jet bomber beyond the Il-28, and in June 1950 a state requirement was issued to the Ilyushin and Tupolev OKBs for such an aircraft. It was to be a swept-wing machine, powered by Arkhip Lyulka AL-5 turbojets, with high subsonic performance and a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles), a bomb load of 5,000 kilograms (11,000 pounds), plus armament of seven cannon. An option was provided to use more powerful Arkady Mikulin AM-3 engines, the engine development program permitting.
The Ilyushin OKB wanted to conduct the development program in two steps, beginning with what amounted to a scaled up version of the Il-28 designated the "Il-46", and then building a second prototype with swept wings as the "Il-46S". The Tupolev OKB chose to move directly to the swept-wing design, coming up with an aircraft designated "Tu-88", also referred to as "Type N" as a cover. It featured a pencil-like fuselage; all swept flight surfaces, with mid-mounted wings; twin AM-3 engines, with one in a nacelle on each side of the fuselage; a tail gun installation and remote-controlled barbettes for defensive armament; and tricycle landing gear, with main gear in a pod on the inboard rear of each wing.
The initial (unarmed) prototype Tu-88, now assigned the service designation of "Tu-16", performed its first flight on 27 April 1952, with N.S. Rybko at the controls. The Tu-16 went into state trials in November 1952, with the trials extending into March 1953. The original verdict was a "thumbs down", and in fact Andrei Tupolev himself was disappointed in the performance of the machine. In particular, it was obvious that it wouldn't come close to meeting its range specification.
However, the Tu-16 was still an impressive aircraft, and the problems were not regarded as "show-stoppers": approval for full production of the Tu-16 had already been granted, in December 1952. The trials simply indicated issues that needed to be addressed, and the second Tu-16 prototype, which performed its first flight on 6 April 1953 with Rybko at the controls, incorporated such improvements as a lighter airframe, increased fuel capacity, and longer nose. The second prototype was also closer to production spec, with defensive armament and offensive radar system. The second prototype successfully completed trials a year later, in April 1954, with a recommendation for service acceptance issued in May 1954.
The Ilyushin Il-46 program had been halted in the summer of 1953 and the swept-wing Il-46S prototype was never built. The Ilyushin OKB did develop two swept-wing twin-engine bombers, the "Il-30" and the "Il-54", but neither entered service and their histories are obscure. At the same time the Il-46 program got the axe, work towards manufacture of the Tu-16 was begun at State Factory 22 in Kazan. The first production Tu-16 was rolled out at the Kazan factory on 29 October 1953.
A total of nine Tu-16s performed a fly-past at the May Day parade in Moscow on 1 May 1954, and 40 performed a fly-past at the Tsushino Air Show in August. NATO assigned the type the codename "Badger"; these early machines would acquire the modified designation of "Badger-A" once later versions were introduced.
The Kazan plant built the majority of Tu-16s. Acquisition of the Tu-16 was a high priority for the USSR, and so Kazan production was soon supplemented by manufacture of aircraft at State Factory 1 in Kuibyshev (now Samara). A number were also built at State Factory 64 in Voronezh from 1955. The last new-build Tu-16s were rolled out in 1963.
Tu-16s were produced in large quantity and served in a wide range of roles, flying as bombers, missile carriers, torpedo bombers, antisubmarine warfare (ASW) platforms, reconnaissance and maritime surveillance platforms, electronic countermeasures (ECM) platforms, inflight refueling tankers, search and rescue (SAR) platforms, and trials / experimental platforms. Many were heavily modified during their lives to take on new roles for which they had not originally been built. They generally flew in natural metal finish, though AVMF machines often sported natty maritime colors of dark gray on top and light gray underneath.
The Tu-16 was flown by a number of export users. The largest was Red China, which signed a license production agreement with the USSR to build the type in the late 1950s. The first Chinese Tu-16, or "H-6" as it was designated in Chinese service, flew in 1959. Production was performed by the plant at Xian, with at least 150 built into the 1990s. They normally flew in spiffy overall white colors.
Along with the H-6 free-fall bomber, an "H-6A" nuclear bomber was built, as well as an "H-6B" reconnaissance variant, "H-6C" conventional bomber and "H-6E" nuclear bomber with improved countermeasures, and the "H-6D" antiship missile carrier. The H-6D was introduced in the early 1980s and carried a C-601 antishipping missile (NATO codename "Silkworm", an air-launched derivative of the Soviet P-500 Permit / NATO "Styx") under each wing. The H-6D featured various modernized systems and sports an enlarged radome under the nose. The H-6 has also been used as a tanker and drone launcher. Later H-6 production featured extended curved wingtips.
Many H-6A and H-6C aircraft were updated in the 1990s to the "H-6F" configuration, the main improvement being a modern navigation system, with a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite constellation receiver, Doppler navigation radar, and inertial navigation system. New production began in the 1990s as well, with Xian building the "H-6G", which is a director for ground-launched cruise missiles; the "H-6H", which carries two land-attack cruise missiles; and now the "H-8M" cruise missile carrier, which has four pylons for improved cruise missiles and is fitted with a terrain-following system. Apparently these variants have no internal bomb capability, and most or all of their defensive armament has been deleted.
Chinese H-6s have been exported to a number of nations as the "B-6"



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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 26 Jul 2008 16:02

SERPENT HAWK FLIGHT -INDIAN AIRFORCE STATION –CHABUA1600 HRS

Lt commander Saikia finished his coffee and slipped into the canopy of his Ka-31 AEW helicopter placed in between rows of Mi 17s just to make satellite detection of the asset difficult . His assigned patrol area was the Dihing river valley north and west of Digboi oil fields and the eastern sector of line of actual control whenever the Phalcons were not available –like today. In the hustle and bustle of Chabua air force station the take of of one Ka 31 went almost unnoticed . Saikia intentionally did not gain altitude as he leaned to port and flew north west along the tributary of Brahmaputra till he was right over the small town of Margarita, 25 km north west of Digboi . Only then he reduced power and deployed his foldable antenna and set a scan speed of 6 revolutions per minute and started the boring task of checking empty sky 250 kms all around .

In August 1999, the Indian Navy placed a firm order for four Ka-31 helicopters and a contract for an additional five was signed in February 2001. Total value of all nine helicopters is estimated at US $207 million. The first Ka-31 for the Indian Navy made its debut flight on 16 May 2001 and the first two of nine Ka-31 helicopters completed tests at the Kamov's Chkalovsky airfield near Moscow. The first batch of four aircraft was officially inducted into the Indian Naval Air Arm in April 2003 and the second batch arrived by the end of 2004. In Indian Navy service, these helicopters operate not only from aircraft carriers, destroyers and frigates but also from shore bases as well. Due to its limitations in terms of endurance, the helicopter will be fitted with a helicopter-to-helicopter in-flight refuelling capability. Also known as the Ka-29 RLD, the Ka-31 is a further development of the Ka-27 anti-submarine warfare helicopter. The Ka-31's wider fuselage - when compared to the cramped interior of the Ka-27/28 - offers greater accommodation space.
The Ka-31 is fitted with the E-801M Oko (Eye) airborne electronic warfare radar which features a 6x1 meter planar array mounted beneath the fuselage. The radar is folded and stowed beneath the aircraft's fuselage before being lowered into a vertical position, to allow 360º mechanical scanning of the radar once every ten seconds. The radar can simultaneously track up to 40 airborne or surface threats, and can detect fighter-sized aircraft from a range of 100 - 200 km (depending on the size of the target) and surface ships at a horizon of 200 km from an altitude of 9840 feet. Developed by the NIIRT (Nauchno-Issledovatelskiy Institut Radiotekhniki) Radio Scientific-Research Institute in Nizhny Novgorod, the radar antenna weighs 200 kg (441 lbs). The co-ordinates, speed and heading of a target gathered by the radar are transmitted via an encoded radio data-link channel to a ship-borne or shore-based command post.
This encoded radio data-link channel will introduce airborne network centric warfare to the Indian Navy, due to its advanced real-time capability. The secure data-link and onboard communication systems have a range of 150 km, at altitudes between 4950 and 11,000 feet. The Indian Navy's Ka-31s are also being fitted out with the Abris GPS featuring a 12-channel receiver. The GPS is designed & developed by Kronstadt - a firm in St. Petersburg, Russia. Abris will provide all satellite navigation data. Other Kronstadt systems featured in the Ka-31 helicopter will include navigational equipment for digital terrain maps, ground-proximity warning, obstacle approach warning, auto-navigation of pre-programmed routes, flight stabilization and auto homing onto and landing at the parent carrier/base and information concerning the helicopter's tactical situation.


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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rupesh » 26 Jul 2008 16:08

Time for Akash to prove its mettle..

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rupesh » 26 Jul 2008 16:10

Image

Akash in action

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Nitesh » 26 Jul 2008 19:35

good going shankarda, is KS-172 is used by IAF? anyone having idea about that? check this:
http://rapidshare.de/files/40086861/270 ... o.jpg.html

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby RamaY » 26 Jul 2008 21:38

Shankar wrote:PLAAF BASE –49 B - NORTH OF LHASA – 1400 HRS
Group captain N eogi studied the just down loaded satellite image of Lhasa region and the massed rows of medium bombers parked on the tarmac .


Question to gurus

Since it is already clear that war is imminent, why cant we takeout such formations using few Brahmo's missiles (when we have these fields with-in range)?

Would it constitute as an escalation of war?

thanks

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby asbchakri » 28 Jul 2008 09:26

RamaY wrote:
Shankar wrote:PLAAF BASE –49 B - NORTH OF LHASA – 1400 HRS
Group captain N eogi studied the just down loaded satellite image of Lhasa region and the massed rows of medium bombers parked on the tarmac .


Question to gurus

Since it is already clear that war is imminent, why cant we takeout such formations using few Brahmo's missiles (when we have these fields with-in range)?

Would it constitute as an escalation of war?

thanks


We have already taken out their iconic infra structure , this is and escalation by itself, ofcourse as long as it is Conventional. :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rupesh » 30 Jul 2008 19:08

Shankar Dada.. i am feeling like 4 days without food..when do we get our next dose! :((

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby vivek_ahuja » 31 Jul 2008 10:51

RamaY wrote:Since it is already clear that war is imminent, why cant we takeout such formations using few Brahmos missiles (when we have these fields with-in range)?

Would it constitute as an escalation of war?


This is something we might as well discuss in this thread. I was asked by some folks some time back on how the air war with China is expected to play out. I thought I might share some of my opinions that I gave them, to fill the gap between Shankar's scenario.

The question of how an air war between China and India will fare when talking about "feet dry" Ops is an open question. a physical boundary joins the two sides. These are not naval task forces trying to outmaneuver their foes. This is a slugging match. So how will it play out?

CONOPs:

It depends on the intensity and level of preparedness, at both the mental and physical levels, and depends on the path to war. A war could be initiated after months of hostility or following none. It could be surprise attack on us or our preemptive attack on them. Or both sides could 'bump' into a war that neither side wanted but is handed nonetheless. It is this last one that turns out to be as damaging as a surprise strike in terms of attrition as a result of restricted engagement Concept of Operations or CONOPs.

The bumping war:

In this special case, neither side can be expected to have deployed the infrastructure required for predicted, step-by-step "escalatory" air operations, but the material for all out war is available and not so difficult to materialize. So in a bumping situation, what constitutes "all out war" in a scenario where everybody is scrambling to diffuse the situation. What constitutes an "act of war" if accepting that as such could quite simply throw all acts of diffusing the situation out of the window?

Air strikes by default have been considered as "act of war" throughout history for the precision damage they cause to the other side's war-fighting capabilities, economies and national morale. Compare that to the bumping of a few infantry patrols or Company level engagements at the border and you see why the above set of criteria do not apply for the grunts on the ground. The level of apathy towards the nation's soldiers allows for such delineation of "escalatory responses" and "non-escalatory responses". If someone has to die, then the dying of a Jawan is not the point for the declaration of war but if a civilian was to die in a major city, or if a military C3I node was destroyed as a result of enemy action, then the latter would be cause for "total war." And the only way to do that would be through BMs, CMs or aircraft. It is therefore easy to see why these three weapons are considered escalations but standard artillery capable of killing only that poor unknown soldier at the front lines is not escalation in today's world.

Take the above after accounting the requirement for the Chinese to prevent loss of face in front of their own people (standard requirements for dictatorships) and you will see why any act of using air-power is going to be taken as "act of war".

But the above does not mean that the application of air-power is restricted. Just that doing the same is likely to result in an indiscriminate tidal wave of enemy response on your own infrastructure (economic, political and military) that you might not be prepared to adequately defend to begin with.

This is what brings us to the concept of what I like to call: 'war in stages'. Basically speaking, the Indian side needs to fight the air war with the one advantage it maintains over the enemy: flexibility. The focus of the war will (and must) change and can be characterized as different 'stages' and whose onset will be almost completely defined by the Chinese (90% probability on this guess), simply on the basis of the rotation of the massive war gears. Our gears have to do complete revolutions for every one of the Chinese...

War in stages

A war in which both sides 'bump' into each other along the vast northern border will be tilted in the IAF's favor for the initial and first stage as far as aerial density and reaction time is concerned. The presence of airbases close to the border and just south of the Himalayas at sea level allow for long ranges/heavy loads/high endurance inside Tibetan airspace. The PLAAF would be hard pressed to counter as quickly given the location of their fighter airbases. The ones in Tibet are incapable of extended fighter ops (refer War in Tibet thread).

To counter this the Chinese air defense system currently is more potent that ours with S-300 series systems being a high mobility, long range air defense network that will almost certainly be used to counter the lack of manned assets guarding the airspace during this first stage of the war. The dominance of the IAF in this first stage of the war depends highly on how quickly this air defense infrastructure on the Chinese side can be dismantled. If it can be achieved quickly, the PLAAF will be denied the time required to begin inflicting losses on the IAF to reduce the latter's overall effectiveness over the skies. There is only a thin time gap where the PLA air defence systems and the PLAAF will be seperated in the strategic sense if you follow what I mean. As time goes by, and if both remain present on the aerial battlefield, the IAF will be hard pressed to conduct highly complicated combined DCA/SEAD/CAS/EW/OCA operations, and the almost definite losses will be heavy (Not to mention the infrasturcture and assets to do the above are not even a fraction of what would be required).

So the game play has to be to separate the Chinese air defense network and the AEW/fighter combination and destroy them one at a time to minimize losses. This plays on the IAF fleet numbers in that role concentration can be used to overcome lack of numbers in this crucial period. SU-30s can help with SEAD operations in conjunctions with Jaguars and CM strikes, armed dominantly for the SEAD/EW role. Later on when the Chinese ground defences have been suppressed (note: suppressed, not destroyed, which is impossible in the given time), then the roles can change to OCA and then after suppressing the PLAAF in the air, back again to help suppress the new systems that the Chinese might bring in to replace previous losses.

You might argue that the SU-27s can fly over the battlefield from the PLAAF northern airbases within a matter of hours, so where does this strategic gap exist? The answer is that it doesn't. But we are not talking absolute numbers, but rather what can be referred to as 'aerial density', and helps define the mental appreciation of the presence of a given air force over the battlefield. To put it simply, a smaller air force can make its presence felt over the battlefield in a magnitude that is much larger than its size by having a quick turnaround time at the airbase and if the airbase are close to the border. Conversely, an air force with much larger numbers can feel as a much smaller air force if its airbases are far to the rear and maintenance and turnaround is sloppy. This latter case with regard to far off airbases applies to the PLAAF while the IAF has that advantage, at least initially before the PLA/PLAAF missile strikes start removing IAF airbases off the board as the war drags on. It allows the IAF to devote a vast majority of its prime assets to a certain job while a minor part control the airspace and fend off the PLAAF fighters who would have to be supported by aerial tankers and thus the latter would be their choke point in terms of numbers.

That brings us to the first time overlap with Stage Two of the air war.

Note: will continue if you guys want.

-Vivek
Last edited by vivek_ahuja on 31 Jul 2008 11:12, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby asbchakri » 31 Jul 2008 11:02

vivek_ahuja wrote:
Would it constitute as an escalation of war?

This is something we might as well discuss in this thread. I was asked by some folks some time back on how the air war with China is expected to play out. I thought I might share some of my opinions that I gave them, to fill the gap between Shankar's scenario.

........................

That brings us to the first time overlap with Stage Two of the air war.

Note: will continue if you guys want.

-Vivek



Please go on its Facinating :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Nitesh » 31 Jul 2008 11:24

vivek_ahuja wrote:
That brings us to the first time overlap with Stage Two of the air war.

Note: will continue if you guys want.

-Vivek


Yes sir, please continue.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby chandrabhan » 31 Jul 2008 11:36

Please continue Vivek.. I find a lot of similarities between the scenarios you post and what they teach at Stanford in business management. Your's off course are far more interesting and engrossing :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Shankar » 31 Jul 2008 15:02

COBRA STRIKE FLIGHT -INDIAN AIR FORCE STATION –JORHAT-1615 HRS


Squadron leader Jamwal was a happy man today .The air force grape vine was humming with the rumor that he is soon going to be a wing commander .But that he hoped was not just a rumor. In the meantime intelligence report have indicated possible hevy air strike in north east possible target the oil refineries in Digboi,Duliajan and maybe Guahati and Barauni . His force was responsible for long range interception of the strike fleet and make them disperse so that the Mig 27s and Bisons can take down most of them .He also had the secondary responsibility of acting as fast moving eye in the sky and control the air battle in later stages,co coordinating the interception of the bombers as it approaches Arunachal border .

In the distance the mighty Brahmaputra river flowed on regardless.

Charlie sierra – sierra hotel – incoming raid -300 km – 46 bandits – 8500 meters- 400 knots – 8 escorts – confirm message received –over
- Sierra hotel – cobra strike lead – copy message – 46 bandits -8 escorts – 300 km from your position-8.5 kilometers altitude –rolling
- cobra strike flight – start engine – form up on lead
- tower –cobra strike lead –request clearance for immediate take off
- cobra strike lead-tower – cleared to taxi in formation –stand by for take off clearance –two Antonovs on final approach

Jamwal stepped on the toe brake for choke removal –it went all the way to hard stop .To a new pilot it will appear that the aircraft have lost hydraulic power but Jamwal knew that is the way it is in Su-30 ,a form of brake by wire technology .While in most jet aircraft the most technically challenging part was starting the engines particularly in multiengine aircraft ,in sukhoi the high level of automation made the task almost easy ,making way for a quick start up and fast turnaround in combat –as on today .As he inched the throttle lever forward and started taxi the brakes started behaving normally once again .The so called brake by wire technology which controls over braking tendency of the pilots depends on specially developed sensors on the brake pads which give feed back signal to the flight computer and through it the hydraulic system allowing it to exert only the minimum pressure required on the brakes for a particular speed and ground traction availability .

Leaning forward Jamwal started switching on the multi functional displays and bank of circuit breakers .As the artificial horizon came on with a mini aircraft symbol in the centre Jamwal could not but notice the difference between Russian and Western air craft manufacturers on this critical piece of aviation electronics. While in the NATO aircraft the aircraft symbol stays stationary and the orange blue horizon rotates in the back ground to indicate the attitude of the aircraft at any point of time ,in Russian aircraft the background horizon stays fixed and only the aircraft symbol moves showing the position of the aircraft relative to the horizon

All lights in green and no red –so far so good. As he came up to the hold .line near the main runway Jamwal applied brakes .The eagle nose of flanker dipped slightly and it was time to wait.

The Two old An-32 came down one after another ,supplying vital medicine and ammo to a remote drop zone which was running short 5.56 ammo and antibiotics for high altitude sickness or more correctly pulmonary odemia.The tower frequency came alive

- mountain donkey flight –tower –clear runway when able –flight held up
- tower –donkey lead – copy that –turning out at taxiway delta zulu –over
- Charlie sierra flight-stand by for immediate take off clearance
- Copy that tower –Charlie sierra lead.-over
- Tower –donley flight is out of runway –over
- Charlie sierra flight –cleared for immediate formation take off –climb runway heading –altitude 7000 meters – over
- Tower –charlie sierra lead –flight rolling now

The main runway at Jorhat is almost 12000 ft long and the Su 30s did not even use 25% of it for take of in full air combat configuration .None of them carried external conformal drop tanks ,internal fuel was considered enough for thr mission in hand .It was a spectacular sight as the six Su 30 MKIs took off on full afterburner power ,a bluish white plume of fire supporting their enormous weight .

Jamwal quickly pitched up to avoid exceeding the maximum gear retraction speed thereby somewhat slowing down the fast building up indicated air speed. The twin AL31 engines producing more than 27000 pounds of thrust made slow speed flying a difficult proposition. As he slapped up the landing gear,the air speed indicator rocketed upwards to 450 knots and it was time to level out and take the engine of afterburner .The finger lever on the throttle control the afterburning function in a sukhoi and with a flick of right index finger Jamwal cut off the after burner and the jet eased up on the vertical speed while still maintaining the desired attitude .

A look back and Jamwal could see all the other 5 aircraft in air still climbing and one by one they leveled out and went off after burner with practiced ease.He put the sukhoi in a slow climbing bank to starboard and within minutes the data link from the Ka 31 started feeding the target range and azimuth data . For the first part of the mission it will be radio silent and radar off operation till the escorts are taken out, after that it was expected to be a free for all .

A H-6 does not stand a chance when pitted against any of the defending aircraft that was getting quickly into air all over north eastern India .Against a Su-30 MKI the chances were precisely less than zero.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rupesh » 31 Jul 2008 15:23

Shankar wrote:

Squadron leader Jamwal was a happy man today .The air force grape vine was humming with the rumor that he is soon going to be a wing commander .


Jamwal wing Cmdr shortly... :lol:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Rahul M » 31 Jul 2008 15:32

vivek, you might want to take into account that PLAAF may use their bases in southern chengdu
and even guangzhou to make direct passes over the NE overflying burma. a lot of their assets can be based in southern chengdu air fields within a couple of days since these are pretty active and developed airbases unlike the ones in tibet. would give much better figures for 'distance to target' and also 'altitude above SL' than the ones in northern china and the ones in tibet respectively.

CAS would have to take care of the massive legacy AA assets the PLA holds, its quantity alone is virtually a force multiplier. the operators too are pretty regularly trained, much more so than most other AFs. considering that most of these are taken from the PLA reserves, it only frees up the regular PLA to get on with the offensive business w/o having to think too much about air defence.
C3I, comm and AD nodes would be protected by a very high density of legacy AD assets. sead and counter value air ops won't be easy for IAF even if PLAAF fails to provide adequate air cover.

p.s. please check gmail account.
thanks.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby Nitesh » 31 Jul 2008 15:35

Rupesh wrote:
Shankar wrote:

Squadron leader Jamwal was a happy man today .The air force grape vine was humming with the rumor that he is soon going to be a wing commander .


Jamwal wing Cmdr shortly... :lol:

heartly congratulations jamwal :lol:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby RamaY » 31 Jul 2008 19:35

vivek_ahuja wrote:Note: will continue if you guys want.

-Vivek


Vivek-ji,

Thank you for the details. Please continue... so we mortals can appreciate the whole scenario...

thanks

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jamwal » 31 Jul 2008 21:53

Quoting Rupesh, Nitesh

Wo to abhee rumour hee hain :oops:
:mrgreen:

jahaju
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 91
Joined: 26 Apr 2008 18:40

Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XI

Postby jahaju » 31 Jul 2008 23:25

SQn Ldr Jamwal, the final decision to convert the rumor into reality will depend upon how u defend the refineris in Assam :-).

so shankarda ko thodasa maska lago ;-)

Vivekji Kindly continue as it enhances the scenario currently being played put over the NE Skies.


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