Possible Indian Military Scenarios - Part II

Y I Patel
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Postby Y I Patel » 03 Mar 2005 02:08

One of my contributions over here painted a scenario where we have an Indian PM who is sidelined, and a smaller group of people quietly takes over the real decision making. That got watered down because a lot of people got very uncomfortable about the turn I gave to the story.

Please take a relook at that scenario, in light of events in Jharkhand. To name names and point fingers, where was Manmohan ji and what is his role in this entire Jharkhand affair? If a PM is not involved in a matter like this (and I believe MMS is not), what does it tell us about how the country is run?

Something to ponder about, without getting emotional - we are like this only. Take this as an opportunity to ruminate about how India is really governed. If you can get over the immediate emotions, some very interesting insights are there to be reaped, IMHO.

PS there's also the issue of Godhra and Parakram, but let's tackle the simple issues first, shall we :)

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What's Godhra and Parakaram got to do with MMS and Ranchi?

Postby HarshS » 03 Mar 2005 09:28

Not clear about the link, but I agree that the current PM does not have as much authority as PM's should have or as his predecessor had. Maybe your scenario of a political coup during the runup to war might happen.

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Postby rajpa » 04 Mar 2005 14:23

yip, can you mail me? grandstrategy.gmail@com

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Postby daulat » 11 Mar 2005 02:37

It took W/O Javed Khan and his team around 2 days of signal analysis and guesswork, but finally he had the answer. Jalghat was identified, but where in Jalghat was anybody's guess. Ghose was there, somewhere.

The images from INSAT5c, recently launched with the Israel co-developed lens system had allowed the rapid creation of a 3D model of the village, but given the mud construction and the lack of sharp imagery due to the heavy vegetation, it was not a great job. The last few Heron flights had started to pique the interest of various radars. The Chinese system was occaisionaly on and a few new ones seemed also to be lighting up.

Lt. Cdr. Pandey of the Marcos struggled with the logistics planning. Sure, he could launch a mini-sub upto Jalghat's banks and get ashore. But how were they going to get the sub up the river system? The range was just too far for the little subs.

Air extraction? Malhotra and Krishnan scratched their heads. Short of a heavy SEAD mission, it would be madness to go back in. Politically, the timing was not good to escalate to that level.

Besides, how would Ghose know that they were coming for him? Malhotra sighed and sunk into his chair very depressed. The situation was hopeless.

"Anyway...", Pandey thought aloud, "even if we get into the village... how do we know where he is without alerting the whole neighbourhood?"

---------

Major Habib listened carefully to the signal trace in his hut inside Hedyatpur barracks radio room. Something was amiss. He couldn't tell what, but something had been transmitting nearby. But what? Did these damned fishwallahs have ham radio these days? He thought about the personal equipment that they had studied from the bodies of the Indians. Perhaps it was...? No, surely not?

But then again...?
-------------

Prasanjit Ghose looked outside of the mud hut at the darkening sky and wondered if he should make a run for it tonight? He could fake the local dialect just about, and perhaps he could start walking... maybe catch a ride on a truck? Or perhaps steal a boat?

He had been unnerved by the commotion in the village. He did not know quite what it was about, but the locals were clearly agitated. He couldn't quite make out but he knew it wasn't good. He needed to get out fast.

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Postby Katare » 11 Mar 2005 06:34

What is it Daulat? Book? :roll:

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Postby daulat » 11 Mar 2005 13:25

er no... its taking a while to figure out a plausible rescue scenario. i think its about time Singha brought out "Return to Hedyatpur" :)

anyway, message received loud and clear

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Postby SuryaP » 04 Apr 2005 16:46

Looks like the Awakening requires an awakening!!!

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Postby P Chitkara » 04 Apr 2005 21:38

Yeah things seem to have stopped completly after such wonderful contributions ! :-?

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Postby Anand K » 04 Apr 2005 23:12

How about factoring in a couple of F-16 Block 52/60 squadrns armed with AMRAAMs, JDAMs(not the jehadi one!), HARMs etc for the Fizzle Ya?
:)

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Postby P Chitkara » 16 Apr 2005 20:27

Well, I second this. They are bound to get some BVR capability in next few years. But, JDAM and HARM still seem a bit far fetched.

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The Time for Action.

Postby rajpa » 18 Apr 2005 11:14

War Council - VII

Attendees: PM Arora, Home Minister Dighe, Defence Minister Sen, External Affairs Minister Miglani, Finance Minister Nagarajan, RAW chief Rao, National Security Adviser Salgotra and General Sastry.

Rao was patient, but uncharacteristically bubbling with enthusiasm for action.

PM Arora was munching on some samosas, calm and collected as usual.

Rizwan was almost smarting from his earlier interaction with the War Council, where, inspite of his high standards, he was not able to provide concrete information or strategy.

Rao: At the end of Parakram, we had smelled out some rats and given them some incentive to stay with us. We anticipated that they will be used to reverse engineer paki strategy.

Rizwan: But it has not paid great dividends for us. Some of them are doubles helping in nuclear proliferation. We have been lucky so far in getting them crawling out of the woodwork before we stamped them.

Rao: Yes, however, we are still on the chase of a nuclear weapon off the coast of Indonesia. This weapon will be tagged by our people. We are on the trail of precisely one of those doubles, the trail is expected to end in precisely two hours near Banda Aceh.

Also, there is a Chinese camp inside Myanmar pretending to be an insurgent outfit, which is aiding in the proliferation of this weapon into Indian territory.

PM Arora: We may urgently need the concurrence of the Myanmarese to extinguish that intrusion.

Gen Sastry: We know the location. It is Myohaung. Our Sukhois and Jaguars love that territory.

PM Arora: The Chinese have come out of their woodwork out to play their version of Russian Roulette with us. And we will have to make sure that they play alone from the start.

Unkil has to told to give us a carte blanche in support, because we are in the chase of this nuclear weapon.

Gen Sastry: Per Rao's report, we will make sure that the prowling USN will be given a notice to stay away from a certain atoll close to Indonesia. If they want to help, they are welcome.

I can see to it that the Coco Islands are attacked and destroyed if their vessels show up. Same for Gwadar if they escalate.

PM Arora: The overall strategy must be to provide a strong response, while containing it to the conventional threshold. Let it be that we are just teaching them a lesson not to smuggle weapons into our territory. That is a reasonable thing to ask of our neighbours I would think.

I will invoke the "B(harat) R(akshak) Doctrine" and send out a message to the world that we will not be attacked within our territory by sneaking in. If they want to fight us, why dont they just say so? Kya Sastry bhai, the Indian Military isnt sleeping is it?

Gen Sastry: Never, Sir.

PM Arora: I want you people to get on to your toes and get your good offices moving. Thank you Gentlemen, the meeting, I believe, is over.

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Postby Y I Patel » 20 Apr 2005 20:20

The guilt got unbearable, so here goes :)


The Other Shoe Falls

Dighe's move to deport illegal Bangla immigrants en masse soon began to have it's political repercussions. These were felt in India, as well as in Bangladesh.

Visible, firm action against the illegal immigrants caused a distinct lowering of political pressure from the Hindu right. At last, someone was begining to do something about the problem the pracharaks had been worrying about for decades. Sure, there were violent protests and threats of removal of support from some participants in the ruling coalition, but on the whole, the nation gave the move a tacit consent. Dighe's hawk credentials got burnished, he began to emerge as the iron man of the ruling coalition... a development that was viewed with great concern by Arora and Sen. The snatching of the deposed Bangla premier from her imprisonment had given Arora a political lift, but the continuing drumbeats about deportations were making that piece of news fade from public memory - there were other reasons for that as well.

The reaction in Bangladesh was equally pronounced. The illegal immigrant community had become a major source of remittances that propped up Bangla economy. Shutting off of this economic tap had immediate effects on an economy that was already feeling strains of adverse international outlook towards another military/fundamentalist regime in a muslim country. The deported immigrants held the new Bangla government and its Pakistani supporters responsible for the disruption of their cozy working arrangements in India, returning immigrants became a major source of discontent against the increasingly visible Military-Pakistani-Fundamentalist nexus. The Bangla junta had no alternative but to stem the "push ins" as forcible deportations are euphimistically termed. They also had to move aggresively, on Pakistani pressure, on the increasingly restive populace. The Arab guests did not help matters, either. They came from an austere background that frowned on any graven images, or any form of idol worship. They were deeply indoctrinated against syncretic Bengali Islam, with its open adherence to modified Hindu festivals, musical celebration of devotion, and worship at dargahs. Destruction of some of these dargahs by Arab guests caused violent local reactions; these, in turn, were magnified manifold by the increasingly vocal Joy Bangla News Network. The deposed premier's weekly addresses roused passion and prompted uncomfortable international scrutiny of the miltary takeover...

Bangladeshis had no intrinsic love for India, but the combination of hardships they were forced to accept as a result of regime change made them realise that any common cause with Pakistanis and Arab fundamentalists was not strong enough to paper over fundamental philosophical, political and economic differences of outlook. The Bangla governement decision to move "integrated" forces out of carefully chosen concentration areas and their border deployment for preventing push ins was especially infuriating to the Pakistani "advisors", most of whom grew up learning how Tiger Niazi's dispersal of forces to the border enabled Indian forces to strike deep into the strategic heart of East Pakistan...

As the integrated forces scattered from their areas of concealment, the extent of Pakistani involvement became increasingly apparent and quantifiable. Rizwi's shop was humming with activity, as reports from newly implanted sources began to pour in - there may not have been any Mukti Bahini this time, but then, not all the push ins were illegal migrants! The Chinese took careful note of the developments, and were getting increasingly uncomfortable about the whole venture...

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Happenings in Bangladesh today

Postby HarshS » 22 Apr 2005 09:33

The killing of the BSF officer could be the spark that eventually sets off the entire Bangladesh scenario that we've been talking off for the last six months.

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Postby P Chitkara » 22 Apr 2005 21:13

Quiet right. The way things are moving wrt b'desh, scenarios painted in this thread have a high likelyhood of unfolding in real life, in a not too distant future.
One wonders how can India let such acts go unpunished. They need much more than routine summoning-and-admonishing the b'desh representatives.
Some actual punitive action on ground must be taken to drive home the message.

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Postby Amarko » 24 Apr 2005 14:33

Question : How can such airspace violations go unriposted ?

BDR choppers fly into Indian area

AGARTALA: Tension along the Indo-Bangla border in Tripura seems to have heightened with the Border Security Force accusing Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) of deploying forces in battle-ready positions and even carrying out helicopter sorties in the Indian territory.

"Bangladesh Rifles has been flying helicopters in South Tripura," a BSF statement said. The release said Bangaladesh guards had reinforced their positions in other parts of the border.

The border area has been simmering since April 16 when BDR guards abducted, tortured and killed a BSF officer. The body of assistant commandant Jeevan Kumar was dumped in a ditch near the border.

The statement from BSF's Agartala office, which controls the Tripura, Cachar and Mizoram frontier, said on April 22 a helicopter was spotted in Indian territory near Chotakhil, Magrum and Beltoli (South Tripura).

BSF said BDR had intensified its strength at Kurma (Bangladesh) in Srimangal (Moulavibazar district) of Bangladesh, opposite Kamalpur in Tripura's Dhalai district. It also alleged that BDR soldiers had dug trenches along parts of the border and started carrying 51 mm mortar shells on routinepatrols.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/arti ... 086480.cms

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Postby daulat » 26 Apr 2005 01:29

Lt Cdr. Pandey looked out from the thin linen cloth bound around his face at the glaring sun and hoped that his thin cotton shirt would mask his skin tone. He was a little fairer than a typical boatman on the Meghna. It had been six hours since they crept into the wooden fishing boat and navigated up the Meghna towards Hedayatpur. The truck had brought them covertly out to a quiet village and once Pal and Bhaumik the two RAW fixers on the ground in Bangladesh had made the necessary arrangements, a rickety old boat had appeared out of the reeds and they had quickly got on board. Pal had paid off the two men who brought the boat. Ask no questions, tell no lies.

With Pandey were Petty Officer Afzal Mirza and Seaman Mondol – chosen for their resemblance to Bangladeshis and their skills in behind the lines operations. Both had passed through the MARCOS training course together, a few years after Pandey.

Beneath the bamboo strip cabin’s plank floors were oilskin bags with their MP5’s, nightscopes, grenades and some comms gear, including the trusty Saathi terminal.

The MARCOS party pulled ashore close to Jalghat as dusk fell and pretended to set up a river camp like many out of area fishermen, or perhaps ferrymen on their way home from some business somewhere down river. Whilst Mirza stayed back at the boat, Pandey and Mondol made a recon of the village, confirming the landmarks and trying to identify where Ghose might be. It had been four days since the last contact. This might be a hiding to nothing, except for the signal that had once again been picked up by Khan’s listening unit back in Kalaikunda.

They sent back a message – “Stay Put, have hope”. They had no idea if Ghose had got it or not. Pandey had asked for volunteers, Mirza and Mondol had been amongst them. Malhotra had wanted to come, but he was overruled by the brass. There were other plans for him.

Two evening’s ago Doordarshan, Star and Zee broadcast a speech by the Prime Minister – protesting vehemently about the mistreatment of the Indian dead at Hedayatpur. Footage of the shadowy images was already doing the rounds on the internet and some broadcasters had carried excerpts. The statement had come as a surprise, since normally the Indian leadership liked to gloss over Indian servicemen killed in Bangladesh – for whatever reason. This time, something was different. Last night the channels had carried an off the cuff remark by an Indian Foreign Ministry official at the Cancun G9 meeting at the back of the FM’s speech on India’s integration into the global economy that “bad behaviour by neighbours would not be tolerated any longer”.

This morning, a number of Pakistani editorials decried Indian belligerence but the Bangladeshi papers had little to say about the matter.

Pandey flicked on the NVG scope and looked at the mud huts. He began to formulate a plan. This was going to be very very difficult.

Approximately five minutes later, a strike package of four Mirage 2000-5’s took off from their temporary home at Kalaikunda and climbed up towards the distant North Bengal hills. Already above Siliguri, four Su30’s were in CAP mode whilst a lone Dornier 228 of the Navy headed off up the Hooghly/Ganga system and started listening. Over the Bihar-W.Bengal border, an Il-78 was already on station.

Mirza composed the pre-arranged message and kept it on standby on his Saathi terminal. He waited, his fingers resting on the stock of the LMG mounted now on the bows of the little boat. Off Sagarmukhi, a Bangladeshi radar picket noticed four blips over the Bay of Bengal, quite deliberate and obvious, with no hint of masking. A few moments later, Air Force control outside Dhaka knew that four MiG29K’s of the Indian Navy were flying a deliberate pattern, as yet over international waters.
Pandey narrowed the choices down to two huts, the problem now was… which one? He waited tensely in the shadows cursing the heat and the mosquitoes.

Faizul Rahman walked out into the night air to smoke a beedi. His head spun with the trials of the past few days, he did not know what to do next. At length he decided to go talk to the stranger, maybe he had some ideas? Mondol listened in his headphone as the directional mike picked up the conversation and he nudged Pandey and signaled a thumbs up.

Pandey swatted a mosquito on his neck and crept forward silently, Mondol following quickly behind, stowing his listening gear and signaling Mirza on the boat.

In another 30 seconds, the four blips out over the Bay changed course and began a slow climbing turn northwards, up towards the huge delta and dangerously closing in on Bangladeshi Airspace.

By now, the eight Mig27’s from Hashimara had climbed up to a nice brightly radar lit position over the W Bengal border and the Mirage 2000’s now also seemed to change track – eastwards.

Air HQ in Dhaka suddenly had a bigger problem on their hands. Phone calls went out to the PAF station and even a tentative one to the Chinese station. Half a minute later, the short wave radio net over Bangladesh started hissing white noise and further communications was no longer possible.

On the Tripura border, a BDR patrol suddenly found itself illuminated by signal flares and a loudspeaker in clear Bengali advising smugglers and miscreants to hold their positions whilst a BSF unit came forward to inspect them. There was a lot of commotion, it was not clear who fired the first shot. A few moments later, accurate HMG fire brought about half the BDR patrol down on the Bangladeshi side of the line.

Pandey lunged through the bamboo door of the hut and Mondol followed closely behind, quickly pulling his MP5 level with Rahman’s head. Alarmed, Prasanjit cried out for him to stop whilst Faizul found himself ready for a heart attack. There was little time to waste, Pandey quickly sized up the situation and the three of them left quickly. At the door, Faizul called back…

“Prasanjit bhai!”

“Faizul bhai?”

“My daughter…?

“Don’t worry… something will be done” Pandey replied once Mondol had quickly translated for him.

Mirza had sent off the other coded messages, and now quickly got the rest of their team and their cargo on board and pushed the boat out into the little stream that went out to the Meghna.

The Chinese radar was allowed to function for another five minutes, long enough to report that at least six aerial incursions were now underway from multiple directions, then the jammers went on again. The Colonel in charge called Beijing on the secure line, he was told to wait. When he passed this message on to the Bangladeshi Air HQ, he was treated to apoplectic rage from the other end.

Knowing full well the fate of the PAF F16’s recently, the Bangladeshi Air Force opted not to scramble, but tried to put the remaining fighters under some sort of cover. They needn’t have bothered.

The first LGB hit the radio and phone station, the second hit the police barracks outside of town. The third hit the Pakistani barracks inside Hedayatpur. The Mirages then climbed up and flew a deliberate cab rank pattern above the town. The Mig27’s did no bombing, only a number of high speed low level passes over military barracks and on the return leg they shot up a POL dump on one of the airfields. Overhead, the four Su30’s flew a highly visible race track and kept an eye on things.

Malhotra stood on the edge of the door as the Mi25 clattered eastwards, his corridor cleared ahead of him by the Mirages and headed for the rendezvous. In the meantime, Mirza had steered the little boat out into the main stream, and despite the commotion elsewhere, he was being followed by a patrol boat from Hedayatpur. The Pakistani signals unit had finally figured out what was going on and had quickly pressed the BD river patrol into action.

Whilst Mondol manned the LMG and prepared for the boat closing fast, Pandey got on the radio and got busy. Prasanjit offered to help, but Mirza smiled at him and told him to lie down.

The radar station at Sagarmukhi was hit by the Navy Mig29’s, who also bagged an F7 that had decided to come up and take a look. His wingman who was trailing him significantly behind, decided to head back once his lead’s radio went silent.

Flt. Lt. Sharma on one of the Mirage’s had never bombed a boat before, but he gave it a shot as Flying Officer Raghunath lit it up with his Litening II. The orange fireball reflected off the river for quite a while. Having done their bit, the Mirage’s headed back for fuel, whilst their place was taken by two two-seater Jaguars in night attack mode, waiting for instructions from the Phalcon flying over the Bay of Bengal with a couple of Su30’s for company.

It took a while longer for the Mi25 to reach the river, and then it was a quick transfer of the four Special Forces men under Malhotra’s charge now for the return back. It was not over off course by any means, there was a risky in flight refueling to do, but another run by the Mig27’s at Kalaikunda had facilitated that. A quick buddy refueling and then head back for the border.

Pandey got on the radio again and passed on the special instructions. A minute later, the Jaguars dropped a number of 1000 lb’ers onto the burning flames of Hedayatpur and headed home. High above, the Su30’s banked slowly and deliberately and headed back across the border.

The BDR patrol on the Tripura border had called for reinforcements, but these were hit by a number of explosions. The BSF would later claim that it was light mortar fire only. However, a BBC news crew would later find evidence of large cratering at the location.

Faizul Rahman watched the distant burning flames and smiled. Allah had listened to the poor sweeper.

Cancun, G9 summit (CNN):
Reporter: “And here we have the spokesman for the Indian Foreign Ministry, lets ask him about the alleged attacks on Bangladeshi soil…, Sir! Sir!? What do you have to say about these claims by the Bangladeshi government?”

Official: “We took some action last night to rescue one of our men who was being held in Bangladesh, illegally. We got him out thank God!”

Reporter: “There are reports of extensive damage on a number of fronts…”

Official: “We don’t know about that, you’ll have to speak to those making these allegations.”

Reporter: “What about the rescue?”

Official: “ Reports are still coming in, but as I said, thanks be to God, one of our men is now safe and well”

Reporter: “We return now to Atlanta for more on the PGA Golf tournament…”

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Postby Cybaru » 26 Apr 2005 02:58

It would be nice to see more detail in resuce operation..

A good long chapter..

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Postby Y I Patel » 26 Apr 2005 19:44

Abu Hamza's cell had been waiting for local contact for weeks now - they had infiltrated in the initial wave, and the extended period of inactivity was making the men restless. So the contact, when it was made, looked heaven sent, even if the contact person looked rather surprising.

Not that the six foot plus, grey eyed Pathan would have been out of place west of Indus, but here, in the midst of short, dark mongoloids? But Salim's conversation indicated that he had fought with some of Hamza's friends who had become shaheeds in the Pir Panjals, so the suspicions lowered somewhat. The flawless, coloquial Pushto no doubt helped.

Salim proceeded to provide two nondescript trucks that were to take the cell to its operations area. He would act as their guide and logistics officer for this operation. Not being familiar with the local territory, Hamza and his cell had to accept Salim's dominant role. Besides, he seemed to have the right codes - maybe he was a buzurg, sent to help out in these unstable times. In fact, Hamza's men seemed to have even fewer inhibitions than he had, and Tausif had been shamelessly forward. Salim had fended off the advance with a smile, but Hamza was furious. He had publicly whipped Tausif for being so behayaa while an operation was in progress!

The trucks rattled along a mountainous pass, with frequent stops to avoid passing patrols. Salim seemed quite adept at this type of movement. The men observed him, and their respect grew by the day.

Hamza kept surreptitious track which indicated a travel time of about eighteen days. The rest of the journey was on foot, after which they arrived at what looked like a village in what Salim said was Aruncachal Pradesh. This was totally new territory for the men, but by now, they were quite ready to follow Salim to the ends of the earth. They saw a hydroelectric project in the process of being constructed, and a small colony of what looked like residential quarters for the engineers overseeing the project. The men didn't need to be told what to do, and as usual for the buzurg, Salim held back with what looked like acute distaste.

Surprisingly, the women were quite fair - turly, Hindus were a surprising mongerel bunch!

After the first action, Salim arranged the group for an ambush of the police force that was sure to rush in. Now even Abu Hamza could see that a master was at work. The incoming police vehicles were blasted to smithereens, very little remained. Then, Salim asked the men to lie low while he went to get in touch with the local contact for their safe house.

It took the 63rd Army group ten days and fifty more men before the last terrorist was hunted down and killed. By then, the news had travelled all the way to Xonnanmai.


------------

Marco Vincent deSilva was Sadanand's replacement for the lonely vigil in the mangroves. His message confirmed what the satellites had already conveyed - the troopships disguised as freighters were pulling out, teeming with men.

The Chinese had gotten the message. It was time to cut the losses while they still could.

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Postby Sharma » 27 Apr 2005 07:14

Y I Patel wrote:Abu Hamza's cell had been waiting for local contact for weeks now - they had infiltrated in the initial wave, and the extended period of inactivity was making the men restless. So the contact, when it was made, looked heaven sent, even if the contact person looked rather surprising.

Not that the six foot plus, grey eyed Pathan would have been out of place west of Indus, but here, in the midst of short, dark mongoloids? But Salim's conversation indicated that he had fought with some of Hamza's friends who had become shaheeds in the Pir Panjals, so the suspicions lowered somewhat. The flawless, coloquial Pushto no doubt helped.

Salim proceeded to provide two nondescript trucks that were to take the cell to its operations area. He would act as their guide and logistics officer for this operation. Not being familiar with the local territory, Hamza and his cell had to accept Salim's dominant role. Besides, he seemed to have the right codes - maybe he was a buzurg, sent to help out in these unstable times. In fact, Hamza's men seemed to have even fewer inhibitions than he had, and Tausif had been shamelessly forward. Salim had fended off the advance with a smile, but Hamza was furious. He had publicly whipped Tausif for being so behayaa while an operation was in progress!

The trucks rattled along a mountainous pass, with frequent stops to avoid passing patrols. Salim seemed quite adept at this type of movement. The men observed him, and their respect grew by the day.

Hamza kept surreptitious track which indicated a travel time of about eighteen days. The rest of the journey was on foot, after which they arrived at what looked like a village in what Salim said was Aruncachal Pradesh. This was totally new territory for the men, but by now, they were quite ready to follow Salim to the ends of the earth. They saw a hydroelectric project in the process of being constructed, and a small colony of what looked like residential quarters for the engineers overseeing the project. The men didn't need to be told what to do, and as usual for the buzurg, Salim held back with what looked like acute distaste.

Surprisingly, the women were quite fair - turly, Hindus were a surprising mongerel bunch!

After the first action, Salim arranged the group for an ambush of the police force that was sure to rush in. Now even Abu Hamza could see that a master was at work. The incoming police vehicles were blasted to smithereens, very little remained. Then, Salim asked the men to lie low while he went to get in touch with the local contact for their safe house.

It took the 63rd Army group ten days and fifty more men before the last terrorist was hunted down and killed. By then, the news had travelled all the way to Xonnanmai.


Sorry for thick head but where is this xonnanmai and was that attack on Chines people......

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Postby Y I Patel » 28 Apr 2005 00:36

xonnanmai = residential/work area for Chinese ruling elite (including PLA)

Was the attack on Chinese? You tell me!

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Postby Sharma » 28 Apr 2005 07:11

Y I Patel wrote:xonnanmai = residential/work area for Chinese ruling elite (including PLA)

Was the attack on Chinese? You tell me!


It seems India has executed a attack on Chinese soil by misleading(Salim) some pro-pak militants. Right?? If it is so than it may be a great hit idea for bollywood. Too good....looks like this thread is again firing........

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Postby Kartik » 28 Apr 2005 20:50

could someone post a story on the MiG-29K/F-7 matchup ? and let that story deal totally with the flyers of the fastjets- the Mirages, Su-30s, Jags and the MiGs.

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Great to see renewed life in this thread

Postby HarshS » 04 May 2005 09:37

Hey,

If we in BR can amount an airland rescue operation deep into the Meghna, isn't it a shame that the BSF can't rescue on of its officials?

Of course this is in the virtual world, assuming a fully geared-up military, but rescuing the BSF officer would have been simple too. It makes my blood boil that the Indian government did nothing, and continues to do nothing about this.

The NDA did not defend 16 BSF people, and the UPA does not defend one 1 BSF officer.

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Postby daulat » 04 May 2005 16:17

Harsh - i suspect that Jivan Kumar was dead very soon after he crossed the border. No one could have rescued him. Also, much as I enjoyed Singha's Raven Force story, if I were guarding Madame xxx and I saw that the brown stuff had hit the fan, I would put a bullet in her head before anything else happened. Rescue etc., is I am afraid, easier said than done.

(lets take this up in the Bangladesh thread on Strategic Issues)

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Postby Sunil » 04 May 2005 21:33

Op Teram Shehr

It was 6:45 am in the War Room. Most of the participants were tired. The orders remained to be given everything else had been worked out to great detail. Dighe sat with a deeply thoughtful expression on his face. Ronen was yawning, and Mighlani decided to join him. The chiefs of staff looked on with mild amusement. Joint Secy. Mrinal Saini was poring over the file in front of him but the PM's pacing about distracted him and he began to rub his eyes instead. The PM stared at the maps on the plasma screen. In the old days the room would have been filled with cigarette smoke, but now things were different everyone was health conscious. Shivji looked at the bank of operators and communications staff in the hall below, one could have confused it with some television broadcast of an ISRO GSLV launch from MCF Hassan - so much has changed in so little time thought Shivji. He remembered the time in the early 80s when he and a few other junior ministers would huddle together in a small room with a table, a map and bank of garish red colored telephones - and to top that off there were YB sahab's jokes-- how could one forget those - things had changed so much thought Shivji. A red light from the Met station began to blink. A sector on the AGPL was suddenly maginfied on the main plasma screen. The lights dimmed, the refresh rate was quite low but one could clearly see that cloud cover was lifting. From Leh two ARC LOROPs or "Longshots" were airborne just in case. The "Longshots" had uplink too which would be available soon enough. The Major General commanding the Situation Center looked up at the Joint Secretary in the War Room, and he in turn looked at the Service Chiefs. Finally one of the chiefs spoke, looking at the Prime Minister.. "Sir, its time, we need the final nod...". PM Arora looked at Dighe and Ronen, and both gave their assent. Shivji stared blankly at the screen and Mighlani pulled up his cup of coffee. Arora turned to the screen for the last time and thought of all the things that could go wrong with this ... putting to rest the demons running around in his head, Arora turned to service chiefs and said... "General you may proceed". The service chief in turn looked at the Joint Secretary who spoke into the handfree mic, "Okay Amrit... yahan sey clear hain"... Maj. Gen. Amrit Rathore turned to the desk in front of him and said "Initiate..." Seconds later an encrypted transmission shot out into space from a hidden antenna, the message read.. "Op Teram Shehr is go".

It was brisk morning in Ghyari. The officers filed into the mess, Colonel Samad Akhtar was already there. At 45, he was a bit old for his command, men by his age had gone farther. Lacking a stomach for compulsive ass kissing Colonel Samad though an above average fighter, had found himself quickly locked out of the race for command. His peers were all major generals by now and had settled into villas in Rawalpindi and Lahore. Samad had always been a bit of a loner, but after the death of his wife in a car accident on the Muree road, Samad had really withdrawn. While his batchmates played the promotions game and constantly sucked up to seniors to get cushy postings, Samad focussed on actually fighting. That was a strict no-no in the Pakistan Army - fighting was for boors who could not understand the value of parading around cities. Surely enough given Samad's conventional attitude and lack of socialization skills, Samad found himself in the wretched mountains facing the back of the Saltoro Ridge. After a few years, Samad had actually grown to like the place and the solitude it offered. His interest in mountaineering had grown and soon his near ascetic lifestyle developed. He seemed to have gained a sense of equanimity. So while his peers put on giant bellies and drove around town in Islamabad in plush cars, Samad quietly walked around the mountains with the spryness that would put a markhor to shame. After almost 10 years in the glacier, Samad had become a fixture of the glacier, the "Old Man of Ghyari" as he was called at Skardu... his superiors had quickly realised his value, and they left him alone. Samad wan't fanatically religious, and mostly phelgmatic in manners, and that made most senior officers a bit uneasy. His calm was appreciated but few felt comfortable with him around. Indeed Samad was quite an odd ball just about able to keep his head above the water as far as army politics was concerned. Samad was a good colonel, he knew his men well and he understood the importance of Ghyari - without it the Pakistani posts on the Saltoro Ridge would never last a day... He carefully lowered the dark edition of the Dawn that he was reading and stared down the mess hall.

Some distance away at a table with his friend Capt. Sohail, the sanguine Capt. Atiq sat babbling away. Atiq and Sohail were both products of one of those priceless little english schools in Pakistan's picturesque hill stations. These schools were full of the charm of the Raj and still bore the white man's burden in an Asia that was no longer part of the British Empire. Occasionally these schools produced students of the "right sort", and failing which they routinely produced people with a reasonable command over the English language. Col. Samad could himself sort of claim to be a product of the same system, but it was not something he brought up in polite conversation. Atiq was busy telling Capt. Sohail about this American reporter for a mountaineering magazine he had taken up to some Pakistani position on Chulung...

Atiq:" So I took him to Chulung and showed him some village in the distance and told him - this is Kargil.. the bloke swallowed it up... then he asked me - why India wanted the Siachen Glacier so much.. I told him that because the Indians are from Uranus... get it... your...aay..nus "

Sohail laughing..:"Yes very good... is that an original.. the Uranus bit.. wicked sharp..."

Atiq:"Oh lord no... I mean its from that American movie .. the one with E.T... you know.."

Sohail: "Ah... very good indeed old man.. dumbing it down for the natives eh... would you care for some more tea perhaps?... dashed bad weather last week.. I had the devil of a time getting down from Tabish and to top it all off those dashed Indians decided to make a fuss, they got Ghaznaffar, my bodyguard when we were rappelling down.. I had to spend an hour making sure he came down.. tragically the weather prevented a helo from evacuating him.."

Atiq:"Yes I heard about that terrible business.. Siachen is full of grief old man.. I say.. how is Samina doing lately.." (refering to Sohail's second cousin and soon to be wife..)

Sohail: "Right as rain really, I suppose she can't complain now can she... probably out shopping now I guess.. its barely a few weeks to the wedding".

Col. Samad winced as he heard the accents... the conversation was positively mind-numbing enough.. the accents just killed the day...how perfectly absurd to see this comic sketch of two perfectly english gentlemen in a godforsaken corner of Pakistan.... the colonel rolled his eyes and sank back into his copy of the Dawn... that was when he heard the rumbling sound.

Atiq:"I say.. what's all that?.. I bet its a landslide, I'd told those boys not to sing those blasted pashto songs so loud with all those drums..."

Sohail... was about to say something but he never quite got the words out of his mouth..

C-4 is a very very nasty explosive. If you pack a few hundred kilos of it in the right way, it easily creates a pressure of 6 million psi. Though the overpressure drops as the cube of the radius from the center of the blast. At a radius of 100 feet, you still have something in the range of 30 psi. The velocity is close to 8000 m/s. At 7:03:54 a 9M55K Smerch rocket S.N. 89455-90 hit a small tree some 70 feet away from the door of the mess. After that all it took was microseconds. The pressure of the air simply ripped holes in Sohail's lungs and slapped him like a toy into the wall a good 50 feet away. He was marginally worse off than the Atiq who had his back to the door and the guards on the entrance to the mess who were vaporised instantly, and marginally better off than Colonel Samad who at the far end of the hall had a huge piece of shrapnel bore into his intestines and bled to death in the next hour. The shockwave also caused the 600 year old shrine of Sayyed Ali Hamadani, the great shia saint to collapse into a pile of rubble.

At Partapur, a small concole showed the after effects as viewed from a satellite. The bosses in Delhi would also see the image simultaneously so the Brigadier was justifably proud. The boys had done a wonderful job. Seeing the results, the Major commanding the battery spoke with confidence into the microphone to the boys in FCS vehicle.. "Yeh setting chalega, that last one was a direct hit..".. pretty soon more more launches were heard and a few minutes later the satellite image lit up as the Smerch missiles hit home.... Ghyari was gone.. and with it all the Pakistani positions on the Saltoro Ridge were up for grabs. The ARC longshots would withing camera range soon. The pictures could take their own time, thought Brig. Sharma of the 102 Bde, picking up his commlink he said.. "Start the music"... Capt. Roy commanding the 4th troop of the 41st Light Arty regiment, pulled off his earphones and gave his men the thumbs up... soon after a hundred or so artillery pieces on the glacier began to belch fire on Pakistani positions.

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Postby max » 23 May 2005 12:16

I on behalf of my fellow brothers and Jingos on BR want to issue a strong de marche to all the writers on this thread that have abandoned this baby.

This thread should now be back at the center of attention and I request the contributers to please keep it alive and kicking especially Singha Sir (Please don't mind me naming you particularly because I love your way of describing things :wink: ).

thank you

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Postby Singha » 23 May 2005 13:21

ok gentlemen enough fun and games. time to head back to class and get serious again.

The next installment of "The Awakening" nicknamed Agneya will be posted on or before June4 midnight IST.


to recapitulate where I left off, A Col Maruf Murtaza had led the mutilation of
indian KIA after the Hedayatpur episode. after CCS discussions, here is where I left off....:

March3, 2008
=========
Arora: Please work to reduce the gaps and you have my go-ahead. We need this done rather quickly to demonstrate cause and effect. I will have DAVP work with the DD/private TV channels to collect TV footage from BD and Pak-TV to catalogue the officers seen with the bodies and get RAW to work Madams political workers inside BD to identify these miscreants.

Gen Sastry: Um, In anticipation we have already prepared the strike plan.

Sen: excellent, kill them all. *bites viciously into a hot kachori*
I want an example made of this case.

Gen Sastry: very well sir. I can also report that JTF Raven is now disbanded and its resources distributed among the other JTFs. We are ready when you are.

Arora: we will let you know when we decide to start phase0, in a way Madam’s TV broadcast has already started it.

Sen: indeed. Do we have anything else today ?

Arora: No, meeting is over.
....
One by one the white ambassadors dispersed into the fog shrouded delhi night.

Gen Sastry called Air commodore Basra to authorize an operation for the following night - Agneya.

:evil: :evil:

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Postby dwaipayan » 24 May 2005 04:24

Hey Singha :

What sort of possible Military scenario are you dreaming of ? I can dream, you can dream, any other Indians dream seeing TSP bifurcated ? But who is to bell the Cat ? I mean, who will declare war ? Our former Prime Minister Atalji hid himself in Himachal Pradesh in the guiss of having winter vacation at the foothill of Himalyas exactly three years ago at the height of an Indo-Pake war, possibly a nuclear war. I thought that he was planning to betray with Indians as the Prime Minister of India, he shouldn't have to gone on vacation during the likely out-break of a war. His self-retreating attitude make me remenise Mikhail Gorbhachev's same vacation during which Former Soviet Union disintegrated.

As long as India Leaders are courageous enough to declare a war even if there is a nuclear attack on India, we shouldn't dream such utopian dream of a possible military scenery.

Ever since the Dec. 13 Parliament Attack, India had got a very good opportunity to launch at least limited war on Pakistan as the opinion of the World Leaders wouldn't be able to prevent India from attacking Pakistan. as India could've justified its attack on Pakistan on many grounds. If the USA could've revenged the destruction of World Trade Center, then why couldn't India restort to retaliation ?

But the problem with India is that since Indira Gandi was assasinated, India didn't have any leader to take decision on Military attack ?

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Postby SuryaP » 24 May 2005 13:34

dwaipayan wrote:Hey Singha :

What sort of possible Military scenario are you dreaming of ? I can dream, you can dream, any other Indians dream seeing TSP bifurcated ? But who is to bell the Cat ?


dwaipayan,

I think you should check the archived threads from the begining to get an idea of what is happening in this thread.

Yes we all can dream, but only when you tell what you dream can others know that it is ok to dream and then may be ok to make the dreams come true.

But, it all starts with a dream, some spoken, some not spoken.

SP

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Postby Aditya G » 24 May 2005 15:29

Can anyone draw up a scenario of strike on Gwadar?

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Postby daulat » 24 May 2005 21:57

Aditya G wrote:Can anyone draw up a scenario of strike on Gwadar?


Agni II + smiling buddha, so long and thanks for all the fish! :D

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Postby Singha » 27 May 2005 17:09

Agneya [ The awakening..contd]

March4, 2008 10:30PM
*******************
Orders from national cmd center arrive early morning of Mar4. the day goes by in quiet preparation as grim and thoughful men ponder the long night ahead. Teams of mechnics run last minute checks on engines, avionics, munitions ..red safety ribbons flapping in the cool winter breeze. Pilots test their relatively new SARBE radios, fire their pistols, go over the escape codes should csar be called for, and spend hours in the ops room going over the operational plans. some write a last letter and hand it in, should they never return....busy squadron leaders/wingco's run around talking to and calming edgy junior subordinates.

Around 10am several airbases in the eastern sector launch a few aircraft each, from panagarh eight Mirage2000s rise and melt into the clouds, from Hashimara in the north, Kalaikunda in the steamy marshes west of Kolkatta and guwahati a few AN32 aircraft in regular IAF transport squadron markings also steal away into the low overhang.

Far to the west, two Midas tankers had risen to station over eastern bihar
around an hour ago, followed shortly by a Phalcon from Nagpur.

A little while later 2 Flankers , topped up with fuel by the Midas and equipped with extremely large conformal SEAD jamming pods formate with the Mirages in the dark skies over east bengal. All turn due north/west and maintain a course towards the chicken neck, the lumbering AN32's from Kalaikunda are the only ones who turn away towards the sea heading out first over the mangroves and then over the dark silty bay of bengal beyond.

Inside a darkened hanger tucked away in the interior of guwahati AFB,
61 men finish packing large backpacks and boxes full of ammo and equipment, receive final instructions from their CO and walk slowly to waiting line of Mi17 and Dhruv helis, both now equipped with FLIR in the nose and extended range fuel tanks along the sides instead of weapons.
The dusty hulk of a ancient Caribou from the 1960s looks sagely over the gathering. Lightning flashes over the adjoining reserve forests to the south and stray droplets of rain indicate one of the pre-monsoon storms seen in march and april is building.

Wearing all black from head to toe, with new kevlar helmets and lightweight BP vests, tavor rifles, NVG and satcom gear these men are a far cry from their ill-equipped and ill-prepared comrades who had fought valiantly to the death in the jaffna univ fiasco and many good/bad incidents since. Black striped face paint completes the picture. They speak little and in short sentences if they do, an economy of speech and movement born out of extended periods in the field, where those who drop their guard first, die first. they had lost many comrades too, good people, men they had grown up with in the force, ....in Hedayatpur.

That is why everyone was eager to go back and settle accounts.

At 11:15PM the rotors start and the team splits up to start boarding their
assigned helis. Few mins later, the swarm of 7 helos departs with a fair amount of unavoidable noise from the base. A lone Mi35 loaned from army aviation in punjab leads the pack in single file into the green , forested valleys of meghalaya just as heavy rain starts to fall....navigating by the
FLIR, maintaining a tight single file, the column banks and turns frequently to follow the valleys as they fly low and hard towards the border.

smoking cigarettes, two dark shadows watch from under the overhanging roof of a nearby hanger with four dark grey towering shapes parked inside. Das shivers a little involuntarily as he watches the body language of the people boarding their flights....jacob nurses a hip flask clearly embossed "water" on its leather cover
[to be contd]

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Postby Manne » 27 May 2005 17:42

Singha,

May I suggest "calming eager junior subordinates." or something to that effect instead of "calming edgy junior subordinates.".

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Postby sbangera » 27 May 2005 19:05

Hurray. Thread's back on Track. Looking forward to the exceiting times ahead.

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Postby SuryaP » 27 May 2005 19:08

Singha wrote:Agneya [ The awakening..contd]
Around 10am several airbases in ......


Shouldn't this be 10pm? As rest of the story seems to be about a night time sortie????

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Postby Sharma » 09 Jun 2005 13:34

:( :oops: :roll: :cry: :x :evil: :-?

"kitne azeeb cheez hai yeh apne story-writers.....kitna likh chuke hain per dil nahin bharta........ab kub kuch naya padne ko milega..............

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Postby SuryaP » 10 Jun 2005 21:12

Singha wrote: ok gentlemen enough fun and games. time to head back to class and get serious again.

The next installment of "The Awakening" nicknamed Agneya will be posted on or before June4 midnight IST.




June 4 midnight IST has come and gone.......... :( :x

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Postby JTull » 14 Jun 2005 14:46

up

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Postby Singha » 14 Jun 2005 15:29

oops ... well ok I will work extra hard tonight and complete this chapter,
400% promise 8)

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Postby SuryaP » 14 Jun 2005 16:03

Ok RS,

We will just say that you had a typo and said June 4 when you meant June 14. Hope you mean 2005, the year I mean.

See, the problem is, you have raised our expectations, so if we keep demanding, it is not really our fault.....

Regards, :D :wink:


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