Indian Health Care Sector

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Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 02 Apr 2019 21:59

[quote="Varoon Shekhar"]https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/agra/3-doctors-from-aiims-killed-in-accident-on-yamuna-expressway/articleshow/63351718.cms

I read the PM from a forum moderator just today! I totally overlook private messages on this forum. Anyway, I was being quite sarcastic and disgusted with all these accidents on Indian roads. It's not good, of course, that anyone of any occupation dies. I was thinking of India's poor doctor to patient ratio, and how such horrific accidents and losses of doctors are going to hurt.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Kashi » 05 Apr 2019 06:56

The Ayushman Bharat Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana and the path to universal health coverage in India: Overcoming the challenges of stewardship and governance

Public spending on healthcare in India is [..] just over 1% of gross domestic product (GDP)


The Ayushman Bharat Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (AB-PMJAY), approved by the Indian government in March 2018, is an ambitious reform to the Indian health system that seeks to provide financial health protection for 500 million of the most vulnerable Indians and halt the slide of the 50–60 million Indians who fall into poverty annually as a result of medical-related expenditure.


Indian government approved the ambitious AB-PMJAY in March, 2018. The scheme, colloquially referred to as “Modicare” after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, aims to build on existing schemes to provide publicly funded health insurance cover of up to 500,000 Indian rupees (over US$7,000) per family per year to about 100 million families (500 million people, 40% of India’s population) . The scheme builds on the previous programs outlined above (for example, the National Health Mission still forms the basis of primary care under the new program) and has been designed to be implemented to either take over or operate alongside state-based programs, but has a broader remit in terms of the services covered and the amount of coverage that each individual is entitled to. The government has so far allocated 100 billion rupees (almost US$1.5 billion) to the program for 2018–2019 and 2019–2020 . Currently, the country spends about US$64 per person on healthcare, two-thirds of which is privately financed by user fees. As such, current UHC initiatives in India centred on AB-PMJAY alongside state-based programs such as those in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, and Kerala represent, as a whole, one of the most ambitious ever health and, one could argue, poverty-alleviation programs ever launched.


Eligibility for the scheme is determined based on deprivation criteria measured in the 2011 Socio-Economic Caste Census. There is no limit to the number of family members covered, and benefits will eventually be India-wide (if all states and union territories sign up to the program). This means that a beneficiary will be allowed to take cashless benefits from any public or empanelled private hospital across the country. State health authorities will lead the implementation of the AB-PMJAY, and states are free to continue to provide existing programs alongside the national program or integrate them with the new scheme. States will also be able to choose their own operating model to either use the expenditure to pay a private insurance provider to cover services, provide services directly (as elected by Chandigarh and Andhra Pradesh, for example), or a mix of the two (as in Gujarat and Tamil Nadu). Expenditure under the program will also be shared between the central and state governments in a prespecified ratio depending on the legislative arrangements and relative wealth of the states, with the Indian government covering between 60%–100% of expenditure.


The AB-PMJAY offers a unique opportunity to improve the health of hundreds of millions of Indians and eliminate a major source of poverty afflicting the nation. There are, however, substantial challenges that need to be overcome to enable these benefits to be realised by the Indian population and ensure that the scheme makes a sustainable contribution to the progress of India towards UHC.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 12 Nov 2019 18:58

Indian device for cancer fight gets USFDA’s ‘breakthrough’ tag.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Centre for Devices and Radiological Health has designated a medical invention by a Bengaluru-based scientist as a “breakthrough device” in the treatment of liver, pancreatic and breast cancers.

Cytotron, developed by Rajah Vijay Kumar, aids in tissue engineering of cancer cells, altering how specific proteins are regulated to stop these cells from multiplying and spreading.

“We are pleased to inform you that your device and proposed indication for use meet the criteria and have been granted designation as a breakthrough device,” states a communique from the FDA wing to Shreis Scalene Sciences, the company that had taken the device to the US.

Cytotron is intended to cause degeneration of uncontrolled growth of tissues. “It is indicated for treating protein-linked, abnormally regenerating disorders such as neoplastic disease, and allowing extended progression free survival, with pain relief, palliation, improved quality and dignity of life,” says the letter.

Kumar had developed Cytotron at the Centre for Advanced Research and Development, which is headquartered in Bhopal, after nearly 30 years of research into cellular pathways and interactions with specifically modulated fast radio bursts.

“It is a great feeling that after so many years of hard work, against all odds, an institution like the USFDA is designating our work as a breakthrough in the treatment of three types of cancers,” Kumar said.

New technologies in the battle against cancer have generally been hard to come by. It’s even rarer for an Indian device to get breakthrough status in the US. The Centre for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for pre-market approval of all medical devices in the US, ensuring they are safe for use and effective.

“The devices will all be made in India, given that there are hardly any imported components. And our American partner will take the device to the US. Cytotron is already an approved medical device and is in use in the UAE, Mexico, Malaysia and Hong Kong, among others,” Kumar said.

How it works

Generically known as rotational field quantum magnetic resonance, Cytotron uses fast radio bursts (FRB), high energy and powerful short radio bursts in which both electric and magnetic components of the electromagnetic signals are "circularly" polarised.

FRBs are produced when a radio signal travels through a powerful instantaneous magnetic field on its path to the target. “FRBs can be used to communicate with the cellular command and control, to up or down regulate a specific protein or gene,” Kumar said in a statement.

He added: “In cancer cells, Cytotron does two things: First, it alters the protein pathways of a pro-apoptosis protein called p53 via p21 inducing programmed cell death in the cancer cells. Second, exposure to Cytotron stops metastasis by inhibiting the epithelial mesenchymal transition cells, responsible for spread of cancer; 90% cancer patients die due to metastasis.”


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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 15 Apr 2020 05:33

India plans to snatch away China’s control over drug market; what it is doing to supply globally.

India plans to ramp up production of pharmaceutical ingredients and become an alternative supplier for global drugmakers hit by factory shutdowns in China due to the coronavirus outbreak. The Indian government has aggressively begun implementing a policy to ramp up local output and emerge as an alternate to China, according to people familiar with the plan who asked not to be identified as discussions are not public yet. The so-called “China-plus one” strategy involves identifying essential drug ingredients, providing incentives to domestic manufacturers and reviving ailing state-run drugmakers, they said.

The deadly coronavirus, which shut down vast swathes of the Chinese economy before becoming a pandemic, snapped global supply chains as factories in Asia’s largest economy fell silent. For India — world’s single-largest exporter of generic drugs — this triggered raw material shortages and exposed its dependence on Chinese imports. The south Asian nation relies on bulk ingredients from China to manufacture a fifth of the global supplies of drugs that are off patents.

Highly Dependent
Bulk Drug | % imported from China

Paracetamol- 100%
Metformin- 100%
Amoxicillin- 90-95%
Ampicillin- 100%
Ciprofloxacin- 100%
Ibuprofen- 80-95%

India imports almost 70% of its bulk drugs and intermediates – the chemicals that make a finished drug work — from China. A number of these are sourced from Hubei province, where the pathogen first emerged in late-December. Of the total $3.56 billion imports of such products in 2018-19, China’s share was $2.4 billion, according to information presented in the Indian parliament.

The current crisis also gives an opportunity to India to challenge China’s stronghold on supplying basic drug ingredients.

After announcing a 140-billion-rupee ($1.8 billion) fund last month for setting up three drug manufacturing hubs, the government has identified 53 key starting materials and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) whose output will be boosted on priority, the people said. These include fever-medicine paracetamol and antibiotics such as penicillin and ciprofloxacin.

Discussions are also underway on the viability of reviving on loss-making state-owned drugmakers Hindustan Antibiotics Ltd. and Indian Drugs and Pharmaceuticals Ltd. to speed up this process and ensure affordable medicines, the people familiar said.

“Indian bulk drug manufacturers could grow income by $3.3 billion if they expand capacity and global supply as the virus outbreak disrupts China’s pharma sector,” Mia He and Jamie Maarten, analysts with Bloomberg Intelligence wrote in a March 16 note.

Essential Medicines
Of the 373 drugs listed under India’s national essential medicines list, some 200 are imported as APIs, mostly from China, Dinesh Dua, chairman of Pharmexcil, an export promotion council under the trade ministry, told Blomberg over phone.

Sudhir Vaid, chairman and managing director, Concord Biotech Ltd, said the government should support local companies by giving low cost power, subsidies and faster approvals. It takes as long as three years to get approvals, Vaid said.

“If the government goes full throttle with the monetary help in one cluster, it can become a success in two years,” Pharmexil’s Dua said. “In five years, we can replicate that model throughout the country.”

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby vimal » 15 Apr 2020 10:14

^^ I'm glad GOI woke up after the virus otherwise they were sleeping on the helm for years.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby yensoy » 15 Apr 2020 10:53

There has to be a 2% "health security tax" on all API imports, and this money used to support domestic production. WTO be damned, just like WHO.

Karan M
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Karan M » 15 Apr 2020 15:06

Discussions, discussions, discussions. What happened to MOF's much ballyhooed plan to make a plan to take away export share from China. Did it even ever get completed?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Rishirishi » 16 Apr 2020 04:55

vimal wrote:^^ I'm glad GOI woke up after the virus otherwise they were sleeping on the helm for years.


Not only GOI, but the whole world has woken up. Even EU countries between them are blocking supply of things like protection masks, sanitizers etc. Germans placed an 30 000 pcs order of ventilators with a domestic company. This essentially blocked sale to other EU countries. Several advanced economies found that they were not able to manufacture even simple stuff.
Governments world over are rethinking import from China strategy. Expect a lot more local production in all countries.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 13 May 2020 07:56

Under-5 mortality rate halved from 2000 to 2017.

Two scientific papers on child survival published on Tuesday by the India State-Level Disease Burden Initiative depicted a significant decline 49% in the under-5 mortality rate (U5MR) between 2000 and 2017, but it pointed out inequality between states and wide variations between districts.

While there is a variation of 5-6 fold in the rates between states, there is also a variation of 8-11 fold between districts, noted the report published in the Lancet. The initiative is driven by the Indian Council of Medical Research and the Public Health Foundation of India, among others.

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The findings show there were 1.04 million under-5 deaths in 2017, down from 2.24 million deaths in 2000 Most under-5 deaths in UP, Bihar comes second Neonatal deaths in India have gone down from 1.02 million deaths in 2000 to 0.57 million deaths in 2017. Neonatal mortality rate (NMR) has dropped by 38% in India since 2000. Sixty-eight per cent of under-5 deaths in India are attributed to child and maternal malnutrition, whereas 83% of the neonatal deaths to low birth weight and short gestation.

The highest number of under-5 deaths in 2017 were in UP (312,800, which included 165,800 neonatal deaths) and Bihar (141,500, including 75,300 neonatal deaths). U5MR and NMR were lower with the increasing level of development of the states. In 2017, there was a 5.7-fold variation in
U5MR ranging from 10 per 1,000 live births in the more developed state of Kerala to 60 in less-developed UP, and a 4.5-fold variation for NMR ranging from 7 per 1,000 live births in Kerala to 32 in UP.

“The research paper has shown that India has made positive strides in protecting the lives of newborns over the last two decades,” Niti Aayog member V K Paul said

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby ricky_v » 27 Jun 2020 09:51

Stats from 2018
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ricky_v
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby ricky_v » 27 Jun 2020 09:54

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sreerudra
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby sreerudra » 12 Jul 2020 02:12

Gentlemen

Do any of you know id the India HealthStack has an 112 API or 108 API?
I am hoping to find some more details.
Thank you in advance.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby VKumar » 12 Jul 2020 04:19

How about opening one AIIMS level hospital in every district HQ?
Also if we open one in each developing country it will be a great projection of soft power. Maybe alongwith an IIT and an IIM too!

sreerudra
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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby sreerudra » 16 Jul 2020 02:02

Does anyone know India HealthStack has 108 integration?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby sreerudra » 12 Aug 2020 18:43

Does anyone know have additional information on Modi's Govt is creating a National Health ID?


https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/in ... 290784.cms

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Hiten » 16 Sep 2020 07:24

BARC's DRHR has made a Sleep Apnea Device

https://www.spansen.com/2020/09/calling ... -barc.html

there should be separate thread to track oddities coming out Organisations setup to pursue something totally different

another BARC product, bitter gourd juice & banana cake
https://www.spansen.com/2020/04/barc-go ... itter.html

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 10 May 2021 03:09

Zydus ‘wrapping up Phase-III trials of three-dose vaccine.

Zydus Cadila is optimistic that its three-dose plasmid DNA vaccine, ZyCoV-D, will offer sustained immunity with longer antibody response. The company expects to launch the antidote “very soon”, even as it completes the advanced Phase-III clinical trials and submits data to the drug regulator for review.

The Covid-19 vaccines presently in India are two-dose vaccines, and Zydus did encounter questions on the economics and logistic complexities involved in a three-dose vaccine. The company, however, stayed the course with its three-dose vaccine, and even indicated that it would be among the most affordable ones. The vaccine will be administered without a needle, intra-dermally.

Unlike most vaccines, which use a needle to inject the vaccine into the tissue, ZyCov-D will be administered without a needle, but using intra-dermal injection that will push the substance into the dermis.

Sharvil Patel, Managing Director, Zydus Cadila, said, “Currently, we are a three-dose regimen which we believe is more suitable for our vaccine and which will give a wider immune response and longer antibody response which we have seen in our data.”

Zydus is also conducting trials on a two-dose vaccine. “If the data are equally good, we will look at it,” said Patel ruling out any delay in the first project due to the trials on the two-shot vaccine.

As India’s second indigenously-developed vaccine, ZyCoV-D will be affordable, reiterates Patel.

“Currently, we are focussing on completing the Phase-III clinical trials and submitting the outcomes. We will decide the pricing of the vaccine closer to the launch,” said Patel.

In an earlier interaction with BusinessLine, Cadila Healthcare founder and pharma sector doyen, Pankaj Patel, had hinted at an affordable price for the company’s vaccine. “It is a trying time for the world. We have to ensure that we help people, more than looking at some quick bucks,” Patel had told this paper.

Ready for variants
ZyCOV-D is developed using a new technology platform that uses non-replicating and non-integrating plasmid-carrying gene of the virus SARS-CoV2. The platform, with improved vaccine stability and lower cold chain requirement, will be easy to transport to any corner of the country. It can also be modified in just a couple of weeks if the virus mutates. In January 2021, the company had received the Indian regulator’s nod to start Phase-III clinical trials for the vaccine on close to 30,000 volunteers. The vaccine was found to be safe, well-tolerated and immunogenic in the Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in 2020.

Throughout the pandemic, Zydus has ensured access to affordable treatment options. It has priced the much-in-demand Remdesivir at ₹899 for a vial, compared to others pricing it at ₹2,450-3,000.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby vijayk » 10 May 2021 21:10

Reposting from other thread ...

I think this pandemic and abdication of responsibility by many states and simply blaming center calls for a Nation Health Service kind of setup.

1. NHS will manage hospital infra. Start with 2/3 major hospitals run by NHS in every district.

2. One medical college per hospital

3. Insurance coverage under LIC

4. Provide NHS to negotiate with doctors to use the infra for surgeries for nominal fees.

5. Completely independent infra like oxygen and necessary drugs and ability to negotiate with pharma.

6. Independent audits by forum of external doctors/state/center officers including judiciary?

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 13 May 2021 22:15

216 cr vaccine doses to be available in 5 months between Aug-Dec, enough to cover all: Centre.

As states grapple with a shortage of coronavirus vaccines, the Centre Thursday said that over two billion doses will be made available in the country in five months between August and December, enough to vaccinate the entire population.

V K Paul, Member (Health), Niti Aayog, also said the Russian anti-Covid vaccine Sputnik V is likely to be available by next week.

With the domestic supply falling short to meet the huge demand, several states and Union Territories including Delhi, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Telangana have decided to opt for global tenders for procurement of anti-coronavirus shots.

Acknowledging the crunch, Paul said vaccines are important "but it takes time" to produce and make them available. "We are passing through a phase when supply is finite."

Several Indian states are reporting an acute shortage of vaccines, even as coronavirus cases surge across the country.

"This is why we prioritised. Which is why (when) free vaccines were given by the government of India, their focus was on vulnerable age groups. We have to keep this mind," he said at a Health Ministry briefing.

However, the officer said that by the end of the year there will be enough vaccine doses in the country to inoculate the entire population.

"Over two billion doses will be made in the country in ve months (August to December) for India and for the people of India. Vaccine will be available for all as we move forward," Paul said, adding that the number is likely to be ramped up to three billion by the rst quarter of the next year.

He said that the estimated 216 crore doses that are likely to be produced between August and December include 75 crore doses of Covishield and 55 cores doses of Covaxin. Further, Biological E is expected to produce 30 crore doses, Zydus Cadila 5 crore, Serum Institute ofIndia 20 crore doses of Novavax, and Bharat Biotech 10 crore doses of its nasal vaccine, while Gennova will make available 6 crore doses and Sputnik V 15.6 crore doses, he said.

The vaccine candidates of Biological E, Zydus Cadila, Gennova, Bharat Biotech's nasal vaccine are in various stages of clinical trials.

On the procurement of vaccines from Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson, Paul said the government is in touch with these firms through the Department of Biotechnology and the Ministry of External Affairs.

"We asked formally whether they would like to send doses to India, manufacture in India, we will nd partners. They said they will talk about vaccine availability in Q3 (quarter 3). We have intensified this process with Moderna, Pizer and J&J and we hope they will come forward," Paul said. "This is happening at the highest level," he stressed. "We invite (them). They make vaccines here, make it with our companies through technology transfer. Under the new strategy, that channel is open and we will support in every possible way," he said.

On vaccination drives in other countries compared to India, Paul cited the examples of the US, Germany and France where the entire population has not received the single dose of vaccine yet.

The government has already said that India is the fastest country globally to reach the landmark of administering 17 crore doses in 114 days.

Paul also defended the Centre's vaccination policy, which several states have criticised.

Many opposition-ruled states have been opposing the policy which mandates them to procure vaccines, nationally and internationally. Opposition states chief ministers too have been demanding free vaccines for all. Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal said the fact that the states are "left to right" with one another in the international market for Covid vaccines portrays a "bad" image of India.

Replying to such criticisms, Paul said, "States wanted flexibility. It (the vaccination policy) was in that response. There was also a demand that there should be (availability of doses) in the private sector," he said.

"Any vaccine that is approved by the WHO, FDA can be imported to India. They can get an import license in two days. Who is stopping them?" he added.

He said that so far 35.6 crore vaccine doses have been either procured or are in the process of procurement by the Centre. Giving a detailed break-up, he said under the PM-Cares Fund, 6.6 crore (5.6 crore Covishield and 1 crore Covaxin) doses have been procured and utilised, while 1 crore Covishield doses have been received and utilised under the Gavi COXAV facility. Under phase II, 12 crore (10 crore Covishield and 2 crore Covaxin) doses are being procured, he said, adding of these, 86 per cent doses have been received while the rest are expected by the end of this month.
Under phase III, he said, 16 crore (11 crore Covishield and 5 crore Covaxin) doses are being procured. The supply for these doses will begin from May 21 and continue through July.

Separately, 16 crore additional doses are in the pipeline which are being procured directly by the states and private hospitals, he said. "So, overall, 51.6 crore doses are being procured.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby vijayk » 17 May 2021 20:28

https://swarajyamag.com/magazine/how-aa ... lth-policy
How Aadhaar Can Help Shape India’s Health Policy

However, without a unique identification like the Aadhaar, it will be practically impossible to design and implement the CRVS. In essence, the CRVS registers every birth and death, and issues birth and death certificates. It compiles and disseminates data on these vital statistics. Given that it also provides information on causes of death, the CRVS could play an important role in setting priorities and shaping health policy in India.

The single-biggest challenge to India’s health policy is non-availability of regular and reliable data on health outcomes, in particular on deaths. A lot can be learnt about the quality of life from death. In a large and diversified country like India, where health needs differ from state to state, and, within a state, from district to district, there is, unfortunately, no quantitative and disaggregated measure of health outcome that can be the basis of framing and assessing health policy. As a result, in spite of the best efforts of the government, there is little or no evidence whether health policies are having any intended effects. Perhaps due to lack of good data, there is no political pressure on elected representatives to address health issues at the local level. Another inconvenient truth is that lack of basic health data disproportionately affects the weaker and vulnerable sections of society – women and children.

Historically, the government attempted to address this issue with the civil registry system (CRS), which goes back almost 50 years, with the passage of the Registration of Birth and Death (RBD) Act in 1969, under which every birth and death was to be compulsorily registered. It was envisaged that CRS would be “…the unified process of continuous, permanent, compulsory and universal recording of the vital events (births, deaths, stillbirths)”. Though there has been considerable improvement in the civil registration scenario in the country since the passage of the RBD Act, it is far from complete, and there is significant variation across regions and socio-economic groups.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby vera_k » 14 Jun 2021 23:35

Not looking good on this front.

Gujarat government has not built a hospital in 25 years, says Congress

In a recent reply in the Assembly, the Gujarat government admitted that only 16 district hospitals in the state had CT scan machines, an instrument critical to the fight against Covid and many other serious conditions.

Only one district hospital — in a state with 33 districts —has an MRI machine, the state government added.

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby vijayk » 16 Jun 2021 19:28

We need a National Health Council just like GST Council

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Re: Indian Health Care Sector

Postby Vips » 19 Jun 2021 02:49

Zydus Cadila likely to seek EUA for its ZyCoV-D vaccine in 7-8 days.

Pharmaceutical major Zydus Cadila has told the Centre that it could apply for emergency use authorisation (EUA) for ZyCoV-D vaccine in the next seven-eight days.

It will be the second indigenous Covid-19 vaccine to apply for such authorisation. It will also be the world's first DNA vaccine against coronavirus.

"Zydus Cadila has told the government that it could apply for emergency use authorisation for ZyCoV-D vaccine in the next seven-eight days," a government source said.

ZyCoV-D is a DNA Covid vaccine, which carries the genetic code for that part of a virus that triggers the immune system of the body.

Niti Aayog Member (Health) Dr VK Paul told ANI that Cadila has enrolled more than 28,000 volunteers for their phase three study.

"We are hoping that they will apply in near future. Most of their study is complete. They have enrolled more than 28,000 volunteers in their phase 3 study. We expect they will submit the results very soon. We are hopeful of this vaccine because it would be the world's first DNA vaccine. We are very proud of their work," he said.

The vaccine is being developed with support from the Centre's National Biopharma Mission as part of the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council, Department of Biotechnology.

India has approved three vaccines against COVID-19 -- Covaxin (Bharat Biotech), Covishield (Serum Institute), and the Russian Sputnik V.

Covishield has been developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University.

ZyCoV-D, the second indigenous vaccine after Bharat Biotech's Covaxin, is a three-dose vaccine -- to be administered at day 0, day 28, and day 56. The company has said it is also working on a two-dose regimen of this vaccine.

The stability data of the vaccine candidate showed that ZyCoV-D can be stored at 2 to 8 degrees Celsius for long-term use and 25 degrees Celsius for the short term.


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